20 Episode results for "Brian"

Request from Brian for Questions

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

01:24 min | 10 months ago

Request from Brian for Questions

"Hey this is Brian Tomorrow. I'm going to do Acuna episode podcast so when I need you to do is send me Eh whatever questions you've been wanting to ask I wanna know what you WanNa hear me talk about and I'll get to the best questions see the ones I think have most relevance to the most of you you can ask about creativity about riding television up by the end of the day Tuesday so you have until Tuesday morning to get him in but get him in today Get a Moroccan so that I can

Brian Tomorrow
Request from Brian for your questions

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

01:46 min | 7 months ago

Request from Brian for your questions

"Happy New Year everybody. Hey this is. Brian actually sitting here with my daughter. Hey so this week for new years I WANNA do Acuna. I want you to ask me anything and I will answer tomorrow on the podcast. Send your questions to me. Either on twitter at Brian Koppelman Bureau I n. k. l. m. n.. or you can email me the moment. Mint B que a g mail dot com any question you can ask me about filmmaking. podcasting creativity hacks had get yourself to write Breaking through writer's block. Whatever you WanNa talk about having to do with anything that I do or anything? I've talked about on the PODCAST. We did this before. I've had a lot of requests to do it again. So so let's do this thing but I need you in order to do it. I need you ask me your questions and tell me if you want me to use your name you your initials nickname the name you were teased by when you were in fourth grade. Maybe there's a teacher who was particularly mean to you. We can pretend you're that teacher whatever you want So ask me anything. Send the questions in as we said sent him to at Brian Koppelman at twitter. Where the moment B. K. at g mail DOT COM? I look forward to seeing these questions last time. The questions were really moving to me seeing. Where are you all? Were what you were thinking about. What your goals were so fire way asked me questions and I will answer them? Thanks thanks talk to you soon.

Brian Koppelman Bureau I n. k. Brian Koppelman twitter Brian B. K. writer
The Chicago Abductor Brian Dugan

Serial Killers

34:56 min | Last month

The Chicago Abductor Brian Dugan

"Due to the graphic nature of this killer's crimes listener discretion is advised. This episode includes discussions of murder, rape and sexual violence that some people may find offensive. We advise extreme caution for children under thirteen. June second nineteen ninety-five was a warm day. INSOMNIAC Illinois located on the outskirts of Chicago. This small village was a quiet, peaceful farm town where most neighbors didn't bother locking their doors, tall oak trees swayed in the breeze as squirrels darted across the branches, gathering acorns beneath them. eight-year-old Opal Horton, road, her pink bicycle down a gravel road, Opel's friend and second grade classmate missy. Akron pedaled alongside her Opel giggled as missy. Missy, who was missing to her frontier Flash Chagrin? MRIs, birthday was in less than two weeks, and the pair made guesses about what kind of cake her mom would bake. As the girls debated, the dust from an approaching vehicle caught Opel's attention. She and missy stopped their bikes on the side of the road, and waited for it to pass, but instead of driving by the beat up. Blue car stopped right beside them. scruffy twenty eight year old Brian Dugan got out of the car and asked the girls for directions. His eyes were red, and he looked nervous. Opel got a bad feeling in the pit of her stomach. Brian inched closer pretending that he couldn't hear their answers. Suddenly he lunged forward and grabbed opal by the neck before she could react Brian Flung her into the front seat of his car and shut the door. Opel watched in terror, as Brian, ran after Missy, and grabbed her Opel tried to open the door, but the lock had been broken off. However, there are still was a way to escape as Brian Watt back to the car with MRI under his arm, Opel jumped out the window and ran. She hidden attractor tire across the street. When she peeked out Opel, saw the car speed away. She locked eyes with MRI the girls wooden. See each other ever again. Hi I'm Greg Olsen. This is serial killers apart cast original every episode we dive into the minds and madness of serial killers. Today we're discussing the story of Brian Dugan. A serial killer who abducted women and children from Chicago's rural western suburbs I'm here with my co host Vanessa. Richardson Hi everyone. You can find episodes of serial killers and all other podcast originals. Originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream serial killers for free on spotify just open the APP and type serial killers in the search bar. This is a one part episode featuring Brian Dugan A. self-described psychopath I will learn about dougans childhood and his chilling encounter with another infamous serial killer. Then we'll follow dougans increasingly violent crime spree. We've got more on Brian Dugan coming up. Brian James. Gan's first moment in this world was traumatic on September twenty, third nineteen, fifty-six, his mother. Jenny went into Labor. The delivery doctor was late and his baby Bryant emerged. The nurse was overcome with nerves. Just slow down the delivery. She and an intern pushed Brian's head back into his mother's womb. Then the nurse bound Jenny's legs together until the doctor arrived Brian suffered terrible headaches as a baby, which is parents suspected was a result of the traumatic. Traumatic birth, unfortunately, they lacked the money to diagnose the problem, and it went untreated left to his own devices. Baby Bryan took drastic measures to stop the pain from the time he could sit up. He would bang his head against the bars of his crib, desperate to soothe himself frequently. Brian did this until he vomited. The busy Dugan household did nothing to help Brian's migraines. He was the second of five children and struggled to find his place within. Within the family to deal with his unruly behaviour, his mother opted for strict discipline. Jenny's frustrations only grew when her son started wetting the bed. She punished Brian by making him sleep in the wet unwashed sheets. What Jenny didn't know was that the condition medically referred to as nocturnal, and your recess was not a disruptive or behavioral disorder. Vanessa's going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode police note, Vanessa's not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist. Psychiatrist, but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks Greg Pediatric neurologist Dr Max Maizels says that the actual cause of nocturnal and your recess is simply due to heavy sleeping, but if a young child is disciplined for it, the punishment has adverse effects punished. bed-wetting can develop early childhood depression, which significantly impairs a child's cognitive function. Without what doctors call positive practice, a child punished for conduct they cannot control will develop disruptive behavioral problems. As a young child Brian was already struggling, so jenny punished him by forcing him to sleep in his wet sheets. It further diminish Brian's emotional capacity and worsened his existing psychological issues, incapable of processing his emotions Brian preferred to spend his time alone. This self imposed isolation didn't help matters. He developed an unsettling attraction to fire. His mother attempted to break this fascination by forcing him to. To hold a lit match until it burnt his fingertips, but just like with Brian's nocturnal and Yuri recess. The punishment did little to deter him. When Brian was eight, his habit of playing with matches resulted in the garage, burning down, and his fascination with fire went far beyond playing with matches around the same time. The garage burned down Brian Poured Gasoline on the family, cat and Lit. Lit It on fire, according to his brother Stephen Brian laughed as he watched the family pet burn. It's unclear if Brian was punished for this behavior, but his parents definitely knew something wasn't right with him. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, seven, thinking a change might help the eleven year old. They moved to Lisle Illinois about twenty five miles outside of Chicago. They tried to get Brian. Brian Interested in what they considered normal activities like baseball, but Brian wouldn't be tamed so easily at some point after the move. Brian started experimenting with Drugs and Alcohol by fifteen he drank regularly and use drugs like marijuana and methamphetamines to support his growing habit. Brian broke into neighboring houses and businesses in January of Nineteen seventy-two. He was arrested for theft and placed under home supervision. Even after his arrest Brian continued breaking into homes, eventually, he was sent to the nearby, came county youth home. As far as we can tell, the punishment didn't deter Brian's bad behavior in backed. It only seemed to worsen it. One night after Brian was released from the group home. He cornered his brother Stephen in the bathroom, according to Stephen Brian, tried to sexually assault him, but he stopped before it went too far. Then Brian said to Stephen. If you were in prison, you are just another pound of meat. I couldn't help you. You'd have to make it or break it on your own. You'd have to submit to it or die. After this incident Stephen Suspected that his brother had been sexually assaulted while he was at Kane. County he was right, and it wasn't Brian's only experience being sexually assaulted soon after Bryan's released from the youth home, his mother told him to go to the store to buy hot dog buns. As he walked along the side of the road, a dark car pulled over a young man leaned out the window and ask Brian. If you wanted to make some money according to Brian, that man was notorious, serial killer John Wayne Casey, but at the time Brian had no idea who gase was, so he got into the car then gay. Him to a secluded spot at the edge of town, and pulled over next to some railroad tracks. He allegedly ordered Brian to put on a pair of Bikini briefs and perform oral sex on him. Afterwards Casey, watched Brian for a reaction, but the teen remained calm. Eventually gase drove him back to the Grocery Store and paid him twenty dollars. Brian pocketed the money and went inside to buy hot dog buns for his mom as if nothing happened. Clifford Line Decker who authored man who killed boys. The John Wayne Gay see story theorizes that because Brian remained calm, gase lost interest lying decker, said one of the things about Casey and a lot of people like him is fear turns them on. Following the incident, Brian trouble with the law continued when he was sixteen, he dropped out of school and committed a string of burglaries. He was arrested soon after and sent to another youth home. The pattern continued each time Brian was released. He committed another crime. He broke into fast food. Restaurants vandalized schools and use drugs, but throughout all his teenage wrongdoing, he never caused physical harm to another person however that changed when he was. In April of Nineteen, seventy, four Brian watched a ten year old girl named Barbara play by the road in that moment, Brian Belt something at his brain turn on like a switch. He approached Barbara and asked her for directions to the train station. Barbara Walters Brian a short way down the road to point him in the right direction. When he was sure they were alone. Brian shoved the girl into a patch of woods, but when her nose started bleeding, he let her go. The ten year old ran out of the woods to a crowd of people watching a nearby softball game within minutes, the police force Brian and arrested. But when they got to the police station, they discovered Brian was also facing burglary charges in another county. Because Brian was sentenced to spend time in a youth home for this infraction, the court didn't feel the need to pursue the incident with Barbara. Any further the charges were dropped. After a few months Brian was released, but like his previous incarcerations, the stint in the youth home did nothing to curb Brian's violent urges for the next couple of years Brian tried grabbing other women, but they always escaped throughout at all. Brian continued robbing houses once again he got caught in one, thousand, nine, seventy, nine, twenty, two year old Brian was sentenced to seven years in prison for a string of burglaries. He served three years before being paroled in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two. If the Parole Board thought Brian had turned. Turned a new leaf, they were wrong only ten days after he was set free. Brian attempted to abduct a female gas station clerk on. Fortunately, he wasn't charged with the crime because his younger brother Stephen provided a false alibi to the police, instead of going back to jail, Brian, was free to roam the streets. That's how on February twenty fifth nineteen, eighty-three Brian for himself in the tiny farming community of Naperville Illinois. The town was virtually crime. Free neighbors knew each other and considered the area extremely safe until Brian Dugan arrived. High on marijuana, and out of cash Brian drove around looking for a property to burglarize around two PM. He stopped his car in front of a home that looked empty. Brian cautiously approached the house and peered through the living room window. It wasn't as empty as it seemed. A little girl sat on the couch, wearing a pink nightgown and eating a bowl of ice cream. Janina Carrico was break ten year old, who loved horses and was adored by friends and family that day. She was feeling sick, so she stayed home from school. Her parents were at work. Janin's presence was enough to keep Ryan from breaking into the House. He was still on parole and feared going back to jail, so he decided to leave and find a different place to rob, but as he walked back to the car that strange sensation inside his brain returned. The one he felt with Barbara Brian later said of that moment it was as if time stopped I clicked and turned into Mr. Hyde from Dr Jekyll he ran back to the front door and kicked it as hard as he could would splintered from the frame as the door flew open. Janine jumped up from the couch and frozen in shock. As Brian stepped over the threshold this time nothing could stop him. Next we follow how Brian's flirtation with violence turned deadly. High listeners if you're fascinated by the mysterious and manipulative side of true crime, Greg and I have another podcast series. That's just for you. It's called cults. That's right every Tuesday joint Vanessa Mae, as we step inside the minds of those who lead and followed the most controversial radical and sometimes deadly organizations in history we'll go beyond the headlines and discover the foundation behind notorious colts like Jim Jones and peoples temple the rudge. Rudge, Niche Movement Heaven's Gate and more. Each episode of cults is full of illuminating details of their improbable origins and sinister intentions, but not all colts are from decades past. Be sure to catch the special four part series on Nexium a Modern Day pyramid scheme turned sex trafficking cult doomsday predictions, religious beliefs, extraterrestrial orders find out what really happens inside a cult subscribed to colts, free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Now back to the story. On February twenty, fifth, nineteen, three, twenty six year old Brian Dugan drove aimlessly along the back roads of Illinois looking for a house to burglarize. After spotting ten year old Janina Carrico home alone, he kicked open the door and burst into the living room, Brian wrapped up in a bed sheet and carried her to the front door as they left the House Janine. Janine reached out desperately trying to hold onto something. Brian Yanked her away, and she left fingernail scratches in the wall, Brian Through Janine into his car and drove west into a secluded area there he walked her down. A nature trail called the Illinois prairie path. When he was sure they were alone. Brian Raped Janine then beat her to death with a tire iron. Brian said in a later interview I was driven by some of impulse that kept growing I could not stop. After killing her Brian Rule Janin's body off the trail and covered her with branches then he walked back to his car and drove away. Around the same time Janine sister returned home from school. The first thing she noticed was the front door hanging open frightened. She ran to a neighbor's house for help with the neighbors searched the house and saw Janin's fingernail marks on the wall, and they called the police investigators searched the area, but they couldn't find any evidence. Leading Janin's whereabouts Janin's body was discovered two days later by a pair of hikers her. Her family was devastated and the entire town of neighbor. Ville was shaken the F. B.. I. Launched an investigation into the murder and offered a reward for any information leading to an arrest. Two months later, an anonymous tip was called in based on the information provided dupage county officials arrested two innocent men. Rolando Cruz and Alessandro does after a rush trial. A jury found both men guilty and sentenced them to death. As Cruz and Hernandez were wrongfully forced to answer for Brian Dugan's crimes, he hunted for more victims during this time. It's suspected that he was responsible. For at least two more attacks on women, unfortunately, while Brian Fit, the description of the attacker in these cases investigators didn't have enough evidence to arrest him. Emboldened by the lack of consequences in the early hours of July fifteenth, nineteen, eighty-four Brian Struck again while cruising around in his beat up Chevy Impala. Brian spotted a young woman. Woman in a car at a stop light he was low on money and wanted to buy some drugs, so he decided to rob her. The woman twenty-seven-year-old Donna Schnorr was a floor nurse at Mercy Center Hospital. In Aurora. She was also a member of the Trinity Lutheran Church and well liked by everyone Donna's brother, Roger recalled. She made everyone feel comfortable around her. She was the type of person you would love to be around. which is probably why Donna who was driving home? Home from a party wasn't alone that night. Her friend and Co worker James was following her in his own car to make sure she made it home safely, but Brian wasn't deterred. When the light turned green Brian followed both of them down the road after a few minutes James reached an intersection near his home and turned off Brian pulled his impala right behind. Donna's car. They were alone Brian accelerated, and side swiped on his car off the road. She slid to a stop. Stop on a grassy knoll and Brian pulled US impala up against Herbert bumper when Donna Potter reverse, she couldn't back up. She was trapped as Brian approached on his car. He could see her through the back windshield. Struggling to the passenger door, he reached in through the window and grabbed her. He pulled done out and dragged her back to his car. He shoved her into the back seat and tied up. Brian then returned to Donna's car and wiped it clean of his fingerprints. He wanted to take down to a lake resort in Wisconsin, but the sun was about to come up. Brian was afraid. People would see her in the car so instead. Brian drove her down a small road that led to a flooded gravel pit called CV Corey Bryant Park the car and Maidana walk into a small mosquito infested patch of woods there he beat and raped her multiple times afterwards he took Donna down to the quarry, and held her head underwater until she stopped breathing, then he pulled down his body back on shore and sat next to it in a days for around twenty minutes. When a census returned, he calmly walked back to his car and drove away. As Brian pulled away from the quarry. Another car appeared on the road inside were three teenage boys out for a quiet morning of fishing as Brian passed them. He turned his headlights on bright so they couldn't see his face. When the boys parked their car and walked down to the Corey, they found donnas lifeless body. Later that morning, Donna's parents worried when she didn't show up for church. When they drove home, they were surprised to find a sheriff's deputy standing at their driveway while the deputy told the, Schnorr is that their daughter was dead Brian. Was Twenty five miles away in the small town of Plainfield Illinois there he abandoned his impala in a deserted area and headed home. He later reported the car stolen. After murdering Donna Brian continued on with his life he met a girl, got a job as a stock handler and moved into his own place, a fifty dollar a week boarding room, it seemed that his need to kill was temporarily satisfied, but after murdering two people Brian new, the urge would return. The only question was when. Criminology professor, Dr Scott Bond says these cooling off periods serve as an emotional pause for serial killers, in which they often returned to their daily routines, Dr Bond Likens it to a drug addict. Coming down off a high during this time, serial killers recompose themselves, but no matter what they do, eventually the urge to kill returns, and when that urge becomes overwhelming serial killers always strike again less than ten months after he abducted raped and murdered Donna Schnorr Ryan's urges completely overpowered him in May of nineteen, eighty five. He got back in his car and went looking for his next victim. On May Sixth Nineteen eighty-five as Brian drove around the suburbs surrounding Chicago, he noticed a broken down car and pulled over looking under the hood was twenty one year old. Sharon Grech Brian offered to help Sharon and worked on the engine until it started as Sharon drove away Brian smiled and waved. Before Sheri- car disappeared from view. Brian got into his vehicle and followed her. When Sharon parked in front of her house. Brian jumped out in held a knife attack terror. He blindfolded sharing and forced her back into her car, and then drove to a small suburb called Batavia. Somewhere along route thirty one. Brian parked the car. He pushed Sharon into the back seat and raped her. According to Brian Sharon stayed calm after the attack, which made him believe she wasn't a threat, so he let her go. It was an eerie echo of Brian's teenage encounter and escape from John Wayne. Gay See years earlier and just my AC. Brian yearned for something more. So just three weeks later on May, twenty eight Brian was back on route thirty, one in town called Geneva Brian spotted a nineteen year old woman walking on the side of the road. We don't know her name so will refer to her. As scarlet Brian, pulled over and grabbed her as Brian, trying to force scarlet into his car. She fought back Brian stumbled, and she made her escape. The failed duck didn't deter Brian. He was going to satisfy his urges. Somehow he had no idea scarlet managed to write. Write down his license plate number, but for the moment Brian was free to continue his attacks the next day Brian saw sixteen year old girl in a parking lot. He pulled his AMC Gremlin over grabbed a tire iron and stepped out of his car. Bryant threatened the team with a tire iron and forced her into his car. As Brian drove across the county line, his glove compartment fell open. His hunting knife was in clearview Brian. Relish the look of fear on the girl's face. It made him feel powerful. When Brian reached will county. He pulled over to the side of the road. Then he put a belt around the girl's Neck and raped her afterwards he drove the girl home and set her free, but the rapes weren't enough to satisfy Bryan. His urge to kill remained unsated a couple of days later, he skipped work opting instead to drive around to getting high eventually, his meandering drive brought him to. To the small town of Psalm Anoc, he turned down a gravel road, and saw two little girls riding bikes. As he drove past them, he was overwhelmed by his murderous urge Brian pulled over a disabled the interior locks by pulling off the KNOBS. Then he turned his car around and drove back to where he saw the girls riding their bikes. His mind was made up. He needed to kill. Next Brian Dugan's atrocities rise to a new level now back to the story. In Nineteen, eighty, five twenty eight year old Brian Dugan. Three women raping two of them, but his reign of terror wasn't over on the morning of June second Brian skipped work and drove around in car, getting high by chance. He drove past two young girls riding their bicycles when Brian saw seven-year-old Melissa. And her old friend, Opal Horton. The urge to kill took over. Later in an interview with the FBI, Brian tried to explain what he called the switch that let what felt like a different person. Take over his body Brian simply said he lives in me like Dr Jekyll, unleashing, Mr Hyde after leading the evil inside him. Takeover Brian returned or Melissa and Opal were riding their bikes. He pulled over and approached the girls pretending to ask them for directions when he was close enough, he grabbed opal and tossed her into his AMC Gremlin Brian, then Yanked Melissa off her bike, and dragged her towards the vehicle, but by the time he got there. Opel had managed to crawl out of an open window. She was already running across the street. Brian decided there was no time to chase her. The street was deserted, but that could change at any moment he had to make his escape Brian Force, Melissa into his car, slammed the door and sped off, he blew through a stop sign, narrowly missing another vehicle and turned onto the highway to keep Melissa Com. He covered her head with a sleeping bag and asked her questions about school when he got Melissa to talk. She told him that she liked gymnastics. He kept her talking as he drove seventeen miles to the small community of Mendota. He pulled. Pulled off the main road and stopped near a small creek that ran through a patch of trees. Then he told Melissa to get out of the car and follow him once. They were out of you from the road. Brian Raped Melissa then drowned her in the stream when he was done, he hid her body under a pile of rocks, satisfied Brian Walked back to his car and drove away. He took the small road back to the highway turned east as he gained. Speed Brian, checked his rear view. Mirror Amendola. A police car was following him. Brian pulled into a service station. Hoping the police car would keep going to his dismay. It followed him into the parking. Lot as Brian walked into the stations convenience store. The patrol car pulled up right behind his Gremlin. Brian was nervous, but he couldn't stay inside forever. Wanting to appear nonchalant, he bought a soda and went back to his car. He asked the waiting police officer of everything was all right. The COP pointed out that his vehicles tag had expired for a moment. Brian was relieved, but when the officer asked for his license, he hesitated. Brian didn't have a valid driver's license. Instead he showed the officer his fishing license as Brian Waded, he heard a call come through on the police radio, but dispatcher announced that a little girl had been abducted from Psalm. Anoc Melissa Ackerman. The officer glanced inside Brian's car, but didn't see anything suspicious. He took down Brian's name. Then left to join the search for Melissa. He had no idea that he had just led the little girls murderer go! The close calls spooked. He drove home and took a shower to wash off the mud from the stream. It had been a particularly dirty murder though he seemed to fear being caught, Brian displayed no signs of remorse over what he had done to any of his victims. Later he self diagnosed as a psychopath with would explain his lack of emotion in a study out of the university, of Wisconsin, Madison researchers linked psychopathy with an imperative ability to receive and process negative stimuli though he was never formally diagnosed. It's possible. Brian was affected in this way by his own admission, he felt nothing for his victims, but his lack of emotion wouldn't protect him from the women he had hurt. That evening as Brian cleaned up eight year, old old, Horton gave investigators a description of Brian's car. The police were told to search for a beat up blue compact after hearing the description, the officer who pulled Brian over remembered the blue. AMC Gremlin police in Kane. County were told to Pick Brian up for questioning. They were intrigued to learn that Brian was already wanted. Scarlet had come forward to report Brian's attempt to. To abduct her, and she had his license plate number the next morning, when Brian arrived for work, the police were waiting as soon as he stepped on his car. They took him into custody Brian was brought to Kane County jail and booked for the attack on scarlet, then police called in twenty one year. Old Sharon Grech who Brian had raped after helping our starter car Sharon picked Bryan out in a lineup. Around this time, the sixteen year, old Brian raped after the failed attack on scarlet arrived at the police station. She was initially too afraid to report the rape, fearing that her attacker would come back to find her. Recognized brine after seeing his face on the news knowing he was behind bars. Safe enough to come forward despite the evidence stacking up against him Brian, proclaimed his innocence and refused to cooperate with investigators, but the police didn't need his help. As they assembled their case, the police made an intriguing discovery. The Impala Brian had reported stolen after he murdered Donna. Schnorr a year earlier was sitting in their impound lot. They parked the car right outside Brian Cell Window. Window to send a message the next day he asked to make a plea deal in exchange for information about the rapes and Donna's murder, but as Brian worked out a deal, Melissa Ackerman's body was discovered, a lab confirmed that dirt from the area matched dirt inside Brian's boarding house room now there was no need for a plea bargain. The police had brian dead to rights. Confronted with the death penalty, Brian confessed to the murders of Melissa. Ackerman and Donna Schnorr in return. A judge ordered Brian to serve to life terms. However, Brian wasn't tried for the nineteen eighty three murder of ten year old Janina Carrico. He confessed to the little girl's murder, but when prosecutors from dupage county were called in, they dismissed his confession. The do page. Investigators insisted that relondo crews and La Monroe Hernandez arrested. Two years prior were responsible for Janin's murder. The two men remained on death. Death row for the next ten years until nineteen ninety-five when they both won their appeals and were released finally. Janin's real killer could face justice. It took a while, but in two thousand nine Brian Dugan was finally found guilty for the murder of Giannini Carrico and sentenced to death, but that sentence was commuted to life in prison. When Illinois Abolish the death penalty in two thousand eleven. When asked what would happen the ever got out of prison? Brian admitted that he was still dangerous. He said. I'm a threat to other people. Luckily he'll never have a chance to hurt anyone again. Thanks again for tuning into serial killers, we'll be back soon with a new episode. You can find more episodes of serial killers, and all other podcast originals free on spotify, not only spotify already have all of your favorite music now spotify is making it easy for you. Enjoy all of your favorite podcast. Originals like serial killers for free from your phone, desktop or smart speaker to stream serial killers on spotify just open the APP and tight serial killers. The search bar will see you next time of a killer we. Serial killers was created by Max Cutler and is a podcast studios. Original executive producers include Max, Ron Cutler sound design by Nick Johnson with production assistance by Ron Shapiro and Carly Madden. This episode of serial killers was written by him. Boland with writing assistance by Abigail Cannon and stars Greg Poulsen and Vanessa Richardson. Hi It's Vanessa and Greg again. Don't forget to check out our podcast. Original series cults every Tuesday we explore the background in psychology behind the most manipulative mysterious and murderous groups in history the branch. Davidians the Peoples Temple Heaven's gate. You may know the names, but just how well do you know? The colts subscribe to colts free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Barbara Walters Brian Brian Dugan Brian Rule Janin Brian Watt Brian Dugan A. Brian James Brian Sharon Brian Brian Fit Brian Struck Brian Belt Brian Cell Window Brian new Brian Walked Brian Waded Brian Force murder Opel spotify Bryan
Can I produce my podcast from a mobile phone without Anchor.fm? - 1KP0031

1,000 Podcasters

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Can I produce my podcast from a mobile phone without Anchor.fm? - 1KP0031

"If anchor is a great way to host a podcast if that's not something that you want to do. Is there still a way that you can publish a podcast easily using a mobile phone today? We're going to talk about that. What's happening podcasters? I'm Brian answering, this is one thousand podcasters and I'm interested in helping you launch improve and sustain your show yesterday. I shared some of my thoughts about anchor and what I think it might be good for some of the things that I think it might not be good for an in particular. I don't think it's great for a show that you wanna grow long-term, and turn into an asset or really serve a group of people over the long haul. I shared a number of reasons. You can, visit top tier audio dot com to find that. And listen to that, if you haven't caught that already. But if you did you might be thinking to yourself. Okay. If anchor isn't a great option is there another way that I can do this. And the answer to that is absolutely. Yes. For the past several weeks, I've been producing. This show almost daily and almost every time I've been using a mobile rig to do it have been using my phone, and a couple of apps to do this, and a microphone most episodes have been recorded sitting in my car at lunch right now. I'm in a hotel room because I'm traveling for business talking to my phone and a microphone, and it's very possible to produce a high quality show using nothing, but your phone and maybe a microphone, I prefer to use an outside microphone, not the built in microphone 'cause I get better quality. If you're wondering how you can do that. If you're wondering what apps you might want to consider, I use a few different apps or what microphone you might want to consider I created a free download for you. You can find that at top tier audio dot com slash mobile and you'll be able to get that download so that you, can, you can check it out, and you can find out if there's an option that's gonna work great for you this particular download, I didn't just give. You one way to do it because I don't like to do that. I like to give you a couple of options because you might have specific requirements, that aren't addressed in a one size fits all solution. So I wanted to give you a couple of different options gave you three different microphone options with different price points, everything from essentially free, because you already have the phone to a great microphone. That's pretty much all in one package. Couple of different options there, then I also gave you three different options for apps to use in order to record and produce your show and it's all based on how complex you want your show to be, do you want it to just be punch record publishing you, you're done. Or do you want to be able to edit? So you'll be able to look at this and make that call based on what you want to be able to do. And then I've provided in this download just a really high level workflow in terms of record it with this. And then you do this with this with this is how you publish so all of that's available for you at top tier audio dot com slash publish. If you're interested in interested in. Considering going mobile, or if you've been thinking about anchor and you want a different solution, because you're not sure it's going to be a great option for you. I would encourage you to consider this as an option for you. If you have any questions, of course, I'm glad to answer those, but this might be a way to get you started toward creating your podcast, especially if you wanna do it mobile. That's, that's what I'd like to give you today. Is that download top tier audio dot com slash mobile? Grab that choose the solution that you want, and then go with it. If you have any specific questions, I'd be glad to set up a consultation to talk to you about your show, whether it's recording and producing mobile or whether it's a more complex production like typically do for myself, and for clients, especially for my flagship show, the engaging missions show, and my clients lot of different stuff that I do for those shows that doesn't fit into the basically live to drive format that I'm doing here. Why record do a light editing? And then I publish, but I'd be glad to talk to you about that as well, topped here audio dot com is the place to get that. And if you know somebody who you think might benefit from this encourage you to maybe think of two or three podcasters, you know, and send it to him one thousand podcasters dot com will send them right to the place where they can listen. Subscribe at greatly appreciate you helping me get the word out, and they would appreciate having this valuable information available to him now go out there and make a great podcast. I.

Brian
Episode 03  Be Our Guest

Brian

28:34 min | 4 years ago

Episode 03 Be Our Guest

"Hey, this is Brian Dunkel of the unadulterated BS podcast. And it's time to listen to our show. Wait. I can't say that. No. So this is what podcast is this, that I'm doing this ad on the wedding. So you're telling me I can't say. None of that. I can't say any of that on this show. Well. Sorry. Anyway. Listen to the NFL three two Bs podcast on the dark ravine dot com and you can hear exactly what I said. I'm assuming it was all bleeped out, probably. Hello, everybody. That's not how you start. Cream. Cotin and the Hugh Grant stub Q watch your mom elite in your dreams Iraq, our on brew. Golsen two weekends dancing Jammie pants deal. The. Of our listeners. I'm Brian, I am out and getting married. Three hundred eighty one days. Perfect. Steve. Intern. I know it's true. The clouds with you. With you think you're. Perfect for me tonight. We're going to touch on the topic of guess guess lists. This is ready to start striking people down. Tell them that they don't get to come to my wedding. You do except for I don't be rude, but we're going to start taking out like. A donation box pretty soon. Donations are fun before we get really started into guest list. That's what it is guest list. Let's talk about a little bit about this podcast as you said, we're getting married in how many days now, three hundred eighty one so not enough times dwindling quickly. But anyway, this podcast is about us giving. You are lessons learned in a few tips on the various aspects of planning, our wedding, and hopefully, it can be helpful for you and your wedding. Problem. Listened to the fuck. Swarmed by mosquitoes. And as a result, smell was itching furiously very. So yes, lists knows don't invite the mosquito. Yes. Keep them -squitoes far far away. Do invite the bug control specialists. Yes. No to the mosquitos such candles. And I mean the bad way and not good say, not Zeka. All right. Enlighten us a little bit on the guest list supposed to do. And we're like what we're more than a year out still. And I'm thinking about who gets to come. Well, yes, because, well, you have to. Because who gets to calm is going to determine how much food you need much food, UNITA's is going to determine how much you're going to spend on food, so on and so forth. The size of the room already, as well as we talked about location on the most recent addition to the spot guest right on that. Right. Which will? No, you're right. Okay. The other thing is, is that people like to assume that, who you should invite. So you've got. You and your fiancee, wanting to come up with people that you want to have their both of you are going to have people that are close to you that you want invited. Then you have to explain that out even further, and you have your parents on both sides, and in some situations, you may have a split family where there's now suddenly. Four sides set of people, then you have the people who just think that they should be invited. Those are always fun people. So it can get very out of hand very quickly. So I found some articles tips for simplifying in helping you with your guest list. Yes. Invite only people whose names begin with litters eight through the no not quite that way. So. You wanted to come up with the main list or a masterless this master list should include everyone. You think you should invite? Okay. So you're talking about family friends. Whoever it is get the list from your parents. Get the list from whoever and start there, because this number is going to be astronomical. It's going to scare the crap out of you, but you have to start somewhere. So. Ten rules to keep in mind when you're trying to cut people number one. If you live in the same city as the potential invite and don't see them outside of events organized by mutual friends. Then don't invite them. These people are not your friends. They're your friends, friends friends friends at this point, what you're doing is you're inviting acquaintances. What if all I have is acquaintances, that's a whole nother pet guest. Number two. If when you visit the town where the potential invading lives, and you don't call them or plan to see them then don't invite them getting shorter and shorter by the minute. If you have noticed to see them when you go to visit them, then obviously, they are not that important to you check and check. If you wonder what do they want when a person calls, you, then they should not be attending your wedding. Ooh, Tom go into voice mail. Unfortunate name to have randomly picked out. It was, which was actually I'm using but. All right now, offense meant anyone named Tom who I may or may not actually. No. If you or your significant significance other has had sexual relations with a person than the one who did not engage in such relations has veto power over the invite. Just take this step further and be like you've had sex with somebody don't invite them to your wedding. Just seems like an awful idea across the board. For co workers apply the but for test if the if the company dissolved, tomorrow, would you still be friends with them, but for your job, do you have anything in common? No, really. Workers tend to get a little bit dicey and we'll go into that in a little bit. We're going to touch on coworkers again. Well, not particularly just co workers, but this kind of goes back to the people that you feel should get an invite. But you may not be as close to many more you should not let the HR department at your job here this if you're going to touch co workers. Honey? I got nothing. All right. I'm sorry. I don't know much about guests if the names like okay continue if the potential recipient has never met your significant other, and especially if they don't even know who they are, then don't invite them. That seems kind of like it would be something that would be pretty self explanatory most. But you never know but, you know. If your parents went to invite friends of theirs that you do not know or barely remember than your parents should help offset the costs pay the Bill. This is the thing. If your parents to you to invite specific people, the new really need to talk to them about how much or if at all they're willing to chip in because you should be footing. The Bill for a hundred of your parents friends, and not any of yours when it comes to plus ones, or guests of guests. No ring no bring is a nice goal, but is not realistic wait. Okay. Well, did you find articles full of wedding buzzwords? Ring to no brain article is actually one that I found. Don't cough into the microphone. It was just a very like powerful. No ring. No bring come on. All right, fine. But it doesn't work. It's not it doesn't work it because you're going to have friends that may never want to get married. You're going to have friends that could have been somebody for longer than you and your significant other. It's not a realistic, but you do have to keep in mind and be aware that plus ones are another person. So you're. Your headaches. Otherwise, we're just like randomly bringing stuffed animals. It would be cheaper. This is my plus one fluffy. He'll have the prime rib the private. For any potential invite you still on the fence about your relationship with this person, five years from now is their chance. You look at your wedding pictures, and say who is that? Weights. I'm hoping not sunny. I think we're not inviting anyone. All right. One final factor to consider is what kind of guests they would make. I want the rowdy ones that are going to be dancing on the bar with their ties wrapped around their head tied around her head draped in front of their face santee. I think we probably have several of those ready. I don't think we need to look. For more Damon eighty so those are just some rules for wedding guest. Lists their little weird not very specific. But I don't know. I think those were all fairly specific view. I guess they give you a general sense to take that one step further one thing that I found that was absolutely awesome. Is that you make some rules for cutting you both agree on and you actually stick with them? That's right. I got the cut list. So it's cut down day at the NFL NFL preseason why I suddenly forgot sports. I don't know what sports are the wedding just fogging your brain down. Preseason. We need to get down to fifty three dudes, Saul. We're inviting fifty three fifty three six foot four two hundred plus pound guys. I know that many, I just wanna say that would probably like be a little bit harder to come up with to be honest with you. We're just inviting the Green Bay Packers. The entire team. That's it. That's it. All right. But it is a little bit like that. You know, you kind of have to be like, I want XYZ adding, that's exactly what it is. The guy who can play man-to-man defense and as good and the bump and run coverage. But what I don't need is another big three hundred plus pound. Do push around people agreed. So we have to make those compromises. Yes, just like you would building. This is how I'm going to think about this. You're going to think about this is what you're gonna guest list is now my own personal NFL roster. Hey, you know what? Honey, sand salary cap, although we accept we sort of have one of those two, as far as the budget is also true. I'm just not paying that budget that money to them. Yes. That's very important. I'm willing to spell spend twelve dollars and seventy five cents on my old college roommate. Why did you get all said? It's very, that's very cute. If that's what you think of meals going to cost. I just said this what I was willing to spend, therefore, he's probably getting cut. Gotcha. Gotcha. All right. So a really cool thing that I found was kind of a fullest flow, I know this was something that made it a little bit easier and kind of helps you go through those cutting rules, you can change them to whatever you need them to be. But this was just their idea of what you should have on their the start off, as have you talked to this person in the last year. If the answer is, yes, do you spend time with them outside of work? If the answer to this is, yes, is it someone you would normally buy dinner for that question. Feels a little bit weird to me. I feel like this is some sort of a wedding guest list, choose your own adventure. Well, that's actually what it is. It's a it's a very cute. Little flow chart here. If you would go out to dinner together turn to page twenty seven right now. If the answer those questions was yes, then they're invited. Oh, no. You've opened the airlock and now we're floating in space. You have died. Those people that choose your own adventure books. If you're if the answer this questions was no than you do not bite them. Oh, they get skipped onto the cutlass. Yes, you don't make the fifty three man roster. Now, if you go back to the heavy talk to this person in the last year if your answer is no, the next question is, do you have close personal family connection with this person? If your answer is friend, feel weird about that question. What, what entails, a close family me? I can't talk on this show tonight. What entails a close family connection like they're actually, in my family or we had children together? That would fall into the have you ever had sex question. So that would be a no. Okay. Just wondering, like, I feel weird. Like, that's what we're questioned aren't relatives generally just invited. Well, are we going to invite third cousin George whose, nobody's ever met before? I don't know. Third. Cousin, George exactly. So you would not have a close personal or family relationship with emperor enough think my point has been defended. So the next question is, do they know your partner's name, if they do not know your significant other's name, don't invite them? So nice to see you again, Susie. Right. Thanks pretty much. Will they make your wedding more fun? A wedding isn't about fun if they're going to make your wedding more fun than you should just invite them. Apparently according to. Just do it just do it guys. The life of the party is going to take all attention away from you, your bride or your bride. And or groom whichever way you're looking at that from say you and your bride or your bright and new. Giving no option. Same thing continue. All right. And as if it's family is it someone your parents would want their, the answer is no then cut them. If the answer is, yes, the next question is are your parents paying for the wedding? The answer is no cut them. The answer is, yes, they're invited while we're cutting the Dave Kuei cut it out motion. Every time that okay. If that's what you're going to feel better. Out. It's gonna get old real fast cut it out, just like about now got through two of them. And I'm done cut. Continue. So. Kinda summarize this. Because guessing summation. Yes. 'nother thing we really need to talk to family, because I see you're going to have to go to your parents on both sides and find out who they feel is necessary to be indication is key. Now, if you've got a little bit more of a thing, where you have maybe a bigger room smaller room. You can give them a number. Don't feel guilty about that. You can go, you can have twenty people that's going to be really hard for pretty much any family. I know. But hey, if it works for yours, then great. Your list is ten people long that includes, you make it. So we have unfortunately, we kind of have downside to that, as you come from a very large family. So even with just your aunts, and uncles on our list, then added, you know, quite a few people eleven on one side and six on the other five. Sure, I don't know. I have a list, I can look at it, but communication. But that being the point that, you know, that definitely comes up with numbers, very quickly, when you start talking about siblings that parents, come from large families or you yourself, come from a large family us in our family alone, or seven people, and we have to feed all of us. So, nope. Kids, get finger, sandwiches and slices of processed cheese product. They would be happy as plans, they would probably that more than whatever. We ended up saving them. That's another thing that was on was on these lists. If you don't feel comfortable children at your wedding that is your right? You should not feel guilty for saying you do not want kids at your wedding, obviously, for us. That is not something those feasible. Not something that seizable. I remember so but all of these different things for different people different strokes for different folks, as they say. Yes, sir. Trying to produce the show and listen and not know anything about guest lists. Well, I gave you a list said here, I didn't even know my parents gave you a list. You didn't. Give me any didn't do anything. Nope, that's right. Don't be me fellows for those fellas that are still listening to this podcast three episodes in. You have to be involved. Well, I mean, we do have a podcast about our wedding. So in that way you are involved. I am. So by me, making terrible jokes while you explain things I'm involved. Some it wouldn't be that much different. If we were just sitting down talking about it either. No come out, it really wouldn't be. And I feel like half of our conversations that we've had to try to have regarding this. I have to turn into Nagy little woman just did what you need to do. No. You don't sit at done. In a while. I got put away a monkey. Yes, you do. Oh man reference, not gonna make any sense. No sound terrible, which podcast in my listening to and why does he have what does he do with monkey? What is going on here? What more do I need to know about guest list? That's good. We're going to call it today, right there. Give you a few flow charts. What you should really do is make up a nice power press presentation and show it off to your family and tell them, why each and every single person has been cuts. It's like the weakest link you are the weakest link you really wanted to get into that much detail in good. Go that far into it. I'm sure you could. Basically with guest list. The hardest thing is that you feel like you should have to invite everyone. Everyone feels like you should have to invite them. And it's really kind of sticking your round another thing that we've always talked about that I meant to throw in there and forgot you is do not feel bad doing dual invitations dual invitations. Whatever do you mean. So. Just answer the question, I'm chuckling. Don't feel bad just inviting someone to the reception. Oh, absolutely. Not anyway, sit around with a bunch of study old people while we eat lukewarm piece of prime rib, most likely came from. Very, very sick. How? So yes, but don't feel bad just inviting people to the party, a part of that, and enjoying them or having them come in. Say Hello to you and enjoy your presence. Joy the festivities. Yes, they can enjoy your party. They can enjoy that part of it, but they don't necessarily need to be there for the entire thing. They may not be that close. This is a great thing for co workers. Those are the people that are like the satellites. So it's not like the moon. The moon's, always there moons kinds of moon and the earth rock-hard satellites come and go. Their orbits can sometimes be ellipses therefore, they're further away, sometimes closer. Sometimes they crashed into space debris in fall, plummeting to the earth, or Corinne, outerspace. Never to be heard or seen from again. I think that happens quite a bit. So make sure you don't invite satellites to heading. It's okay to have them come to the reception. Yes. By losing it here. Yeah. It's really stop. This is not working as far as like an allergy, you started out strongly, super strong super super strong on the money on. And then it kind of doubts. Yeah. Drifted off. You tried to keep it going. I think you forgot what started on those minisatellites that the bigger satellites spit out in space. Those are the Kwaidan ses, you don't want them there at all. Maybe you do. I don't think I've learned anything from anything. You said haven't no. Sorry. At this point, I'm going to have space analogies, and cut it out jokes the entire time. We're referring to, I guess, list, different strokes for different folks for not going to get very far on this. Why do I have the bad feeling that it's just going to be a Honey invite whoever you want? I got a list of like seven dudes I met down at the biker bar last weekend at the bike to a biker bar. Was there for this today, part go to bed? And yep. Sure. Yeah. So no questions of reach the mailbag this far on Brian Melba Mary, but if you do have a question, but anything that we've talked about, or perhaps, even have a tip of your own, you want to send along to us. We'll read that on the podcast, you can send that to be M G M, the dark ravine dot com. In addition, you can always go to the dark, Wien dot com and check out the podcast show post for this podcast and you can post your comments in the comments section there, we'd read those as well. If you're interested in helping out this show, or the other shows from the darker Wien, or even just donating to the wedding effort, you can check us out at a patriot and the link is on our website at the dark, Wien dot com. I believe it's patriots dot com slash the dark Wien. So not only can you donate to the wedding effort. But if you just like listening to the podcast, I want to help support this show and the other's at the darker Wien you can actually just submit your donations that way. There's two ways to do it. It's a nice tidy little tiny amount out of your checking or credit card account once a month, they want to donate a dollar a month every little dollar. That's right. Exactly. And it comes out automatically union have to think about it ever again and it shows up magically in our account power of financial institutions, otherwise you can also do one time. Nation. So let's say I don't wanna give you three dollars and fifty cents every month, but I'm be more than happy to give you twenty five bucks. Once you can do that as well. The other thing that we've been trying to get people to do is follow us on Facebook through Facebook dot com. Forward slash the dark ravine, and that's our podcast network page, and anything about this podcast and our other podcasts shows up there. So check that out become a follower on that Facebook page. Do we have anything else to add about guest list now that I've done pimping, all of the other stuff that we have to? It. Don't think so that's it. We hammered out our guest list yet. No, it's an ever evolving beast. Well, I shouldn't say that we have we have the family parts we have my half of the wedding party, we have the children weird. We have to sit down and hammer out the friend Clayton's part of this acquaintances. Yeah. We haven't gotten there yet. This can I give away on this show? It invitation to our wedding tickets. It's like. Right. Right. We ask a question. We'll have a competition. This is this is going to be in the works coming next week. Who knows us best. Well the contest. Actually get to eat. Have a few drinks. Yeah. It's well worth it. It is room and board has not provided no traveling accommodations are not provided by that is. I knew. I have to look, up some contest language, so I can go off and rattled off in the if you've ever listened to the radio, and they do the long like you're only allowed to win a contest, once every thirty days from the global related to affiliated with anyway, for this company or any of its sister companies. You are unable to win a prize. Less than twenty five dollars. Maybe giving to other people. Total retail value. Blah, blah. Contest. I've decided now. You can make it onto my wedding guest list. We'll say four spots. For four spots for random podcast listeners. So there's someone randomly listening to this. Especially since after the show will be on tunes here, people randomly be listening to this and like extend bowl Turkey. Decide they want to come to the wedding. When I come to our wedding. See what it's all about you wanna go with an overly like racist name. There's I'm not gonna say name of said person, this is they wanna come that's probably eight to come to our wedding, but they just randomly like I want those tickets, and then we'll make them jump through some weird hoops. Because, you know, flying in from Istanbul Turkey to get to our wedding. That goes Istanbul may not be in Turkey. I may not be I actually don't know either. I feel like. All right. This podcast is now going off the rails. Yeah, we've lost it. It's all gone. We went from being the wedding show to more like the unadulterated Bs podcasts happen. We apologize for that. We were definitely in a mood to record a certain type of podcasts in it. Yes. And this one is suffering for it. All right. So we're getting married in what three hundred eighty one days Eighty-one days, three hundred eighty one days to finalize our guest list, if you have any guest list questions remember him over to us via Email will answer them in future episodes of this podcast. But otherwise until then the countdown continues. Love you Honey. See you next week. Twig. Perfect. Stayed. Pooffy. Turn. I know it's true. I've been in the class with you think you're the wooden shoes. Agree perfect for me. A jazz up the show a little bit. Oh, goodness. Hi, everybody. I'm brian. I'm oh, and we're getting. Distracted reading them, Celje, -tations, marital miscreants.

NFL Facebook Turkey Tom George whose Brian Dunkel NFL Brian Intern Steve Green Bay Packers Saul Cotin Hugh Grant Iraq Istanbul Istanbul Turkey UNITA Zeka Damon
Revisionist Revisited: Free Brian Williams

Revisionist History

42:27 min | 2 months ago

Revisionist Revisited: Free Brian Williams

"Hello hello loyal. Revisionist Historians Malcolm Global here as some of you may know. We're in the middle of a celebration. Here Pushkin our new season which launches June eighteenth will be fifth our fifth anniversary. I believe the traditional fifth anniversary gift is would which is depressing by the way. Five years is the longtime. You'd think you'd better than would what's romantic about would what's going to give your loved one a cutting board place. Which is why here is history. We've done something much better for our fifth anniversary. Revisionist revisited a listener contest to pick the greatest episode of revisionist history ever last week. We begin our countdown with the bronze medal winner. A good walk spoiled the episode that has earned me the enduring hatred of golfers everywhere. And this week. The silver medallist chosen by you. Ready Free Brian Williams from season three Brian Williams is of course celebrated NBC. Anchorman who had a moment on the late show with David? Letterman Williams told a story about being on a helicopter that came under fire journey Iraq war but in fact it wasn't his helicopter. It was the helicopter behind him. Big Controversy people called him a grandstanding. Liar he was suspended from his job and I thought wait a minute and podcast. Episode is about my wait a minute. I won't spoil it for you if you missed it the first time around but I feel I really should answer. The obvious question here should night which is now come. You did this big episode Brian Williams. Did he ever reach out to say? Thanks and the answer is I really thought he would. I mean again. Thank us all the time from the suburbs of episodes notes gifts after I did my episode. Mcdonald's broke my heart in season. Two about how McDonalds ruined fries when it stopped cooking and tallow and how beef tallow was. Maybe the greatest thing in the whole world. You know what I gotten a male giant white tub of beef tallow so giant. I'm still cooking with it. From the coast packing company of Vernon California and on the label. It says packed especially for Malcolm well with gratitude for your appreciation of natural healthy beef. Tallow may all your deep frying the Golden Brown crispy delicious. Mcdonald's may have broken my heart but the coast packing company of Vernon California. Made it whole again. My point is we take graft here at revisionist history happily and willing so in the weeks and months that followed the episode. Drop a Free Ben Williams. I checked my inbox every day. If I saw a package my heart would leap flowers. Perhaps a box of chocolates and NBC. Tote bag if the phone rang and I didn't recognize the number I would think. Is this Brian inviting me for lunch in the thirty rock commissary? I'm still waiting so just so you know free Brian Williams winner of the silver medal in the revisionist revisited. Contest is an act of unrequited. Love Brian. If you're out there all right I have to go back and work on season five again. Coming June eighteenth we have war stories. Lost Van Gogh a couple of new grand unified theories. But before I leave you two more things. I want to encourage you to sign up for the revisionist history newsletter at Pushkin Dot. Fm See you can follow all things wonderful and revisionist and second he know. It just rolled out of Pushkin headquarters another season of against the rules mass season. Michael Lewis roamed foreign wide to bring a story about the assault on referees in American life this season. He's looking at the rise of coaches loved season. One of against the rules the season even better story out this week episode two is about his high school baseball coach in New Orleans. I don't WanNa give anything more away except to say it is everything that is genius about Michael Lewis so go check that out. Meanwhile here's free. Brian Williams on the evening of March. Twenty six two thousand thirteen Brian Williams appeared on late night with David Letterman. Very happy to have this man with us is the Emmy and the fee Buddy Award winning anchor and managing editor of the NBC. Nightly News. Latest gentleman here is our good friend. Brian Williams Vista Williams. Brian Williams looks like a TV anchor. He has one of those rectangular super handsome made for television heads. Maybe two sizes larger than normal like he inflates it with a bicycle pump before he goes on camera. And he's charming very charming. Congratulations twenty years at NBC News. Thank you very much a young man tell me Williams sits down next to let him and and the two of them Chitchat until jokes. There had been some big kerfuffle about the today show involving Matt Lauer and let them and tries and fails to Bait Williams into saying something juicy about lower stuff now if I'm onto. Something blinked twice. Then let him and ask the question. That will destroy Brian Williams career. Tell me And if I knew this I forgot it and if I forgot it I'm ashamed Something happened ten years ago in Iraq. Tell people what that brought a photo which arrived in my email two mornings ago of where I was tonight a decade ago. This very day this very day my name is Malcolm Global. You're listening to revisionist history. My podcast about things forgotten and misunderstood this episode. His part two of my exploration of memory and our naive ideas about what memory is worth. If you haven't heard the previous episode. You should listen to IT I. It's the story of an early morning raid on a Nazi hideout in Eunuch arrayed that involved a world class Monica player and a dashingly handsome undercover spy. The lesson of that story is it. Only a fool accepts the evidence of his own memory as Gospel. The lesson of this story is we're all fool This was me ten years ago and a Young Command Sergeant Major. I was in Iraq. Now a couple of caveats here as war correspondents go. I am the herb Schmendrick of war. Correspondents I am. I'm not terribly good at it. It is not what I do full-time. I mostly New York based I do. Go cover these two wars. We've been fighting when I do. I like to go out on patrol. I'd like to get out in it right. We were in some helicopters we were going to drop some bridge portions across the Euphrates so the Third Infantry could cross on them two of our four helicopters were hit by groundfire including the one I was in no RPG and AK47 has. You may remember the helicopter. Brian Williams was riding was not in fact hit by groundfire. Williams was miles away in another aircraft entirely when the attack happened. One of the most respected network news anchors went on late night. Tv To tell a story about his near death experience and it turned out not to be true. What happens the minute everybody realizes you've been hit We figure out how to land safely and we did. We landed very quickly and hard and we put down and we were stuck four birds in the middle of the desert and we were north out ahead of the other Americans as a as a as a guy as a journalist. What do you think this is a great position to be in or holy crap? I gotTA GET. Outta your more toward the holy crowd. This is what we know for certain about the case of Brian Williams and the helicopter or colleague Brian Williams was back in Kuwait City. Tonight after a close call in the skies over Iraq Ryan. Tell us about what you got yourself into well in the end. Tom Did give us a glimpse just after the. Us invasion of Iraq began in the spring of two thousand and three Williams filed a report for NBC News from the field. He described how he'd been embedded with a convoy of four Chinook helicopters flying out of Kuwait City. They were carrying bridge components so that the US army troops could cross Euphrates. This is Williams reporting March. Twenty six two thousand three on the ground we learned the Chinook ahead of us was almost blown out of the sky. That hole was made by a rocket propelled grenade or are PG as Williams describes it all four helicopters ended up on the desert floor. There was a massive sandstorm. They were trapped there for three hurling days. The main invading force was still miles. Away what we didn't know was we were north of the invasion. We were the northern. Most Americans in Iraq Williams's account is included in a book published by NBC. Shortly after four years later he tells it again in a blog post written after the death of a retired general who was in the helicopter with him. Only this time Williams uses a vague sentence. There was small arms fire in a later blog. Post in two thousand eight. He's more explicit. All four of our low-flying shook took fire. We were forced down and stayed down then. Letterman TWO THOUSAND. Thirteen Brian Williams fateful appearance. So we got hit. We sat down. Everyone was okay. Our captain took a purple heart injury to his ear in the cockpit But we were alone. They started distributing weapons. We heard a noise and it was Bradley. Fighting Vehicles and Abrams tanks coming. They happen to spot us. This was the invasion invasion. They saw US suddenly a story that Williams has been telling in bits and pieces gets told in a spotlight on late night. Tv and who sees it Lands Reynolds the flight engineer on the helicopter that got hit? Reynolds response on. Nbc's Facebook page. Sorry Dude. I don't remember you being on my aircraft. I do remember you walking up about an hour after we had landed to ask me what happened. One by one the members of the flight crews involved come forward to say the same thing and then the skin tell me. Do you know where Brian Williams was at the moment that your helicopter was hit by the RPG. Fifth Brian Stelter of CNN. Interviewing Don Hellas the pilot of the lead helicopter. Oh we had a lot going on but I am pretty sure he was not in our flight at all. Then stelter talks to the pilot of the helicopter that Williams was on. His name is Alan. Kelly is it right to say that Brian Williams was aboard your helicopter and not aboard the helicopter that was shot in Iraq Nut Day? That's correct. He was aboard my aircraft that day in March. What was your aircraft doing and was it ever. Within sight of the that was shot at is far as the Chinook from Big Winnie. That was shot down. We were not within visual range of them. So what sort of distance was there between your helicopter? with Brian Williams aboard and the helicopter that did take fire so initially. We're probably a half hour behind them. Soon every pundit under the sun is wagging disdainful finger his Don Imus tell me where you thank all remember whether or not you in a plane that gets hit. I can not remember getting punched in the face in fourth grade. Rosie O'Donnell I think he would know if you were in a helicopter. That was actually hit by a missile. So I don't think he did it. Remember that I think he fabricated that story. John Steward. We got us a case here of infotainment. Confusion Syndrome OCCURS WHEN THE CELEBRITY CORTEX gets its wires crossed with the Madurai anchored Dolla. Even Whoopi Goldberg. When he first told the story he told the story as it happened and every time he told it again. It got war exciting. He wore this was more that and by the time he was finished. He was on a helicopter. You know it's it's stolen valor. You can get a read so if you impersonator. Soldiers were in combat. You can actually get arrested and charged him put in jail for doing just what he did. He's reprehensible he's disgusting in like a lying coward. He's been telling the story. For twelve years repeatedly this goes on for months. Nbc Suspense Him. Six months without pay culminating with a public penance on the today show Matt Lauer interviewer seat. What have these past five months been like for you It has been Torture now maybe you don't care about Brian Williams. A lot has happened since his scandal he currently has a nightly show and MSNBC at eleven eastern. He's going to be fine in the grand scheme of things. What does it matter? Well it matters because of what the case exposes about our understanding of Memory Brian Williams remember traumatic event. One way then a couple of years later he started remembering that same event a different way and the assumption of virtually everyone who weighed in on the case was this if changes their original story then they must be lying. The change must be delivered and self aggrandizing. Everyone assumes memory is time stamped video of what happened in your life and that if you contradict the evidence of the video you're up to no good. I'm sorry but that's insane free Brian Williams. I'm going to ask you a series of questions about the morning of September eleventh. Two Thousand and one I'm talking with my friend Dee Gordon. I've known her forever. How did you first learn about the attack on the towers I had just taken my dogs out for a walk and I had bought the New York. Post The New York Times and I remember Paris Hilton on the cover of the New York Post. I think and I want and I you know took my walk around the block and I came to my apartment and I was sitting at my counter reading the newspapers and I saw all these people standing out on Hudson street staring up in the middle of the street and so I- poked out the window. I couldn't really see what was going on. And then I turned on the television and saw what was happening. Would you do next I when up and are either called? You are went up to your apartment. I can't remember it was one of the one of two things either. I think I called you. Because you're upstairs Dee Dee Gordon and I used to live in the same building in the West village above a Bodega. Whenever she came up to see me she would sing the theme song. From the Sitcom Three's company come and knock on our door. You call me before you went down on street or after a mystery. I called you before. Oh did I did I picked up. You did and I was like you need to look out your window and you didn't turn on the news. Did you see me that morning or did you leave before I came down now? We we saw each other. And you're like well. I gotta go fly someplace today and I remember I said to you. I go what Indiana. The airports were closed. And you're like oh I guess I'll leave tomorrow morning and I said all like you're going to get on a plane like I thought you were crazy and you said Gordon. This is the safest time to fly. Remember that don't you know? Priscilla memory for this stuff is kind of phenomenal. How certain are you about? All of those memories. You just told me how certain am I? I'm pretty certain now. Let me ask you the same questions I was just asking. How did you first learn about what happened on nine eleven? Where were you? What were you doing? How did you feel when you first became aware of the attack? Who was the first person you talked to about the attack? What were you doing immediately before you became aware of? I'm going to guess that many of you can answer every one of those questions. Maybe not with the same Specificity D. Because she has an amazing memory. But you can tell me where you were. When you heard the news. I was in bed. Tv called me. I went down to Hudson Street and stood in the crowd watching the Twin Towers Burn. Then I went down to a little coffee shop around the corner from my house and sat there with a cup of tea in numb nine. Eleven is what's called a flash bulb event. A big dramatic incident that series itself into our memories and as a whole sub specialty in psychology devoted to the study of flashbulbs memories. You ask someone where they were right after something dramatic or historic happened. Then you come back to them months or years later and ask them again and measure. How accurate their memories are? There have been countless studies like this over the years when was done after the death of Princess. Di another after the resignation of Margaret Thatcher the Challenger explosion the fall of the Berlin Wall the election of Barack Obama the O. J. Simpson verdict not surprisingly. There was one done after nine eleven as well so nine. Eleven happened and I got together with a former student of mine at Nyu. Ms. Phelps the nine eleven project was headed by Bill Hurst from the new school and Liz Phelps at New York University I went to see hearst and he told me that he and Phelps had come up with the idea over dinner on September twelfth in a restaurant close enough to the towers that you could smell the smoke her says that he and Phelps realize they could do the mother of all flash BULB STUDIES SO THE NEXT DAY. They reached out to colleagues around the country. Boston New Haven New York Washington. Dc Saint Louis Palo Alto and Santa Cruz. A total of three thousand two hundred forty six subjects asked the same questions. I just asked you. Where were you who you with? How did you feel the participants were asked the same questions? A year later and two years later and finally on the tenth anniversary of the attack. In twenty eleven. So what did the researchers find? Well I that everyone knows where they were when they heard the towers fell. Just like the indeedy. It's burned into memory but are those memories accurate. No not especially in the first year after flash BULB EVENT ALL kinds of discrepancies creep in one of the respondents. I said she was in the kitchen making breakfast. When she heard about the attack a year later she swore she was in the laundry room folding clothes another said in two thousand and one that she saw the attack while watching the today show a year later. She was convinced that a girl in her dorm at rushed into her room and told her so when we look at these kinds of inaccuracies and inconsistencies creep into how large is the variability among the subjects. That has to say. Do we have some will get everything? Wrong in retrospect and sound right. No I would say that. The variability is fairly small. Some people get everything right. Some people get more wrong. But it's it's not a huge variability hearst fines on average a sixty percent decline in memory consistency meaning. Sixty percent of the answers changed over time. You would think that everything about nine. Eleven would be seared into our minds. One of the most dramatic days of our generation but everything is not second even more crucial. Are we aware that memories of nine eleven are flawed? No word on our confidence in the accuracy of memories of that day is sky high. They're super high. And why walk me of a dumb question but it walked me through? Why are they so high? Her says nine eleven is like a death in the family. We feel we have a responsibility to remember if you had only vague memories of where you were when you found out your mother died. Well I would think like what? What kind of person are you? How could you not remember that? Our New Yorkers confidence levels higher. Forget everybody's confident level is so high so it's hard to differentiate. Yeah we're all absolutely sure about what happened to us on nine eleven. My Friend D can talk about that morning just as if it were yesterday and I will swear on a stack of bibles that she called me on the phone and then I ran downstairs and then eventually ended up sitting numb and alone in a coffee shop and yet it is almost certainly the case that we are wrong on at least half of those details did not happen that way. Her says the participants in flashbulbs studies refuse to accept this fact. They will not admit that their memories are wrong. Take the flashbulbs study done. After the explosion of the Challenger Space Shuttle in Nineteen Ninety six. The psychologist in charge sat down with people months later and showed them how differently. They describe things right after the disaster. He showed them what they actually wrote. He says it is it their handwriting and They say yes. But I don't know why I wrote that because it's wrong I agree. It's my handwriting. I agree I must've written that but I don't know why because I clearly remember I was in the dorm even though this piece of paper says in the cafeteria so this is overwhelming confidence. That people have now. Why are we so adamant on the subject of memory because we're memory fundamentalists? We think our memory is a camera recording our life in real time with the video. Time stamped and stored for later retrieval. It's not like memories. W- when you remember something. You're retrieving it. It remains absolutely stable. And then you put in the footlights of your consciousness. It's it's more that it when you retrieve. It is open to the possibility of change every time we retrieve a memory in other words. There's a chance it can get contaminated. We hear some new detail somewhere about the event and without it we just added in memory. Researchers talk a lot about what they call time slice errors. A couple of things happened in the same general timeframe and we get the sequence. All jumbled up did he says she and I talked in person that morning of nine eleven. I have no recollection of it. But she does. I'm almost positive. We spoke inside the apartment. Yeah and then I really said I was getting plane next day. Oh Yeah and you were like Kinda cocky about it to your lack. You kind of looked at me like Gordon stopping so neurotic like don't you know this is the safest time to get on. An airplane is when something like this happen could be really quick turns out. It's my favorite thing about you. I decided to do a little fact checking I still have my datebooks from two thousand and one. I'm pretty meticulous about keeping track by travel and I did not have an airplane trip planned for September. Twelve now maybe I'm mistaken maybe. Dvd's right but according to my records. I flew to Montreal on September nineteenth eight days later. I think our conversation about flights must have been right before that trip. Because why would I say it's the safest time to fly on the morning of nine eleven? That's something you would only say after the airport had reopened with much tighter security. I think did he made a time. Slicer at some point. She mistakenly moved that memory to the morning of nine eleven because it seems plausible that we would have talked about planes that morning. Now does that make video liar? Is she working some self promoting angle did? He is one of the most honest people I've ever met. She simply did what human beings do when it comes to traumatic events there is our memory and there is the truth and the two are not saying okay. So what if it's not nine eleven? What a couple years later at the very beginning of the Iraq war. What if I'm in a convoy of helicopters deep in enemy territory scared out of my wits? And the helicopter ahead of me gets hit. I'm reporter and I interviewed lots of people that day about what happened and we tell the story so many times that their details become my details and I start to think that it was my helicopter that God head would. I read your paper. The first person that came to mind Brian Williams yes. Yes isn't didn't need to commit an incredibly normal human. Yes that was my view and it was the view of most of the people in the memory field that I know of your of the mind that he genuinely believed story he told it. Yes now do you see Brian Williams predicament. Everyone thinks he's lying in order to paint himself as some heroic war correspondent. But he doesn't think he's lying. He honestly believes he was in the lead helicopter. With the same confidence we all have in our flashpoint memories. De Remembers Plain as day that I was catching a flight. On September. Twelve people in flashbulbs studies look at own handwriting from years earlier. And say that can't be right. That's not how I remember it and on Thursday. Nbc News announced that. Brian Williams a twenty two year veteran of this network would not be returning as the anchor of NBC nightly news. He steps down. When Brian Williams does his penance today show in mid two thousand thirteen he and Matt Lauer go around and around in circles. I told the story correctly for years before I told it incorrectly. I was trying to mislead people that to me is a huge difference here but Matt Lauer is having none of it. I worry as you say this Brian that people who are going to have listened to your apology on air and in other areas facebook and Stars and Stripes. Who heard you use? Words like conflicted aircraft or or made mistakes with my memory of certain things are now going to hear what you're saying now. And they're going to say he's still saying he didn't intend to mislead people and yet he didn't tell the truth and he had to know is the guy who lived through those experiences that it wasn't the truth he had to know as the guy who lived through those experiences that it wasn't the truth. No that's one hundred percent wrong. What should Matt Lauer have said he should have said? Brian Memory is fallible. You're a public figure for goodness sake the next time you go on national TV to tell a war story go back and check to see if your story is accurate but lower dozen say that the today show interview was billed. As tough-minded uncompromising journalism it was actually the opposite an interrogation about memory conducted by someone who hasn't the slightest clue how memories work. And what is Brian Williams? Supposed to do he is not fence. All he can do is to base himself from. I understand it. This came from clearly a bad place a bad urge inside me. This was clearly ego driven the desire to better my role in a story. I was already in. That's what I've been. Tearing apart and unpacking this comes from clearly a bad place once again wrong it comes from the most human of places and Matt Lauer Matt Lauer for Heaven's sake puts on the hi hat several days after you told the story on nightly news you went on the air and you apologized and I just said you you use terms like I'm mistaken. I was mistaken in my recollections. Did you give thought at the time to going on the air and saying I lied Matt Lauer by the way had an entire staff whose job it was to prepare him for interviews. This research on memory is not a secret bill. Hurst is at the new school on Fourteenth Street. And Fifth Avenue in Manhattan Hurst. Co Author Phelps is an Nyu down. The street from Rockefeller Center. Where the today show is taped. Two of the world's leading experts on memory are four subway stops away on the B or d trains on a nice day lower. Could've walked it. How hard is this not to put words in your mouth but had you gone on the air that night and say folks? I lied and I'm sorry. Do you think the outcome would have been? Do you think forgiveness would have come soon? Except he didn't lie lying in this instance would-be. Brian Williams pretending that deliberately made up that story. So Matt Lauer saying that he would rather Williams had lied and confessed that he'd lied rather than having told the truth that he honestly thought he was telling the truth. The Council of cardinals could not make sense of the more logic attack by the way. It's worth noting that the whole Brian. Williams saga is a case. Study in memory. Failure C. N. N.'s. Brian Stelter interviews Don Hellas. The pilot of the helicopter got shot down. He asked Hellas when he first heard Brian Williams mischaracterizing what happened and says oh a few weeks later when I got back to Kuwait meaning in two thousand and three this is this is crucial. Mr Because according to the time one that we've been looking at for the past several days it wasn't until about two thousand seven that Brian Williams began to embellish this story about being actually nearby or even on the chopper that was struck by the RPG. You're saying you heard it on television in two thousand and three saying I heard on the Internet that was an interview Avert Internet video of the television segment. Yeah Yes stelter is way too nice to say it? But Hell is can't be right. His recollection is off by four years. And does he realize how badly he's misremembered the dates. No He's adamant then. Another man comes forward the pilot of Williams helicopter and claims. They did take small arms fire. Goes ON CNN? Adds some gossipy details then a day later the pilot takes it all back quote. The information I gave you was true based on my memories but at this point. I'm questioning my memories which might be the first self aware thing said by anyone during this whole story fair booth in the Brian Williams case everyone was allowed to have a bad memory except Brian Williams. So hard on him but I think it is. He was treated very unfairly was I think absolutely I will. I'm waiting to see the formation of cognitive psychologists for Brian Williams as a lobby group. I was thinking of doing so so sorry for him. Thanks for doing this rose. Thank you for joining us around him. And thank you everybody for coming. Yes not long ago after the Harvey Weinstein Scandal broke. I went to a talk in Manhattan at the Ninety Second Street. Y It was a conversation between rose McGowan. Who was the first actress to go on the record with accusations against Weinstein and Ronan Farrow? Who wrote the definitive devastating account of the Weinstein Case for the New Yorker magazine? It was a fascinating and sometimes strange evening. Mcgowan speaks kind of elliptical. Poetry is not always obvious which he means. Farrow was a lawyer before he turned to journalism his rigorous. I asked me if you were in office. Who WOULD YOU BE? Would you be rose curtain? I would be the curtain. You're not the man. The curtain you are the court. I am the curtain. The cartons very pretty curtain gets used kicked aside. Nobody really notice occurred in their appreciative. That it's they're politicizing and done put. It absorbs everything from both sides from this side presentational. It looks so great to right. This is the curtain that you see from the back side. You see everything too but nobody knows the curtain curtains taking notes. Mcgowan is someone who requires an interpreter. There was one moment that really struck me when Pharaoh talked about what being an interpreter meant he was trying to get people at NBC where he worked at the time to take. Mcgowan's accusations seriously. I spent a year listening to a lot of powerful men. Call these women who were relating the worst experiences of lifetime crazy. Call THEM UNSTABLE. Call them on reliable narrators and a lot worse things that I won't repeat on this stage. That was something that was lobbed at your story countless times I sat and rooms and defended the fact that got on the record testimony from you matter and what you people like. Nbc A few minutes later. The two of them start talking about what it takes for a story like McGowan's to break through all the scepticism and indifference. I think when women come forward individually and they do a blog post or social media posts and tell their story. That's great. The question is it's then incumbent on reporters to do right by that and the best way to do justice I think to any person coming forward with difficult story is to interrogate it as thoroughly as possible and lend credence of course where it's do one of the battle-cries of the fight against sexual predation has been believed the women but notice. That's not what PHARISAIC saying he did. He says the best way to do justice to any person coming forward with a difficult story is to interrogated as thoroughly as possible and lend credence where it's do. Pharaoh didn't believe rose McGowan. Feral listened to rose McGowan. He took her seriously. That's what memory demands. What if rose McGowan had said that? She'd been assaulted by Weinstein in a hotel room in Paris and it turned out to have been in London and she said it had happened in March. That turned out to be July. Can you imagine her on the today? Show twisting and turning as she tries to defend that lapse in memory to Matt. Lauer you said you were in Paris. You're miles away in London. You had to know as the woman who lived through those experiences that it wasn't the truth but remembering yourself in one place when you are actually in another does not mean that you're lying. It just means that uncovering the truth requires an understanding of what memory can and cannot do. If we don't get the small cases right the Brian Williams cases we're going to be helpless at the big cases looking back it had to have been ego that made me think I had to be sharper. Funnier a quicker than anybody else. Put myself closer to the action. Having been at the action in the beginning please stop apologizing for a crime. You didn't commit free. Brian Williams took the senior producer. Is Meal Abell with Jacob Smith and Camille Baptist? Our editor is Julia Barton. Flawn Williams is our engineer. Fact checking by Beth Johnson original music but we skara special. Thanks to Andy bowers and Jake Place Berg I out mountain. So what's interesting is so. I'm sure you called me and your show you called me. But there's a one hundred percent positive I called you got I am too but there is a chance that you didn't call me. There isn't a chance because I know I called you. I know you call me too but I know it's incredibly hard to deal with but it's like there's a chance you didn't. I mean there's a chance you not to my door you know but I think thinking about. Did I really not going door because I respected your privacy as you respected mine and I would have never just want to knock on your door just in case you had like a lady up there or something so in respect for that. I would probably call. I just not even not even if like the twin towers are smoking on. I would've not walked upstairs to interrupt your your intimate moment with a lady friend. Even if the twin towers were on fire but please don't conclude that in your podcast third. It's Michael Lewis here. I'm back with against the rules last season. I talked about the attack on referees and the idea of fairness this season is all about the rise of coaches in American life. What are you doing? It wasn't that long ago that we only had coaches in sports lazy pieces and work for your pitcher. Kick your ass got it now. Coaches are everywhere. Shut up I'll give you positively. There are people who call themselves life coaches and other people who call themselves deaf coaches as a saying which is therapies. Tears and coaching is the path of laughter. You can hire a coach to improve your executive skills your online dating performance. And even your charisma. I am here to guide you in making sure you grow as a person but the rise of coaching is connected to unfairness. The riches best performing people in the world have the most coaching back. Guy would never have gotten to Yale but this guy who got all this coaching did get into Yale. It just seems like anyone who can answer. These questions has got to be coached. Who's coaching the Uber driver? Coaching just ends up making the rich richer. Yeah join me for season. Two of against the rules from Pushkin Industries. I might even get a little coaching myself. So Michael if Hugh had some. He wants to be coached on with that being. I'm not telling at least yet against the rules is back. May Fifth. 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MISSING: Brian Shaffer

Crime Junkie

47:33 min | 9 months ago

MISSING: Brian Shaffer

"This episode was made possible by boost mobile making the switch to boost. Gives you more a super reliable network for Free Samsung Galaxy phones and four lines. Thanks for just twenty five dollars per line per month with unlimited gigs. For data talk and text the limited time offer while supplies last offers and coverage not not available everywhere. Each free phone requires port in additional terms and conditions may apply visit boost mobile dot com or your nearest retailer for details high crime junkies. I'm your host Ashley Flowers and I'm and the story I want to tell you. Today is a creepy one and one that I've I've been obsessed with for years long before we had a podcast. This was one of those cases that I would put on my Google rotation along with more Murray and Bracelets Pizza I always wonder. has there been an update in the disappearance of Brian Schaefer In the spring of two thousand six a young woman named Alexis should be getting ready to enjoy a hard earned vacation. She's in her. Second Year of Medical School at Ohio State University studying to to be an obstetrician and the courses are tough but she is thriving under the challenge along with her long term boyfriend. Brian Schaefer who's in medical school with her. Now the both of them had planned this spring break trip to Miami but on the morning of April third two thousand six. This was a Monday morning. Alexis at the airport and she's anything anything but excited. She is anxious. She's scared getting panicky. She had spoke to Brian on Friday night but she hadn't been able to get a hold of him all weekend so she had stopped by his apartment multiple times throughout the weekend. Saturday Sunday each time finding nothing there. No Brian and she tried calling over and over all day Saturday all day Sunday but got no answer on his cellphone so that Monday. This was her last shot. Ah Hope that Brian was okay. Maybe he needed some time but he would not miss this flight. Alexis waits for Brian. All around her flights are taking off off landing. It would be their turn soon but Brian is nowhere in sight and listened. There are two types of people in the world those that want to roll up to the gate just in time for boarding and those Mike Me. Yeah and then the people like me who are there two hours ahead of time so I can have two glasses of wine and not feel rushed at all so even though he's not there right that second like again and she still holding out hope until a half hour before takeoff when the flight attendant at the gate is ready to begin the boarding process. And he's still not there ear and she's getting more and more nervous more and more anxious. Where is Brian? She keeps trying to call his phone over and over. Why isn't he answering? It's not like him to just drop out of touch and disappear by the final boarding call. Alexis is panicking because she knows something is terribly wrong. She keeps thinking back to the last time. She talked to him on Friday night just three days before he sounded completely fine. He told her he loved her. Nothing seemed wrong when the flight takes off and Brian is still not there. Alexis Calls Brian's Dad Randy and Randi goes right over to Brian's enes apartment to look for him and according to MEL magazine Randy fines. Everything just like it should be car outside. The apartment bed made all of his schoolbooks are in order. Everything at the apartment is normal. Except there's still no Brian right away. Randy calls the police to report. Brian Missing. Meanwhile Brian's brother other Derek gets involved to hoping against hope that this is all just some misunderstanding and according to the Columbus dispatch he even wonders for a second. Like this whole thing is a practical joke because Brian was last seen on April Fools Day. And there's no way a guy like Brian just disappear is not a guy who's six foot two hundred sixty five pounds handsome with like just enough of a cork to his features to make him like the best kind of memorable and he even had this Pearl Jam Tattoo on his right biceps and a distinctive flag on his is surely sorely. Someone has seen him okay. So the last time Alexis talked to him was Friday night right right like what were his plans for the rest of the weekend. Well that's that's something that the police and the family had to piece together Randy knows that he actually saw Bryan on Friday night the same day that Alexis talk to him but they start to realize as as they talk more and more to one another to other people that no one had seen him after the early morning hours of Saturday April first. And here's what they piece together on March thirty first. Brian has dinner with his dad. Randy at a steakhouse in Columbus. Then he goes to a popular bar near campus on High Street called Ugly Tuna Soluna Yuna to meet up with his old roommate. Clint now the ugly tuna caters to the Ohio state crowd and it's known for like cheap drinks loud music and like gently holiday fire. Yeah it's like he good place to hang out and I even saw pictures online and they have like this fish bowl drink that are in actual fish bulls like very comic. Yeah so Brian. When he goes does he leaves his dad he goes out? He invites his brother. Derek and Derek's girlfriend to come meet them but Derek and his girlfriend had been at a comedy show all evening and they're just ready to head home so they pass. It was Alexis with him at the saloon. No so actually. Alexis doesn't go out with Brian that night because she's not actually in town at all. She had gone back home to Toledo the Ohio to visit family. So around ten o'clock Brian actually calls Alexis just to like check in and they talk for a little while you know maybe about the British in whatever they part on good terms. They're excited for Monday. And then he goes back to having fun and again. She says he sounded totally fine. Totally normal after a few drinks. Ugly a tuna. Brian and Clint decide to leave. They do some shots at other bars in the area. They have a little bit of kind of like a pub crawl and according to six one four now dot com. Clint and Brian then meet up with another friend Meredith. Who drives them back to ugly tuneup? Now at some point at the ugly tuna they get separated. Like Clinton Merritt. They're still together but Brian get split off and you know like this happens at a bar. Sometimes you leave your friends to like step outside for a second you go to the bathroom. You grab another drink like it's no big deal. You come right back doc. When you're done right so except after they got separated? Brian doesn't come back eventually. Last call comes up the lights come on in the bar. Dr And Clinton Meredith are looking around for Brian because like they're ready to leave but they can't find they call his phone. Clint checks the men's room but Brian is totally. Mia Mia and the wait outside of the bar for a little bit. But when they realize he's nowhere to be seen Clinton Meredith figure you know he probably just decided to head home on his own like he lived within in walking distance of the ugly tuna so he could have left early. It'd been super easy for him. Like who knows. Maybe he didn't pressure them into leaving before they were ready. Maybe he got the MUNCHIES. Jesus wanted to go eat something like thousand things like. I had this friend in college who that was like her. She would just dis appear and a friend disappearing is worrisome to all as crime junkies and life role. If you came with friends leave with friends. Yes but they don't worry too much at the time and they decide to make their own way home now. They worried when they left the bar and they're still not worried necessarily the next morning when he doesn't pick up their phone calls for a lot of people like the general thought was like you know. Maybe you don't use out drinking all night. The shots everywhere. There's a good chance he's hung over. Maybe he's just sleeping it off like been there done that Yeah morning after after are rough and there are definitely times where you just don't even want to get out of bed. Yeah I mean I had a more than I'd like to admit those in college so I get it even though again us crime junkies to look back in hindsight and like scream. I think it was totally normal for no one to be like sounding the alarm bells right away. That like Saturday Saturday morning Brian was smart. He was responsible guy like no one ever thinks something bad could happen to them or someone that they know but Brian wasn't just sleeping. Keeping it off. Everyone realizes that when they come together and realize that no one had talked Bryan during the day Saturday or Sunday and now that he hasn't shown up for his is trip. They were sure something serious was going on. You See. The trip was extra special not just because Brian needed a break or because he was planning to propose to Alexis this on the trip the trip had way more significant meaning that the trip was a gift from Brian's mom renee the whole family family was super close but Brian was extra tight with his mom. Renee she was a nurse and his whole inspiration for studying. Medicine came from her three weeks before he was supposed to leave for for his trip. His mother actually passed away she had been sick for a while. Battling a rare form of blood cancer so brian skipping out on the trip didn't seem right. It didn't seem like something that he would do but now the Schaefer family are in this devastating position. Having just lost Rene and now just literally a couple of weeks later. Brian is missing after a night out drinking with friends leaving his dad randy and his brother. Derek and Alexis frantically searching for some insight insight about where he is now. Police did say that. Since Brian had been drinking all night he was more vulnerable to getting mugged or for something like sinister having having happened to him now he was six to remember and it's clear from photos on his my space page around the Internet that he kept himself in good shape like sober. He'd be a risky target for a perspective. Active thief but drunk. He might be a little easier to take advantage of now. Brian's girlfriend Alexis stays at his apartment for days on end. Desperate desperate for that front door to open and Brian to walk back into their lives. She takes to social media. Begging Brian's mice base friends to please spread the word and keep Brian in their prayers. These messages are heartbreaking. And there's one from April third. The day he missed the flight that says quote. I love you so much and I you just want you to come home and quote. Police check local hospitals and homeless shelters. But there's no sign of Brian and no one that matches his description. Local media media picks up the story a tip line is set up. Police and volunteers Plaster Missing Person Posters on telephone poles all over Columbus but Brian isn't found and no one is coming forward with any helpful information. So the police decide to go back to the ugly tuna Selena to retrace O'Brien's steps they pull the video surveillance from that night and there. He is on camera and here is where everything gets so strange. And you'll see why I've never been able to stop thinking about this case. Security footage shows Brian going into the ugly tuna at one fifteen in the morning of April. First now Brian can be seen being outside on the escalator that leads up to the bar and he standing in front with two people behind him who six four now says is meredith and Clint. There's nothing weird about this footage. He looks like he's having a good time. Everyone's happy he doesn't seem like overly intoxicated like he can still walk and function normally Ben then when he gets to the top of the escalator he walks out of frame and heads inside the ugly tuna with Clinton Meredith behind him now. According to dateline there were a couple full of girls inside. That Clinton married at new and Brian starts talking to them now. Police know from talking to everyone. That Clinton Meredith at some point got separated from Brian. Dan and they couldn't find him and they assume that he left on his own. So they start going through the other security tapes fast forwarding to see. When Brian comes out you know trying to like nail down exactly actually what time he left maybe which direction stuff like that? Exactly exactly like where did he go. The bottom of the escalator so they spot him again on the tape at one fifty. I five in the morning and you can just barely see him in the corner of the frame but he's hanging out at the top end of the escalator like right outside the entrance of the bar and he's talking to two girls calls after a minute or two goes by. He walks off camera again back inside the bar so the police fast forward again like again looking for the time when he comes out he leagues but the thing is they never see him on security footage again. Wait what's yeah and I'm sure they rewound a couple of times games. Played it back slower but no matter how many times they watched the tape. Brian never was seen on it again. Coming out of the ugly tuna okay but like that can't be the only exit right like yes. It's like the one that the public uses or the one that everyone usually uses but they have to have like an emergency urgency exit or like a delivery door somewhere in the back. Like come on. Yeah so so yes you're right. There is another exit. The ugly tuna tuna has one other door out back. But there's a freight elevator and it leads to a really messy construction site like heavily really under- construction site. That would be super hard to navigate. Even if Brian hadn't been drinking but like again like add alcohol to all of this dark out and it would would it make sense like yeah he would have had to go out there again. If you're so wasted that you don't even know where you are you're not functioning properly like you go out there and you get stuck out there right but like again again. No one found him in this construction site and there was no camera on that door but a lot of other places around that area had cameras. That would pick up the door so they pull video from all these places to see A. Brian made the strange decision to exit that way and again. Brian isn't on any of the other. Cameras footage now. This gets even crazier when you factor in. Just how much surveillance is in Columbus now. I didn't know this before. I was researching but according learning to this mel magazine article that I read Columbus quote has more Closed Circuit Television Than Cleveland Cincinnati and Toledo combined buying. WHOA that's like a lot of surveillance right? So which means like. If Brian left in any way thing would have seen it. I don't know how you would have been able able to leave and avoid all of those. TV's now even though they are able to stop Brian. On any of the video footage they are able to use all of this video footage and comb through it to find out exactly who was at the bar that night and Fox eight Cleveland and other sources report that every single person who entered the bar that night was accounted for and seen leaving except for Brian. And it's it's literally like he vanished into thin air somewhere inside that bar. I mean yeah but like unless we're going to stop this and make this show about aliens. That just doesn't happen. No either he left or someone did something. Those are really the only two options. Right right I mean I think the how physical however this could have a spinning in circles all day. How can you be seen going into a place and never seen leaving right when everyone else is accounted for coming in and out like how so instead of how? Maybe let's talk about. why Y so like you said I feel like we have to real options here either? Brian left on his own or someone did something to him right. An early on and you still see people speculating about this today. People thought that maybe Brian did walk away on his own because he was so overcome with grief from the loss of his mother. I mean I guess that's not out of the question. Like how many times have we seen like what grief can do to a person. You can be one hundred percent. Okay one minute and then just devastate the Zack's like there's nothing about the grieving process. That's rational and people do things that they just wouldn't normally do. Aren't them them. You know and right running away and starting a new life. I don't think is like crazy to consider no. It's it's totally true so I'll admit admit up front like in all of the past years that I've been obsessed with this case. I never really gave that possibility a ton of consideration because personally I just didn't understand it but I've also never lost a parent. I think it's really hard to put yourself in someone else's shoes but as I was putting together this episode I was talking to a friend about the case and she opened up to me about the loss of her dad and she said you know. As soon as he died I ran. I went overseas for three weeks. I didn't go to his funeral. It was the only way that she could cope. And and there's something about hearing it from her like all of a sudden I got it like medical school was stressful enough without having seriously ill family member and remember. Brian's Mama was in bad shape before she passed away. It didn't just happen overnight. On top of that. She was his inspiration for going to medical school in the first place. Yeah and I mean watching a loved one go through cancer. Treatment is a grieving process. All on its own and I don't think it's something that I can even fully grass or explain to you well like I don't think thing anyone could unless you've had to live through it but my friend. She helped describe it this way she. It's hell and it's hard. Because when the cancer is terminal there death just this kind of slows down so every moment with them is precious but also every moment is just agony as well right and even though Brian was a medical student an understood intellectually what his mom was going through. That didn't make it an easier for him. So he's they're still the emotional component for sure. He's caught between this turmoil of wishing her suffering would end without wanting her to die. So what if in the middle of all this stress and pain. Brian decided to completely walk away. And just start over verse somewhere like it becomes a little more possible in my mind. Well especially if you consider the fact that this trip was a gift from her like yes trip could be an emotional trigger for him. That's really true idea until that moment. Yeah until it's coming up like oh my gosh. I'm going to have to leave. This is right. It's too much now. Everyone in his life knew how hard rain as death was on him. But despite all of that and you know they're considering all the same things we are here. They're convinced there's no way Brian would would up and run away from his life. No matter how upset he was because of rain as laws Bryan Randy and Derek had all grown even closer and they all said lead. Brian was expressing excitement about the future. His proposal his trip and he was just determined to make his mom proud and beyond that when I kept talking to my friend about how she dealt with her grief. I said. Here's the thing I don't get like you came back. You wanted to see her mother again like I get him running and that part does make sense sense to me but what does it make sense is that you would never come back to your girlfriend who you're planning on making your wife. You never come back to your brother to your dad like that. Part doesn't quite works for me especially because they seem like such a close family like like you said your friend came back like you would think that if he did decide to step away from his life or whatever for time he would want to reconnect and want to be there for his family like they've been there for each other all along right and plus let's just go back to the how if he wanted to leave and start over a he could have done it at any time. Like go missing from your apartment wide a mystery of like you being seen coming into to a bar and never coming out. Yeah and again even be if that was your plan like I want to be seen going into this bar and then just disappear. I still don't get how like he would have needed. One crazy kind of disguise to leave the ugly tuna and totally avoid being spotted by all those cameras and everyone everyone around him and what I've never seen mentioned is again. Police accounted for everyone walking in everyone walking out. I've never seen it mentioned anywhere that like. Oh there's this person then who walks out that we never saw walking in so even a disguise doesn't really make everyone's walking out was accounted for walking in. Yes so I think we. If this was the plan I think whatever ever he would have had to done would have been really hard and then again factor in that he had been taking shots and drinking all night long. It just seems less plausible so so another possibility police. And the searchers have to consider is that maybe Brian had been the victim of a terrible accident may be Brian Dot hurt somewhere or maybe he fell into the Olatunji river by his apartment so they bring in cadaver dogs to the Osu campus but the dogs don't pick up any scent. Columbus monthly reported that the city even searched the sewer lines and found nothing. Okay but what about his friends did any of them see anything like weird or out of the ordinary ordinary the bar before they lost track of him. Nothing that's been officially reported. So here's the thing police. Do Talk to both Clinton Merit Pretty early on in the investigation mirrored. It doesn't know anything about what happened to Brian. And when they ask her to take a polygraph she agrees and she passes. Clint however is more more of a mystery. This episode was made possible by boost mobile switching to boost. Mobile gives you more so they're surprising. Surprising people with more at every single turn because boost doesn't just offer one great thing it offers many like they're super reliable super fast network but beyond that. There's still more you also get four free Samsung Galaxy phones for the whole family when you switch to boost. But they're still more you you four lines for twenty five dollars per line per month with unlimited gigs for data. Talk and text you if anyone is still living with gigabyte limitations in the world of streaming. I'm going to have to ask you to please step out of two thousand ten and into present day we are streaming everything all the time. Life Without Unlimited. Gigs on a high-speed reliable network is a realistic one anymore boost. Mobile they are the switch. That gives you more. This is a limited time offer while supplies last offer coverage not available everywhere. Each free phone requires port in additional terms and conditions. APPLY VISIT BOOST MOBILE DOT COM or your nearest retailer for details. All right now back to our show. Clint refuses uses to take the polygraph. Then he gets a lawyer and according to the lineup. Clint through his lawyer expressed that he had nothing to hide eight and felt that he already told the investigators everything he could. Which yes we talk all the time about knowing your rights and understanding how you interact with police and not taking polygraphs yet like again? Clint's doing all the things I would do. But it instantly makes people suspicious especially Brian's brother Derek. He told MEL magazine quote quote. I didn't know clint very well but I always thought something was off with him the way he talked about my brother after he went missing kind of a negative way. Hey I wouldn't expect that from someone who's friend vanished. It Clinton knew something I hope he would have shared it. I deserve to know and quote but the friends like Clinton Brian our friends runs. I mean you'd want to help your family in a situation like this which is like literally a worst case scenario situation like even if which is to help them get closure. This kinda reminds me of the live. Show that we do like. There's an abortion where someone related to the victim might have information and they just like they. They learned the same thing they shut down. They get a lawyer. The guy like moves and everyone is saying like I get protecting yourself but at some point like if your family the only member your friend is like missing. The most important thing isn't like if you get in trouble or something happening to you it's like let's find the missing person right but the more I found around. I guess things really weren't the best between Clint and Brian. Though investigation discovery special that I saw they did like a piece on this case back in July of this year and they spoke to Sergeant John Hurst of the Columbus PD who was the lead investigator on. Bryant's case and he said that at some point they had found out that clint and Bryan had gotten into a verbal argument at the bar which I had never heard before and this only makes Derek and Alexis more suspicious. That Clinton knows more than he's owning up to. Now there's another theory that makes Clinton look like he's involved but but with a twist people say if Brian Really did have this premeditated plan to run away he probably would have needed help so some are saying okay. He's this old friend an old roommate's maybe he helped him leave and disappear when that's why he's being so cagey right. So maybe he is protecting his friend but like in his own weird way. That's making him look guilty. But that's just one of the theories and there isn't anything to link Clint O'Brien's disappearance so investigators have to just keep looking. They talked to the two women who were chatting with Brian. Outside of that bar on the video at one fifty five and neither of them had any any real insight either so they're crossed off the list pretty fast now as you can imagine between losing his wife and his eldest son in the span of three three weeks. Randy Schaffer is devastated. So much trauma in such a short time makes him desperate so he consults psychics while the police are searching in for clues about where Brian might be a Columbus monthly article from two thousand nine told this heartbreaking story about how one psychic told Randy that Brian Ryan's body was quote submerged in water held down by the whirlpool that form at the base of concrete bridge posts and quote. Now since Brian lived so close to the Olatunji less than a mile away randy goes out buys waiters and just starts canvassing the river with Derek and they do this for miles looking into all the world pools for any signs. A Brian Until Randy trips falls in the water and almost drowned in the same place that he searching for his missing son. Oh my God I know. There's something about that story that just really got to me now. Randi and Derek. Eric and Alexis keep searching and keep hoping and keep praying Alexis calls. Brian's phone every day for months and and it always goes right to voicemail but one day about six months after he disappears his phone rings now when the phone rings. Brian doesn't pick up the phone. But just the phone ringing itself with something. Alexis hadn't heard it in half a year when she called his phone so she notifies the police and they reach out to the phone company. 'cause if there's a ring there's a Ping Right. I like that slogan again. But yes if there's a there's a ping so they reach out to the phone company and find that the phone pinged off of a tower outside of Columbus. The problem is as like no one can really like pin this down and the best anyone can say is his service providers says. It's it's possible that this was just some kind of computer `puter glitch and there's really nothing to indicate that Brian had actually turned his phone back on and there's been no activity on his phone since the night he went missing. Not only has his phone not happen US but his bank account is credit cards. All of that stuff is totally untouched. If Brian still alive he's not accessing his finances at all in all all he had with him when he went missing from the ugly tuna. We're like normal things you take with you. If you're planning to come back home like keys wallet shoes but none of that stuff has ever been located either either with no new leads and every tip turning out to be either a vicious hoax or a dead end. Gradually the case goes cold by two thousand was an eight. There haven't been any new leads in years and the tip line has turned into a place for the worst kind of humans to have fun like these quote unquote tips. Hips aren't even attempting to be credible. I read some of them in Mel magazine. And they're just people being racist and obscene for the sake of being gross. It's awful. It was total abuse. The tip line now as if the Schaefer family hasn't had enough tragedy. Randy is killed in a freak accident on September or fourteenth of two thousand eight when a tree branch falls and hits him during a windstorm before he died randy was involved in the central Ohio crime mm stoppers and he even worked to get. Legislation passed in Ohio that set up a statewide protocol for handling missing adults cases. He had never given up hope that Brian would come home. And now Derek. This is just another shock to his system. His whole immediate family is now gone in less than three years. Here's God once again. The Schafer's friends and family gathered to mourn they pay tribute at his funeral and online. And this is where things get even weirder. The Columbus dispatch publishes. Randy's obituary on their website where people can leave condolences and a mysterious post shows up in the comments and it says quote. Dad I love you love Brian and quote and in parentheses it finishes with US Virgin Islands and everyone is like taken aback. Like could this be real. Is this proof that Bryant's aliens alive and has somehow snuck out of the ugly tuna to start a new life like away from all the suffering away from his home as an American citizen. He wouldn't need a passport to get into the Virgin Orlands either like and he had his wallet with him so presumably he had a photo. Id which was never recovered. So if Bryan had truly wanted to disappear and start over it would be an easy place to go now. According to the lantern the Ohio State University Student newspaper. Police subpoena the website records to find out where this originated hoping that. Maybe just maybe this is going to offer some genuine insight into Brian's disappearance but of course it does not. Oh aw on October. Seventh two thousand eight. This is about three weeks after the message appears police announced that the post was made on a public computer in Franklin County Ohio which houses both the city of Columbus and Ohio State University. And we find out that basically this post is just yet another hoax. and Brian's case stays cold in the years right after Brian Disappearance. The Internet kind of goes bananas for this case. There are so many conspiracy theories he is but what could have happened to him. One of them though is that Brian was murdered. Not by a friend or someone he knew but by elusive Predator known in any online community as the Smiley face killer. Now we have gotten so many requests to talk about the Smiley face killer and we might someday but that's a whole nother can of worms but we're not opening just quite yet. It's not even been proven that it's like a real one person doing it exactly so for anyone who doesn't know the Smiley highly faced killer. Theory was developed by a pair of retired NYPD detectives and a criminal justice professor in Minnesota and basically they think that a series of drownings in the Midwest over the nineteen nineties and two thousands weren't accidents rather they were the actions of a serial killer targeting intoxicated college age each man dumping their bodies in rivers and then spray painting a signature Smiley face near where the bodies were left and this idea that Brian's disappearance was somehow how connected to the Smiley face killer really picked up a lot of steam in two thousand sixteen when another young man went missing from that same area where Brian Banished and and the parallels are eerie. This kid's name was Joey Labute. He's twenty six years old were. Brian was twenty seven. They were both tall with dark hair. They were both drinking at bars on high high street near campus in the springtime and actually they were just a mile apart now in both cases their friends lost track them and then they're each last seen on surveillance footage from the bars. Joey loved ones. Were just as heartsick and terrified as Brian as they waited for information but three weeks later his body he was found in the Saito River. But here's the catch. His body was found in the river but joey didn't drown. There was no water modern his lungs so he was dead before his body was placed in the river. Oh my God. There was no sign of trauma. No obvious cause of death like no sign of suicide side. Nothing weird on the toxicology reports. Just another enduring mystery and plenty to speculate on this smiley face. Killer theory got so much attention that the F. B. I.. Even looked into it for several years and they put out a statement in two thousand eight saying quote we have not developed any the evidence to support links between these tragic deaths or any evidence. Substantiating the theory that these deaths are the work of a serial killer or killers and quote aside I from law enforcement agencies like the FBI. Saying this isn't a credible theory. Even if Brian was a smiley face killer victim. There's no way to tell without his body or proof proof that he's dead right now. No Smiley faces. Were found along the river where police and families searched for him. And even if there had been like it's a really common common thing that anyone with a camp spray paint can just put up on a wall right. It's not like a unique tag or anything right but again you will see this theory all over the Internet now shortly. After Randy's death another tip comes in Columbus monthly recalls the story of this like more credible tip that puts Brian's body in a field near a freeway just outside of the city so a team of human officers and Canine sniffer dogs head out there but the field is empty. And they're at square one yet yet. Again there's no new trace of Brian just that same grainy image on the tape. That's been rewound again and again and again all with the enduring. Hope that maybe this time something. New will emerge this episode so it was made possible by oncoming goods uncommon. Goods is on a mission to help you discover your new favorite thing and you guys. They are so good at it. They surprised me and Brett was gets in the mail and we were blown away at. How Much Bay nailed us? It's almost like they've been listening to her show for a while or something. I swear I was like checking my house for listening devices connected to their headquarters because I was just telling Brett how me and my husband's new favorite thing lately has been eating shirt chewed reports reports that we make imbed and you can stop judging me. It's wonderful but what do I get an email but this amazing would shirt Choudhury serving said that expand and collapses lapses and has little utensils that come in and out of it. It's something I never knew I needed but now I can't imagine eating cheese and bread without it. If you're searching for something truly unique weeks holiday season you have to check out uncommon goods. They have freaking everything you could imagine for every type of person in your life and their unique gifts. You won't find anywhere else. Uncommon goods wants to help you discover your new favorite thing. They're offering our listeners. Exclusive deal on your first purchase. Just go the uncommon goods dot com slash crime junkie to receive five dollars off your first purchase. That's uncommon goods dot com slash crime junkie to receive five five dollars off your first purchase. All right now back to the show. I read a quote from sergeant hearst. I in Columbus monthly that I think really sums up the difficulty of cases like this. He described the investigation as quote looking for a deceased person. And and for someone who's still amongst the living at the same time and quote. Brian's brother Derek still blames himself for not going out to meet Brian at night. He van she keeps thinking like what if him being there changed. Just one little thing about that whole night like the butterfly effect. What of him being there changed? All of it and completely changed. Circumstances is and everything would've gone differently and even now dirk asked himself the hardest question of all if he'd gone to ugly tuna that night. Would Brian still be with them today. Now Derek eventually married the woman that he was out with that night and while Derek remains haunted by Brian's disappearance he's moved on with his life as best he can and Alexis has to when the Columbus dispatch visited her in two thousand sixteen ten years. After Brian disappeared. They reported that she'd finished medical school. She became an Obgyn Gyn who practices in her hometown Toledo. She's married with two young kids and she's not the same person who was posting loving messages on Brian's my space page but she's she's candid about that part of her pass and how it altered her life she told the dispatch quote. I put his things in the back of my closet and I just needed that. Chapter of my life to be over there were a lot of tears and it was sad but it was time to move forward and quote as for the ugly Tuna Soluna it closed in two thousand eighteen. Whatever clues the interior may still have held about? Brian's fate or completely gone now. I mentioned earlier in the show that Brian had a tattoo of his favourite band Pearl Jam. Brian's Tributo is of Dick man which is basically become like iconic as the cover art on the band's alive single and and Eddie vedder. The band's lead singer even dedicated one of their songs. Come back to him. When Pearl Jam performed in Columbus in two thousand and ten? Yeah which if Brian knew about this attribute it probably would have delighted him and maybe just maybe someday he'll be able to find out about it or may already know if you have any information regarding the disappearance of Brian Schaefer. Please contact the Central Ohio crime stoppers at six one. Four four four six one eight four seven seven or go to stop crime dot org to submit a tip online again and if you have any information about the disappearance of Brian Schaefer go to the Central Ohio Crime Stoppers at Stop Crime Dot Org. If you WanNa see any pictures or our sources for this episode you can find those on our website Cranky podcast dot com and be sure to follow us on Instagram at crime donkey. PODCAST and we'll be back next week with a brand new episode Crime Junkie is an audio chuck. Chuck production so what do you think. Chuck debrief Okay so prophet of the month right. Let's do it okay. So this one is a little bit unconventional and I want to highlight it Specifically because like a lot of families get puppies for Christmas and what's so true and so many people don't keep dogs past exactly. It's like I'm all for getting dogs for Christmas. I got one for my birthday once and I still have him niles but a lot of people get puppies. He's from puppy. Mills and not great places and adult dogs are everywhere and they are in every shelter completely inundating leading their their shelter. And I really want to highlight. Some dogs are being foster right now. That are looking for their forever homes. All let's do it. Yeah okay so our listener. Jason emailed me and told me about three dogs. They're currently fostering which three dollars. This is even better. So it's all you just found them. They came from one of our crime junkie. Ladies and it's a crime listener. They have these dogs. They're fostering they are willing to travel across state lines from where they are to to get these dogs their forever homes and I just. I'm so obsessed. So Jason and his wife has started posturing dogs and they are in Houston Texas S.. Which Ashley if you know this? But supposedly according to said Houston is like the street Dr Turley Itchy and like taking the paddock noise. You can hear it is appropriate month. I mean I don't know so Jason and wife have been fostering profit eh. So they've been finding in their hometown of Houston and actually. I don't know if you know Houston is evidently the stray dog capital of the US. Oh really I actually didn't know that at all neither did I. And there's like thousands of straight Austin surrounding the Houston area and so every time his wife life kind of stumbled across when she brings it home with like same. Yeah I mean like I cannot cross paths with the homeless gay but not and right exactly I I just have like a million cannot move to Houston. And when they emailed me they had three foster. Dogs Scarlet Bruce and Ivy and he's only pictures of them and they're all just these beautiful sweet loving pit bull puppies I say puppies. That's very universal range of ages. But they're all puppies to my heart and by the time that I emailed him and it was like we want to feature these puppets. Tell me all the things more he was like so we've already gotten them adopted. That's great news. It's it's such amazing news and I was like that's that's great like I have no problem with that like thank you. I'm glad you emailed us like whatever. And he's Acer. Yeah like this is a great. This is a great ending to my email. I would love. I would love for more emails and like this and then he was like but also we found two more more. Tell me about these two more so they just found them like this past week so they don't know a ton about them but they attached pictures and information on Barton and Gomorrah and bark is definitely pretty young. He has like the whole puppy energy going on. He is super friendly and loving there. is some skin damage around his his legs and the again like. He's a stray. They have no idea what he has lived through very very young life and Gomorrah is super super laid back and only wants attention and she's super super sweet and doesn't seem to have a violent bone in her body and the only reason I say that is court. She does say because she is a people. A lot of people have negative connotations awards critical like violent breeds. Which I had is such a bummer? Now I have two pit bull crosses and ash are my dogs cutler. The sweetest does little to sit on your lap. And they only went love. And so- Bruce and Gomorrah are going to be on our page along with Jason's information on how to reach out to them and figure out how to adopt them. I'm super excited again. Like they will drive to you. They'll they'll come to you you guys and it's the holiday season if your kids or your family wants a dog this season like please consider not getting a puppy mill and or even for from rescue. Because they're so they go so quickly considered adult dog. They're potty trained. Yeah they've already. Trained completely can be trained on leashes. Yeah I think that's it's great for the holiday season this year. You guys. Yes if you're going to get a dog for your family. Considerate talked a little bit older. I mean like you know I have a soft spot for full on senior dogs but even understood dog. That's like a year or two years. It's so much harder for them to really is and it's such a great need in our country. Eight to adopt older dogs so considerate. It's just an option and everyone would love you for it and before we sign off completely. I I have like a little mini story to tell you here and it's kind of like a mystery dog. He's only a dog that I've heard about. Okay listen to this so I was having dinner a couple of weeks ago with the old director of crime stoppers who. I'm still good friends with and he has this new job and works with some listener in Texas. If this is you you please reach out. He works one of our fans in Texas and he said that they have this like shelter or rescue or something and they had this dog. Who's WHO's been there a long time again one of these dogs? WHO's a few years old? Nobody wants to adopt because they all want the puppies and the dog is kind of anxious. I wouldn't really like calm down. Not Not that he's like violent or mean or hyperactive. With just like just a what. Yeah just anxious and so they tried all these things. They tried playing music. They tried like the puppy. BTV like all of the things and nothing worked to get this Dr Calm Down until they started playing crime for this dog knows and they said what I hear they said through the chain of people is that when they started playing crime junkie as soon as this dog doc heard my voice just like totally calm down totally soothe. I'm about to cry. No so if this listener is listening we need to WHO this dog is because this seems like the perfect companion for any crime junkie like listened feature him as a prophet the Mariah and get him a home with a crime. John Yeah so call out to whoever that listeners. I WanNa find this dog so this dog can find their new crime junkie home. Make sure to go to our website day to see the dogs that Brit featured and we'll be back next month with a new profit of the month by guys bye.

A. Brian Derek Brian Schaefer Columbus Bryan Randy Alexis Dr And Clinton Meredith Brian Missing Clint O'Brien Medical School Columbus dispatch Ohio Samsung Mel magazine Brian Disappearance Brian Really Brian Dot Toledo Clinton Meredith Ohio State University
Happy Daily 407  Caviar Dreams

Happy Day in Wilkes!

01:16 min | 1 d ago

Happy Daily 407 Caviar Dreams

"Hey y'all this is Brian and you're listening to the happy daily people. You'll never guess what happened to me I've been living in Mooresville. So long that I've been getting all fancy like with my speech I've got me a big corporate job and I'm running board rooms and eating caviar with bigwig executives. It's so awesome that I'm buying the fancy new car and a swimming pool in a fancy new double wide. I'm just kidding y'all. This is just plain old Brian. Doing what I do best, and that's the happy daily. Wait I can tell you realize something has changed. I didn't want to have to tell you but I had a horrible goose control accident and a goose damaged my voice box I don't know that it'll never fully heal. It's going to make recording my Christmas album this year so hard and my little girl wants to sing jingle bells with her daddy so badly. Insert crying here. People I love you and I appreciate everything that you do. Please pray for me. Please pray the goose inflicted damage from my body. Please lift up this goose affliction in your prayers and let the light of love shine down on my gnarly scarred up neck and man bits. I love. You My youngins love you and I. Hope You have a happy. Day.

Brian Mooresville
Brian Story

Men Who Matter

26:57 min | 1 year ago

Brian Story

"We're back everybody so excited to be here today for another episode of the Group Wild Men who matter podcast and let me tell you what we have a special guests with us today. There's a guy met a couple of years ago and he didn't know me from Adam but for whatever reason I thought he was really cool cat and always made me laugh so but before we get into that of course a half to introduce my man Brando Broach e the man who makes us all happen what up be good to be here. Steve excited for today and get to talk to our special guests but <hes> <hes>. Let's get right to it yeah man so <hes> I met Brian Robertson a couple years ago at a classic and for whatever reason I felt like I needed to get done in a three point stance and and <hes> square off within in which if you don't know Brian played eleven years in the N._F._l.. And he is a monster of a man <hes> and I'm a big guy but I ain't as big as him but for whatever reason I squared up with him and I looked like a fool but Brian uh thanks for joining us man what is up no problem and man just enjoying life you know retired now enjoying life being with my family in getting a lot of fishing in that's that's really about it right now. Hitting a lot of fishing and Yeah Brian Ryan played eleven years in the N._F._l.. And even even more crazy he played eleven years for one team. The Minnesota Vikings and last time I checked Minnesota wasn't bad fish and spot. You know it's okay I mean we. We don't like the a tutorial too much like to keep the you know the what do you call them. The guys that jump over you know state lines. We don't like stay over there Fisher lakes now it is it's tremendous fishing up there you oh you gotta short season yeah in that amount of time I mean you can get a lot of fish absolutely if you guys don't know Minnesota the season whether it's because of frozen water just the actual bass season up. There's pretty short and bronze originally from Texas which is the opposite end of the spectrum of really fishing year round growing season year round. He comes from a really pretty amazing state deficient and Brian before we jump into kind of what we really want pill back today is let's talk a little bit about like where that fishing came from so <hes> for for those you know Brian are kind of following Brian on his social media right. Now you know bronze retire but Brian is is pursuing and <hes> competitive fishing. He's he's fishing tournaments and very much in love with the industry and the sport but where did that come from where where I mean N._F._l.. Football player fully committed now chasing fishing. We're we're what happened there. Yeah you know I got. I got taught fishing from a young age my dad I think as early as I remember three years old you know bring me out to the pond and catch him fish and things like that. We had a creek at the bottom of our road so I'd go fish that every day after school and so you know I had fishing in my blood from an early age but for me when it really took off was about five years ago I made the decision to go out and by my first bass boat and I went out and bought it a fished out of it for for a year kind of going to some lakes and stuff that I'd never been to I mean I'd never fish like like that. Out of a boat never really got out on lakes like that. Fishing on a boat it started out as an escape from football you you know something to get away and and just kind of relaxed my mind and I found myself not missing that competitive part but being on the water and that competitive part creeping back into me and it was I see a guy it you know up the cove there. He catches a fish will now. I'm like okay. I'm more catch two of them you know and then it became then I started learn. It's not about competing against the guys about competing against the fish and you know so all that stuff I've learned over the years has has kind of become a part of it and to me. That's that's where all that passion is. Come from absolutely not and I share a very similar kind of point of view on that you know I I was fortunate to play college. Football all's well but at a a a division one AA school but I remember thinking about that transition in that that competitive nature that I had that I really didn't even know a hat. 'cause you know if you think about it. You Know College Sports Professional Sports. You really get in this. This is this groove of this mode of of of it's just it's who you are. How you live you don't really think about all of the process and all the competition that you're you're really constantly in competition and then it starts to dwindle away or fade away really come to an end <hes> what's going on one? I feel one. I feel funny. Why was one I feel so weird and you realize and I love competing? I need I need to compete and and I I quickly to jumped into the the tournament world <hes> after after my career came to a screeching hall so but Broncos Divan man because because when I met you and as I kind of got to know you and and and you know we'd get to <hes> hang out in a at shows and stuff and just through striking's relationship that we both have and <hes> I began to think about this this idea of man he he is Whoa then ten now eleven years into the N._F._l.. which is crazy 'cause that's extraordinarily over the the average career stint in N._F._l.? And then even more so the fact that you've spent all eleven years at the Minnesota Vikings and so <hes> we talk about a lot or here group wild this idea that we have talents we have gift ings. We have things things that were really good at but talents never enough and so you're a great football player at Texas and a great football player in the N._F._l.. At the Vikings but what really I'm trying to get. My head around a fluffy to pull it back as we we know and we see over and over and lives at talents never enough and that there's things that you've got to bring around your town to ever be truly successful and if you will man I just I would love to hear your perspective of maybe what that was. What did you bring around your town man? You could have been a phenomenal athlete and really a beast of an athlete your whole life but you know as well as I do your talent. There's no way your town was ever enough to get you to where you got. And what do you feel like. What do you feel like that thing was or those things were that you brought around your talent that helped you not only succeed in football but but really kinda stand out in the idea of the longevity of your career end the fact that no team other than maybe a quarterback keeps people that long what helped me is okay? Let's let's start this way. Every guy in the N._F._L.'s talented every Oregon Major League baseball is talented when you go through these professional sports N._H._l.. Soccer doesn't matter what the sport is. Everybody's talent the guys that stay around the guys that lasts long the guys that have prolonged along careers the guys that stay one team they find a way to do something extra to give them an edge over everybody off and for me those things were you're a failures in the past the my work ethic and then see which I definitely hit on as well is being more mentally prepared in proponent and you know I the thing I see what professional sports that's different from other things like in our people. Don't get me about this but let's say an artist right. If you're talented as an artist you can you can run with that talent forever. Yeah I mean very few people are talented enough to truly be artist what I'm saying absolutely when when you play sports and you get to a certain level that talent almost becomes obsolete because yours talented as I am. He's talented as we are so who's going you better. That's a that's why I think you see so many guys that are quote unquote first round bust or things like that. It's not because they aren't talented. It's not because they didn't belong there. It was is just because everybody else caught up to them and they was they didn't maybe didn't have the failures throughout life or never failed at sports you know was always the man and then all of a sudden everybody's kind of on the same level and they don't know how to handle it and for me. There's a couple of times in my life that I can really attribute to what helped me be with the Minnesota Vikings for eleven years and I remember growing up in town door and I'm going through literally stuff like that. I get to be about ten years old and on the man like I'm plan running back plan linebacker but what like running back. I'm getting like thirty six touchdowns and ten games. I'm rushing for like you know fifteen hundred yards or whatever it is I mean I'm like I'm like dude yeah and I started to you. Get that attitude on that dude not that I would treat people differently but just in that aspect of life sports. It was like I'm GonNa do like I can just go out here and just do it well as started already to catch up to me we go to junior high and I go to try out and tell the coach I wanna play running back lager. Well we get done with tryouts and stuff like that. We go two weeks camp or whatever and roster comes out and I'm playing center in D.. Tackle might know I said I'm playing running back in linebacker. You know he goes Nelson. You Ain't athletic enough. That was the first point my life that somebody told me I wasn't good enough. You Know My dad was always my harshest critic growing up. He was always like you gotta work for. What you get you gotta you know I came home and told him that he said well? You thought you were man didn't you. I mean just straight up. You thought you were manned in you so yeah he goes. You really want you really WanNa be great. I said yeah he goes you. Want me to put you through workouts. I said Yeah and they said well. If you want me to do this you ain't quitting. You're GONNA do it. He goes. You'RE GONNA do it at least through the year it at the end of year. You don't want to do it. No one's fine yeah. We'll help you he goes. I'M NOT GONNA waste my time but if you make that commitment today you're GonNa do it through the year. You're not gonNA quit and I can't tell you how many times through that summer through that season and I said I quit yeah. WHO said no you don't you made a deal you gonNA stick with it? My Dad had come to instill that that driven attitude emmy that that work ethic and things like that so attributed a lot of that and then second fold old that was we in a high school or going into high school and he said he told me one day he went to north shore high school which is high school down in Houston <hes> big high school <hes> one of the biggest he gets in state actually and they're a powerhouse in sports. I mean they're just really good. Whatever plant Converse Judson who back in the nineties early to thousands I mean if you wanted to get state championship pretty much? She'd had to go through North Shore Converse yet and they happen to you playing each other. My Dad said you WanNa know what pro football players look like. I said sure he goes well. We're going to high school game. I said high school game. I said you just ask me what I WANNA know. What profile of hey goes yeah? WE'RE GONNA go to high school game because all these guys you're competing to go to college for and all these guys. You're competing to go to the N._F._l.. For your about seeing him I said all right. Let's go down there. Do you talk about an eye opening experience. I was like while I mean literally I remember sitting back on while <hes> not even close and at that point it was almost like the work like I didn't need that to push me anymore. It was like I'm doing this on my own you know but that work ethic bean instilled in me carried over not not only in to my football life but eventually my family life aim off the field life because whatever I do. I do it as hard as I can do it whether it's foundation whether it's raising my kids whether it's being eleven hundred mile wife any of those things like I put my full heart into it so that to me is probably basis number one the failure in the new work ethic. It's so cool to hear your perspective in the background the story behind the story and so I love what you just said about work ethic and hard work we tend Steve. We talk about that a lot. You know just because remember everybody's on the staircase. There's no elevator to the top and stares require work. So wherever you're chasing is gonNA take hard work but it's going to be worth it. You touched on one other thing mental toughness and I think we haven't really talked about this Alaba. I really believe that mental toughness is a differentiator among men. I think it's the number one reason that people quit. They lose the battle in their mind before they ever lose the battle on the field and you said that that was one of your things so I'm excited here what you got to say about it yeah. Absolutely I mean you know we do. We just got through kind of talking about the failures in our work and all that stuff and all that stuff is definitely also what separates people you know from the great good not so good but that added aspect of what I'm GonNa hit on now which is the mental. Oh aspect that to me is is probably like you said the ultimate separation of good from great and so for me playing in the N._F._l.. And I learned this in high school as well is being mentally prepared for whatever comes your way and so you can't just put on the pads go out. I can bench five hundred pounds. I can squat six six hundred plus and think you're GonNa beat the guy across from me because once again when you get in the N._F._l.. Vaga can probably bench for close to five hundred pounds and they can probably six hundred so it doesn't matter and in my case I'm a two hundred earned sixty five pound man. I'm very strong but I'm planning this guy who's maybe somewhere between three hundred and three fifty so he outweighs me by almost one hundred pounds on the top in so really really a physical strength really going to help me in that aspect. That'd be a little if I'll use my leverage. But how do I know what I'm going to beat this guy with well go into film room. I would make sure that when I will go into a game I knew more about this guy than he knew about himself. Now the other part about it is and this is where the toughness part comes in the mental toughness part is people don't realize when you get get into those games. You don't keep doing the same thing the whole game because they're eventually if they're losing their eventually going to change and they're gonna say this ain't working. I gotTa do something else and anyway all of a sudden midway through the first quarter say I'm not throwing both hands. I'm on my inside hand. When now you gotta change the way you Russia's guy so it's not like there's a set way going into the game and that's the way it's going to be and you just roll with it? There's a mental battle throughout the whole game as well as a physical battle with the physical battle being what you see the mental battle being what you don't see which is this guy's changed. I've got to be mentally tough enough to change with him and it goes on the whole game and I would even say sometimes it goes from play to play you know. How many times have we got so frustrated with something? We just literally say. I don't know what to do a quick yeah or I'm done like there's nothing I can do. Yeah I mean if you think about that year year defensive linemen and and if you think about Divas Lamin even even cross him into baseball players so if you got to Saxon a game that's phenomenal but we love you realize he probably played sixty five to seventy snaps a game and so you basically if you got to Saxon game or even a lot of times one set you had a phenomenal nominal game like it's it's it's headline stuffed Robson two sacks. You basically failed the the other sixty five times and that any over the baseball a guy who gets out seven out of ten times in baseball gets out seven ten times in baseball is a hall of Famer all right and we and that's why we really got a pill back and think about what it looks like have mental toughness because even in life even in your careers. There's even in whatever you're pursuing more than likely you're going to fail or not. Achieve Your goal more times than you do but your mental toughness is really is what's going to continue to push towards those goals you set the the level of success. She wanted achieve the fulfillment that you're searching for but you gotta be mentally tough and so real quick as we kinda start wine in this thing down Brian. Maybe maybe give give the listeners one or two things that that that you use to build mental toughness throughout your career and even in your life today because again a lot I mean you're you experienced an experience for years. Fishing competitively the mental side of Competitive Fishman Tournament fishing is a huge element. Everybody out there can cast everybody out. There can flip a Jig. Most people can skip doc right. Everybody can crank on alleged especially with the electronics. Electronics Disdain Age but in sport side fishing side every side mental toughness mental toughness is huge but you gotTa build it you don't it just doesn't happen so what was one or two kind of techniques or things that you did that that helped helped build your mental toughness and before we get to that I wanna hit on something you just said. We got sat down one time. Jared Allen probably going to be a hall of fame defensive in a place for six years. <hes> great dude we. We're talking to him one time and he said I guess I want you to think about this. If you have one sack in every nineteen pass rushes that equates to a sixteen sack season he said Sixteen Zach season is crazy right. I mean it just doesn't happen very often and he's probably getting a rate yeah just a little but he said my point is. It's not about you going out and getting a sack. He said more so for defensive ends. It's how many times are you willing to lose to get that one sec and he said not that you go out there and you try to lose every rush but but when the plays over can you be okay I lost that one onto the next one going back to what you said and to me building the mental toughness. This is something that I think you can use it every aspect of life sports sports home life. You know your job whatever it may be because I've used it in football. I've used it in fishing. I've used it in track went up through shop putting stuff. I've used it at home number one. I think this is probably the most important I may not even need to do a number two number one is learning to let go with the past and when I say that I mean if I lost the pass rush there's nothing I can do about it so I gotta move onto the next play because if I let that play affect me for the next play well now fell twice and if I keep it in my head well then I'm gonNA keep failing so guess what I've let one play or one game effect the next two three four instead of just letting go and understand what was not in my control anymore. move onto the next one is the same thing with shotput for example was a world class shoplifter if I had a bad throw if I dwell on it was gonNA affect my next throw so I gotta let it go fan. Life is the same thing you know me and my wife we talk about it all the time. When we have an issue that maybe one of us is not comfortable with or little upset with or something like that? We talk about it. We put it under table and we move on you have to address the issue but you also have to move on so those are the two things I would say is number. One is addressed the issue but number two being the bigger thing is learned to move on you cannot sit there and let things that you have either no control of or that has already happened or anything like that. You can't dwell on that. You have to move on and if you do dwell on it. It's going to your one failure your won Miss App your one trip up your one. Whatever you want to call it is going to have a domino effect absolute for what happens next yeah so you see it all the time in business in marriage in parenting and sports? It's like if you'll just address the issue and then move on. Don't let it affect the next day the next play the next adventure the next conversation <hes> I love it and it and it's a cool representation guys you know we talk about grip grip wild and you know grip <hes> you know being God relentlessness integrity and passion mental toughness is definitely one of those fits into that relentlessness because like you say <hes> great examples in in the sports side but even in life even in your careers even in relationships and you're you're you're. You're not going to get it right a lot. You're you're going to stumble a lot. You'RE GONNA make mistakes allot it. You'RE GONNA fail in life but if you can I build that mental toughness an Lebron's is just one example of how to do that but if you can this bill that mental toughness I think you'll you'll find yourself <hes> far more successful far more <hes> in a healthy place. Your life where you're beginning to experience Aso's things that you dreamed about those things that you that keep you up at night. Those things that you just know or inciting you know that you were created to do and you begin to equip yourself to achieve those things and so be. I think our our biggest takeaway today as he's he said something that Ah maybe you guys can chew on this. Is You know if you're going to be that dude. You're going to have to be mentally tough and so guys this week. I'll just kinda think about that thing about areas in your life where one you can work on being mentally more mentally tough and just say all the time then execute on that no that if that's what it's GonNa take so don't just think about it executed on Brian and thanks for being being with us today man I know you're running in gun Annan Hustle and so I'm grateful man. I'm grateful to have a relationship with them. So I'm so thankful have met you get to hang out with you periodically throughout the year and hope the best for you and fishing and and I because I know that that is a mentally tough game came in but we're grateful man thank you and and and Y'all go check out his new youtube series that you know youtube this day and ages is really cool tool to get fed and see cooled things and can experience a community. What what's the what's the name of of Youtube series so is just pages just Brian? There's a space Robinson ninety six altogether and our youtube sears was shooting this year's call the transition season so it's kind of basically the transition from football ought to fishing so go check it out man I I've enjoyed doing it. You know one thing I will say is if people watch it leave a comment. I read every one of them. Send me a message something if any criticism whatever we're we're always looking for something to make make it better absolutely until next time guys. I want you to remember you are the dude so they'll be a man who matters.

football Brian Minnesota Vikings youtube Steve Texas Minnesota Brian Ryan Brian Robertson Fisher lakes baseball us Vikings Adam Brando Broach Soccer north shore high school Jared Allen
#281 Brian Shaw

First Class Fatherhood

30:18 min | 9 months ago

#281 Brian Shaw

"Now the lace welcome to first glass fatherhood. Welcome to the PODCAST. I am happy as always to be here with you. They give stopping by. If this is your first time listening to a podcast. Please get over there and banging that subscribe button. You do not WanNa miss all the action. That's coming your way right here. On First Glance Fatherhood all right as I have an awesome guests to bring you guys on this transformation Tuesday. Brian Shaw is a professional strongman competitor and a four time winner of the world's strongest man. Competition he also Has Victories in the Arnold strongman classic. Brian we'll be here with me just a few minutes. So please stick around for the interview and Brian. Shaw is sponsored by Red Con one in this week. Joe Is First Class. Fatherhood you guys may remember my interview with Red Con one founder and CEO. Aaron Cinnamon Back on episode two fourteen in the PODCAST. Red Con one is just smashing. The supplement industry right now now and they had these m. r. e. bars that are made with whole foods. They are delicious and this week. I live by the WHO listeners can save twenty percent on their entire order at red CON DOT COM By using the Promo Code Father. So if you're a dad out there that's into working out or eating healthy and staying fit. Just take a look at red CON DOT com. Check it out. wholefood received a common denominator? He would all these guys that are living active healthy lifestyles and crushing it in the gym. Like Brian Shaw. I lived many years of my life on a beer vodka and Marlborough Diet and I've tried to turn my whole attention to eating healthier finding better ways to nourish my body and it seems like whole foods is a good way to get this done and red card. One has exactly what I've been looking for so head over to red CON ONE DOT COM and use my Promo Code Father. Save twenty percents off your order and check it out for yourself later this week former. NFL Standout and Super Bowl. Champion wide receiver for Andre. Reisen will be joining me here. Andre is dad who had a huge turnaround in his life. Many people may remember the incident in which left eye burned down his mansion years ago and things seemed a bit out of Control Control. He is now in a new healthy marriage with more kids. It was a great interview so please stop by. Check it out on Thursday and if you could share this podcast but every father that's in your neighborhood or in in your contact list. Let them know about the show that celebrates fatherhood and family life fatherhood rocks family values rule and every day is father's Day right here with me and I'm going to be right back with four time world's strongest man. Brian Shaw on allegation. You're listening to I last fatherhood. DADS are you tired of taking supplements that never deliver well. Red Con one was created to ensure that you get real hardcore products that deliver real results trusted by four time world strongest man Brian. Shaw and founded by Supplement Entrepreneur. Aaron Karen Singer men read Con One is crushing the industry. You have to try their m. r. e. bars which are packed. Full nutritious food sources that will replenish your system when you need it most and they taste so good would your toddler will think they're eating a candy bar but we're talking to whole food meal replacement and right now I play. His father who listeners can save twenty percent on their entire order from red con one simply simply use the Promo Code father at the checkout. So let's go. Dad's for the highest state of readiness. Choose Red Con one visit read con Dot Com. Use the Promo Code Father and Save Save Twenty percent all right joining me now first class father. Brian Shaw welcome to I last. Fatherhood thank you. I'm really excited to be here. This is great man all right. Let's start to hear. How many kids do you haven't haven't how old are they? We've got two kids. They're both boys and our oldest is three and our youngest is one. Wow okay very cool did you. You guys do any type of Gender reveal just smashing dumbbells color wasn't soldered awakened to find out you know we Actually just Kinda did it. We got you know the results from the past when we went in and and my wife and I just Kinda opened it together So we found out at the same time with with both of them and and then ended up sharing that with our family and friends After the fact but so we kind of did it amongst ourselves okay. Yeah that's awesome. I if you could Brian Brian please just take a minute here to hit my listeners. A little bit about your background and what you do. Yeah absolutely So I How many Professional strongman competed in strongman Gosh sense started as an amateur in two thousand five and then My first world's strongest man contest was two two thousand and eight when I qualified to compete in that and I've gone on to win for a world's strongest man titles I've made the final so the top ten at world's strongest man eleven years in a row and Have had a awesome career competing in that and got to travel the world and And do a lot of really cool all things Around that as well. Yeah those how to be tremendous experiences. I'm sure how. How did the experience of becoming a dad kind of changed your perspective on life? Yeah I mean I was I didn't know quite what to expect. you know it's becoming a dad You know my wife and I of course were were are planning to have a family and wanted to have a family and You know for so long for me. I was focused on competing. And and you know setting goals with that ad and and just it was a very Kind of one track mindset that I had to be the best Strongman that I possibly could be and so you know I I went along in life. Kind of Basically everything revolved around that For me just just being the best that I possibly could be and You know once once we had our first son it. I didn't know how that would change. I didn't know how You know things would shift left up but you know it's a big change you know as you know You know having having your I kid you don't you don't really know an and has a dad I felt it's a little bit helpless actually when we had our first son and and You know as more Trying to be supportive of my wife and help her out as much as I could could but you know it was Not Anything you know. Of course my wife was breastfeeding and so it was more just being supportive of her. 'cause I I really really felt like the only thing I could do is change diapers and And that was about it and so you know having after we had our first. My perspective on life changed a lot and You know Kinda Kinda put everything into perspective In a Lotta ways. Because you know my life was so focused on on competing and only doing that. And then it changed into you know having a having more purpose and more direction and you know and that's only only and more and more as As we've had our second Signed and You know it's it's a very very good thing and and You know it's amazing because In a Lotta ways all the trophies and all the accomplishments and everything I had in my career Definitely come second to both of our boys. Now Yeah yeah very well said and I know that was in You know you're the been the strong world's strongest man and everything about a child. Eldest is soft and gentle. So it's like what are some of the challenges like for you of being the you know the world's strongest man while being a father. Yeah I think I think I think a lot of people You know think that I'm only strong and and I can only be that way but You know I definitely we have a switch that goes on and off when I compete and Outside of competition. I'm a pretty down to Earth and fun Guy You know just likes to enjoy life and So you know being that it's it's Very much reinforces that because like you said you need you need to be generally need to be soft and you know especially really with with our boys being so young I mean You know I'm I'm grabbing. You know books or toys or whatever to play with them and and You kinda get down on the floor and How some fun and that type of thing? So you know it's something where You know it's it's a very drastic difference you know from lifting thousands of pounds too. You know you know picking up picking up the kids book to read to them or or You know playing playing with a toy car or whatever you know it's a it's a great Contrast I think and now how about as far as discipline goes with your three year old Ryan you like. Are you a spanker. Thank you timeout. Guy How'd you kind of handle discipline so far. Is it that you know the be completely honest with you. My wife and I are still trying to navigate that In a a lot of ways it's it's a learning experience You know I mean growing up my my dad's saints me for sure and and You know I going through that. You know. I think I learned a lot and It obviously helped me. You know. Become the man that I am today. Okay and so my perspective on it is is that at times. I think that it can be a very good thing. And I think that you know in in a Lotta ways You know it spanking has been such a taboo subject and you know People take that in a lot of different ways and and and the world has changed. I mean I know it's different than when I was growing up and and You know we have to recognize that but you know with our three year old The way that my wife Phen I have handled. That is a lot of times. I think he's having a hard time kind of going through all of the emotions and You know and and being able to verbalize what he wants to say and so he gets upset and so a lot of times. We'll just kind of sit down and talk to him and You know if you need to go under time out to kind Calmed down and and That type of thing. We will do that but I found that. Really if you sit down and talk to him get him to take We'll just just kinda go through some breathing you know. Just get him to take a few deep breaths and then be able to verbalize what he wants to say That seems to work pretty well right now and You know it definitely is At least getting him in the right direction and and It's it's it's been a interesting dynamic right now because him and his brother are not quite two years apart. And so we're working on the sharing and you know it's it's You know something whereas if one of them takes toy heuer something both of them will get upset and so we were just kind of working through that right now. I'm sure that there will be many more challenges When it comes to discipline you know they get a little bit older here but We're we're trying to navigate the best way that we can. I don't think there's an exact science to to that type of thing but You know we definitely have rules and and You know we want them to have good manners and Listen to US and You know how that I have that kind of You know block and white line if you will in their life so So that you know hopefully as they get older They they you're listening to us and and You know Grow Up to be just like I said it turned into it to the man that I am hopefully I can be able to do that for them as well. Yeah very cool and and like I said I have four kids it myself. And it's a response to a different style of discipline and it's a that's part of the fascinating fascinating about this is figuring out. You know the right way the right technique the US reach hit. And I'm like you like my father had me. When he was fifty years old he was born in nineteen thirty so he came from a much older older elasticity of parenting where it was like You know spanking your child like today. I've used that when my kids were were younger and found that effective but it also came with a tremendous amount on a guilt on my end like I felt terrible doing it whereas like my father. He didn't see my e had any emotion when he did it. You know so. That's something that's definitely changed over the years here. Yeah I remember remember one thing I remember my dad telling me when he would spank me as he would say to me that. Hey this is harder for me than it is for you and that never made sense. When when I was a kid I was like wait a minute? I'm the one being spanked and you're doing the spanking. So how was it harder for you now. Now is a dad. I can see because you know that. That's the last thing that you WANNA do. It's kind of like a tough loves type of situation where you know. Obviously we love our kids so much and that's what I can genuinely say that. That's the last thing that I would ever want to do that. But sometimes you know if it if it is needed and warranted wanted You know to you know to help them to understand and to grow and and You know to to be a good kid then then sometimes. That's maybe what what needs to happen. And and You know but again. It's not fun and like you said it's it's I I completely understand what you're saying because it was. That's the last thing that I would wanNA do for sure. Yeah and turn this over to you do now Like I said I. I read Sigmund on the podcast here and obviously his product with the right kind of one or some of the best in the business and kids. Today they're hitting the weight and pretty hard early in high school now. The high school sports has become big business for kids going to the next level and they're always looking for that edge. What what are some of the safe and effective supplements for kids to be using it? How old is a good age for them to start? Hey dads are you. Looking to boost your energy level. strikeforce energy has got you covered with strikeforce energy packet. You can turn any beverage into into an energy drink. Their original energy packets contain no sugar no calories just an explosion of energy and flavor added to any beverage. strikeforce energy is veteran owned and all their products addicts are me right here. In the United States Co founded by Navy Seal Sean Matson strikeforce energy blows away the energy drink competition right now. first-class father who listeners can save fifty fifteen percent off their purchase by visiting strikeforce energy dot com and using the Promo Code. Fatherhood strikeforce energy turns any beverage into an energy drink get yours today. STRIKEFORCE ENERGY DOT COM Promo Code. Fatherhood all right guys many of you have hit me up saying that you would like to start your own podcast. I am telling you right now. Anchor is the easiest way to get this done number one. It's it's free. I have never paid a dime to publish any of my podcasts. And their creation tools. Allow you to record and edit right from your phone or your computer anchored those all the distribution bution as well so it can be heard on spotify apple podcast and many more also you can make money with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast in one place. What are you waiting for? Download the free anchor APP today or go to anchor dot. FM to get started. What are some of the safe and effective some supplements for kids to be using and how old is a good age for them to start? Yeah that's that's a great question I You know like you said the competitive nature of sports now is even more so than when I was growing up and really sports supplements. I remember when I was in high school that they were just kind of getting started with some of the protein shakes and and that type of stuff and And I got into it right away. I mean I Was I remember mixing shakes after after my workouts and I was reading all the information I could at that age because I started working out and wanted to improve and get a lot of things That at that age to try to improve my diet and and you know I didn't know hardly anything in there wasn't really the amount of You know information out there At that point in time and so things have evolved a lot since then but you know as far as as far as supplements go go And I know Aaron would agree with me at the end of the day like you. You really need to have a lot of things coming from whole food and then supplements are on top of that. So you know I think for kids. You know Like for example even with our kids The bars that read con makes them or e bars are three year old. Loves those well one and three or both of them will eat them. And we'll cut those up so you know and that's just a protein bar We'll mix up shakes that that You know if I shake it's always like Oh dad I want some of your shakes. All give him some of that. 'cause it's just all food sources With the red con one products especially the MR e Line of products. So I I will definitely share those with them Outside of that you know I think you know create Tina's Gina's been one of the most studied You know Supplements out there and I think that that's been proven to be you know something that's safe you know outside of that. I really At that age especially in high school. I mean if you're as long as you're getting enough protein and you have a good diet and you're working on that at the end of the day it's calories so that's where some of the the shakes and that type of stuff could come in around working out but you know kids started working out on especially with A lot of kids are metabolism is so high. So the the real challenges getting enough calories so so that they can gain weight and try to build some muscle muscle as well so Yeah hopefully that answer your question but I I think you know it's not necessarily like you need to have all these different supplements Ah especially at that age. It's more just whole food and enough calories Coming in and that can get you a long way. Yeah yeah yeah very cool and a lot of information to see. That's something that I never would have thought of like giving my three year old like a protein bar. I would always assume that that's supposed to be for somebody else. But I guess it's got to be a Lotta healthier than so many of the choices that are in the aisle. They're for kids and a lot of times especially if we get that that picky eater. Sometimes you WanNa just give them anything just to get them to eat and sometimes we do more harm arm than we do. Good no that that is for sure. I mean it's it's something where I don't know if they would even know the difference between That Maureen Bar or for a candy bar and so it's and he calls it our our son Braxton is our three year olds he'll he'll ask for protein bars. You know. I mean it's something where it's it's an and it's it tastes that good because a three year old is obviously not going to lie about About that or if it didn't taste good demo he wouldn't ask for but you a lot of times for a snack or or something like that. We'll give it to him or you know like I said he loves the shakes but it's You know something where we we really my wife life and I have worked very hard with both of our boys to try to you. Know feed them well balanced meals and healthy food and And try our best is to not give them kind of young To eat so you know my you we we They go they go to a daycare now and and literally every single day My wife packs them lunches that are you know have some type of meeting some type of Carbohydrates typically vegetables or fruit. You you know until they go in and have these have these lunches like that and it's very important to us to try to help them get on the right track with eating healthy and Audio setting the stage for the rest of their life. Hopefully yeah very cool and how buffalo kids that maybe interested out there. Bryan that in strongman career is the market therefore therefore it what would be the best Steps they can take to get that done. I'm in coming in coming into the sport a strong and I actually played basketball Growing up and Play that through high school and then played in college on a full ride and and That was my first. Love is the kid was the game of basketball and then after her. After I was done I I went into a strength coach and just loved lifting weights and and I'm in a super competitive person so Having in an outlet I watched world's strongest man as a kid and never really knew how to get into it or where to start and so You know as as I got done playing basketball I just needed another other competitive outlet and that's how I found strongman and and Started competing in loved it immediately And I was told it was it was really funny. What what I was told when I got started that you know you? You just do it for fun and you could never make a career out of it you can never do it professionally or anything like that. And things have changed a lot since I started competing and there's a lot more opportunities now for Four competitors especially on the pro level if you if you can work your way up to that there's there's literally contest to happen all over the world all all year round most so you know if you can get to that that level it is something that you definitely can do. But I think it's like any other sport you know There's there's amateur levels that you could do If you just enjoyed loyd pushing yourself or just when I have a challenge and the weights are a lot lighter so the weight scale up so I would say to anybody that's interested or or wants to try there's something Kind of you know not typical Jim Training. If you will that will teach you a lot about yourself. I think You know training in training strongman and training the events You know it's kind of outside of the normal gym training but You know you set goals and you achieve them and it. It could be something very positive. And so that's what I would say is just starting if you love it enough and can work your way up You know through the levels and get to that probe with something where I would never tell anybody. They can't do something I would. I would encourage them to try. And if they're willing to sacrifice and work hard enough often and Can Open those doors then maybe they can make it work. Yeah well said and yeah and it's amazing how many different techniques and styles or I know that cross it became I'm very popular Quite a few years back Jason Leap on the show He's been a champion at that. So it's just amazing all the different varieties of working out and what is the. What is the best best exercise Brian for someone as looking to gain that type of brute strength that you have what what is the best exercise to work on that at the end of the day? building a foundation of of the major multi joint movements so squatting dead lifting and pressing. I would say those those three movements movement's probably are where you would want to build your foundation from and then from there then branch out but you know it's You know like I said those major multi joint movements or are GonNa Kinda have the the biggest bang for the buck If you will and and give you the most carry over t- to building that foundation China strength and a Lotta Times I think You know too much gets put on doing curls or or something like that where you know Those types of movements aren't going to carry over to building building that type of strength but especially for For younger athletes. I think Those are the movements that I I would say. You would wanNA focus on the most. Okay yeah good stuff and what was it. What was it like you've gone from having one child to to and is Having a third on the on the table for you. Yeah they're going to go from one to to We we knew what to expect a little bit more obviously with With the second you know on way and coming and You know it wasn't quite as much of a learning kind of shock experience as the first one but We're kind of right now to be completely honest. We're kind of not sure on the third. My wife really wanted to have a little girl so it was You know it was definitely hoping that our second would be girl and ended up being a boy and and So we're kind of in the Middle Right now. We haven't really made a decision if we're going to try for three really happy with With our two and of course you know at the end of the day. We're very blessed to have two healthy boys that are you know that are great and we haven't had any problems At all so I don't know we're really happy where we're at Maybe maybe this third might happen at some point but Right now we're really happy. Happy with two okay. Yeah we ended up getting three boys then finally got the girl in the fourth. Try So You never know See that's that's that's what I told my wife if I said you know we try for the third and it's a boy then you know I don't know if we're going to be done at that point and then go for it. It's kind of one of those things where you know. So I think I think if we could guarantee somehow that the that the next one would be a girl we would probably do it. But you know it's kind of that Not Knowing Fatter But I I I don't know we'll see what the future holds but we're really happy for sure. What's the two? Yeah I think for us. It was like we're in for a dime. We're Greenberg dollar here. If we didn't get on the fourth try we had five by now so we got her. Though that's great now what What kind of you've had so much success? Chechen already Brian. What type of or what kind of plans for yourself but a future? You know I I I really am oriented person and I. I love to have goals and things things that I'm working on And I'm actually. I'm still competing in strongman I Still enjoy that. It's been it's been different now having even having the kids and and it's something where You know for example. Our our day my wife and I both She really likes to work out as well. So you know we split Dr Dey and and You know I try to stay home. Spend enough time with them and then I'll go train After they'd bad so those those have Changes has happened Where where it's it's a little bit more of a grind but you know I my wife and I both really feel that it's important You know that we keep pushing ourselves selves as well because we both feel like it sets a good example for the boys and I don't want to give up on what trying to work on as well so I still have. I saw some some goals and things that I would have liked to accomplish in the sport before I retire. And walk away from that So I'm still working on that and then We've got we've we've got actually a couple of different businesses that wife and I run together the main one is is SEAN STRINGS DOT COM which is kind of our online business that my wife and I run together And we got a couple of other things that we're working on and hopefully hopefully it will be able to announce soon but It's it's just kind of the constant Progression of of moving forward and setting goals. So I've got a lot of things that I'm really excited about and A lot of things working on but You know it's been a really fun ride and hopefully we can keep that going. Yeah very cool. And I'll drop a link to that website and description. Today's podcast episode so my listeners. Because you just have to link and get over there and check it out last thing. I WanNa hit you with Brian. I love to ask all the DAD's GonNa get on the podcast one time. If I see a half of that new father or for that about to be dad add. WHO's out there listening? I I would say that Try to be as prepared as you can Going in but you'll will never be able to be fully prepared for for what's coming and you know the sleep will be a huge factor as I'm sure a lot of the guests that you've had on we'll say say you know it just completely changed the routine and and You know life changes but it changes in the best way possible and it's very rewarding and I I would say to try to take in every single moment You know with the kids because grow up so fast and they'll change so fast and It's it's something that I personally tried to do. with with our voices is You know BS president as I possibly can because you know it just seems like a blink of an eye and all of a sudden they're going from crawling to walking and then they're talking and you know just just becoming their own little You know their own little person in a lot of ways and so just trying to take in every moment enjoy it and You know just just hold on for the ride. Yeah very well. Santa loved a message. There's been on for me. Yeah I gotTA Say Brian Shaw. You're a first class father all the way. Thank you so much a few minutes time on I last fatherhood I definitely appreciate allocation basis. You probably on back to wrap things up here on. I play fatherhood I gotta give a special social thank you once again to Brian. Shopping time unit was so cool. You sent me up on twitter guys Ajami a DM on instagram. Let me know what you thought about. Today's episode always love reading. Your feedback locking install a lot more. Actually she comes your way this week. NFL Standout Wide Receiver in Super Bowl. Champion Andrei Rise will be here on Thursday and Friday. We have a fresh frogman Friday edition of First Place. Five hundred coming your way. It make sure you follow me on Instagram at Alec Underscore Lace for all the upcoming guests announcements. That's all I got for you guys today. I'm Alex thank you for listening to firstly as fatherhood and please remember guys. We are not babysitters babysitters we're fathers and we're not just fathers we are first class fathers So down a you know.

Brian Brian Brian Shaw Red Con NFL founder and CEO basketball strikeforce Aaron Cinnamon Joe Andre US twitter spotify Aaron Karen Singer Reisen Alec Underscore Lace Bryan dot
Brian Liu

From Scratch

19:00 min | 4 months ago

Brian Liu

"I'm Jessica Harris. This is from scratch. My guest is Brian Lou. Co-founder of legalzoom. An online legal documents service for consumers and small businesses legalzoom help visitors form corporations file patents trademark name create a last will living trust without the fees associated with hiring a lawyer. Brian started legalzoom in two thousand. After working as a lawyer at Sullivan and Cromwell in Los Angeles Bryan is a graduate of UC Berkeley Phi Beta Kappa and Ucla. Law School. Welcome thank you. How does legalzoom work? We came up with this idea because we knew that for a lot of really common legal. Needs you really can do this with a lawyer. And with just finding the information online so we created a service where you can go online and you can take care of things on your own. You know you still have to go to law school for three years to try to figure this stuff out and it was in a language. You didn't understand now. We simplify it so that everybody has access to that what we're really trying to do it. Legalzoom as democratize law. I read somewhere. That seventy percent of Americans don't have a will and it just made me wonder like what percent of people do think don't have access to the legal system but now do because of online services such as the legalzoom the American Bar Association always has has done studies like this in the past and they say that about fifty percent of the people who have a legal need. Don't ever get it taken care of. And one of the main reasons they don't is because they just don't think they can afford an attorney and that's what we're trying to overcome at legalzoom as we're trying to say. Hey look if you really need help you should go out and find it instead of doing nothing. I WanNa talk about how you came up with the idea for legalzoom are you were working in the law. You met your co founder. Brian Lee At Law School at Ucla was he also practicing law at the time. Yeah he was. We were both attorneys and we were kind enough. I'll tell you the truth. We're kind of a little miserable. Didn't really like our jobs. So we were coming up with different business ideas and trying to figure out our escape plan and I remember seeing this this magazine and they advertised for something called we the People. I remember seeing that they had six offices and thinking well if they're doing essentially paralegal like work and they had six offices in Los Angeles. I thought there must be something there. The other thing is when you're working at the law firm there such a disconnect between what? You're actually doing what you thought you'd be doing like you know. I got into law school my parents. It said like you know while as soon as you finish law school finally get that will that mom's been bothering me for years about once. I did graduate. I had no idea how to do all this stuff and I think I realized that I could put something together that really blended those needs and people had a need in everything from online stock trading. Online travel was happening at that time. And we figured. Why can't we do something similar for law? So did you and Brian Start Working Nights and weekends or did you quit your jobs. I talk to me about the mechanics of those early days. Well Bryan story will be a little bit different from mine. He he actually a he actually was the one who decided to quit. I but I still remember the first time we had our first V seed meeting with family. Friend THIS IS THE FIRST DOT com boom of late. Nineteen Ninety nine two thousand and we thought we were going to get funded for sure. We thought five million dollars funding no problem and our very first. Vc meeting was the day that the Nasdaq crash. Like twenty percent in one day being venture capital and we showed up at family friends office knocked on the door and he said Brian. What are you doing here? I said Ankle we had. We scheduled this meeting weeks ago and he said don't you know it's over and so we did. What any sensible Aspiring entrepreneurs would do at that time we went to a Benny Hana's across the street had dinner at a couple drinks and said well what do you think what should we do? I mean we could still ask for our jobs back at this point. We still bag. We decided you know what we believe in this so much and we said we're just going to continue regardless you decided to go forward without raising capital initially just except maybe from friends and family. Why was that a blessing in disguise? Not to have the capital. We raised three hundred and thirty. Three thousand five hundred dollars and the five hundred was the best because we first started with like well you know what at least ten thousand dollars minimum and then okay maybe five thousand and it got to the point where we were so desperate? Somebody won't we gave us five hundred dollars a week. Took it but we were able to really utilize that money in just just the best ways that we could and we didn't have room to waste what we're signs of early traction with legalzoom A sense that You know what this is actually resonating people. Yeah first couple weeks. Well you're just waiting for that first real customer but the sign that I knew that we were onto something was on a Friday night. We were out at dinner. We got ten orders for a particular document called a living will a healthcare directive ten people throughout the country? I don't know where but you know this is Friday night and they've got nothing better to do than to make living wills of fried while we're onto something. That's when I knew you brought on board early in the company in addition to your co founder. Eddie and Brian A lawyer by the name of Robert Shapiro who's famous or maybe infamous for leading the defense team of Oj the OJ Simpson trial. Why did you think to contact Robert of all people so we knew that we worked at some pretty good law firms and we were pretty good lawyers but when it comes to something like this you really need trust. You know again. People didn't know us but they certainly knew Robert Shapiro. They knew as reputation. I think you know even after the trial I think his reputation was very good very positive and we just needed somebody like that. Was there a sense that the trial was so controversial that his joining would bring controversy somehow. Of course I was in the back of our mind but we didn't really think of it that in the same way. I mean it was really interesting if you saw what was going on with the OJ Simpson trial when when we were in law school at the time because it was it was very polarizing literally half the students at the school. Were just like you know when they heard the verdict was just like. Oh that was awful. Not Half but I'll significant percentage. They were clapping. They were like yes so we knew that I mean there was some controversy around it but the most important thing was that people believed I mean. I think Robert Shapiro was seen as very standup lawyer. And he's quite quite good at what he does. What credibility did he ultimately lend to the initiative in the early days? Fantast an incredible amount. I don't I don't think Brian and I would have immediately quickly. Quit our jobs and left unless if we knew that Robert Shapiro was on board. I mean he really he really was one of the original founders and when we launched we had such a great publicity surrounding it and it really added something to our own self esteem as well. I'm Jessica Harris. You're listening to from scratch. My guest is Brian Lou. Co-founder OF LEGALZOOM. A company that helps consumers and small businesses prepare their own legal documents. Online legalzoom save people time and money and make the legal process more accessible to consumers and small businesses who otherwise might not have bothered with such documentation. As living will or PRENUP. You have faced a lot of legal hurdles from the Bar Association's across several states Stating that you are There's unauthorized practice of law. So one way to address that has been to add legal advice to legal zoom by connecting visitors to lawyers around the country. That's correct. Can you describe that more? Sure I mean there was. We always knew that this would be something. Potentially that some of the state bar associations wouldn't be happy with but again we. We were always pretty clear in our heads that we weren't really competition against attorneys. We weren't stealing business away from them. This is really about. How do you increase access? How do you get more people the legal help that they need? So you know. Our early stage are phase. One I'd say or stage one was really about utilizing technology and creating self help documents so that people can get fairly standard documents and by the way these same documents have been available for decades either online where you can download it. And for centuries through books now what we're doing is combining the actual help from real attorneys licensed attorneys and combining that with the document automation platform. That we have in creating a more full service. And that's really what we always imagined you ultimately did raise venture capital from firms Kleiner Perkins and institutional venture partners and Laris. Can you talk to me about some of those meetings? Were tensile tell you? They were very tense meetings. You worked so hard to get to that point what what was tense up about those meetings and in particular without getting into all the details there was a lot of arguments over whether we should take these additional fundraising rounds and and one person said no and then we had to figure out a way to actually make it happen even though they technically had vito right so we looked around until there was a structure that kind of circumvented that and it requires a little bit of a little bit of a push their appeal to These VC's was that you were disrupting an industry. What was it about the legal zoom in two thousand six or two thousand seven? Do you think that didn't appeal to them? In two thousand aside from the macro economy improving although this is before two thousand eight frankly. They couldn't envision something in you know in the business of law working. Fate didn't see how it could scale and it's very different now. I think at last time I looked there were over six hundred startup legal companies in different aspects of legal space of course but over six hundred on angels list. It's striking hell. You know the the word law lawyer makes me want a yawn a little bit yet. The they're dealing with the most like base human needs and an emotions right. I mean dealing with divorce forms. An prenuptial agreements and private see matters. I mean what have you learned about just behavior of people? Do this might be. You know the technical business and what we do might be words on paper but that's not really what we're doing. We're really helping people in times of need. I'll give you one example. One time a long time ago when we were starting out we actually did investor pitch with somebody who had a terminal disease and she was going through the living will process. We did it. You know Kinda like walked her through it in real time and actually saw it and I mean it's just incredibly incredibly emotional again. The the legal part of legal documents. That's that's not hard. The decisions that people make in terms of you know whether you want to be kept on life support who their property goes to the those are Beagle legal questions. Those are personal questions. What are other examples? There's this Indian restaurant that I go to all the time and one day I was talking to the. I don't know how I got started. I was talking to the owner and I realized that he had just incorporated on the ozone his restaurant business and we started talking about everything that was related to how he how he ran. Got This restaurant. He was from Bangladesh and he came over there with his brother and they basically did everything they could to put their money into this one restaurant this business and now they have to restaurants and and just hearing the story which is that Hilda that great immigrant and that great American dream story that. That's what's really amazing. Because behind every business there is a tremendous story you have helped to launch. A company called Xenophon by which is a beverage company. A so-called functional that functional beverage which is a functional beverage It's a drink aside from just being a refreshing drink at quenches thirst as it has a function in this particular function for xenophon is. It's all about natural stress relief. What are the chemicals in it that caused the stress relief mechanism? It's got the same antioxidants as you find green tea but without the caffeine. What's L. Fenian is one of the Ingredients that's right. Is that the chemical that's in Green Tea But without the caffeine in the strength xactly it. That's that's the antioxidant you'll find in green tea and Gaba and lysine is from Camille now. You seem like a an active person yourself. A like a at somebody who would drink than a fi like you exercise a lot. And what kind of exercise do you do? I'm I'm a big surfer. So that's that's my favorite thing But I also will train at the Freddie Roach's Wildcard Boxing Gym It's a boxing club. It's just such focused intensity for a short period of time. That kind of a kind of it focuses my mind but it's also soothing and meditative at the same time. Do you meditate. I don't meditate. But I do on the surfboard when I'm out in the ocean on the weekends usually by myself it is just so beautiful out there. It's like meditation. Why is it that you like surfing so much would you say? I think it's it's about nothing like that feeling of being one with nature and being one with the wave and go on but then I'll just sound like a surfer dude. How Did you get interested in surfing a year from Taiwan Seattle? Yeah I I think it must have happened when I was young visiting Hawaii one day and I don't know what happened. I just got hooked and somewhere in the back of my mind. I knew I wanted to live in La. Just because I wanted to be close to the ocean. What do your parents do? My Dad was He's in the shipping business. So he was a captain. He was one of the youngest captains. If this particular fleet of merchant ships and then he moved our family to. Taiwan. Because he didn't want to always be away from the family because he was months at a time out on the ships so found a desk job and we actually we actually came from Taiwan the US on now on one of those boats. It took thirty days to get here. Yes. I've read a lot about being out at sea. These captains of these you know cargo ships. What a lonely existence. Yeah especially back then. I mean it was in those ships were a lot smaller and And you're out for a long long time. But at some point at some point in time he decided to start on his own and he got this little office and one thing he told me. Is that you know. There were four desks there and he was the only person there and I asked him. Well what about all these other deaths? What about all the furniture and you said you know? I bought all those deaths. I bought at that time. Typewriters computer say he bought the office? Equipment didn't rent them didn't leave some because he said you know because I'm gonNA fill those up soon and he started another shipping company or just a NESN agency. What was he shipping? Basically it was you know containers anything that's exported from the US over to Asia. He was one of the first people to charter a hope bode. This is such a long time ago but we just started doing trade with China at that time. So he was one of the first people would actually do trades with China as still remember because he was so early. We got invited to China once when we're really young and we met like all these really big big. You know Communist Party leaders. You didn't out say granddaughter dot or something. It was really really pretty crazy. Did you grow up speaking Chinese in your home? What was it like for you growing up in Seattle having had the first half decade of your life in Taiwan or were you too young to notice I was. I was too young. I think But I met one of my great friends. Best Friends Ready. Who is my next door neighbor? We start our very first business together business. Who Need these pins? We made these buttons and it was during the height of the Michael Jackson craze. And we made these pins as I do not heart Michael Jackson and we go to these rock concerts. These heavy metal rock concerts and start selling is. He's over there. Truly I was. That was really fun. So your first business was selling. I don't love Michael Jackson. Did you have a sense as you were growing up that you wanted to start your own businesses? I mean also you know upon seeing your father or I was I think somewhere in the back of my mind that was always there because even when I went to law school I one of my very best friends. Brian Leave. Why started legalzoom with we met the first day of Law School? And we kind of you know. I think we connected because I looked at him and he looked at me and said what. Are you doing here in law school so I don't know what are you doing? Thank you very much for joining us. My guest has been Brian Lou. Co-founder of legalzoom. If you'd like to learn more about the show please visit our website at from scratch. Radio DOT ORG. You can also follow us on twitter at Jesse Harris or find us on facebook. I'm Jessica Harris. This is from scratch.

legalzoom Brian Brian Lou Jessica Harris Robert Shapiro Los Angeles attorney Co-founder OJ Simpson Taiwan co founder Bryan Seattle US Michael Jackson American Bar Association Xenophon Brian Lee
Episode 04  The Registry Chronicle

Brian

34:51 min | 4 years ago

Episode 04 The Registry Chronicle

"Perfect. I know. Thank your lawn. Listeners. This is Brian, I am out and we're getting married in three hundred seventy five days seventy five. It's just constant March. The countdown continue it does seems to faster and faster every week. Welcome to Brian Mel get married. This is the podcast where we Brian Mel talk to you about our wedding planning and some things we found out along the way, one thing rest, you is, we are not certified wedding planners in any way, not even close. We probably don't even know anything more than you do, but we have been doing our research, and we hope that through our experiences and us answering any questions that you might have the you learn a little bit about planning your wedding. Whether you're just going to be like we're loping I mean, we're not dealing with this definitely is some pros and cons to all things, I think, on this week's episode of Brian Mel get married. We are covering wedding registries who this is where I get stuff. Yes, you did. This is where people give me stuff. Yes, or us. But yes. And really fancy like three hundred dollar nights sent. I mean you can register for it, but somebody supposed to buy that really fancy three hundred dollar knife set. So what's the deal with wedding registries? Why did that start? Why is that a thing? Why do I get to put my name on a list and have people? Get me stuff. Well originally really had nothing to do with you. It would have to do with me. Oh. Actually, wait, wait. No, no. Are you sir? I'm pretty sure like we're going to start talking about, like wedding dowries and stuff. Right. Still technically to do well, yes, dowries go back, but they still technically to do with the bride because it was, essentially you and your family. Hang my family for me. How much? Twelve dollars seventy five cents the same amount. It was willing to spend on my college being invited to the wedding. Usually it would include, you know, land animals treks of land, money or other forms of historical wealth. Historical. Well, sure. Yeah. Basically, interestingly enough the first week four dollars. The first recorded dowry was exchanged in three thousand BC. Okay. That's that's all well and good. But how do we go from me getting huge tracts of land to people getting maker? Yeah. You gotta fast forward on this because as time went on things changed as marriage change. What marriage mentioned evolved. Yes. Inserted marriage well through Elvis presence in such changed. If you go into like the renaissance, for example, marriage, chests were thing, these chests held all of the bright future wife goods right up there with huge tracts of land, which she would then take to her groom's house. It was sort of an early form of a hope chest. So, you know, unmarried women would collect things that they would need to embark on married, life linens, things like that. This is kept them in there. They did on us until they were married. I just have a chest of linens towels and sheets. And Dell's heats. And things like that. Guess nothing more I could possibly need other than just clean sheets. And tells I have always found that entire thing to be very weird in very strange. But the thing is, is that as a for a hope chest, you really talk to your mom, my mom, they would know what that is. That was a thing when our parents were growing up that this is what they did like they had hoped Chester. This is my mom, I who is her cedar chess thing that she still has that would've exactly been it. That cedar chests would have been that what they used for that. My mom had one as while it got destroyed in a flood, however many, many years ago, it was just smell weird. But yes that is what the dress was in and things like that. That's yeah. That was essentially, what that was women had these chests. So we moved from there from there, too. Eleven key basket. Ooh. This sounds like it just got a little kinky, everybody drafts their keys in a bowl, and then you just take a key later on. No, this is not wife. Swap. Oh. This is an American thing. This was solely. An American thing American brides would be gifted other key basket, which would give her keys to unlock doors, chests, cupboards, and things in her new home. You can get into your house. Exactly it symbolized her new status. This is what that did this symbolize status lady of the house. Cube thinking odd status to be granted. All right. But it wasn't until actually after that, that marriage still kind of on mount itself from status and ritual, you're not marrying so much for money anymore. You're not marrying someone because they are from the wealthiest family on the block. So therefore wedding. Wedding gifts. Kind of evolved in nineteen twenty four Macy's unveiled the first wedding gift registry. Macy's Macy's nation of our society. Right and other department stores quickly jumped on board. So really team twenty four nineteen twenty four. So it's actually not that long ago that this kind of became a thing within the past one hundred years and earlier days, gift registries of crystal silver China. We're very common things to gift a bride. And fact, it was a thing of status. It was an essential thing you have to bride. So I still have got nothing out of this nothing other than huge tracts of land someone's going to get that reference. And it's going to be great continue. But picking out the right China header was essential. That was thing. That was the thing of status. That was things that women would do they would spend hours and hours and hours, trying to find the right China pattern, which is why the blue Carell where the blue but this is my you're, you know, when your parents talk about bringing out the good China or your grandparents are talking about the good China. That's where this came from. This is usually. It was good ChinaNET, you know, the plastic stuff the clear stuff, that's when we had the fancy guests over. Today. We get to use napkins using Apkindo my goodness. All right, continue. And tell me how was when they bring out the nice China. Think you're thinking, like all right. I think you're thinking, like beauty and the beast and like other Disney movies where it's very earn mates and crazy. And there's like entire like people bringing out China platters and things. It's not quite like that. It was the nice dishes, though. We just had the Carell where with the little like fluid aletha. It was in, like a brownish green on the outside edge. Okay. Well, you had these migraine mom always had the good China breakable, by the way, they really are you toss those things against a wall say, let's say land absolutely face down, if it was a plate and like literally had like the air trapped and then they just. Or when you tried to pick them up, they would shatter in your hand. We're doing it again. All right. However, in the current era of gift giving so things like this with us, what we're going through gift registries tend to be a little bit more personable and different things for me. A lot of the times, couples live together before, marriage, PS four. Seventy two inch big-screen TV. I'm sorry. I was just going through in my head. What I was going to be doing with his registry thing. So kitchen appliances linens, flatware sometimes tend to not be as popular of gifts. A lot of times modern couples or finding creative ways to celebrate their setting up charities, donate to charities just asking for cash plight. Of course, cash money. So cash homey. I think that it's interesting to see how it's volved it's kind of gone completely off. Course from what it was originally. But it's kind of cool nonetheless. So nowadays uses head down to the local target. Or even online, Amazon dot com. And he basically just pick out things you pick things that you need things. That would be good for your home things I'd be good for your family might be I might be ready to stump you here again. But are there any rules for people say, in our situation? Who had previous relationships in there for then coming together as far as your gift registry. Or if you just have basic rules on gift registry anyway, I do have some basic rules after destroyed. I think that in our situation that really doesn't apply. I mean, there aren't going to be necessarily rules regarding the fact that we basically took two homes smashed it into one and have slowly been getting rid of everything and replacing it. I think that our situation, however, is probably more of the norm and kind of what they were talking about with the changes in society. Now, most couples do together. So even taking out the previous relationships when people move together, you're tending to bring to lays into one, you both probably probably have lived separately. Get rid of that old foods on mattress boys. Yes. Burnitz. Burnitz and don't ever expect her to sit on it. Got weird and personal continue, registries more personal than I did. All right. Why ding registry, do's and don'ts? Just give it up. Don't don't. All right. Do set up your registry early. Really? Yes. Why early well, because from the moment you announce engagement, friends and family will want to send gifts right away. This is the thing that happened. It is the thing that happens. I lot of the times, I think, when you have something like this, this people who may know that they wouldn't be able to make it to your wedding may know that they wouldn't be able to make it to shower. So if you have family that especially out of town family that is overseas family that is maybe older and knows that they can't make a travel. They may just want to get that out of the way as quickly as possible. Now, some people still do engagement parties. Some people still do engagement gifts. This is the thing that has always weirded me out. So we're not on board with that. I Don have engaged party, therefore, we can't get more stuff. Sorry. That's all right. Can't fit more stuff in our house, anyway, also too. However, one of the domains, do not register at just one location. That's bad. It is you wanna give about two to three is ideal to register and Napa auto parts. No. If possible at least one of them should have a brick and mortar store in the area where many of your guests live. Go ahead, select video sweet, just because you like the convenience of being able to shop. Online doesn't mean your grandmother. Your great grandmother, great, aunt, Juliet. Feels the same way never going into selective video. The thing is, is that having the ability to actually go into the store. Pick something up on paper. Look at something like that is going to make some people way more comfortable. Fair. Due. Register for a ride range of gifts at various price, points, people prefer choosing from a large selection. Do you have one hundred invited guests you're going to need a minimum of one hundred and twenty-five registry items? That's insane. It is. It really is. Going down the dollar. Paddock paper. But this actually gives you see Whoopi cushion because this, this actually gives you some pointers. It says registering at one kitchen store, one home goods store in one department store, should cover all of the bases. Now, a lot of work. I feel like in today's age. We don't really have such a huge distinction between these as maybe they do, either in bigger cities, or other areas or other times I think your biggest kitchen and home goods store, you're really gonna find, if he went like a bed bath and beyond that's going to kind of encompass just that part of it is this. Why target became a big deal? Covers the whole gamut of everything it does target Kohl's is usually another one, bath and beyond is one that most people typically do. BBB but about a third of your item should be under fifty dollars a third from fifty to one hundred fifty and the rest one hundred fifty and up, seventy two inch flat screen for Kate television. No. I really need it. I mean, we really need it. We really need it. We've really need. It really need it just like at one with the little like this kind of concave. So it's like at you and maybe maybe really thin has the lights in the background. So therefore, the entire wall lights up to match the colors of the TV screen to make you feel like a more immersive experience feel like you're going really fancy for TV that's going to sit in this living room. I'm just throw that out there feel like it's going to take up most of the living room at this point. I'm fine with that. It's knowing your audience is what it actually comes down to. And I feel weird that that's what they used. But it really is knowing your guest list. I don't know my audience at all. I've made a series of off color jokes less far today. Yes, you have. But for one for one couple having gifts that max out of two hundred dollars could be too much for another. They could be thousand dollars plus and be fine. So just something to kind of go by. Pizza cutter. Pizza peel pepperoni, you do not want to put your registry information on any of your stationary example. Do exactly that's exactly it. You don't want to put it on your save the date, you don't wanna put on your invitation. However website. Your website would be fine. But that was not stationary. See. You are able and you are okay to put a separate piece of information in there little slip of paper. Little slip of paper, you see that all the time that's perfectly fine. But you do not want actually printed on the material that's bad. Don't do it. Tacky. You can request nontraditional eight if they reflect you as a couple. Nine head rotating? Oh, sorry wrong show. Very wrong show. Not going there. Ignore said coming to new one example, that someone side was that they had friends who registered it REI, which is a sporting store, and they registered for eight tenths and a canoe owners. They were they were extreme outdoor enthusiasts. So it made sense. Derby dinners another thing wine. Registries honeymoon registries guests can say pay for your bed and breakfast while you're in Fiji. Things like that Fiji or just putting money towards your honeymoon. That's another thing that's kind of been a new thing couples that have been together for long. Periods of time. Couples who live together may just request that people donate money to their, their honeymoon fund. The Honey fund. Put money in the box for the Honey fund. It's as do wait to use the presence that arrive before the wedding. Wait. So if I get a brand new toaster, and I really want some toast. I gotta wait. Well, I'm gonna chill on it. I just to look at it the kit behind this toasters sitting there in that box. The advocate behind this is that if for whatever reason you were to call off your wedding toast better than that black and decker. If it was not take place for whatever reason, really wants those gifts should be returned. Sending back. Yes. But I get the money. No. You send them back to the people who sent them. Don't, return them and keep the money you, you should send them back who? So I mean I feel like this one is a little weird. But not so weird. I think that's fair. We like there's some scam artists out there. This having sham wedding, every six months just to gather a lot of. Appliances. Toaster ovens, right? Guess I don't know why you would wanna do this, but stand because they really wanna kitchenaid. I really wanna kitchen item. Listeners out there will be my registry. You do once. Right. Thoughtful and prompt. Thank you notes, emails, and calls do not count. They don't they do not motto. I know you do can I type them print them. No. Do. Guy's hand. I get hand cramps on I'm sorry. I can't within six weeks. You have six weeks. So it doesn't six weeks, receiving the gift, it'll be an assembly line. You want to write a note that references the specific abject in how or why you will enjoy using it. So you should keep a log, once you start receiving gifts from who when, and when you actually sent the no it out. So that way, you can make sure you actually did it aunt Jud I will enjoy the spatula. But in ways that I cannot write to you. Thank you note. You're really pushing to go to the other podcast, aren't you, you really, really really wanna get there. At that point where a married couple we do hind closed. Doors is perfectly. Okay. Fair enough. I suppose. Just think about the movie, stripes. The aunt Jemima from stripes. Twenty minutes at this point. They checked out. Or they need a chuckle. I do have another one of ten big registry, etiquette mistakes. You might be making please. Tell me putting the ninety big screen TV on the those TV keeps getting bigger keeps growing mistake. Number one would be not registering at all. Why is that a mistake? Well, your guests will want to buy youths. What if I don't want gifts? It's not tacky like you're asking for things, plus registering for gift saves you type and headaches. Basically, what they're trying to tell you is that at joys going to bring something to your wedding. It's going to save everyone. If you just tell aunt joy what to bring you this also, however goes back to the charity thing if you truly do not want things for yourself for your home. There are other options of things you can set up. Another one is waiting to register. The third one would be not taking inventory of your own stuff like getting stuff that I already have. Right. Which is not included. One hundred and two inch flat screen TV. Fairly soon. This TV is not going to fit in our house at all slamming, and be lifted on the wall. Get ten minutes, lessen the podcasts is gonna keep getting bigger. Registering at one store. Skipping. The fine prints. You wanna make sure you know about the store's policies before you register their return policy. And making sure that if your guests want to order something online off your registry. They're able to if your guests want to call in an order a why they would. But if that's what they wanted to do making sure that is convenient to an easy as Jude only uses the finest technology with her rotary dial. Telephone right, exactly. Dial kohl's. Kohl's. Do not register for only expensive pieces. So the one hundred twelve inch TV is like can't be the only thing. No. It cannot be the only thing can we get it set up so that like the hundred and twenty four inch TV is like a joint thing from everyone at the wedding. Well, what actually says, here is that if you register for some things under fifty dollars or right around fifty dollar Mark, and you were there's something bigger that you truly wanted you can return things and get that bigger up that bigger gift good, because one hundred thirty six inch TV is not going to cost less than fifty dollars. It is not this is true. Do not just register for the essentials, so. Things like that. So pin toothpaste. Thanks, jude. You wanna make sure that you're registering for things. You'll be excited to receive not just things that you could go to the local store and buy yourself and as just as easily. By so. Do not earn do not forget to put your registry on your wedding mope site. Oh, that's about that earlier. That's a big thing in our wedding website. It's going to be in our podcast website that as well. Who do we do have a wedding website? Oh doing. Yes, we do. You looked at it. I looked at it. Do not register only once I don't think you've covered that one on here again like. Do not register only one I think what they're saying. Back in registry. Change it at things as you see fit and was needed because a lot of times, you'll be getting shower gifts wedding gifts. So like you don't want seven gutters. Right. So take it off. If someone bought it, exactly and do not procrastinate on. Thank you cards. We kinda cover that but Sam ideal. You wanna make sure you're getting those out. I want everyone to know who buys anything off our wedding registry. You are essentially creating a child labor situation. All five kids, just signed writing goods. I feel like. Trace will give them the first card, and then they can just trace every card has to be different. You have to rate personalized notes based on what someone has given you and how, and why you're going to be in. Yes, it doesn't work, but I do have some other great articles that I will make sure put up on the website. You'll check them out while he'll make sure Honey. But I'll make sure that you do it. You know, thirteen unconventional registry ideas cash wedding registry options things, like what I was talking about with the honeymoon and other things that you can register for ideas and resources for you, the listener exactly that if I read, all these would take us into, like two hours worth of show. So check it out some good ideas. I actually found a lot of great things on Google. That was wonderful for this one goal registry. Yeah. They don't have that already. Also very true. Speaking of people giving people other things. Before we go into a little more personal side of things we're going to talk about the podcast right now. The podcasts at the dark, Wien dot com. You can head over there and check out all of our shows one where I'm allowed to curse, and then this one. Yep. And then how that goes that's pretty much what that is. Speaking of registering, there's one thing that we here at Brian Mel get married and the dark ravine need from you, and that's for you to register and basically, not even register just like our Facebook page. So go to Facebook dot com forward slash the dark ravine, all lower case. They'll take your right to our Facebook page just like the page. Great thing about that doesn't cost, you any money doesn't do anything other than tell us that you're listening. And it gives you access to all the podcast content that the dark ravine produces including the unadulterated Bs podcast as well as at some point leaguer flakes. We're literally going to do this at some point we have. Honky. Do that. We basically said, we're going to do these movies to figure out how to make it all work. Yeah. And if you like the unadulterated Bs Facebook page, please, please, please, please, please, like the darker ravine page. It gives us makes it easier we get to pass around all of our podcasts, and that way, you know, the latest news podcasts, and everything from the dark ravine, and that is our website at the Dirk Wien dot com. You should go there because not only are you helping this show you're helping our wedding. I mean doing this podcast, then costs a little bit of money. It doesn't cost very much, but it does cost a little bit. There is some church. Yes. Therefore, if you go to our website at the darker, Wien dot com. There's two ways right now that you can help us out. I don't have any sponsors. I don't have anything like that other than Amazon dot com. Where we have banners all over the website. You just click those banners and you go to Amazon dot com, and you can even check out our registry. Once we get it up on Amazon. Yes. By us things and the great thing about that is, if you go through that link mentally, are you buying us something, but you're also giving back to the podcast by clicking through those links? Those affiliate links help get us a percentage of the price of whatever you're buying, and it doesn't cost you anything extra. You just get the. The joy the warm feeling in your heart of knowing that, not only these, you get something for us in our wedding and registry. But you help the podcasts as well. It's true, the way of showing your support and even non-selfish Sandpoint by yourself something and click on that banner and help us out. That's right. You two need a kitchenaid mixer. And just as an example, just doing ahead. You buying the kitchenaid mixer just made us twenty seven cents. Oh, do nothing. Did every twenty-seventh? So it's helps I don't think I don't think it's that low. The other way you can help this podcast and others is through our patriot page and you can do that either through a website at the dark ravine dot com or you can go to patriotdepot dot com. PAT art, E, N dot com forward slash the dark Wien, that'll take you to our patron page where you can become a patron. There's as you can do that. You can either do that on a monthly basis where you give us a small meager amount. Let's say three bucks a month for all the podcast content that we give to you for absolutely free free free free for you to listen to this. And that just takes three dollars a month from your Bank account credit card whatever you don't even notice. It's there it's just three bucks. It comes to us. It helps pay for our production costs or you can give a one time donations through that page as well, anywhere up to I think the sky's the limit on that point, you can give whatever you want once, and it's never gonna come. Out again. It's just the one time let's say twenty five dollars twenty five dollars once it's there it gets taken out of your you're done. Thank you for supporting the show any of the people that actually sign up. They'll get mentioned on these shows. Definitely. So, like, I, I will know somebody gives we have the option to give out supporter gifts and things of that nature. That's something that's being worked on not right away at this point in time. But there will be exclusive podcast content down the road for people who are subscribers or patrons of the dark ravine dot com. So now I've tempting plugged everything there is to plug about the website. What about our registry? Have we done that yet? No do we have to do it. Yes. We do. So we have to like, pick a day. And go take the scan gun at target. Well, yeah. John, if you thought about this for us yet, I know you thought about this for the podcast information, but, like have you thought about this for us yet? Like, what are we gonna do? Well, I have actually would like new vacuum. Well, and that's just it. Our registry. We've already kind of decided, we'll definitely be doing an Amazon registry. Target again, that kind of seems to be that place that you wanna do that, at all those target just about everywhere. Exactly. Beyond that, I haven't quite decided we probably should pick a third place. Napa auto parts. A Byron Amata or register for random auto parts. Can we go to the liquor store? We helping the podcast things to drink when we do these things people, right? But I kind of figure that, that's one of those things that we're gonna have to sit down one of these days, go through, we've already kind of talked about some of the things we know we need. We know any dishes. We know you need enu vacuum. For example, ours is kind of randomly on its last leg choking. It's yeah. Yeah. It's, it's trying really is try try. It is it is. But things like that we kind of know that there's some things that we definitely need around our house, one hundred thirty six inch flat screen for K television. Sure. Honey said, ask him too much, if you want if you want to register for that you go right ahead. Please do not be devastated when we do not receive this. There was one thing. I wanted people thing you couldn't make it happen. Hate all of you. You're all uninvited from the wedding. Now, we won't know this until after the wedding will be able to see the one hundred forty eight inch flat screen TV box seriously to call off the wedding late. They're done. We've paid all this money for this reception. Screw you all. You must leave. Then ten minutes later, someone's gonna come in and hauling it in like, wait. Oh. Double prime rib for this guy. Double. No, no. You give him more is you give him more is. You don't skip on the whole skimp on the issue, but going on. We know that there are things that we want that we have not spent the money on to by far all kitchenaid mixer, for instance, because I really want one people. If you haven't figured this out, yet, on new coffee maker, curious kind of shitting, the bed as well. Things like that. Things that we wouldn't normally buy, I but we know we want. Feel a little dirty now. Begging for things, but you're not supposed to that is what everything that. I just said that means you know hundred and fifty two inch flat screen television, that when might you probably deserve to feel a little thirty for a little bit. It's the one thing I need one thing I need at this point people. We have run out of wall space. I don't know where he's putting it our living room is not that big. But you know he's in a figure it out. It's just going to be like a giant THX theater just in my little. Our neighbors are gonna love us. Dobie at most surround sound. I don't know how landlord will feel about it either. I'm not sure when like the entire house just shakes down around this, you know, down to three hundred seventy five days three hundred seventy five days just over a year. I know it is it is getting tight, but tune back in every week for another show I think we missed a week, but we'll be fine every week other than that. And also now at this point should be on I tunes. Yes, so citing, so you should follow and then leave a review of the show on items as well as soon as you hear this, go right there. Five stars. Please I learned wedding stuff. You may not even be interested in getting married. But you learn how to register for a wedding to register. You can laugh at our craziness and. So on and so forth. There was no laughing here. Oh, no. We're totally serious all the time. All right, Honey, three hundred seventy five days to go the countdown continues until next week. Honey, let me to buy. Perfect. Stay. I know it's true. With you think you're the wooden shoe of free. Perfect for me.

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Larry Magid: Findings Say Wireless Companies Throttle Video

Tech Reports by Larry Magid

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Larry Magid: Findings Say Wireless Companies Throttle Video

"Lyric average person tell if they are being throttled. It depends on the device that you're using and what you're watching not often often not all we should say it for example on a smartphone. You may not notice it because the video is so small to begin with you. Don't need a great deal of bandwidth. If you're watching get on a television set you probably would notice but the mobile carrier then with the exception of those people who connect their phone to their t._v. There may be some most people are watching it on a smaller screen and they may or may not notice it frankly if they're gonna notice. It is going to be slight in most cases. I'm guessing somewhere in the fine print of signed signed off that could do that for me well. It's actually an interesting question because what what i certainly signed off on if i go above a certain threshold if i use it's too much data they can do it or if heavy network congestion and can do it. That's what this study found by the way like all steady when i read through it i found some caveats and limitations uh-huh but this study that they're doing all the time not just when the network congestion and they're looking at all the major network eighteenth print t. mobile mobile and brian so ah frankly it would be a violation of network tragedy if we hadn't neutrality but of course the f._c._c. sent packing a couple of years ago and now there's legislation to try to bring it back but if indeed with the study suggests that there are throttling content and not other words they simply slow down everything that would it'd be. Hey we've got congestion. We need to slow down but if they're just slowing down video that is discriminatory and if we had the law that with one in play for the policy then it would be a violation but under the current regime. I don't believe it is a violation.

brian
Leadership With Brian Gordon

The Drozcast Podcast Speaking of Motivation and Leadership

49:14 min | 6 months ago

Leadership With Brian Gordon

"Buckle up you are about to enter the draws cast podcast your host author and motivational speaker. Jeff drope says he will transport you through the world of motivation and leadership. Oh is keeping an eye on having some fun too sometimes with a guest other times just jeff either way. You will leave better equipped to succeed sooner than when you came in here. He is the dress. Jeff Present Ski. Thank you author. Motivational Speaker trainer. Coach coach video blogger and podcast. Geoff Drozdovsky welcome back to the show. The draws cast podcasts. Speaking of motivation and leadership. Today I have a special guest. And we're just GONNA go ahead and get right into the interview. Have a nice bio to read about our guest. Brian Ryan Gordon here. And we'll do that first. And then we'll let Brian Kinda take us down the road of leadership and motivation. Brian Gordon is the Allen Alan W Bush award winner which is annually given to the Michigan High School Athletic Association Administrator Coach official trainer doctor or or member of the media who has at least fifteen years of experience in Michigan interscholastic athletics with unusually frequent and significant contributions. Contributions Ryan is the director of athletics at Novi Community School district. He began his his career more than three decades ago. As a physical education and health teacher for Royal Oak schools. He began that in nineteen ninety. He moved into the athletic letting Director Assistant Principal Role in twenty ten at Royal Oak and then became director of athletics at Novi High in two thousand twelve prior to becoming athletic director. Mr Gordon taught at the elementary and high school levels for twenty years while teaching. Mr Gordon Coached Baseball football basketball. Skit ball track and field from junior high to varsity levels including a long stint as the Royal Oak Kimball and Royal Kyw Varsity baseball coach from Nineteen Eighteen Ninety five through twenty ten. Brian was inducted into the Michigan. High School. Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame in Twenty Eleven. All Right Brian we are going to take it from there. Your bio is really long. You have a plethora throw of successes and we can get into those details but first of all welcome to the draws cast. Thank you thank you dress. It's great to talk to you. I went for transparency sake. Brian and I were teammates at Central Michigan University way back in the nineteen eighties. That's right folks the nineteen eighties. But it's I've been watching Brian from a distance His accomplishments and successes and as we moved into two thousand twenty with more guests. I thought Brian would be a great guest to have on talking about leadership and motivation and Doing a little show prep and having some conversations back and forth. I can tell you that Brian is. He's right on line with what his bio says he's very successful. He's got a great attitude and I know that he's GonNa share it with us today so Brian a lot to live up to dress a yeah I know I know that's the thing about having a big bio is now. You gotta live up to the expectation. Yes so we'll start off nice and simple here in the way that I like to do interviews as we kind of start way back when kind of build the foundation of how you got to where you are today the and then we'll we'll end it with some fun stuff so we'll go on from there but I question your background Tell us we came from the bio says a little bit but what I'm more interested and while you were growing up is we know about your sports interests Did you have any other interests as you were growing up. Gosh I like the fish you know growing up in class in which is pretty close. Goes to where you grew up drives. Our family was very much involved in the baseball community. Grandfather actually started the Little League program in Costin Austin back in the nineteen fifties. And so we've always been kind of a baseball family And as I was coming going through class in high school in junior high at the time there were a couple people that really made a difference in my life. Probably the biggest reasons why I went into education Steve Lousy was my baseball coach. And Dick Morris was my football coach in basketball coach. Those two gentlemen really Kinda showed me the way and the direction I wanted to go and then you know had a moderately successful high school baseball career. You're wearing an opportunity to go on and play for the Chippewas for a little while and central Michigan. Chihuahuas that it is yes and so while it. CMU just got involved in Education Some of our teammates. You were older much older than me draws. You're a senior. I was a freshman coach. Philosophy was baseball but coach Moore. Who was my football coach? This guy was also my junior. Your high school teacher. He e teacher a geography teacher. JV basketball coach Bercy football coach. You you know I really ended my dad. Two S in my dad was my coach for quite a long time and then When I got to a certain age My cat had a left town. I didn't like it is nowadays where everybody's at a travel team. So I left town when I was probably fifteen sixteen years old and so Rutgers but those people were very impactful Mike Rear Path and today. So what you're saying has this just wasn't baseball. You were kind of three sport guy. You played football in the fall basketball in the winter in baseball in the spring. Louis Okay but also awesome. Yes and so baseball was where your biggest talent laid. And that is evident with the fact that you received received a scholarship to play at Central Michigan. You saw you built that foundation through high school. You had a All those amazing influences and really since we are talking about leadership and motivation. Those influences that you Had as a youth is really what a big part of leadership is and school systems. Isn't it absolutely you know. Being the coach of the coaches naturally athletic director is You you serve as a mentor for many new coaches coming in So the coaches at that. We had at Royal Oak in Rural Kimball in here at Novi I've learned tremendously from them. I can tell you that As a young coach coming into into coaching high school baseball my very first baseball job was JD. Baseball coach at Kimball and A gentleman by the name of Frank Closer was varsity coach and frank was very happy with a one nothing win whereas all never left the Infield for either team and so he was kind of a small ball guy and but I never. I'll tell you what he is by far the finest coach that Dinah been affiliated with and so I came in as a young guy twenty three years old. Who thought you know? I played at Central Michigan. I knew everything about the game and what I didn't I didn't know was how to teach the game and how to rally kids and how to get kids to believe in you as as their leader and so Frank really did show me the way in that respect and another guy there too as well Chuck Jones with my athletic director. Chuck was to say something bad about the guy you'd have to make it up so yeah and for those view. Most of you out there who are not or did not grow up in the southeast Michigan area. Those two people that Brian Mentioned Chuck Jones and Frank Closure are legendary names that when he mentions those it does drum up all those things that you mentioned one of them is C. was small before small ball was Was Small Ball all right. I mean it was pitching and defense and if a guy got on then it would be you know still second bottom over to third and the ground Bala get him in. That's that's that's boring but it was successful. No doubt yeah. Well that's awesome So let's go back a two year. Cmu Days and What position did you play? I know but the people out there. I was a a very mediocre pitcher so My career at Central Michigan was a little bit quite a bit injury written We I lieutenant. Ninety S at a torn rotator cuff my junior year and so my time on the mound in Mount Pleasant was not glorious glorious by any means but I will say that Having the opportunity to be part of something bigger than myself. is is is by far my greatest memory of being a Chippewa us. Reconnecting alone is just disclosed Algae algae that you know. The program Central Michigan especially in the eighties and part of the early nineties was one of the finest in the mid west and it was because of the people. Oh Yeah we affectionately call those years the championship years and when you go back to my pleasant people in the Athletic Department apartment. That's all you have to say. Is I play during the championship years of the eighties. And the psycho man you guys. You're one of those guys you know. But they say it with reverence Prince because that was a very successful time and and that is Something else that wanted to make sure people understood is that So you know we played and we played a real high level ball at CMU. There was a couple of years there my junior and senior year in particular. We were just a stone's throw away from making it to the college world series. And you know. It was heartbreaking that we didn't don't but but you learn from things like that and I know during our show. Prep we talked about victories and losses and how that helps you later on in life. Is there any particular time Brian. Hi and in your sports career or maybe later on where you had maybe a a defeat or something went wrong but you really learned a lot from I can tell you that when when I walked away from the game. Back in nineteen eighty nine. Eighty Eight I had to sit down with coach screener and tell him that I couldn't i. I simply could not throw anymore that that was arguably the I mean at a young age of twenty one twenty years twenty one years old It brought tears to my eyes and and I can tell you that coach screener was extremely gracious. He continued to honor my scholarship. Even though I was not productive by any means. And I like to say that that I mean that was a defining moment home and how I would treat kids as a coach as a teacher moving forward. You know when we were talking about the show. Prep we were talking about kids. Want WanNa play for somebody WANNA be led. They a good sign of any program is when when people come back to be part of it. you've got back to central Michigan and and been a contributing member. I've done the same thing In how we do that could be with. Funds can be with planning the golf outing. It could be with recruiting It's something that I I'm very proud of that. That was part of something as is amazing and successful and not just from a wins and losses perspective but there are quality people that came out of that program that are doing amazing things now and to me. That's what that's what educational athletics is about. Even at the collegiate level totally agree and just a little bit of background on some things that Brian was saying. First and foremost Brian Story about arm trouble and rotator cuff tendonitis. And the road to Major League. Baseball is filled with guys like us on the side of the road who you know if our bodies would have held up we may have been able to move on and do bigger things in the baseball world as far as playing his concern but injuries are a big part of any sport. But especially when your arm goes. That's pretty that's pretty much. It so so the other thing is for those of you who are listening out there. Brian mentioned Dean Craner and dean. Craner Dave highlights pilots are legendary baseball coaches that coach during the seventies eighties and nineties at central Michigan and just as recently the as last spring they had their numbers retired and in their numbers are out in the outfield at CMU Mu thirty three and thirty four so they are legendary folks and dean was a d craner a teacher through and through and and your experience with him is amazing. And I think that kind of leads us into your after Afterlife College so to speak and the lessons that you learned in the lessons that you learned by the people that have have framed you so so we talked about how you got to wear your at What about being a vice principal? Now we'll talk about leadership here and a vice principal usually is somebody who doles out the discipline correct oil absolutely. Yes in my role all at at Royal Oak. It was very challenging. Because I was wearing two hats. You know The majority of the of the school day the assistant principal is responsible for like you said I had half the discipline in the building. I had a lot of educational responsibilities. Elise Rick Low Teacher evaluation Special Education needs a supervisor. lunchroom You deal with discipline as it comes in at you. A you know. Depending on the day you it's field trip and then at the end of the day we would put on the athletic hat and Make sure that bosses are going in the right direction. Officials are their coaches have with they need facilities are are maintained You have someone to charge cell tickets at the gate. Someone to run the clocks make sure the concession stands stocked in the The hot dogs hot dogs aren't burning and and then away. We go and so that they will go to about nine ten o'clock at night and so is you can only imagine Someone who holds that role as an AP ad they're looking at twelve thirteen fourteen hour days which it is very challenging. Yeah absolutely Being in the food business and having been on my feet for twelve and thirteen hours a day and running in a restaurant and trying to serve people. Great Food Great Service I can relate to that. Probably a big challenge for you would be when you're the dean of of discipline right and you have one of your players come in who who may be has done something that that's gotta be tough right. It's really tough because kids see when you're the ad or your coach you're looking in a certain light when when you're the assistant principal there's another light. And so I think what benefited me. What am I royal oak was that I was in the building for the first I twenty years as a teacher and a coach? And you know in those roles. If you're out to try to make everybody happy. You're destined to fail because that's just not going to happen. It really isn't That's where you have to think as a leader you need to draw on on your philosophy in your core values news and and some other things so kids get struggle with that you know there's loose fifteen sixteen seventeen years old when we were that age we struggle with it too not everybody is going to get in parents. Parents sometimes struggle with it as well. It's very it's a difficult position it truly. He is one of the things that you have to manage as a coach. You mentioned it. A couple of times is the parents right. Parents parents are are they all want their kids or they all think that their kids are professional athletes in the making king and sometimes they act that out on the fields of play and you probably have had a conversation jhnr to with parents about the rail in it in a little bit. Yeah that's something that we we spend a Lotta time with setting our expectations early. And that's what parent meetings got coaches in student. Athlete meetings But that's that's something. That is a leader. I think is important that you establish a culture that a is that we're everybody understands what the expectations are. And that's that's from the person who really kind of cuts the grass. All the way up up to the superintendent and how we how we conduct ourselves as people that are involved in in our Athletic Department and representatives of our school district in our community in all those are I mean. It's I called the no by way here. Just how we do things. That's how we do business and If we have folks that that struggle with that than than we than it's my responsibility to reel them it if it's even possible sometimes people never get and and that's that's the world that's the way like this so it sounds like you have built a a program there an idea that kind of showers down over every little bit and piece of your job All the different things that you have to worry about as an athletic director and I mean this as a compliment but it seems like you have built this way to keep all that in control troll but even then sometimes yeah even then sometimes there are things out of your control that you have to deal with. Yeah Yeah we We have an amazing team of people dress and as as a leader I guess of our department I never put myself like at the top. I'm not at the top of the mountain. We have a lot of people that are on the mountain with me and we all have different responsibilities. It it just so happens that on the athletic director. We have people in our office and support each and every day that we can't do business without them And how hard they work to provide an experience for kids in coaches and families in our community It's it's it's team and that's and that's one of our core. Values is team. That's a last one of our Senate It's really important that people believe they have a similar belief system not that they can't challenge you as a leader. I liked that I liked pushback. Because if we're pushing back we're trusting each other because they feel comfortable sitting down with me truth to power is as a popular phrase these days. But that's that's that's exactly what you're talking about. Is You know they can give their perspective. And sometimes it's very truthful a creek criticizing way. Yeah and it's okay. That's good that you accept that. Yeah absolutely so your philosophy then. As far as leadership is concerned sounds sounds like it's more of a servant leadership or a team oriented type of leader leader the mass right a great book if you've never read it in I how do you ask anybody to work hard. When organization if the leader of the organization is not working hard him or herself south and it does not happen overnight? You have to earn that respect as I tell the kids to you know a lot of times kids will say well. I'm not being respected respected. Well as I say give us a reason You know respect is not handed out like Halloween Candy. It has to be earned and how you earn that is is by putting your nose to the grindstone and being a hard worker and somebody who is a good teammate. And that's true in anything I think I always will add. End Our meetings with two phrases with our parents. One is one of the highest compliment. Anybody can ever ever pay your son or daughter. Is that he or. She is a great teammate. Literally had a gentleman stand up by himself in clap when when I said that and then the other one is this that parents and this I think this is true in life as we know. Failure can be your your greatest teacher. We asked parents that they prepare their child for the path not prepare the path for their child. And we see a lot of that too but You know those are two things that we emphasize around here where we do put the team. I in with our coaches. Were they work together as with everybody here here in the athletic office when we're hosting a state final out on us this year we hosted the state files for boy sacher. It is a team the people they're putting a product. We all have responsibilities yet. Going back to what you said about the respect factor. I have had that experience in the restaurant business as well especially when way back when when I used to manage restaurants that you give for a young person in particular maybe somebody who's never been in a position of authority regardless of age. You put them there and they think that A A automatically get the respect that their title says yes and no one leadership right there. Yeah exactly exactly and it's That is the biggest mistake that I see. People make when they get into a leadership position no knows of being a leader. You just mentioned one and that is when you get in a position of power that that power goes to your head what is there a maybe one or two other items that you think are knows of being a leader. Well no I mean I actually I wouldn't I I. They like to look at it a little bit differently where it's not so much the no no's but some things that you think are must do's must do to me would would be Find a mentor. Find Somebody who was in your line of business who you can lean on to help you along the way because it takes like with our coaches. I tire coaches. We only have A. We have a handful of master coaches people who truly are in it for the kids wins and losses. Don't make bets ninety part of their dialogue. That's not in their vocabulary. Abdulah winning and losing. We had a gentleman here. Brian O'Leary soccer coach and he would talk about winning Very rarely what he was. Most concerned concerned with was developing young. People into being amazing adults are young adults and he says that's up here. He says winning a State Championship is he's here and if we can get here all this other stuff will take care of itself but to truly believe that and where you focus is on that part of the coaching or leading whatever your role is and this is what I think. Athletics can do for people is really important. So you gotta find somebody. You'RE GONNA run into allow a lot of roads a lot lot road road blacks. That were you need a mentor. Who Do you pick up the phone when you call guide you got a Gal they you can lean on when you're so frustrated you don't know where to go and that goes not just in the education field to Have a podcast that I'm going to be doing on ESPN. I just happen. Happen to be in Bristol. Connecticut This past week and ESPN is headquartered. There so it just got me to thinking you know. ESPN big company You know we we kind of all know how it got started. But what is some of their philosophies that they have there and one of the items that they have that they subscribe to is the seventy seventy twenty ten method of leadership. Have you heard of that before. No Okay so seventy percent of what people do do or how they learn at. ESPN is really just based on on the job. Experience twenty percent goes to what you were saying about mentor. Ship and then ten percent is classroom training seminars. Things along those lines but they have have that mentor. They like have a mentor. Ship program that's built into their organization so it doesn't matter if it's education and doesn't matter if it's sports good companies realize stat mentors people who are going to pass the torch along to the younger longer folks it's important and an ESPN K.. State Bill Dad right into their model so in some leaders are really really good at like I call putting a round peg in round hole. You know you see people ed coming through your doors in you see something in like somebody saw something again. Me Chuck Jones saw something in me and put me in position where I could I could learn. You know Kinda learned the way and he he let me fail. And so we do that with our coaches like you know I remember my second year. Coaching Baseball as the head coach The a year before we had a really good year. And so what did I do went out and scheduled everybody and we ended up. My are only losing season. We are eleven and twenty two and and. I don't think you'll have had seen losing season since I think nineteen sixty eight which was called his first year and I know that because he reminded me of that when we had that losing season Nice in a frank ever watch this he will be smiling ear to ear. Chuck let me fail and all he did was bring me in and say okay. What what did you do? What did you do different from the year before you know? How would you change six and I remember saying why wouldn't a player way we play? He said that's exactly right. He knew what we had coming back but he also knew that you had to learn and so when you put people in those those round pegs around holes also as a leader in you give them that opportunity you know to to lead and little little little snippets bats. That's what makes an organization so strong yet. And that's what a good leader does and my vernacular what you're saying. Is You know. A leader knows their strengths. Thanks a good leader. A great leader knows what they're weak at and then they find people that have the talents that they're weak at the kind on a fill in those those spots. And yet you know that is a Richard Branson and a bill gates in a row L.. And Jeff bezos kind of philosophy is filling the round hole with a round peg like you said so find people and utilizing their talents and really getting out of their way to let them do their job. Yeah that's the other thing I I found about. ESPN to their their management leadership. Philosophy was that so five questions. I'm going to give you Brian First. First thing that pops into your head. We'll call this the speed round a okay. First question your favorite food seafood laughs leaf lobster WANNA have tonight. LILLIES downtown Royal Oak Lawson okay. Hey what kind of car do you drive. I haven't F. One fifty my very first brand new vehicle just got it last year. Never have had a brand new bill. My wife Yeah. I'm close. I'm close to that myself We we least for years as we were raising our kids and by I dream is to get a truck so behind you get drunk and you'll never go back this. Everybody told me never bacne right. Yeah what What sport other than baseball do you like to go? Watch live with ball. I really enjoy joy college or Pro College Guy. I really some of my when I do get some time I will The Saturday nights all the ESPN Games. It's great I go down in the basement now in my little world com. And I I watch watchmen college football. So would you call that your man Cave. Yeah well s are marseils. Works here in the office. Just got a man cave assigned put up the Christmas especially got it's got. It's got a name so I guess that's when when you could call it that and I love the college the Ncaa Basketball Tournament. That's my favorite event. Do you get to see that all the time. I'm now with your schedule or do you. DVR Games or do you just watch on your phone. I watched it and I got to screen tearing another stream there. Yeah we'll put it on during the day so it's running in. We got something going on here. I'll catch when I can catch it. One of the perks of being a dis. You got what three televisions probably in your we got a couple of video monitors a double header my office. So I'll work on the game on and the other so do you Do you like to travel. Oh Gosh I was just just had a conversation with mark you'll the executive director of the HSA last week and we were talking about that. In the only places I've ever really gone draft has been were baseball. Took me and that was either me or my Saad God because my son is played some baseball so I went to a wine months for my brother's wedding in have been to Canada so I mean I haven't been a lot of places now no by athletics is taking some pretty cool places. I'll be going to Baltimore next month for a Our soccer coaches upper national coach of the year or high school so Piper which is pretty cool. Yeah that's awesome there to be with him. So if you you know right off the top of your head some place that you've never been that you would really like to go. I want to get to Italy at least high in a lot of people's lists I would say that would be high on my list to and I've been fortunate ordinate but my first travels very first time I was on an airplane was on our southern trip my freshman year and we went down down to Texas and I had one of the worst flights in my life. People were were getting sick on the plane and and Yeah it was a wild wild wild ride to get from Houston to mcallen Texas. Sorry but from there you know there was the traveling traveling for the NC Double A. Tournament. You know the Mac away games and whatnot but then as I got into the restaurant business in particular to training that sat took me everywhere in the states so Fifty states and Canada and Mexico a little bit in Europe up sell when I retire. My wife is traveled. Though she's been the Europe she's been a lot of different places. I've always worked as of this recording. It's right before Christmas Do you have all your Christmas shopping done. Yes all UH. When did you complete it? Yesterday I was a day late out. There uh-huh maybe. We had a hockey game on Saturday. This past Saturday night at basketball Friday eighties. Don't typically they take you know you don't get a lot of vacation tag you really don't you're always on you know we. Everybody has his say rehear. The cell phone we call this. Our Electric Electronic tethers and so in our role. You've gotta be available We had the team got stranded where the bus didn't show up who they again. Call me call me so we gotta get those kids picked up so that could be at ten o'clock on a Friday night so that goes back to you. Know the position that you're in and the the success that you've had but in particular in that situation really any situation as the leader you can't have a nine to five job and kind of let it go it just doesn't It doesn't work like that because the people's needs skull beyond you know business hours and when things happen you know someone has to pick up. You know it's you know. Coach was at a bowling alley and he's got his kids in. It's our responsibility getting back and for me not to take that phone call. I mean that is Wrong as a day long. Just you know we got kids out there coaches who are working art art in so you need to be working hard right along with them and so that's what it's about so tell me about this. Is I guess a a time to take a victory lap Brian Alexa. Let's show off a little bit. What is the Alan Bush award? Now I know that it's for the M. H. H. S. A. Administrator coach etc.. Is that like the Academy Award of Michigan High School. Athletics are a Golden Globe. Call it okay since you put a net net Irreverence those kinds of awards. The Ala Bush award goes to somebody. WHO's been around for a little bit but has done significant amount of Service do educational athletics and the MHSAA EH here. At last year alone we hosted twenty four different MHSAA tournament events and five state finals. Five in five different sports and so we we are filing referred to as the HSA East Which means and you know? Nobody does their lion share of support when it comes time for state tournaments and oftentimes our teams are not even in these things. We just we do it. Because it's that's what that's what provides a great experience for kids and it isn't just your own kids. It's all kids and so Myself along with having three other recipients Serbian this past year received award So and I said that's a team award because at that Brian Gordon like all by himself. There are hundreds of people who do things around here. Yeah and that goes back to our. Cmu Days and it when you're in high school on a lot of situations you're you're the best player at least on your team. Oh yes and maybe the best player in the area or one of them and then you go to the next level and you learn very quickly that not long. I think my second day. Yeah that you you know. You're not the best player on the team. But so you have to improve very quickly and you have to at some level everybody start to put work into it and you really at at least for me and then I have to put that much work into high. School looked practice and stuff like that but as far as the work and the work you know it took me a year and a half really before or you know I started getting some significant playing time. Just because the level play one and then there's that next level and you hope that somebody on your team kind of carries the flag for you or carries the torch and maybe get some to the big leagues and In our case Kevin Tapani was able to make it to the big leagues. And those of you listening. Google Oh Kevin Tapani. API and you can see that He had a real nice career and was part of the nineteen ninety. One Minnesota twins world series at the Classic Classic One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety one world series. And you know so. That's what you represent a Brian or anybody who receives that significant of an award year carrying that torch up there for all those other people that have supported you You Agree Oh okay One hundred percent. Yeah matter of fact they should have given out. It should say not athletic department is should not say me And I do mean that with all. Oh my heart because without people the people around you are who define you. They really do in. I tell our coaches all the time like you are the average of your five close friends and tell kiss as well if you look at you know with kids. It's good grades and you know what they do what they do when they're not in school. You're five friends will define you professionally if you take your best friends drafts. A you are the average average of that. And what how much money you make or the success however you measure success Those five people will define you in. So that's if this is the same thing gear with all the number of people who do all the great things around here Jim Fowler our grounds guys who they do outside all the officials does it come in and Bar McDougall who are athletic secretary nationally boots. Both of them were so hard. And that's what makes no what it is a really is so you're going to get some awards for the kind of stuff go ahead. That's just eighteen team. Yes so it sounds like you built a great team and You probably have some outstanding facilities as well right if people want to come back to Novaya. Oh my gosh yes. We're very fortunate where the community is invested in what educational athletics US and the people above me you know Dr Mathews our superintendent In a doctor. Kinser Dr Dr Webber and I call them the big four. They are four big decision makers they appreciate and understand what educational athletics does for Kids Kids families and for community and for the identity of building. Its culture this is the culture we at culture really starts. It's with with leadership so yeah and you probably take some cues from your principal as well. Nicole Carter is fantastic. She's a member number of the Rep Council for the MHSAA. So she's also involved her matter of fact her husband. Nigeria Carter played in the NFL. Oh Yeah Yeah. So we have We have amazing leaders in our district on old. Is the number one public school district in the state just recently was rated number one But it's it's because of the people in it's because the community's expectations are such that we do have high achieving professionals. Yeah alright so I see that in two thousand eleven when you were inducted into the Michigan High School Baseball Coaches Association Hall of fame. Yes that's pretty impressive. And really in the grand scheme of things fifteen years is not really a long time. Some coaches go on though the Harrington fellow at Armie Ted Harrison he was there for two lifetimes Yup two times so I again really dries draws you were part of the Royal Oak families I mean. Royal Oak is a great community where they have some really fantastic kids in Baseball's a big part of it. And so so you know frank clousre ahead of me is also in the coaches hall of fame. He showed me how to coach he and dean screener to just a small and teaching skills and in getting the most kids in baseball game. You can control Would always say so. We had great families and who supported us. And we we. We are refurbished. A kill. Oh High School's baseball field immigrants field. I know you probably used to plan on that. Slag that was. That was a mess. We're literally throwing rolling uphill by three feet from Hawaii Iran to the to the shade. That's right that's right retaining wall in all everybody who supported that and so you know. The framework in the foundation was built by Frank Collar in again Chuck Jones and so as the corrector. So I just I took that torch in trying to make a little bit brighter and out on a lot of games but you know I get I get if I got a second here. I'll tell you a quick story about one of our kids. I I had gone out to aligns game and I'm I M my appendix went so. My son drove me to the emergency room table. So just a little bit of a background so you went to the lions game right and during the time that you left the house to the time you got to Ford Field or one you've got to Ford field Your Appendix Burst. Yes it didn't burst but we a lot of pain and so they just out of nowhere. Nowhere Oh boy dogs when we went a lot yet probably probably that gotten up to Troy Beaumont in land there at about midnight they find out they gotta take it out and the surgical came up to me and said well. Hey Coach looks like I'm taken onto your appendix and so it was a kid Brad Watson who played left field. I and gamble a great kid and obviously doing great things. Now people taken taken Taken responsibility for you there. Wow that's pretty crazy in any field or so and then I see a lot of these see the final fours the regional championships district championships. Amazing stuff that you've done and last question for you. Brian Give me one defining winning achievement. And the life of Brian Gordon. I have to say the Allen Bush award was really important to me at dries I I get a little choked up talking about this because battle award was originated in nineteen ninety two and the very first recipient of that award was Chuck Jones else. Oh Chuck and Chuck passed away this past June fourth and for me to be named recipient. FBI two weeks afterwards. Really Kinda hit rate in the old heart there. That's a full circle al-Qaeda it is and when I say it's a team awarded. It is a team award and whenever I'm faced with tough decisions decisions to make you know when I talked about mentors before I always will reference back in my mind. You know how chuck handle this and so it's the guy's been really important to me you know and to get that award went where he was was the very first recipient and I lose him all in one swoop than was pretty. It was pretty pretty powerful Okay well thank you for sharing that not everybody Kind of opens up during during an interview like that. So Ah definitely appreciate it. Take care draws cast podcast listeners. Thank you Brian Again. Take Care Bye for now. Thank you for being being part of the draws cast check Jeff's website draws talks dot com to find out more about booking jeff for your next event also draws talks dot com. You can purchase Jeff's book inspired hired Howard. Differences are changing the workplace or inquire about Jeff's training programs and personnel or executive coaching. All of justice video blogs can be seen on his youtube channel. Jeff Bezos Sqi. Thank you and bye for now.

baseball Brian Michigan Chuck Jones High School Royal Oak Brian Gordon director CMU football basketball Athletic Department Jeff ESPN Central Michigan Brian Ryan Gordon Michigan High School Athletic principal Brian Kinda Athletics
Introducing Impeachment with Brian Lehrer

Impeachment: A Daily Podcast

00:35 sec | 10 months ago

Introducing Impeachment with Brian Lehrer

"I'm announcing the House of Representatives moving forward with an official impeachment inquire you cannot find any reason to impeach president impacts are nationals Kurti and Congress has a whole host the news is rapid the political cries are loud and our democracy is in crisis. I'm Brian Lehrer and you need to know in impeachment news today. We're bringing you the latest in the impeachment inquiry story.

Brian Lehrer House of Representatives Congress president official
Brian Wilson with The Zombies

Talkhouse Podcast

44:13 min | 11 months ago

Brian Wilson with The Zombies

"Hi this is Keri Brownstein stoop. This is Dr Bernard. I'll see you got the lizard right here. Is Me Down Right here. Thanks to Tyler Trucco quest for at arm's Tim Brits all of your yourself mice. Thanks and you're listening to the talk house podcasts and what is this Elian Horn here in Brooklyn and joining me from Chicago Josh Modell what's up. Hey Man we have an amazing Talk House House podcast episode for you this week Listeners Brian Wilson and the zombies are touring together. I Repeat Help Beach Boy Brian Wilson and recent rock and Roll Hall of fame inductees. The zombies are touring America together right now and guess. What did you guess did you guess is it? We are so truly truly pleased to have them in exclusive conversation together right here on today's show. It's an all star cast this week. The zombies songwriter and Keyboardist Arjun and singer Colin Blunt Stone along with Brian Wilson Fellow Beach Boys founder and rhythm guitarist and harmony singer Alger Dean Nineteen Seventies Wendy's Beach Boys Edition on Guitar Vocals Blondie Chaplin who also played with the stones for fifteen years insane resume and Darren Sanja Gotcha who's played with Brian for two decades and who was key in the making of the fantastic. LP Smile way back in two thousand and four federally enough dairy and has also toured as a member of the zombies zombies. This guy has serious chops. Now the zombies formed back in nineteen sixty two in Saint Albans. That's not too far north of London their break cocaine a couple years later with the single. She's not there and then sixty five tell her no and the nineteen sixty eight smash hit time of the season from the album odyssey and Oracle cemented meant their status in the timeless Pantheon of musical greats now Josh I realized that my hyperbole has reached new heights and yet it is completely justified is to fight here. We have a conversation with the guy who made pet sounds one of the greatest albums of all time yes sir and the guys who made Odyssey and Oracle one of the greatest albums comes of all time. It makes sense that you're a little excited. Let's take a moment to play what is a lot of people's favorite track from Odyssey Oracle. Here's a clip of time of the season season before we hear this song Elliott. Let me ask you three quick question. Okay I'm here for what's your name. Who's your daddy is? He rich like me. The Greatest Lyrics all oh man he can't beat Daddy Daddy in AS Roma's showed you too yeah. I love that track so so so much. You know what's Funny Josh I I heard it when Belle and Sebastian covered it. Oh that's funny yeah. It was a late comer to the zombies not just because of my age I was GonNa say you weren't born yet when that song was a hit so but you know who I've been into since I was eight years old the beach boys I believe it. I mean the the beach boys early hits are sort of accessible to anyone and of course as you get older you can get more into the nuance of what was happening happening. They are truly like a huge pop band. They've sold one hundred million records but there are also musicians musicians and they're certainly one of the most influential and legendary very groups of all time. The beach got together about a year before the zombies in nineteen sixty one but across the pond in Hawthorne California just outside Los Angeles this string of hits that followed it includes Surfin. USA California girls got only knows good vibrations help me Rhonda don't worry baby and literally dozens more we could take the rest of the show just naming their heads. Let's do that for an and let's just as an exercise now. Brian's gone onto release some incredible solo records including the aforementioned Brian Wilson presents smile. That's a studio version the lost beach boys album from that. Lp Let's check out heroes and villains. I'd Eddie been to ride in the wrong and sunny down sued by the heroes et Josh I got to see Brian Wilson and dairy and saw Najah speak about the making of smile in two thousand five live at South by South West and I learned something that my fellow hardcore Brian Wilson fans may already know by now these days Brian is a man of very few you words. They're powerful. They're inciteful. There just aren't many album. Hey with a guy like this who has released so many genius records. You take what you can get a men now. The Brian Wilson zombies tour kicked off on August thirty first in Las Vegas at the joint at Hard Rock Hotel and casino. That's where we recorded this conversation. Sation between the two acts sound checks Brian in the guys literally walked off stage into the room to talk with the zombies and the zombies literally walked out of the room onstage to soundcheck on this tour Brian is concentrating on tracks from a couple of kind of weird outlier beach boys records nineteen sixty eight friends and nineteen seventy-one Surf's up an environmentally conscious record which just kind of perfect for right now. He's GonNa play some rarities and of course a lot of beach boys classics. You're gonNA hear all the hits and then some great cool stuff yeah. I got to catch catch Brian. Touring pet sounds I saw him at Primavera in Barcelona ended pitchfork in Chicago. Amazing amazing shows truly special zombies are GonNa give the people what they want playing odyssey oracle in its entirety home and some great new songs Yeah including one Colin mentions they just finished last week still kick in in the guys get into a lot here we hear about the early days of both the beach boys and the zombies and their deep love of each other's music we also hear kind of a bittersweet bittersweet story about founding zombies guitars Paul Atkinson who left the band to work on the label side with acts like Elton John Abba and the beach boys it was fun to learn about the challenges challenges and playing songs you haven't played for fifty years yeah and the recording of the friends album which was done in Brian's living room amazing which he lets us know or in this conversation version dogs about how that was not his favorite way to record at home. The guy is also get into how Brian's work with the legendary wrecking crew and his pet sounds record record inspired odyssey and Oracle about the surf's up albums legacy and quote balls out Hammond B three organ and a quick note before we rotate on this this this talk is followed by some of our favorite moments of Brian Wilson zombies on the talk house podcasts from back in two thousand sixteen. We hear a one question wonder in which Carly Rae Jepsen asks Brian Question Russian backstage a pitchfork music fest where they both performed and then the zombies and conversation with their friends Hollis Brown a chat that went down live at the flagship Samsung store in Manhattan's meatpacking district Yup does fantastic moments from the archives and now let's roll a little beach boys and zombies in Condo. Check it out hi. I'm blender Bundy Chaplain Russian here from Zombie Geraldine from the beach zombies his Co.. Johnson from Serbia's Brian Wilson hasn't started yet but this is a night tonight and we're just doing on behalf of this is just really very thrilled to be playing with Brian in the guys. We're we're really excited about it. It's GonNa be a wonderful adventure for us. Tonight is the first night right so yeah. It should be a lot of fun. I'm looking forward to I'm nervous. I wasn't going to admit it but if you admit nervous planned songs we haven't done for fifty years. Oh well well. We're playing one song. That was any written about a week ago so I yeah yeah. We need to soundcheck absolutely yeah but Darren's used to play with this. Aren't you Darren. I am and I'm so looking forward to playing with you guys again. I'm Darren saw Najjar by the way I I play keyboardist and singer in the Brian Wilson Ban for how many years Brian Twenty twenty twenty years wow twenty wonderful years. I'm so grateful to be playing. Brian's is music and then I was so touched when I was asked to sit in with his Arby's as well for their odyssey and Oracle performances performances that started about ten years ago. I guess they did Darren and we wouldn't do it with anybody else. Because it was fantastic because Darian you medicine medicine I think about two thousand and four we played the key com- yea and you were there and you started playing a rose for emily which is a song oh I'd written on Odyssey and Oracle and I said hey what are you doing. You said Oh well you know we're we're big fans and I realized that when we started to play artists in Oracle we would only do it if we could reproduce every single note on the original album because we didn't want to do it otherwise with the original guys you know and you were the guy that that did all the Millerton thoughts that under originally played and you note perfect. No that's really honestly honestly we would do it without Darren Interesting Times Darren was saying to road no. That's not what you played in. This is what you plan on these Darren Right. He was right differences. He told me the same thing I I guess I knew proved me wrong. What do you think Brian Brian? Am I okay and you're banned. You're fine. You're good. Hey who'd well. That's great to anybody else so there would we're doing songs off the friends album same year as the Odyssey and Oracle album we thought that would be nice but then also some songs off of the surf's up album which ones eating being from surf's up yeah we're doing more blondie seeing two of Carl's songs great long promised road and in feel flows yeah yeah and then the title track surf's up surprise doing so we doing that and Dan looking forward to this is the first thing a lot of hanging to do and Al's got a few tricks up his sleeve will was that what was the last thing we ran yeah nervous about it. It did it's fine. I like the Oregon break biggby three organised you don't you don't hear that too often. In Our music no balls out these religiously sound yeah that picks up renters are waiting for that all during the song the other keyboard is in the band Gary playing the organ soul and at one point we were kind of struggling with it and I just said you better get shape because Rod Argentina he did. He kicked a new is great. He was inspired off with a little bit of so. I hope everybody comes down gets a piece to this because we're going to have a good time so as to do Brian. What's your favorite stuff off? The new of the new songs were doing like friends wake the world yeah I'm not so conversant with friends L. Much really looking forward to hearing this stuff yeah uh Francis like a home movie that that gets better and better as you listen to a little rough around the edges but perfect from within yeah kind of this because as we didn't have all the professional gear that most studios have we did it in his living. Oh did you with our sound system equipment we we take pick our Sanga on the road bring it home break it down and that would be our studio speakers and we'd record in Brian's living room but that can have a real feeling of its own the thing about the album very intimate and very easy breezy the surf's up album which came what seventy seventy one who that I know has gone down in history as being like the first sort of hip album really appealed to the FM radio movement that that was happening at the time so it was kind of dark album kind of addressing a lot of ecological political issues of the time and so that's always has been it's had a reputation but now it's come around where a lot especially like a younger generation. They're discovering the really loss beach boys albums of the late sixties season. This rich friends is one of them. You know that was always the tradition of the early beach boys was made the fat that you guys recorded. Stop with your own. Ideas are not in the traditional way that was the production of a record on the Brian so much had these fantastic original ideas and you weren't just trying to tread the path that everyone else had trodden so that's less route. Tradition isn't always moving always moving mm forward orange going forward on his mood no looking back. We'll look into tomorrow. That's yeah that's fine talking about Brian. What did you enjoy most? Did you enjoy most working in the studio or at Your Home Studio Yeah. Wasn't there any convenience lenience that you enjoyed at home. No do it again. We did exist studio well does the studio does hearing a whole bunch musicians playing together. You know zombies. I remember seeing the stuff where Brian was directing the wrecking crew. This quarter famous thing is in the on its own sparring because Brian you had you had the direction so down. It was fantastic when you were just saying no. I want to hear it like this. Can we just have a bit of Auburn here. No no no no no no drums right now. I just want to hear a bit of percussion here. Yeah that's great. You know that was inspiring to us because we did all the oracle was it about a year after sales came out and that feeling of structure the was on pet sounds I mean I can honestly say we didn't copy anything from the album but the actual the feeling of expanding the structure of music that time was something that was very inspiring to us and it was certainly with the songs that I wrote on the album and the thing that you were always seem to be part of your music Brian a things that I really felt allied to were the melodic logic by parts that yours used in your music and an when I first wrote she's not there. The Bass riff was the first thing are wrote on there and I was thinking about melodic baselines and I was thinking about different drum patents as well different to the way late bronze or things but now Brian was had that I thought was pet sounds you took it to another level. It made is certainly made me want to develop some songs like care of cell forty four. I mean some of the the baselines from things like on Sansom. What's it called here today today? Okay yeah on those lovely almost orchestral Contra Punch lines that you had that honestly it was it was such an inspiring thing and in an indirect way I think on that feeling that it was possible to expand the pilot of what we were able to do and it always is felt to me and I might be wrong about this but at that time so many of the people in charge of the recording industry record companies didn't really I understand what was going on so they would leave your up to us in a way that I don't think many bands can do now and so you could use the experimental mental directions that you feeling they would accept it because they said well do it and you know because we don't really understand what's going on here on that felt very freeing and it was like a time when all the boundaries were able to be explored and advanced but certainly you know we'll let me know that pet sounds had a huge impact on the Beatles and it certainly in our own special way. It did allow US music too so thanks for that okay okay. How about that Brian Yeah? So what songs do you like like all the time of the season visit. Oh that's a beautiful green law to the major age colon. Go get them. I remember we did a benefit for Paul. Atkinson who is guitarist and our band don I know he he worked with the beach boys albums and you did a benefit and we were there as well and I always remember you. You asked him what song he would like you to play and he said don't worry baby and you said you know we don't normally do that but for you. This is your night. We'll do it and it was so special that was it was really special absolutely beautiful where was it was in. La What what was the Blue House the blue a wonderful evening. We've met you by then. Yes we have many. It wasn't funny thing is I met Paul many times hijackers of things like you know presenting the beach boys with some kind of honor or some kind of record sales but I didn't know it was the poet I'd always heard it was Paul because Melinda and Brian would say oh Paul this Paul that you know and I always show up distinguished British John and adheres accent and then later I saw his name printed on something Paul Atkinson. That's the Paul is that I remember watching him and asking him and you're you pause Atkinson from the Camby's and he he did this sort of like oh you're the cart but for him he done some it was almost as if he was referring to like something he did long long ago because he's done so much sense right right. He's a record executive very successful but unite that night in La when when we play Bryan his family had never seen pull Atkinson on stage so that night he got up and he was very ill he got up and I'm played with us and he was so excited she because that was the only night that his family saw him up on stage playing with the band. He said I really want to do it because they don't believe the acts you've you've ever play and he had a catheter in his arm and he had morphine going into his arm so that he could play just on that on that a little sad that we did together yeah it's on it was also learned. Oh sure we're GONNA love the show tonight. I'M GONNA be great great yeah. I'll tell you what if I wasn't involved in the show I would buy ticket. I it's not like they blondie just army you played songs and nine hundred seventy one with us when you joined the band yeah yeah at least the surf's up stuff right renew surf's up tonight to yeah and is your cog in all the whole tour right so you were there knew played lots on base. This is a play based on and surf's up always a surf. Did Yeah Analog Pravo Fouhy for years. Did we do feel flows in. I think called it and promised to yeah so now you're seeing lead right there. You go took a little while but we deployed together wants. It was in Nashville. It was in Nashville and we went you. You invited us to AH party after the show we were playing together and all this modern different night but we went there was a barbecue and and the first armored I've ever heard ball ball ball opera and the very first time yeah and you were doing the barbecue this. I thought it was really cool back. Then when was your which is sixty five. Would that work out not anything right now. Brian was Brian was the first time I'd say didn't they played in England well yeah it was a big hitting sixty five or talking about. You're talking to sixty yes. When did it come in sixty sixty six sixty five I? I don't know Barbara Nine hundred sixty five alive. Oh alive hardy West already up so we met them. We we met then we played in fact. You invited us to the beach after the after the tour we we know I mean you. You said when we go the west coast coming third in the calendar didn't yeah yeah I think Brian. I think that's when you quit. The road right nineteen sixty four. I wo- I wrote pet sounds shortly after I got after so that was who replaced you on the road grim Campbell thanked Campbell was there yes. Can I tell you I'm sorry no no going goes the second. I'll tell you a little family anecdotes about Barbara Ann when my when my little boy was about three years old oh you may have been younger naturally yeah he was was young because we're always pushing him in the Prime Pram stroller yeah locker stroller yeah like a pro and he was really really little and and I was walking along with my wife and I started seeing bar bar Bar Bar Barbara Ann might son Mark when no no I thought was kind home what what's wrong with him and this happened two or three times and then I realized that when I'd started singing that just the thing that we used to do with cathy she would try and sing the home then get wrong. No no no no no no and he picked up on the living. We didn't realize that was the case musician. He's he played the drums while but you know he didn't keep it up. I'm afraid he's got a good ear then yeah but you had something about just now. I'm absolutely sure that when we played together in Nashville Brian wasn't there. I just remember what I didn't know that didn't know that Glen Campbell took his place but I remember remember the show. I watched it on the side and I I remember the show really really well off this great but someone told me that Ben Campbell was in the wrecking crew. Yeah yeah was that right okay. He started there though right right he was first musician and then he beating the beach boys and then he had a solo career right right well. You wrote a great song for him. Guess guys ever heard uncle get some that he wrote and produced Oh well Hello Lackland task sixty four Y- you and your dates on ah sixty four was a good year goodyear jewelry baby sixty four hundred and sixty four hundred well okay well. Everybody enjoy the show coming your way your way all right. Thanks so much to everybody who participated in this conversation today Brian Ryan Wilson of course along with Rod Colin L. Blondie dairy. I hope I'm not forgetting anybody. There's a lot of voices in there a lot of experience on this podcast Jackson Jackson. I was editing this conversation. It occurred to me and I don't mean to sound too poetic. Just how many millions of broken hearts these guys have helped to heal through their songs that was too poetic. They'd bring it out of me. Josh they just bring it out on me listeners. If this next clip sounds like a little bit of a chaotic situation Shen guess what it was we were backstage at pitchfork twenty sixteen and had just hung out with Brian Wilson in Barcelona backstage. I got to interview him. There air for another project and Brian said to US ED pitchfork. I'm down to answer a question. What do you got? I quickly hit up carly RAE JEPSEN and said. Do you WANNA do a one question under with us. Here's what happened hi. This is Carl Jeppesen with talk house. I'm about to meet buying Wilson shake in my boots. One question go brain's. It's an item ear been asking the question Pat Hi Hello so my question for you. obviously does your songwriter of all songwriters. How did it start for you? What was the first time you realize that you had a gift of songwriting and Rose Nineteen? I wrote surfer girl. That's where my I knew. I had a gift really yeah. I'm Acoustic Guitar. You're going on channel okay. What was it sparks from? Where did the inspiration comes from the four freshmen? Okay amazing okay all right bye bye Josh Josh. I think we're GONNA have to keep calling for on Tacos podcast. What are you signed her up? She's amazing. She's awesome. I'll tell you what else was awesome a conversation that we hosted at the the Samsung store when it first opened here in Manhattan in two thousand sixteen between the zombies and their friends in the band Hollis Brown you can check out that full talk in the House archives but we've chosen clip for you today. That really takes in some amazing stories from the zombies earliest days to their reunion we hear about their early image problems having hit at the wrong time realizing they were rockstars in the Philippines and so much more. Let's do it going back back to the sixties talking about nine hundred sixty four to nineteen sixty seven we had the most pulling image especially in the UK and his didn't not rock and roll which wasn't a good start I but basically we were eighteen years old. When we very first straight out of school with straight out of school we didn't understand anything about the business and it was totally out of our control and I think I always say usually except of course most graciously any success that you get any time in your life but out of choice it might have been interesting if our first hit record come a couple of years later when we understood the business a little bit better than we could have been more in control because they they just seem to be so many things against us and we were presented very much as sort of academic school? Boy's people won't plans to be dangerous dangerous and we were in particular academic. Say What can we hang this story on and that follows around the same time you got Jagger. WHO's at the Russia's top university? Are you got Joe's Manfredi was Oxford absolutely crazy. It was so false and that's one of the problems. If you try to create an image that is not true. I'm in it really backfired on us because it wasn't our idea. That's a great Beatles. They would just is totally natural. Absolutely and people don't who younger don't often understand what an enormous departure that was because up to that time the whole show Oh biz concept was that you said certain things you never mentioned other things Lennon McCartney and what all of them when they were asked a question they would answer it only stars they would just say exactly what they thought it got into trouble sometimes but they're from a tough city Liverpool right yeah. They were just being themselves and that that is the answer. I think let me ask you when you guys reunited fifteen years ago. Were you aware that to a particularly to your songs I know for me timeless season. She's not there had become basically Siklie Standard Repertoire every rock station in America Classic Rock Station Well. I did know that because the thing is it was that really that provided you know I was always afraid. Lucky having written songs personally it provided me with a cushion of finance which enabled me to follow what I wanted to do so always very aware of you know I think to a degree they wrote that was a surprise for us. Because when we first started for the first six or seven years we toured as column loans and enrolled Arjun not zone visit because we didn't want to sit artificially rake over the call and also we didn't feel there was that much interest in this opposite wasn't wasn't too we got out on the road that we realized that internationalists not just in the UK not just in America. There's a huge interest in this on this and it took us buys is a very pleasant surprise but it really took us by surprise and in the end we were being asked to do more and more Zombie chains chains. We'd forgotten auden embarrassing situation. We had to relearn Zombie chains with that. There are fifty years something we've never played live no probably just played them in the studio media and then forgotten. WE'VE GOT A couple of Utah in Asia in do in fact the Philippines is probably the country we were biggest in really would be the other side of the world. The first time we went to the Philippines and six sixty seven and we had no idea about the Philippines a tool in my mind's. I thought we were going to go to an island island resort. Well this manager. We had this red hot manager. He was terrible. You lose money so I thought we were going to kind of resort and we would be playing in a hotel bar in the evenings and hopefully reduce some somebody during the day so they thought well it'll be a little holiday when we arrived at Mineta report. It was the middle of the night and they were thousands of people that we did that sort of thing. When you get off a plane and you you look back to see who's on the plane on the plane that these people have come to see and then you suddenly realize it's us? They're all film crews there and we open to twenty eight thousand people at the Araneta Coliseum residents residency on the next night was thirty the two thousand people and we've been we were being paid eighty pounds tonight. Oh man he's like one hundred and forty dollars between us to play to twenty eight thousand one was it was year sixty six my inflation office that like it's not good business. You have to realize is that one hundred and forty dollars in those days worth at least a thousand dollars a night now. Maybe one thousand people don't come to us about the best people to advise them business. We found out that the guy the promoter there God knows where I manage it was making uh-huh promoted. They're made out of that week. Made Twenty six thousand pounds profit which is worth fifty thousand dollars six six in nine hundred ninety seven yeah yeah you hear a lot of those stories. Though I mean especially hall from in the sixties fans were it wasn't just us all bands aunts who ripped off. It just seemed to be the normal thing that's why a lot of the bigger bands just starting starting your own management companies yeah. I think possibly if we'd kept going we would have done something like that. I'm the only one I think all the rest of the guys are quite happy that we finished and it seemed unnatural time to finish the band insects is of but I'm I'm the one that's intrigued what might have happened next especially because road and Chris Wyatt the other major. You're right in the band. They were just going to very very hot. Streak of writing wonderful songs and I'm always intrigued what we might have done is just doesn't matter as see you guys broke up the first time in sixty seven yeah and time. This season became a big hit in sixty nine so two years later in that happened. What is crazy in those days because I'm fond of saying the world was a much bigger place in those days nowadays? If you get a cover Aaron or whatever and say Erin put that out in Australia and it was a hit within a day you know it would be on social media right. You'd have someone in those days. We just didn't know years. After we split up we found for instance that we usually had hit somewhere in the world but we just didn't know at that time so what it meant was that because we were so based in the UK we had fewer hits in the UK than anywhere else that the income that all the Bam. We're getting that the writers there's just going down and down and it meant in the end that I remember the first sort of nail in the coffin was a guitar player in look okay. I'm about to get married. I've got no money off go to move on and that and that started the disintegration really it was only Chris and I had the money so you didn't know a lot of things oh happening and we knew that our cooper who was really hot new producer after the super sessions and blood sweat and tears and everything waiting for Clive Davis he'd been hired by Davis he came up to the UK picked up two hundred hours and went back to climb. There is one album that don't care who's got this. We have to pay whatever it costs again and he said well we've got passed on it and it's going to release it so but then the first song they released actually one of my favorite songs now which was a Chris White Song called butcher style. It's never a single dominion years so that stiffed and then we broke not by this time because we thought nothing was happening. The second song was one on the everyone thought was commercial iskoe sell forty four but it didn't didn't happen as a great thank you it's and then the third one they put out time the season again that didn't happen but there was one very small. DJ In a little town in Idaho Boise who started playing an in those days as you guys know very well. The whole record industry was very very different and things could take their time to break out on this guy started playing this song and it started getting instant reaction but in a tiny honey pool someone threw a pebble in a tiny poor and the ripples gradually started to radiate outwards and then one or two people started playing and the whole process took six months before it started climbing the billboard charts and in the end it made number one but we didn't know until I can't believe that you know about the funny thing is that the band split and sixty seven and I think doc by the time Al Cooper taking the album to CBS by the time they released it by the time three singles or come over time of the season I think was hitting sixty nine aimlessness sixty nine. It's time Reuters cited Arjun and I was just starting a new solo career and it was very difficult for us to get back together again but it's very frustrating strating to see yourself at number one in the charts see I loved that I didn't find it frustrating at all because it felt like it was just a complete bonus. We were both starting you know Chris and I were doing a production deal to do your new album and do Arjun and it made it very easy. We were over there. Guys didn't decide to just to another time because we've moved onto different. Pause and you know what I said about not wanting to rake over 'cause that's. We've always naturally looked ahead always. Did you perform like when you're doing urgent you during Silica. Did you guys perform those songs on your own sets. We did ton the season. Actually that's we hold you okay from yeah because the baseline well we playing a version of time the season one nine Chris Wyatt the original Bass player yeah was he and I wanted to definitely stay in in the business. We didn't want to give up a tool but Chris. I don't WanNa play anymore. He said but I'd love to be a silent member of co-producer writer and he was it one of our early gigs and we were playing very very long sad so we went into time the season we saw improvising and we went into a riff never played before Chris that riff unloved rotate around it told you how came right out time the season now. Did you always collaborate together for throughout the years this or call in here we have done as most not as writers but usually it would be road producing me. He's he's rose produced three or four miles and also we every now and again. We do a charity Gig together also in touch so we were always working all the way through the is a huge gap. all geant came off the road in seventy four and I'm on my first Alabama came off the road about an as well and and we didn't get back together again so you know as a touring band until the end of the nineties so it's nearly a quarter century's gap. was there anything that sparked it was. Is there any like one thing you can say just well. We both remember this in a different way but do you WanNa we might remember a different way but call-in had I started eventually to go back on the road with a Soda Ban after many many years of not wanting to do it and around the about two years after he done that there was a the jazz musician could John Dankworth who is married to Clear Lane Jones dead now but he was a very good friend and he had a theater and he asked me to do a charity show to raise money for the theater. I said well I haven't done any livestock been musical my life but I live stuff longtime. How come on do it in the All music concept because he still Astiz was on music so he was a great jazz musician real pioneer but he loved music classical music like good rock and roll so he had very openness so I thought yeah I'll do something that spirit and I put an evening together? We're actually got Arjun back together for forty minutes but I did a jazz set and I did. I played a Bach Concerto shirt with a with a string quartet as well so I tried to include it or call him was in the audience and he got up and saying she's not there in time the season and I tell you what it felt so nice and so natural. It really felt like we don't have been playing a couple of weeks before and soon after that calling me up and said you know I've got an I'm going to do a few more. Why why don't you do with me? I said time again to that and that's that's how slowly started and really certainly from my point of view I really did not want to. I do this on this because I thought that's looking back. You know just trying to Reich over the cars. That's the reason I didn't do on these things to start with and it was only when it's time for really natural because we suddenly realize clients there was a lot of stuff that we hadn't played live ever and it became a rediscovery for us as well. I ah started becoming interesting then so we do something like I want you back again done recently we never ever play and that felt like doing something new and it wasn't just saying cynically cynically Let's give people what they want and we might be able to make a bar. It was never that and that's not what it is now as I've said before I believe you have to for the right reason and when you guys are doing new records and just relying on material good great stuff there if you want to hear that the full conversation head over to talk house dot com slash podcast where you can catch that and every episode we've released were over over two hundred and fifty shows in now. God Damn that last clip was recorded by the in House Samsung Staff Carlene Brian in conversation was recorded by CO producer Mark Yoshizumi and Malcolm Harrison of national southwestern in Las Vegas recorded today's centerpiece conversation big love Tar co-producer Mark Yoshizumi double love to marketers as we have some fun pictures from behind the scenes on our social channels checkout tacos at the usual spots facebook twitter instagram and and make sure you catch and Brian Wilson touring together. This could be a once in a lifetime well. I suppose they played together once the sixties this could be the once in in your lifetime. If you're my age or younger show and I'll certainly be there at the New York date you can find all of the tour dates at Talk House Dot Com the Talk House podcast theme song was composed and performed by the rank. Who I hear has some new music coming down the pipeline? Yes I'm psyched for

Brian Brian Brian Wilson Oracle Brian Yeah Josh Josh Keyboardist Arjun Darren Sanja Paul Atkinson Samsung Brian Brian Ryan Wilson Nashville Carly Rae Jepsen Saint Albans UK Chicago America Chris Carl Jeppesen Chris Wyatt
Brian Liu

From Scratch

19:00 min | 11 months ago

Brian Liu

"I'm Jessica Harris. This is from scratch. My guest is Brian. Lou Do co founder of legalzoom an online legal documents service for consumers and small businesses legalzoom help visitors form corporations file patents gents trademark name create a last will living trust without the fees associated with hiring a lawyer. Brian started legalzoom in two thousand after working as a lawyer at Sullivan and Cromwell in Los Angeles Bryan is a graduate of UC Berkeley Phi Beta Kappa and Ucla law school. Welcome thank you how does legalzoom work. We came up with this idea because we knew that for a lot of really common legal needs you really can do this with a lawyer and with just finding the information online so we created a service where you you can go online and you can take care of things on your own. You know you still have to go to law school for three years to try to figure this stuff out and it was in a language you didn't understand now. We simplify it so that everybody has access to that what we're really trying to do at legalzoom as democratize law. I read somewhere that seventy percent of Americans don't have a will and it just made me wonder like what percent of people do think don't have access to the legal system but now do because of online online services such as legalzoom the American Bar Association always has has done studies like this in the past and they say that about fifty percent of the people who have a legal equal need don't ever get it taken care of and one of the main reasons they don't is because they just don't think they can afford an attorney and that's what we're trying to to overcome at legalzoom is we're trying to say hey look. If you really need help. You should go out and find it instead of doing nothing. I WanNa talk about how you came up with the idea for legalzoom Tom you were working in the law and you met your co founder. Brian Lee at law school at Ucla was he also practicing law at the time yeah he was. We were both attorneys and we were kind enough. I'll tell you the truth. We're kind of a little miserable didn't really really like our jobs so we're coming up with different business ideas and trying to figure out our escape plan and I remember seeing this this magazine and they advertised for something called we the people I remember seeing that they had six offices and thinking well if they're doing essentially paralegal work and they had six offices in Los Angeles. I thought there must be something there. The other thing is when you're working at the law firm there such a disconnect between what you're actually doing what you thought you'd be doing like you know. I got into law school my parents it said like you know while as soon as you finish law school finally jet that will to mom's been bothering me for years about once. I did graduate. I had no idea how to do all this stuff and I think I realized that I could put. It's something together that really blended. Those needs and people had a need in everything from online stock. Trading online travel was happening at that time and we figured why can't we do something similar for law so did you and Brian Start Working Nights and weekends or did you quit your jobs. I talk to me about the mechanics. X of those early days Ho- Well Bryan story will be a little bit different from mine. He he actually a he actually was the one who decided to quit. I but I still remember for the first time we had our first. V seed meeting with family friend. This is the first dot com boom of late nineteen ninety nine two thousand and we thought we were GONNA get funded for sure. We thought five million dollars funding no problem and our very first. VC meeting was the day that the Nasdaq crashed like twenty percent in one day. The being venture capital and we showed up at family friends office knocked on the door and he said Brian. What are you doing here. I said Ankle we had we scheduled this meeting weeks ago and he said don't you know it's over and so all we did what any sensible aspiring entrepreneurs would do at that time we went to A. Benny Hana's across the street had dinner at a couple drinks and said well. What do you think what should we do. I mean we could still ask for our jobs back. At this point we still bag. We decided you know what we we believe in this so much and we said we're just GONNA continue regardless. You decided to go forward without raising capital initially just except maybe from friends and family why was that a blessing in disguise not to have the capital we raised three hundred and thirty three thousand five hundred dollars and the five hundred was the best us because we first started with like well you know what at least ten thousand dollars minimum and then okay maybe five thousand and it got to the point where we were so desperate. Somebody won't on gave us five hundred dollars and we took it but we were able to really utilize that money in just just the best ways that we could than we didn't have room to waste what we're signs of early traction with Legalzoom a sense is that you know what this is actually resonating with people yeah first couple weeks well. You're just waiting for that first real customer but the sign that I I knew that we were on to something was on a Friday night. We were out at dinner. We got ten orders for a particular document called a Living Ping will a healthcare directive ten people throughout the country. I don't know where but you know this is Friday night and they've got nothing better to do than to make living wills sales of fried while we're onto something that's when I knew you brought on board early in the company in addition to your co founder Eddie and Brian a lawyer by the name of Robert Shapiro who's famous or maybe infamous for leading the defense team of Oj the OJ Simpson trial. Why did you think to contact Robert of all people so we knew that we worked at some pretty good law firms and we were pretty good lawyers but when it comes to something like this you really need trust you know again. People didn't know us but they certainly knew Robert Average Shapiro. They knew as reputation. I think you know even after the trial I think his reputation was very good very positive and we just needed somebody like that was. was there a sense that the trial was so controversial that his joining would bring controversy somehow of course. I was in the back of our mind fine but we didn't really think of it that in the same way I mean it was really interesting if you saw what was going on with the OJ Simpson trial when when we were in uh-huh law school at the time because it was it was very polarizing literally half the students at the school. Were just like you know when they heard the verdict predict. It was just like Oh. That was awful not half but I'll significant percentage. They were clapping. They were like yes so we knew that I mean there was some controversy around it but the most important thing was that people believed I mean I think Robert Shapiro was seen as very standup lawyer and he's quite quite quite good at what he does. What credibility did he ultimately lend to the initiative in the early days fantast an incredible amount I don't I don't think Brian and I would have immediately that quickly. quit our jobs and left unless if we knew that. Robert Shapiro was on board I mean he really he really was one of the original founders and when we launched we had such a great publicity surrounding it and it really added something to our own self esteem as well. I'm Jessica Harris Chris. You're listening to from scratch. My guest is Brian. Lou co-founder of Legalzoom a company that helps consumers and small businesses prepare their own legal documents online legalzoom aims to save people time and money and make the legal process more accessible to consumers and small businesses who otherwise might not have bothered with such documentation nation as living will or a prenup agreement. You have faced a lot of legal hurdles from the Bar Association's across several states stating stating that you are there's unauthorized practice of law so one way to address that has been to add legal advice to legal zoom Tom by connecting visitors to lawyers around the country. That's correct. Can you describe that more sure I mean there was we always knew that this would be something potentially that some of the state bar associations wouldn't be happy with but again we we were always pretty clear in our our heads that we weren't really competition against attorneys. We weren't stealing business away from them. This is really about how do you increase access. How do you get more the people the legal help that they need so you know our early stage are phase one. I'd say or stage one was really about utilizing technology. Adji and creating self help documents so that people can get you know fairly standard documents and by the way these same documents have been available for decades either I either online where you can download it and for centuries through books now what we're doing is combining the actual help from real all attorneys licensed attorneys and combining that with the document automation platform that we have in creating a more full service and that's really what we always imagined you ultimately ultimately did raise venture capital from firms. Kleiner Perkins and Institutional Venture Partners and Laris. Can you talk to me about some of those meetings eatings. They were tense. I'll tell you they were very tense. Meetings you worked so hard to get to that point. What what was tense up about out those meetings in particular without getting into all the details there was a lot of arguments over whether we should take these additional fundraising rounds and and one person said no and then we had to figure out a way to actually make it happen even though they technically had a veto rights so we looked around until there was a structure that kind of circumvented that and it requires a little bit of a little bit of a push their appeal to these VC's was that you were disrupting an industry. What was it about legal zoom in two thousand six or two thousand seven. Do you think that didn't appeal to them. In two thousand aside from the macro economy improving although this is before before two thousand eight frankly they couldn't envision something in you know in the business of law working fate didn't see how it could scale and and it's very different now I think at last time I looked there were over six hundred startup legal companies in different aspects of legal space of course but over six hundred on angels list. It's striking. Hell you know the the word. Law Lawyer makes me want a yawn a little bit yet and yet they're dealing with the most like base human needs and an emotions right. I mean dealing with divorce forms. Send prenuptial agreements and private see matters. I mean what have you learned about. Just behavior of people do this. This might be the technical business and what we do might be words on paper but that's not really what we're doing. We're really helping people in times of need. I'll give you one example apple. One time a long time ago. When we were starting out we actually did investor pitch with somebody who had a terminal disease and she was going through the living will process we did it. You know Kinda like walked her through it in real time and actually saw it and I mean it's just incredibly incredibly emotional all the again the the legal part of legal documents. That's that's not hard. The decisions that people make in terms of you know whether you want to be kept on life support who their the property goes to the those are the legal questions. Those are personal questions. What are other examples. There's this Indian restaurant that I go to all the time and one Sunday I was talking to the. I don't know how I got started. I was talking to the owner and I realized that he had just incorporated on the ozone. His restaurant business and we started talking about everything that was related to how he how he ran got this restaurant he was from Bangladesh and he came over there with his brother her and they basically did everything they could to put their money into this one restaurant this business and now they have to restaurants and and just hearing the story story which is that Hilda that great immigrant and that great American dream story that that's what's really amazing because behind every business there is a tremendous story. He you have helped to launch a company called xenophon by which is a beverage company a so-called functional that functional beverage which is a functional beverage it's a drink aside from just being a refreshing drink at quenches thirst as it has a function in this particular function for xenophon fires. It's all about natural stress relief. What are the chemicals in it that caused the stress relief mechanism. It's got the same anti-oxidants as you find green tea without the caffeine. WHAT'S L. Fenian is one of the ingredients that's right. Is that the chemical that's in Green Tea but without the caffeine in the strength exactly that's that's the antioxidant you'll find in green. Tea and Gaba and glycemic is from Camille. Now you seem like a an active person and yourself like a somebody who would drink than a fi like you exercise a lot. And what kind of exercise do you do. I'm I'm a big surfer. I said that's that's my favorite thing but I also will train at the Freddie Roach's Wildcard Boxing Gym It's a boxing club. It's just such such focused intensity for a short period of time that kind of a kind of it focuses my mind but it's also soothing in meditative at the same time. Do you meditate. I don't meditate but I do on the surfboard when I'm out in the ocean on the weekends usually by myself. It is just so beautiful out there. It's like meditation. Why is it that you like surfing so much. Would you say I think it's it's about nothing like that feeling of being one with nature and being with the wave and go on then. I'll just sound like a surfer dude. How Did you get interested in surfing a year from Taiwan Seattle Yeah I. I think it must have happened when I was young visiting Hawaii one day and I don't know what happened. I just got hooked and somewhere in the back of my mind. I knew I wanted to live in. La just because I wanted to be close to the ocean. What do your parents do? My Dad was He's in the shipping business. So he was a captain he was one of the youngest captains of this particular fleet of merchant ships and then he moved our family to Taiwan because he didn't want to always be away from the family because he was months at a time out on the ships so found a desk job and we actually we actually came from Taiwan the US on now on one of those votes who took thirty days to get here. Yes I've read a lot about being out at sea. These captains of these you know cargo ships. What a lonely existence yeah especially back then I mean it was in those ships were a lot smaller and and you're out for a long long sometime but at some point at some point in time he decided to start on his own and he got this little office and one thing he told me is that you know there. There were four desks there and he was the only person there and I asked him well. What about all these other deaths. What about all the furniture and you said you know I bought all those deaths. I bought at that time. Typewriters computer say he bought the office equipment didn't rent them didn't leave some because he said you know because I'm gonNA fill those up soon and he started another shipping company or just a NESN agency. What was he shipping basically it. Was You know containers anything that's exported from the the US over to Asia. He was one of the first people to charter a hope bode. This is such a long time ago but we just started doing trade with China at that time so he was one of the first people would actually do trades with China as still remember because he was so early we got invited to China once when we're really young and we you met like like all these really big big. You know Communist Party leaders. You didn't out say granddaughter a daughter or something. It was really. We've really pretty crazy. Did you grow up speaking Chinese in your home. What was it like for you. Growing up in Seattle having had the first I half decade of your life in Taiwan or were you too young to notice. I was too young. I think but I met one of my great friends best friends ready. Who is my next store neighbor. We start our very first business together. Business who need these pins we made these buttons and it was during the height of the Michael Jackson craze and we made at these pins. I says I do not heart Michael Jackson and we go to these rock concerts. You know we go to like these heavy. Metal Rock concerts and start selling leans over there I was that was really fun so your first business was selling. I don't love Michael Jackson. Did you have a sense as you were growing. Hang up that you wanted to start your own businesses. I mean also you know upon seeing your father or I was. I think somewhere in the back of my mind that was always there because even when I went to law school I one of my very best friends Brian leave why started legalzoom with we met the first day of law school and we kind of you know I think we connected because I looked at him and he looked at me and said. What are you doing here in law school so I don't know what are you doing? Thank you very much for joining us. My guest has been Brian Lou co-founder of legalzoom. If you'd like to learn more about the show please visit our website at from scratch radio dot org you can also follow us on twitter at Jesse Harris or find us on facebook. I'm Jessica Harris. This is from scratch.

Brian legalzoom Jessica Harris Robert Average Shapiro Los Angeles attorney OJ Simpson Brian Lou Taiwan co founder Tom Lou Do co Bryan Brian Lee Seattle co-founder US Michael Jackson
2020-02  Clean Your Email Inbox

Bacon Daily Marketing Flash

01:00 min | 7 months ago

2020-02 Clean Your Email Inbox

"I welcome to the big in the Vega system martyring. Hi this is Brian Basilica. Oh is one of your New Year's resolutions to clean out your email mailbox. Do you realize most people have over eight thousand email sitting in there well. It's time to get cracked. Go into your inbox and do one of three things. I simply delete the ones who don't want second Crete treat folders and put your email in those folders for future reference number three. Keep it in your inbox and use it as a to do item the day before you need to get and repeat this as often as you possibly can. Keeping a clean invites will not only make you more productive. But it also helps you keep track of important items. That's Today's big and marketing. Minute keep sizzling.

Brian Basilica
Brian answers your questions

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

34:56 min | 10 months ago

Brian answers your questions

"Hey is the moment I'm Brian complimented thanks for listening today's guest is you not in some crazy Meta sense but you are today's guests because I asked on here and on twitter for your questions and same in it's because it's a foundational primal early life question and really fucked up or Ken this story be fixed that's quite a different question from am I good enough am I crazy hey some kind of dividends to you but I don't believe that's at the heart of the question at the heart of the question is the desire for some outside all that stuff and so if you're somebody who asks that question frequently about the work you're doing dead in fact what you are made of is worthy of Love Sport Protection respect these questions and some of them are quite difficult to answer with any authority for anyone especially the the response some of your questions surprise me some didn't surprise me there was a good deal of force to tell you not only are you good enough is your work good enough you essentially are good enough that you don't have to view an indication of whether your impulses toward this artistic life seemed to have a chance to is about whether you're really a good enough artist so there are there are things one can look at metrics one can look at it can I'd say similar concern expressed a lot of it had to do with some kind of insecurity about whether you should be tried and I want us to be clear about which question we're asking and I want us to be clear about why where asking that question and as I can get to you need to know that I don't necessarily hold myself out as having definitive answers question that has as much to do with the way you were raised the way you grew up the way your parents express love didn't express love as it is about twenty times it got rejected Twenty Times Hey Mrs Editor Ms Editor Mr editor mix editor hey is this story essential Russian I got many times which is how do I know if I'm good enough and the reason that that question is so hard to answer and why it's so prevalent is the we don't know yet the easy one right is if you wanna quit because or if you want to try to sell the things you can and I want to separate it out right because yes it's a very legitimate question to say hey I wrote this short story I've sent it out and one of the questions you can find an answer for kind of easily or in a kind of straightforward manner and often the answer that one on to me the the question was do I still get something out of doing the creative work if I still get something to do this kind of work creative work or not and I'm GonNa give you my best answer to each of these questions a change that you don't have to run the fastest store that you don't have to learn to walk the fast stored who read the fastest but during the day as long as the creative work is inspiring me as long as it's making me seem kind or those that I love out of doing the creative work that I'm gonNA keep doing the creative work and I'm and as long as the creative work is making me feel more alive during the day not less alive now that doesn't mean it's easy to do that doesn't mean you're never dealing with a sense of feeling either blocked or stopped somehow because I'm engaged in something that matters to me then the more I'm going to do it and that was magnitude before we sold I gripped if instead it is pulling you you or you don't continue continue as long as the work is fulfilling continue as long as when you get up in the morning that's the thing you WanNa do down then I would look at it but I wouldn't look at it from a standpoint of has the thing sold yet or I wouldn't let that be the definitive thing and whether you continue sleet it's additive than I you know I think keep going because I don't really understand how to give advice in the opposite direction I don't really a little bit of glibness to it because it it subtracts the pain of not knowing so I I understand that there is a pain of not knowing what I'm talking about when you look at it overall is it additive to your existence or is it taking something away from her existence and if you can answer has successful artists in delusional very thin and that line when I say it is true but there is I in the purpose of giving advice in the opposite direction and I'm not surprised this is the most frequently asked question I've said many times that the line between being I understand there's a fear attached with not knowing but that's the terrain we're in the terrain of creating stuff for the terrain of making stuff also I'd be lying if I didn't say that the fact that people respond to the work didn't matter to me it does aw and yet easy from my perch on a certain level because I've had success at it and because I've had rewards people it makes it easier in the fallow periods to know that on the other side is the very real possibility of an audience because I had one before so that in the times when it wasn't going so well commercially I didn't really ask myself the terrain of changing things by definition were in scary terrain and I choose to embrace it the case and I just knew I had to do it and so that's the answer to sort of the most frequently asked question and whether I was a person who could tell these stories do this that had been proven to me already that said in the beginning that was circle back so what's the next question I want to answer okay it's related Jacqueline said think it's a very deep question and I understand it and now let's move on to a couple of other questions and maybe will circle maybe and yet I see how they denied their own dreams and desires for mine never became fulfilled people yeah well me too this quote of yours is so powerful to me in the quote is blocked people become toxic they become toxic themselves into the people around them and the but I definitely also had college paid for among these people has led me to believe that create a fulfilled life is not for me I specially struggle with this because I benefited from my parents stable career choices Sinoe college uh not the they didn't become fulfilled people my parents both of them in their own way were and are fulfilled my mom passed away my dad's still thriving and I didn't want to be toxic to those that I loved and I did straightforward things I I the people who were responsible I've often talked about the fact that one of the reasons I was able to dream and live a life that was beyond life of just trying to take care of me and mine was because but the question of how to get through the block for me as complicated as it is as disturbing it is and you know I was blocked writer until I was thirty person wrote in says I recognize so many my own family members in this quote people who could have had bruin creative lives and instead became toxic how void the same fate and get unblocked we're living in this is my foundational story and it's true Until I found a way through so painful to be blocked by felt that toxicity thing happening wrote down what I wanted to be doing how I wanted to feel and I knew that was doing something creative I couldn't do it can you do the exercises you will be presented with the opportunity to get past this block and to create the work that you WanNa Create even if your family tells you they want you to responsible the truth is they did all this work so that you can try to soar parents terrified I didn't know college debt I had family that there was a safety net there for me I college paid for an I could figure out how I wanna live and then you'll find yourself living a life that feels a bit more fulfilled I think ages something happened and reading her book and doing the exercises and I would say her book and Stephen Fields Book the war of art and I pressed field on the podcast and here's the thing about eight sleep eight eight sleep and I read the book the artist's way Julia Cameron I started doing morning pages everyday three longhand pages every morning and doing the morning I those tools are just they work if you do it if you do the way if you read the book side of their children not being able to survive so their fear is GonNa make them look at you askew so and that's three screen plays where that's a novel you don't have to carve a giant chunk of time or you have to do is produce a little bit of work every day I can't say that strongly enough the power of three longhand pages every morning it tips your unconscious tips your subject watches out onto the page it could you pass the perfectionism it gets you past the guilt which you here in your letter guilt but he in your if you are trying something different in that but that's fear don't let that don't catch that fear it's contagious don't catch it and just do a little bit of work every day crazy comfortable bed that's why it is the fitness approved bedlow by athletes trainers and models right now get one hundred fifty bucks off your pod and free shipping when you go to eight sleep research shows the deep link between sleep performance and temperatures so the pod reacts in real time to your body's unique needs adjusting the temperature to keep you comfortable and sleeping deeply every time you know podcast or go online and get another ad for another mattress there are thousands of them and you know what they'll find something sleep on into this this idea one page today for years three hundred and sixty five pages even one page day for a year minus Sundays or Saturdays is over three hundred pages only one uses technology and temperature to give the sweet asleep the pod by aides the is the very first bed to combined dynamic temperature regulation and sleep tracking to ensure you're getting the best possible also I have found that I'm able better able as I get older to get rid of the distracting stuff so dot com slash moment that's eight sleep dot com slash moment t sleep dot com slash moment. I like this question it's it's and I pushed myself and that has made me feel so much better given me so much more energy reason out why you can't do this work I don't buy it I'm fifty three couple of things one I really added Cardio back into my life in an aggressive way this year and even though I'm still really fat has after work or if you don't get enough sleep like don't watch a ball game don't watch television go to sleep super early wake up super early and gave an so the key to this I think is to say no to all the inessential things and it's hard right 'cause stuff seems essential I understand where you're coming from we can literally feel there's less and less gas in the tank year-on-year I'm asking is another Malaysian is trying to get some kind of creative practice going while still working to support my family all night long look the stats say it all customers sleep on the pod fall asleep faster they toss and turn twenty four percent less seventeen percent increase in periods deep sleep all in the television series we had a movie come out the bombed talk about feeling tired and and and used up and like my career was toast for me I think all you need is an hour or two a day to do this kind of work and so I would say yes even if you're middle aged person and you're feeling tired that fear that you don't have gas in the tank is another version of what Stephen Press feel calls resistance and to me it's another way to extremes so I walked over and I tuned and my fingers found the fraud board I don't know what was my choice I I started writing as soon as I started writing I would have the greatest commercial and artistic success of my life in my fifties but that's what happened and that's what can happen I remembered hey they can't take that away from me I can still right I I can still sing or if I can write and sing I use the word fat in case it bothers anybody but I think of myself I am fat but I also do cardio five or six days a week and I don't miss it and I do forty five minute of it let's say in the old days you could really work for a very long period of time highly concentrated but the truth is probably wasn't that highly concentrated hour a day or two hours a day to do this work if that's if this work is calling to you and from your letter it's like this work is calling to you and I think told you that I would answer them and I will answer them you know being a person of my word and I have to say I love twenty thirteen when is twenty fourteen when I was feeling at my creative low and I started talking to people about these issues mark or more key questions how do you as a middle aged man find the gas in the tank needed for your creative process hand on heart at this age he's saying for you no matter what your age is only saying this stuff because I lived at one of the things I did that stoked my creativity was this podcast right I started this podcast on my farm or I had to go back to my parents and then one day I was sitting there and I looked across the room and there was my guitar same all they did was put one foot in front of the other it sounds so trite it sounds almost impossibly simple but it turns out to be the only true answer is old before billions started dave and I were almost out of the business we've been fired off a movie sorry we provide company flushed your album down the toilet and what do you hear what you hear is yes and I didn't know how I'd ever work again and I walked around the city for hours and getting up the energy to do the work was really difficult but so that's at forty you know forty nine right I David I right the thing I think the show goes on the fifty years old maybe I'm still forty nine turn fifty as it's on the air that April and who would have thought that every day to a little bit and you ask somebody hey you you your television show got cancelled your album your record fox I get a microphone I can go on a stage and I can perform again and then before you know it the person realizes the judgment of the outsiders whoever dropped them from the about how they process their highest lowest moments about what they did to move forward what I realized is what they did was so basic but so hard and and that's how they start again and that's how I started again and that's how you can start again or start for the first time label or fire them from the band that doesn't matter what matters is the next song the next performance the next verse the next course and feel alive and they both gravitated toward somehow this this form of communication but I do not think parenting I'm GonNa try to get to them because I mean if you find me on a basketball court and then you ask me a question I'm going to answer that question so Spencer your one of your questions is I'm curious to hear if you have a process for auditioning ideas for projects what makes idea graduate from the notes folder on your phone or something more I do this with partner so it's ideas that David and I find ourselves unable to let go of its obsession really from the beginning from we didn't tend to have a very top down approach parenting so it's not like we we tried to tell them what they should be ever how did you figure it out and he said well I heard Sam Brian Koppelman and doesn't take a genius so spencer thanks for saying Hi and you asked a couple of questions here so santeuil are their distinct phases the come after or is it more question of feel and which ideas you find maintaining a hold on you yes it's that it's that almost exclusively but remember characters or the world I start reading everything I can about something I started watching everything I can I go visit where it is I feel myself become key the answer is what we did in our house and amy as a writer and a director Amy's a filmmaker and a novelist that's my wife and our daughter Anna is in college hi it's at all I think it's an art form and I think it's about connecting with your kids and and listening listening to your kids the the best you can jump Hook this guy had guys named Spencer and and and Spencer said hey are you Brian Koppelman and I said Yeah and he said I'm a podcast ban like that's cool his first book is coming out this month about which more later or it's coming out next month sorry November judge them by their accomplishments and in fact what mattered the most us was that they were sweep to each other and amy was incredible at figuring so the other day Salmon I went and played basketball and we really funny experience we go play at this place Sam plays a lot he happened to be in New York and so I went with walking into a poker club if something just takes hold of my imagination and stays there and starts to grow if like lines start to come up it's really hesitant to talk about parenting because that job is never done and also I don't take credit for my kids accomplishments ever and I don't and so I I have to take some so the writing every morning the journaling right ideas will start to surface again and again in the Journal or service when you're walking around short stories Dave writes his novels and so absolutely we both will if there's another outlet lately it's songwriting for me like all of like a flame about this thing that's what I know I should work on it so you have a lot that goes from finishing a song to whatever it is that you're on or how there's more like we try to make things available to them and we stressed probably doing something that contributes in some way and that makes you to help that to happen and they both were really good at it the kids but what we did was just live alive by example so like what we can do this with that or I could that and then suddenly we're building upon it and making it bigger and better and more than we're in great shape and so that's a big them and we're playing in a third guy a friend who was on our team and it was three three and the the friend of Sammy's mentioned the compliment family like we art of How it happens and then Spencer you also asked do you have any story ideas that feel like they'd be best realised from other than screenwriting and you said you ever through that fear and get to the other side we talk about Ziprecruiter yes higher grushin posted her job in Ziprecruiter she was impressed quickly she found qualified applicants she also used ziprecruiter's screening questions to filter her candidates so she could you come to you stoke it you try to treat each of them in the beginning like that but then some they continue in that way in some don't in my old life Easter never finish anything when I was in my twenties so both would take time creative do our stuff talk about what it felt like we already stuff all gave knows each other and not stuff still happens question and this question is from Anne Marie and Anne Marie asks if you can talk more in depth about the slog of writings and we all would say the best writer in the family as other constantly stoked creativity what it is is that we and I've did what did you find to be successful if you've been listening to podcasts for while you know both of my kids right my son Oh it's tremendously valuable to do it because it reminds me of what it's like to be a beginning artist again what it's like to be scared and then what it's like to press but yeah I'm not going to limit it because I'm not thinking about the market so if I get an idea if I get it I know it's a move your I know it's a television show scored or we did something in the guys like co- common families not kidding around and then after the game one of the guys who are playing against guy was playing hard really sweet your inner critic what you said it didn't say disapproving relatives who'd rather you had a job well the answer is by the time we I was writing solitary man David and I had already written in other formats either as cross training or because you just want well I mean the podcast is one of those things I write a lot of essays to have that have been published in a lot of places nations thirteen or well I started I started south remember four ocean's thirteen and then finally finished it after ocean's thirteen but a quality candidate within the first day see Ziprecruiter's effective for businesses of all sizes trust Ziprecruiter for free at our web address it recruiter dot com slash moment that now let's go after that but if I don't I won't just throw it out I'll be like because if you each of these things as really valuable like writing songs scary to me and hard so and I wasn't really sure that I could do it myself I wasn't really sure that that kid who was unable to finish college assignments until six months late have an idea or a line and I'll just grab guitar and I'll try to get something down or I'll I'll write the words and then ascend into some a friend of mine who's a musician ziprecruiter dot com slash moment ziprecruiter dot com such an antique ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire there's another to which I didn't have the answer and it sucked because I really felt like boy if I show these thirty pages to somebody or these at some could really find a way to hold an entire screenplay in his head and then actually write the whole thing plus l. just quotable co-founder Gretchen hubner discovered Gretchen needed to hire game artists for education company? She knew it wouldn't be easy to find someone to grow their team that's why she went to Ziprecruiter Ziprecruiter dot I couldn't figure out the second half of the story because my outline kind of ran out but what happened was out outlined like half of it in a flurry and I didn't WanNa wait I wanted to write it depend on candidates finding it finds them for you it's technology identifies people with the right experience and invites them to apply for your job so get qualified candidates fast career at this the scary thing there was I'd only ever written long-form stuff with David I'd written essays alone but only written long for stuff David Take Long Walks I meditate when I do a float in in the meditation and if it keeps resurfacing I'll know that it's real but also through talking to Dave right if I throw an idea dave's alternate how you fought through it when it didn't seem that you could that would be amazing specifically the daily Grind and fight itself versus the necessary break to do stand up what you told yourself and how you countered resistance and just stopped and it was years before I could finish it I gave it to a one of my best friends davits cigarettes in the in the sixty page market he asked me a question I went with kids out we read that a house for a couple of weeks and suddenly after all this time I was able to blast dead because I was so nervous that I wouldn't do it so I- sprint that out and wrote so much but then kind of wrote myself into a corner and about what I thought was supposed to happen at the end because it did have an idea about the end and I told him something and he was like well I don't really WanNa see this thing and he said gave notes it wasn't about hey look at me I'm GonNa Dazzle you with my notes Craig's notes were here are the problems here's a possible solution here through the I I was able to write slug lines like boom this is next this is next this is next and here's where we end and I blasted out those slug lines and one now the peoples who want to know what sets Mazen's notes part well crag didn't phone the man at all first of all Craig's proven now was spot on and really just was what we needed to hear at exactly that moment and if you understood November fifth season five but I can't tell you when it's going to be on the air though it certainly will be at one point it was like fifty five or sixty page like this is like this a movie like this character is a real character I can get a movie sort of play this character I felt those things but then the rest of our career was going well feeling like a failure and having years of feeling failure is fairly common theme in these creative lives he just kind of is what I think you're trying to accomplish over the course of this run of scenes here's what's happening within the scenes that's making that difficult and then here within this scene try to find your way through them are at Allen has a question which is I was just listening to the riders panel podcast David did so damn much when will billions be back is a question from Ameet well we start shooting it uh there's two moments that aren't quite working and here's something I'm thinking about and his answer might not have always been right but his diagnosis the best ones and that's Gretchen and new game artists in less than two weeks with there's also like that it's no wonder four out of five employers who post on Ziprecruiter get a ego listen Gregg and I go back and forth a lot and there's no one is gonNA say Craig doesn't have an ego I have an ego but when Craig somebody came up that's been nagging me for a while what is it about Craig Mazen's notes that make them so extraordinary it's something you've mentioned a couple times and it has me intrigued you must get notes range of amazingly ex and I said I thought I have to pay off and he's like now you don't have to pay that off and I was ready to hear it then it was years later any set it I then remember walking around and then amy the description for each of them and I was able to write the end of it in three weeks but it was years of out it was years of feeling like a failure even as Phil love doing what I I do look make stories that have anything to stop us from doing our work not turn out great often starting with the script but the people making this stuff we're all flawed we all have blind spots we all version creatively that I can and if I don't make it to be the single greatest writer of dialogue of my generation maybe I'll have still found a way to entertain some people and Aleisha Craig which goes back two thousand five I think or four you know how hard it is for me to give him this kind of credit but the fucker really did help me great movies and bad movies great television shows and bad television shows I'll have never been on one where people were trying not to make something great every time was that the characters would be wearing basically like sweat like sweat outfits like Jim Sweats most of the time because that's what the is really hard to do and sometimes you're in the middle of it and there are financial reasons why they would continue because if they stop in the middle then the money's been flushed leaks in an editing room cinematographer and director who view the way something should be lit differently there are thousands and thousands of ways something can all have moments where we're working at our top capacity and moments where we think we are and we're not and I think throughout time there have been great books and bad books is how do we how do we maintain the positive influence our reverence

twitter Brian Ken twenty four percent forty five minute seventeen percent fifty years three weeks six months two hours two weeks one foot six days one day
Is Your Firewall Up?

DIAF

08:04 min |

Is Your Firewall Up?

"This is. Perform, Brian brushwood Justin, Robert young. And Andrew main GIF is the only audio book presentation of fan pitch in Britain by the fans and perform by the subjects. Chapter four is your firewall up. We did to get out there and defend a city, you're yells as you grabs a sword and jumps over the bar defend. The city and asked says he stands up and follows giggle out of the boss. What Chan dig loop exits the bar and looks around for the action now neighbors to the east the three head toward the east. We're all the soldiers are gathered. We used to be allies in the wall. But the got to large to back and finally, finally tried to destroy chat round due to the silly hubris. They approach the east wall and a man standing next to a massive raptor petting while sharpening sore. Drag captain Drissa, what do an? Have school contingent soldiers for Chan maybe one hundred two hundred the most with nothing being arrested. The man says he feeds his sword and feeds raptured chicken, an arrow, she's over the wall, as the roars of the soldiers can be heard just on the other side, you to juice points at Brian, and Justin, what weapons do you? I'm good. With sabres testing labs of bode the light end. Non light variety. All right. Jewish birth rose, just in a massive hooked metal soared who looks confused and then swings it with glee whosever now looks on the Brian. I don't suppose you guys have any guns master-marksman, Brian scratches, his head very good for hands Brian, along in a quiver of arrows on never never really fired a bone. Brian looks at the bow and I'll figure it out gig loop swings. Her sword in smooth strokes. What's the plan, captain? She has rest or sword on her shoulder. We're going to do the firewall juicy. Juicy reminds explosion. Where's my goddamn oil to soldiers run up with cultures void swaggered look very good tough jobs day? Need to go out on the other side of the wall? It this oil is well dispersed among the enemies awesome. Swagger, and all salute. We're gonna cover us wells hostile to keep you. Says signals squad of soldiers to ready sir open juicer yells, Eastgate Smythe open or. City, but a beating back out of the, the night's an opening the horde of invading forces may by the soldiers and swagger, and pilot run into the fray with possible. Letting it seep out as they run into the horde of four, ten soldiers are top of the walls, covered with well placed EROs to the head or going the enemy combatants Brian runs at the Rambert in try to fire, the bow just stands at the gates of the city and prepares the fight off anyone enters, oversized and Silva is saber got the swagger can be heard yelling from within the hordes of enemies gums, more and more oil and dodges a sore kicking the voters. Swear in the testicles soldier, a massive ads. Greg's through the line enters the game coming straight from Justin is get wide as he prepares his soul raises his axe high and brings it down the heavy cleave. The way this is the at slams round rose steep and brings his abor quickly across the back of his enemies leads the ten news and desma bears death strikes. But it's not my quick, backhand soldier, his not backing the law has just collect himself. He's got my driving into the ground. He looks up at a massive at as blocks out the sun overhead for ten soldier looks down at Justin begins to bring his acts down all of a sudden he stumbles forward dropping. And reaching around in bed. He joins around doesn't sees an error wads square spine of on the ramparts. Brian is teal works. Brian tears Jiming high and trying to click zeal, but failing miserably the portends soldier falls. Done all it can be heard screaming from behind the walls of the fourteen forces. He and swagger, disperse, the oil, I'm on the other side of the invading horde on high in the ramparts Tito signals them. And they dropped their cultures and run off around the and forcing close there. Tedo yells, gigging kits. A man of facing Rosen by the throat, Atma city has. Before before temperature. Gate slam shot. Tedo yells coup. On Tito, yells name, but nothing happens. The enemy forces begin the hammer at the gates. Tita was joined in my civil others in screaming the name down to the city man sitting in a chair. Eating sandwich looks up confused now, remembers his task drops the dirt and grabs his boat and Ryan east Eastwell. He arrives the fire. He pulls back his string fires. Flaming. Perfect playing any of tents Oaters over not dying in a fire begin to die and flee the lies on the plane back eastern kingdom for ten who smiles and walks back over to chair the sandwich since back down after picking pebble from his snack takes a bite and less. Gino says utter amazement the swagger and private all appear back in town. Having all the way around the west gate, Brian injust in meet up and just inside the Justin points, down the massive soldier that had almost killed him. Kid that guy Brian flexes, his arm, and kisses. His bo. Killed me. Giants come on now. Brian Justin, says his hand on his saber and some random person passing by I helped. Sure, sure, Brian rest is bow on the wall, as Gigulu approaches with specks of blood on her face guys. Good out there. She she and his sword and wipes blood from her dress. Thanks. I was actually wondering if you knew how we might get back to where we came from Brian asks with concern on his face. Was that exactly? You're loop starts to walk back toward the bar. And Brian Justin follow shortly behind that's kinda complicated just and tries to figure out the best way to say it. Simples way to say is Wayne from around here now it's something like that. And I talked to Patrick Dila, Hannity. He's the keeper of the knowledge and you'll find him at the library glue points over to an old stone building, if there's a way back home for you to p Delancey will know it. We hope you enjoyed this presentation of DIA brought to you by by the fans of NSF w available at NSF w show dot com. This episode was performed by Brian brushwood, just a robber, young and Andrew main, you get subscribed DIA on the I tuned podcast. See future episodes, and Kurt up, so and DIA dot NSF w show dot com.

Brian Brian Justin Brian brushwood Swagger Brian scratches Chan Brian rest Brian injust Andrew main Tedo Tito DIA captain Drissa Britain sabres Eastgate Smythe Tita Kurt Ryan east Eastwell Robert young