19 Burst results for "Brian Yarbrough"

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Wall Street Breakfast

Wall Street Breakfast

06:22 min | Last month

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Wall Street Breakfast

"Good morning today is. Friday july thirtieth. And i'm your host. Steve brown our top stories today. Debt drama not enough and closing out july leading today's news gear up for the next big spectacle in washington as the debt. Ceiling comes back into force this weekend. Following a two year suspension. The deadline will curb detroit. Cerise capacity to issue debt unless lawmakers can reach an agreement which seems fetched at the moment due to the republican position. Gop leadership contends. The democrats are in spending free for all and will only support raising the debt ceiling if they promised major spending or forms and cutbacks analysts commentary. It is a very slow moving train wreck outlined gennady goldberg rate strategist at td securities. The longer they delay raising the debt ceiling the more treasury has to reduce bill supply leaving less debt to invest in particularly on a short term basis. What you're going to see more and more pressure on money market rates which will in turn put pressure on money market funds. It's already having some effects. Starting at noon today. The treasury will use the first of its so called extraordinary measures which will suspend sales of securities that help states had municipalities invest bond proceeds. Others will take months to kick in and starting in october or november. The congressional budget office predicts the treasury will run out of cash while raising the debt ceiling has turned into a bitter partisan issue in recent years both sides of always reached a late deal to avoid the country going into default outlook many expect similar scenario this time around and the game of chicken could continue into the coming months however if democrats can't get support from ten republican senators they may be forced to increase the debt limit via an upcoming budget reconciliation bill which only needs a simple majority. They could also advance a vote to raise the debt ceiling along straight party lines before the august recess or tied the debt ceiling to a must pass funding bill at the end of september in other news amazon reported quarterly earnings. After the bell on thursday with revenues that were twenty five percent higher than the same period last year. While that's pretty impressive in its own right. The percentage wasn't high enough to match analysts expectations. The e commerce behemoth finished the quarter with hundred and thirteen billion in revenue compared to consistence estimates of one hundred fifteen billion prompting shares to slump seven percent and after hours trading. What it means amazon has historically exceeded expectations so the revenue miss the first since two thousand eighteen triggered some alarm on wall street amazon also said it would continue to see difficult. Comparisons to the pandemic quarters of twenty twenty meaning. The era of the company's bumper results may be slowing. It comes as people turn to their old shopping habits like traveling and dining out which could weigh on the company's rapid growth recorded through the pandemic. It's still phenomenal growth. When you think of the sheer size of the business said. Brian yarbrough an analyst with edward jones. Obviously the pandemic helped him. But they're not going to be able to grow that rapidly on top of those numbers still doing quite well. Investors overlooked better than expected profits as well as a strong performance in the advertising business and cloud division amazon web services sales increased thirty seven percent to fourteen point. Eight billion above the fourteen point. One billion estimate while the other unit which is primarily made up of advertising grew revenue by eighty seven percent year over year to seven point. nine billion. the numbers come just weeks after. Andy jesse formerly chief executive of aws took the reins of the company which has been growing exponentially and even more complex. It's the final trading day of the week and month but equities are not wearing their party. Hats nasdaq futures led the declines overnight. Falling one point. Two percent after q to revenues at amazon fell short while the retail giant gave a weaker outlook. Pinterest is also down twenty percent pre-market after losing monthly users during the three bullets into june thirtieth. And don't forget the disappointing. Ipo from robinhood rally growing fragile gdp data on thursday suggested the pace of growth may be slowing the us economy expanded at a six point five percent annualized rate in q. Two but that was discouraging given expectations for eight point. Four percent growth summer looking further into the data seeing a larger than expected drag from the global supply chains shortages which could be an economic boom when the issues are finally ironed out. There are so many cross-currents going on at the moment influencing markets said sebastian mackey a multi-asset fund manager and investor. We've entered a more volatile period for markets but markets will continue to move higher because we're still seeing economic growth. On the economic calendar inflation focused investors will also get some clarity today. The fed's preferred inflation gauge the personal consumption expenditures price index will be published this morning at eight thirty. Am eastern time and the twelve months through june the so called pc price index likely. Shut up four point. One percent with the core figure not far behind at three point seven percent year over year. Efficacy of pfizer's corona virus vaccine which is pegged at ninety six percent decline. It's an average of six percent every two months according to the company and effectiveness in groups like the elderly immuno-compromised diminishes even more quickly. As a result the drug maker is recommending. Third dose of its vaccine can strongly boost protection against the delta variant preliminary data that a jet to be peer reviewed or published even suggest that levels of antibodies from third booster increases antibody levels five to ten times higher over. Its two shots. Bigger picture other front runners in the global immunization drive astrazeneca and johnson and johnson are yet to see the evidence to support the need for booster shots the to take a similar approach in their kobe. Nineteen vaccine technology using viral vectors. Instead of their ima- rene jabs produced by pfizer and.

treasury amazon gennady goldberg td securities Steve brown Cerise Brian yarbrough congressional budget office Andy jesse Gop detroit robinhood edward jones washington
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

06:02 min | 5 months ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on WBUR

"Angeles. I'm kind result it is Wednesday Day. The 28th Day of April. Get is always to have you along, everybody. The economic news. Oh, the day today isn't really about Today. President Biden's big speech about his big plans for this economy. Take years, maybe decades to play out. That, of course, is the long term news. Jay Powell, wrapping up the Federal Reserve's two day meeting today, said this about getting back to full strength. We've got a long ways to go and also it's going to be a different economy. We call that the medium term news closer to today We'll get the next dose of data on consumer spending on Friday, and with it a sense of the economy and in particular Spending on services and how it's all coming back Marketplaces. Marielle Segarra made some calls to hear what people are looking for now and in the medium to long term. So before we get too far into this, something you should know on the show. We often talk about retail sales numbers. Those come out monthly and tell us mainly whether people are buying goods which they've done a lot of during the pandemic. Nina Petersen is chief economist of the Conference board. Good spending was very strong people bought cars. They bought appliances. They bought lawn furniture. They bought boats and RVs on Friday, though, we're getting consumer spending numbers, which is different. It's more heavily weighted towards services, bars, restaurants, hair salons, amusement parks theaters. Call it the experience economy, which didn't do so well during the pandemic, but as more people are vaccinated, and certainly as economies are reopening Experiential standing will come back. Friday's numbers will give us a sense of how much Peterson says she's expecting the numbers to be very strong and to continue on that path through the summer and probably into next year. But Orry Hef, it's who teaches macro economics at Cornell. Says it's hard to say how long any bump in spending might last. The numbers are a snapshot in time of March. Specifically, when a lot of people were spending their stimulus checks. I'm going to spend differently. Money I saved over many years. Then I'm going to say, hey, spend effect government check that they actually never counted on and all of a sudden surprise. In other words, the way people are spending right now because they've got that fat stimulus check and the sun's out and they got their vaccine and they're feeling hopeful. That's not necessarily gonna last. I'm Marielle Segarra for marketplace. Speaking of fed stimulus checks in the sun being out and all that and the hope that it's gonna last allow me to introduce to you the topic of business inventories. The Census Bureau reported today that wholesale inventories are going up Those air the businesses that supply retailers stocking up ahead of the sun being out in the fat stimulus checks getting spent marketplaces Justin Oh, has our inventory story today. Wholesalers are basically the middle step in the retail supply chain. They buy goods from manufacturers that they're hoping to sell to retailers, says Tim Fiori, with the Institute for Supply Management, So they're speculating on the future. So wholesale inventory growth is absolutely an optimistic indicator optimistic because wholesalers believe consumers are going to be spending more. That's already starting to happen, says Wells Fargo senior economist Sarah House products are just flying off the shelves as soon as retailers can get their hands on them. How says that's a sign that the economy has plenty of room to grow. Sales could be even better if we could actually get our hands on on the supplies and products that consumers and businesses want houses. Some of those products are stuck in the supply chain right now, because of the congestion that's been clogging up U. S ports. And so we have cargo that sitting and ports waiting to be off, loaded or waiting for a driver for its truck chassis. And so that's getting caught up in the inventory levels that we see. So wholesalers are staying in closer. Intact with retailers to get a better idea of what they'll need, says Brian Yarbrough, consumer research analyst at Edward Jones. Ah lot of wholesalers. We're trying to figure out ways to improve the supply chain. Be more nimble. Be quicker. Yarbrough says wholesalers will ramp up inventory throughout the summer. But at the same time, he says, business is air thinking about the fall and winter. And what happens when government relief aid wears off? Okay, so demands really good, but how much of that is demand? It's going to stay and how much of that is more stimulus driven? Yarborough says. Wholesalers are likely to keep increasing their inventories, but at a pretty slow pace. I'm Justin how for marketplace? On Wall Street today, a little deflated. You could say we'll have the details when we do the numbers. I'm not sure we needed an earnings report to know this. But Starbucks said in its most recent announcement that store traffic is still down from early last year, when things were normal spending per visit, though It's up so much that sales are back to normal. Where they were when things from normal and the company says some of that is thanks to an 18% bump in the number of people who signed up for its loyalty program in the past year, the 90 Day active member rate, which is the preferred metric, I guess for those loyalty programs. Is now for Starbucks 23 million users in the United States. And just because Y reinvent the wheel, McDonald's and Wendy's and white cast on a bunch of.

Marielle Segarra Tim Fiori Jay Powell Nina Petersen Starbucks Brian Yarbrough McDonald's Wells Fargo Orry Hef United States 18% Institute for Supply Managemen Today March 90 Day Justin today Friday Peterson Sarah House
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:22 min | 5 months ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Is always to have you along, everybody. The economic news. Oh, the day today isn't really about Today. President Biden's big speech about his big plans for this economy. Gonna take years, maybe decades to play out. That, of course, is the long term news. Jay Powell, wrapping up the Federal Reserve's two day meeting today, said this about getting back to full strength. We've got a long ways to go and also it's going to be a different economy. We call that the medium term news closer to today We'll get the next dose of data on consumer spending on Friday, and with it a sense of the economy and in particular Spending on services and how it's all coming back Marketplaces. Marielle Segarra made some calls to hear what people are looking for now and in the medium to long term. So before we get too far into this, something you should know. On the show. We often talk about retail sales numbers. Those come out monthly and tell us mainly whether people are buying goods, which they've done a lot of during the pandemic. Dana Peterson is chief economist of the conference board. Good spending was very strong people bought cars, they bought appliances. They bought lawn furniture. They bought boats and RVs on Friday, though we're getting consumer spending numbers, which is different. It's more heavily weighted towards services, bars, restaurants, hair salons, amusement parks, theaters call it the experience economy. Which didn't do so well during the pandemic, But as more people are vaccinated, and certainly as economies are reopening that experience will spending will come back. Friday's numbers will give us a sense of how much Peterson says she's expecting the numbers to be very strong and to continue on that path through the summer and probably into next year. But Orry Hef, it's who teaches macro economics at Cornell. Says it's hard to say how long any bump in spending might last. The numbers are a snapshot in time of March. Specifically, when a lot of people were spending their stimulus checks. I'm going to spend differently. Money I saved over many years. Then I'm going to say, hey, spend effect government check that they actually never counted on and all of a sudden surprise. In other words, the way people are spending right now because they've got that fat stimulus check and the sun's out and they got their vaccine and they're feeling hopeful. That's not necessarily gonna last Mariel Sierra for marketplace, Speaking of fat stimulus checks in the sun being out and all that and the hope that it's gonna last allow me to introduce to you the topic of business inventories. The Census Bureau reported today that wholesale inventories are going up Those air the businesses that supply retailers stocking up ahead of the sun being out in the fat stimulus checks getting spent marketplaces Justin Oh, has our inventory story today. Wholesalers are basically the middle step in the retail supply chain. They buy goods from manufacturers that they're hoping to sell to retailers, says Tim Fiori, with the Institute for Supply Management, So they're speculating on the future. So wholesale inventory growth is absolutely an optimistic indicator optimistic because wholesalers believe consumers are going to be spending more. That's already starting to happen, says Wells Fargo senior economist Sarah House products are just flying off the shelves as soon as retailers can get their hands on them. How says that's a sign that the economy has plenty of room to grow. Sales could be even better if we could actually get our hands on on the supplies and products that consumers and businesses want. Post says Some of those products are stuck in the supply chain right now, because of the congestion that's been clogging up U. S ports. And so we have cargo that sitting and ports waiting to be off, loaded or waiting for a driver for its truck chassis. And so that's getting caught up in the inventory levels that we see. So wholesalers are staying in closer. Intact with retailers to get a better idea of what they'll need, says Brian Yarbrough, consumer research analyst at Edward Jones. Ah lot of wholesalers. We're trying to figure out ways to improve the supply chain. Be more nimble. Be quicker. Yarbrough says wholesalers will ramp up inventory throughout the summer. But at the same time, he says, businesses are thinking about the fall and winter. And what happens when government relief aid wears off? Okay, so demands really good, but how much of that is demand? It's going to stay and how much of that is more stimulus driven? Yarborough says. Wholesalers are likely to keep increasing their inventories, but at a pretty slow pace. I'm Justin how for marketplace? On Wall Street today, a little deflated. You could say we'll have the details when we do the numbers. Mm. I'm not sure we needed an earnings report to know this. But Starbucks said in its most recent announcement that store traffic is still down from early.

Tim Fiori Marielle Segarra Dana Peterson Jay Powell Brian Yarbrough Starbucks Wells Fargo Orry Hef Mariel Sierra Peterson Friday Institute for Supply Managemen Justin March next year Federal Reserve Today today Census Bureau U. S
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:13 min | 5 months ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In Los Angeles. I'm kind result it is Wednesday. Today. The 28th Day of April. Get is always to have you along, everybody. The economic news. Oh, the day today isn't really about Today. President Biden's big speech about his big plans for this economy. Gonna take years, maybe decades to play out. That, of course, is the long term news. Jay Powell, wrapping up the Federal Reserve's two day meeting today, said this about getting back to full strength. We've got a long ways to go and also it's going to be a different economy. We call that the medium term news closer to today We'll get the next dose of data on consumer spending on Friday, and with it a sense of the economy and in particular Spending on services and how it's all coming back Marketplaces. Marielle Segarra made some calls to hear what people are looking for now and in the medium to long term. So before we get too far into this, something you should know on the show. We often talk about retail sales numbers. Those come out monthly and tell us mainly whether people are buying goods which they've done a lot of during the pandemic. Dana Peterson is chief economist of the Conference board. Good spending was very strong people bought cars. They bought appliances. They bought lawn furniture. They bought boats and RVs on Friday, though, we're getting consumer spending numbers, which is different. It's more heavily weighted towards services, bars, restaurants, hair salons, amusement parks. Peter's call it the experience economy, which didn't do so well during the pandemic, But as more people are vaccinated, and certainly as economies are reopening That experience will standing will come back. Friday's numbers will give us a sense of how much Peterson says she's expecting the numbers to be very strong and to continue on that path through the summer and probably into next year. But or you, Hef, it's who teaches macro economics at Cornell says it's hard to say how long any bump in spending might last. Numbers are snapshot in time of March. Specifically, when a lot of people were spending their stimulus checks. I'm going to spend differently. Money I saved over many years. Then I'm going to say a spend effect government check that They actually never counted on and all of a sudden surprise. In other words, the way people are spending right now because they've got that fat stimulus check and the sun's out and they got their vaccine and they're feeling hopeful. That's not necessarily gonna last Marielle Segarra for Marketplace, speaking of fat stimulus checks in the sun being out and all that and the hope that it's gonna last allow me to introduce to you the topic of business inventories. The Census Bureau reported today that wholesale inventories are going up Those air the businesses that supply retailers stocking up ahead of the sun being out in the fat stimulus checks getting spent marketplaces Justin Oh, has our inventory story today. Wholesalers are basically the middle step in the retail supply chain. They buy goods from manufacturers that they're hoping to sell to retailers, says Tim Fiori, with the Institute for Supply Management, So they're speculating on the future. So wholesale inventory growth is absolutely an optimistic indicator optimistic because wholesalers believe consumers are going to be spending more. That's already starting to happen, says Wells Fargo senior economist Sarah House products are just flying off the shelves as soon as retailers can get their hands on them. How says that's a sign that the economy has plenty of room to grow. Sales could be even better if we could actually get our hands on on the supplies and products that consumers and businesses Want House says Some of those products are stuck in the supply chain right now, because of the congestion that's been clogging up U. S ports. And so we have cargo that sitting and ports waiting to be off, loaded or waiting for a driver for its truck chassis. And so that's getting caught up in the inventory levels that we see. So wholesalers are staying in closer contact with retailers to get a better idea of what they'll need, says Brian Yarbrough, consumer research analyst at Edward Jones. Lot of wholesalers. We're trying to figure out ways to improve the supply chain. Be more nimble. Be quicker. Yarbrough says. Wholesalers will ramp up inventory throughout the summer. But at the same time, he says, business is air thinking about the fall and winter. And what happens when government relief aid wears off? Okay, so demands really good, but how much of that is demand? It's going to stay and how much of that is more stimulus driven? Yarbrough says. Wholesalers are likely to keep increasing their inventories, but at a pretty slow pace. I'm Justin how for marketplace? On Wall Street today, a little deflated. You could say we'll have the details when we do the numbers. Okay? I'm not sure we needed an earnings report to know this. But Starbucks said in its most recent announcement that store traffic is still down from early last year, when things were normal spending per visit, though It's up so much that sales are back to normal. Where they were when things from normal and the company says some of that is thanks to an 18% bump in the number of people who signed up for its loyalty program in the past year, the 90 Day active member rate, which is the preferred metric, I guess for those loyalty programs. Is now for Starbucks 23 million users in the United States. And just because why reinvent the wheel, McDonald's and Wendy's and white cast on a bunch of other fast food places have piloted or have launched loyalty programs off their own low These pandemic MONTHS. MARKETPLACE Kristin Schwab explains why It seems like.

Marielle Segarra Tim Fiori Brian Yarbrough Starbucks Jay Powell Kristin Schwab Marielle Wednesday Wells Fargo Dana Peterson Los Angeles 18% McDonald's Today United States Justin Institute for Supply Managemen 90 Day Friday next year
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:53 min | 5 months ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"In los angeles. I'm kai ryssdal. It is wednesday day to twenty eighth day of april. Good as always to have you along everybody. The economic news of the day to day isn't really about today. President biden's big speech about his big plans for this economy. Going to take years maybe decades to play out. That of course is the long-term news j. paul wrapping up the federal reserve. Two day meeting today said this about getting back to full strength. We've got a long ways to go and and also it's going to be a different economy. We'll call that the medium term news closer to today. We'll get the next dose of data on consumer spending on friday and with a sense of the economy and in particular spending on services. And how it's all coming back. Marketplace's mary cigar. Made some calls to hear what people are looking for now and in the medium to long-term so before we get too far into this something you should know on the show. We often talk about retail sales. Numbers those come out monthly and tell us mainly whether people are buying goods which they've done a lot of during the pandemic. Dana peterson is chief. Economist at conference board good spending was very strong. People bought cars. They bought appliances. They bought lawn furniture. they bought boats. Rv's on friday though we're getting consumer spending numbers which is different. It's more heavily. Weighted towards services bars restaurants hair salons amusement parks theatres. Call it the experience economy which didn't do so well during the pandemic but as more people are vaccinated and certainly as Economies are reopening that experiential. Spending will come back. Friday's numbers will give us a sense of how much peterson says. She's expecting the numbers to be very strong and to continue on that path through the summer and probably into next year but ori hefetz who teaches macroeconomics. Cornell says it's hard to say how long any bump and spending might last. The numbers are a snapshot in time of march. Specifically when a lot of people were spending their stimulus checks. I'm willing to spend differently money. I saved over many years. Than i'm gonna say is spend if a government check that they actually never count on and all of a sudden surprise in other words the way people are spending right now because they've got that fat stimulus check and the sun's out and they got their vaccine and they're feeling hopeful that's not necessarily gonna last. I'm maryelle sagarra for marketplace. Speaking of fed stimulus checks in the sun being out. And all that and the hope that it's gonna last allow me to introduce to you. The topic of business inventories. The census bureau reported today. That wholesale inventories are going up. Those are the businesses that supply retailers. Stocking up ahead of the sun being out in the fed stimulus checks. Getting spend marketplace's justin. Oh has our inventories story. Today wholesalers are basically the middle step in the retail supply chain. They buy goods for manufacturers. That they're hoping to sell to retailers says tempe with the institute for supply management so. They're speculating on future. So wholesale inventory growth is absolutely an optimistic indicator optimistic because wholesalers believe consumers are going to be spending more and that's already starting to happen. Says wells fargo senior. Economists sarah house products are just flying off the shelves as soon as retailers. Get their hands on them. How says that's a sign that the economy has plenty of room to grow. Sales could be even better if we could actually get our hands on on the supplies and products that consumers and businesses want how says some of those products are stuck in the supply chain right now because of the congestion that's been clogging up. Us ports and so we have cargo that sitting in ports wins to be offloaded or waiting for driver for its truck chassis. And so that's getting caught up in the inventory. Levels that we see so wholesalers are staying in closer contact with retailers. To get a better idea of what they'll need says brian. Yarbrough consumer research analyst edward jones. A lot of coal sealers are trying to figure out. Ways to improve the supply. Chain be more nimble quicker yarbrough says wholesalers will ramp up inventory throughout the summer but at the same time he says businesses are thinking about the fall and winter and what happens when government relief aid. Wears off okay so demands really good but how much of that is demand. That's gonna stay. How much of that is more stimulus. Driven yarbrough says wholesalers increasing their inventories but at a pretty slow pace. I'm justin how for marketplace on wall street today. A little deflated. You could say we'll.

Dana peterson peterson Friday los angeles maryelle sagarra today kai ryssdal next year Today friday Two day j. paul wednesday day brian Cornell justin edward jones march ori hefetz President biden
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:24 min | 5 months ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm kind result it is Wednesday. Today. The 28th Day of April. Get is always to have you along, everybody. The economic news. Oh, the day today isn't really about Today. President Biden's big speech about his big plans for this economy going to take years, maybe decades to play out. That, of course, is the long term news. Jay Powell, wrapping up the Federal Reserve's two day meeting today, said this about getting back to full strength. We've got a long ways to go and also it's going to be a different economy. We'll call that the medium term news closer to today. We'll get the next dose of data on consumer spending on Friday, and with it a sense of the economy and in particular Spending on services and how it's all coming back Marketplaces. Marielle Segarra made some calls to hear what people are looking for now and in the medium to long term. So before we get too far into this, something you should know on the show. We often talk about retail sales numbers. Those come out monthly and tell us mainly whether people are buying goods which they've done a lot of during the pandemic. Dana Peterson is chief economist of the Conference board. Good spending was very strong people bought cars. They bought appliances. They bought lawn furniture. They bought boats and RVs on Friday, though, we're getting consumer spending numbers, which is different. It's more heavily weighted towards services. Bars, restaurants, hair salons, amusement parks theaters call it the experience economy, which didn't do so well during the pandemic, But as more people are vaccinated, and certainly as economies are reopening That experience will standing will come back. Friday's numbers will give us a sense of how much Peterson says she's expecting the numbers to be very strong and to continue on that path through the summer and probably into next year. But or you, Hef, it's who teaches macro economics at Cornell. Says it's hard to say how long any bump in spending might last. The numbers are a snapshot in time of March. Specifically, when a lot of people were spending their stimulus checks. I'm going to spend differently money I saved over many years. Then I'm going to say a spend effect government check that I actually never counted on and all of a sudden surprised In other words, the way people are spending right now because they've got that fat stimulus check and the sun's out and they got their vaccine and they're feeling hopeful. That's not necessarily gonna last Marielle Segarra for Marketplace, speaking of fat stimulus checks in the sun being out and all that and the hope that it's gonna last allow me to introduce to you the topic of business inventories. Census Bureau reported today that wholesale inventories are going up Those air the businesses that supply retailers stocking up ahead of the sun being out in the fat stimulus checks getting spent marketplaces Justin Oh, has our inventory story today. Wholesalers are basically the middle step in the retail supply chain. They buy goods from manufacturers that they're hoping to sell to retailers, says Tim Fiori, with the Institute for Supply Management, So they're speculating on the future. So wholesale inventory growth is absolutely an optimistic indicator optimistic because wholesalers believe consumers are going to be spending more. That's already starting to happen, says Wells Fargo senior economist Sarah House products are just flying off the shelves as soon as retailers can get their hands on them. How says that's a sign that the economy has plenty of room to grow. Sales could be even better if we could actually get our hands on on the supplies and products that consumers and businesses want. House says Some of those products are stuck in the supply chain right now, because of the congestion that's been clogging up U. S ports. And so we have cargo that sitting and ports waiting to be off, loaded or I'm waiting for a driver for its truck chassis. And so that's getting caught up in the inventory levels that we see. So wholesalers are staying in closer contact with retailers to get a better idea of what they'll need, says Brian Yarbrough, consumer research analyst at Edward Jones. Ah, lot of wholesalers are trying to figure out ways to improve the supply chain. Be more nimble. Be quicker. Yarbrough says wholesalers will ramp up inventory throughout the summer. But at the same time, he says, business is air thinking about the fall and winter and what happens when government relief aid wears off? Okay, so demands really good, but how much of that is demand that's going to stay and how much of that is more stimulus driven? Yarbrough says wholesalers are likely to keep increasing their inventories, but at a pretty slow pace. I'm Justin how for marketplace on Wall Street today a little deflated. You could say we'll have the details when we do the numbers. Hmm. I'm not sure we needed an earnings report to know this. But Starbucks said in its most recent announcement that store traffic is still down from early last year, when things were normal spending per visit, though It's up so much that sales are back to normal. Where they were when things from normal and the company says some of that is thanks to an 18% bump in the number of people who signed up for its loyalty program in the past year, the 90 Day active member rate, which is the preferred metric, I guess for those loyalty programs. Is now for Starbucks 23 million users in the United States. And just because why reinvent the wheel, McDonald's and Wendy's and white cast on a bunch of other fast food places have piloted or have launched loyalty programs off their own load These pandemic MONTHS marketplace Kristin Schwab explains why It seems like everyone on social Media has a hack for something including how to get lots of freebies. Hey, guys. Welcome back to my channel. It's numb birthday. That's youtuber Lindsay Ray. Her gold..

Marielle Segarra Lindsay Ray Kristin Schwab Tim Fiori Jay Powell Brian Yarbrough Dana Peterson Starbucks Wells Fargo McDonald's Wednesday Today Institute for Supply Managemen Census Bureau 90 Day 18% United States Friday March today
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:51 min | 9 months ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Money for transit system, schools and vaccine distribution. And what did Mr Powell say about the sort of stimulus Only Congress can do. Once again, Powell said. Congress really has the best tools to deal with this crisis, he said. There's a lag time with the feds tools. And he said there are millions of Americans who need aid from Congress, not loans from the Fed. It's the 10 million people who lost their jobs. It's people who may lose their homes. You know, you see the many, many millions of Americans are are waiting in food lines in their cars these days all over the country. Okay and Nance ever going to see a vote on pandemic relief? Well, negotiators want to attach it to a spending bill and that has to pass by tomorrow, so the government doesn't run out of money and shut down. Congress could pass a continuing resolution that would keep the government going temporarily while they finish haggling over the co bit relief bill. Thank you. Maura. People signed up for unemployment benefits in the last week after fresh layoffs up again at 885,000 people. Now call it a serendipitous opportunity. Others might see a holiday miracle and the player monopoly would see bank error in your favor. Pharmacists around the country are noticing when they open the pack of Fizer beyond TIC covert vaccine that's supposed to be five doses per vial again. Sometimes squeeze out of sixth. Maybe 1/7 dose. The FDA looked at this yesterday and it's saying go for it. As long as these air full doses. This could mean millions more will get their shots earlier at a time when the first vaccine is in short supply. S and P and NASDAQ futures or each up 5/10 of a percent. Now think what this covert economy would be like without the post office ups and FedEx the last one releases its summer into fall results today in the summer package shipped with FedEx by ground. We're up by a third marketplaces. Justin, How has that? Delivery companies have had to expand. They handle the boom in e commerce. During the pandemic, FedEx has been upgrading its existing facilities and building new ones. And even before covet, it started making home delivery seven days a week. So th general is president of the consulting firm Shit Matrix. They have bean a great beneficiary off having that seven day network in place Last quarter, the Commerce Department said E commerce sales grew by 36% compared to the same time a year ago. But will that last Brian Yarbrough was consumer research analyst at Edward Jones. I think it was being overly optimistic if they expect these growth rates to continue, Even if growth slows, shipping companies will still have to scramble to meet demand, says Rob Martinez, IT ship where That concept that the demand exceeds the capacity will continue into 2021. Martinez says The big shipping companies usually compete with each other by offering discounts to retailers. But right now, he says, that's not happening. I'm.

Congress Mr Powell FedEx Rob Martinez Commerce Department Nance Fed Brian Yarbrough Maura FDA Edward Jones Justin research analyst president
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:51 min | 9 months ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on KCRW

"Money for transit system, schools and vaccine distribution. And what did Mr Powell say about the sort of stimulus Only Congress can do. Once again, Powell said. Congress really has the best tools to deal with this crisis, he said. There's a lag time with the feds tools. And he said there are millions of Americans who need aid from Congress, not loans from the Fed. It's the 10 million people who lost their jobs. It's people who may lose their homes. You know, you see the many, many millions of Americans are waiting in food lines in their cars these days all over the country. Okay and Nance ever going to see a vote on pandemic relief? Well, negotiators want to attach it to a spending bill and that has to pass by tomorrow, so the government doesn't run out of money and shut down. Congress could pass a continuing resolution that would keep the government going temporarily while they finish haggling over the co bit relief bill. Thank you. Maura. People signed up for unemployment benefits in the last week after fresh layoffs up again at 885,000 people. Now call it a serendipitous opportunity. Others might see a holiday miracle on the player monopoly would see bank error in your favor. Pharmacists around the country are noticing when they open the pack of Fizer beyond TIC covert vaccine that's supposed to be five doses per vial. Again sometimes squeeze out of sixth, maybe 1/7 dose. The FDA looked at this yesterday and it's saying Go for it. As long as these air full doses. This could mean millions more will get their shots earlier at a time when the first vaccine is in short supply. S and P and NASDAQ futures or each up 5/10 of a percent. Now think what this covert economy would be like without the post office ups and FedEx the last one releases its summer into fall results today in the summer package shipped with FedEx by ground. We're up by a third marketplaces. Justin, How has that? Delivery companies have had to expand. They handle the boom in e commerce. During the pandemic, FedEx has been upgrading its existing facilities and building new ones. And even before covet it started making home delivery seven days a week. So taste general is president of the consulting firm Shit Matrix. They have bean a great beneficiary off having that seven day network in place. Last quarter, the Commerce Department said e commerce sales grew by 36% compared to the same time a year ago. But will that last Brian Yarbrough was consumer research analyst at Edward Jones. I think it was being overly optimistic if they expect these growth rates to continue, Even if growth slows, shipping companies will still have to scramble to meet the man says Rob Martinez, IT ship where That concept of the demand exceeds with the past. We will continue into 2021 Martinez says The big shipping companies usually compete with each other by offering discounts to retailers. But right now, he says, that's not happening. I'm.

Congress Mr Powell FedEx Rob Martinez Commerce Department Nance Fed Brian Yarbrough Maura FDA Edward Jones Justin research analyst president
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:47 min | 9 months ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Money for transit system, schools and vaccine distribution. And what did Mr Powell say about the sort of stimulus Only Congress can do. Once again, Powell said. Congress really has the best tools to deal with this crisis, he said. There's a lag time with the feds tools. And he said there are millions of Americans who need aid from Congress, not loans from the Fed. It's the 10 million people who lost their jobs. It's people who may lose their homes. You know, you see the many, many millions of Americans are waiting in food lines in their cars these days all over the country. Okay and Nance ever going to see a vote on pandemic relief? Well, negotiators want to attach it to a spending bill and that has to pass by tomorrow, so the government doesn't run out of money and shut down. Congress could pass a continuing resolution that would keep the government going temporarily while they finish haggling over the co bit relief bill. Answer. Marshal Gunther. Thank you Call a day serendipitous opportunity. Others might see a holiday miracle and a player of Monopoly would see bank error in your favor pharmacists around the country or noticing when they open the pack of Fizer beyond Tech covert vaccine that's supposed to be five doses per vial. Again sometimes squeeze out 1/6 maybe 1/7 dose. The FDA looked at this yesterday and a saying Go forward. As long as these air full doses. This could mean millions more will get their shots earlier at a time when the first vaccine is in short supply. Numbers. Dow and NASDAQ futures each up half a percent right now. I think with this covert economy would be like without the services of the post office ups and FedEx The last one releases its summer into fall results later today in the summer package shipped with FedEx by ground, We're up by a third marketplaces. Justin, How has that? Delivery companies have had to expand. They handle the boom in e commerce. During the pandemic, FedEx has been upgrading its existing facilities and building new ones. And even before covet, it started making home delivery seven days a week. So th general is president of the consulting firm Shit Matrix. They have bean a great beneficiary off having that seven day network in place. Last quarter, the Commerce Department said e commerce sales grew by 36% compared to the same time a year ago. But will that last Brian Yarbrough was consumer research analyst at Edward Jones. I think it was being overly optimistic if they expect these growth rates to continue, Even if growth slows, shipping companies will still have to scramble to meet the man says Rob Martinez, IT ship where That concept of the demand exceeds with capacity will continue into 2021. Martinez says The big shipping companies usually compete with each other by offering discounts to retailers. But right now, he says, that's not happening..

Congress Mr Powell FedEx Rob Martinez Commerce Department Marshal Gunther Nance Fed Brian Yarbrough Edward Jones FDA Justin research analyst president
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Tuesday Dad do believe the twenty, nine, th of September good as always to have along everybody our lead story today is a tale of a balancing act of retailers in this economy trying to overcome simply terrible I three quarters of the year. By finishing strong, you'll hear elsewhere in the program today of indicators were watching to educate our guesses about where things are going but a report from the accounting consulting firm. Bdo chose twenty-nine big retailers filed for bankruptcy protection in this economy through August and that if things continue at that pace, we will match two thousand, ten the dark days after the great recession. So for all the retailers still getting by the last three months of the coming year, that is this year are going to be even more critical than usual as they go looking for some hope in the holidays marketplace's Justin Ho starts us off. The report found that bankrupt retailers have closed almost six thousand stores. This year retailers that have seen the most bankruptcies sell apparel shoes products. We just haven't been buying much during the pandemic stores in malls have been especially hard hit. You've got eight or nine hundred stores spread across malls. In the United States, you probably need about half the stores Brian Yarbrough is an analyst with Edward Jones. He says the big box retailers are spending more to attract consumers who just aren't going to the mall and WanNa shop online you're seeing the walmarts and the targets of the. World Invest. Billions of dollars a year in technology these small companies can't keep up but many retailers rely on their physical locations and are struggling to stay competitive and attract shoppers during a critical holiday season David. Berliner at BDO says, that could include services like contact list checkout or in store pickup for online orders whenever they can do to make consumers feel safe going into these brick and mortar stores Berliner says what retailers need to figure out is what makes sense for physical store to be profitable to make sure that Rick and mortar stores are in the right place? The right size for you know I think stores could be smaller than. Alvin. Designed years ago Berliner says the pandemic has just accelerated a trend of store closures throughout the US that's because he says the country has been over stored for years. I'm Justin Ho for marketplace after the debate this evening by the way, there's a debate. This evening Joe Biden is going to start a campaign swing through Ohio and Pennsylvania tomorrow morning, and he is going to do it. By train. We bring this up because earlier this month Amtrak's CEO William. Flint is his name. He told Congress that the railroad needs another two point eight billion dollars in fresh federal funding to help make up for pandemic losses, and in the meanwhile Amtrak is planning to cut back a lot of its long distance routes from daily departures to three times a week marketplaces and dealer has this look at infrastructure economics on the rails. Technically, Amtrak is a for profit business, but it's more like a public service that's John Mack Humber at the Harvard Business School, it has material subsidy each year from the federal government of equal to about A. Third of its operating revenues that material subsidies about two billion dollars before the pandemic Amtrak's finances were all that bad. In fact, last November it announced its smallest operating loss of about thirty million dollars. Baroque Feigenbaum is with the reason foundation with cove nineteen. A ridership is down significantly down eighty percent from a year ago, and that's why Amtrak's planning to furlough ten percent of its workforce and cut some long distance services like trains the travel from San Antonio Chicago were Seattle to Los Angeles at Tracks Long Distance Service. A loses a lot of money to the best of times in. So now we're talking about really significant losses. They just cannot sustain. Amtrak already got a billion dollars in covert relief money Feigenbaum says additional federal funding just isn't a good investment. But Jim Matthews with a rail passengers. Association says, Amtrak. Service cuts could cost the interior regions of the country billions when that ridership falls everything that goes along with that ridership falls with it the tourism spending the restaurant spending anything that benefits from those riders gets cut. So he says Congress should step up with additional funding. I may dealer for marketplace. Little bumpy in equities today details,.

Amtrak Berliner Justin Ho Feigenbaum United States Flint Congress Edward Jones Bdo Joe Biden Jim Matthews BDO Brian Yarbrough Harvard Business School WanNa John Mack Humber analyst Seattle CEO
As pandemic stretches on, retail bankruptcies approach highest number in a decade

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:07 min | 1 year ago

As pandemic stretches on, retail bankruptcies approach highest number in a decade

"Our lead story today is a tale of a balancing act of retailers in this economy trying to overcome simply terrible I three quarters of the year. By finishing strong, you'll hear elsewhere in the program today of indicators were watching to educate our guesses about where things are going but a report from the accounting consulting firm. Bdo chose twenty-nine big retailers filed for bankruptcy protection in this economy through August and that if things continue at that pace, we will match two thousand, ten the dark days after the great recession. So for all the retailers still getting by the last three months of the coming year, that is this year are going to be even more critical than usual as they go looking for some hope in the holidays marketplace's Justin Ho starts us off. The report found that bankrupt retailers have closed almost six thousand stores. This year retailers that have seen the most bankruptcies sell apparel shoes products. We just haven't been buying much during the pandemic stores in malls have been especially hard hit. You've got eight or nine hundred stores spread across malls. In the United States, you probably need about half the stores Brian Yarbrough is an analyst with Edward Jones. He says the big box retailers are spending more to attract consumers who just aren't going to the mall and WanNa shop online you're seeing the walmarts and the targets of the. World Invest. Billions of dollars a year in technology these small companies can't keep up but many retailers rely on their physical locations and are struggling to stay competitive and attract shoppers during a critical holiday season David. Berliner at BDO says, that could include services like contact list checkout or in store pickup for online orders whenever they can do to make consumers feel safe going into these brick and mortar stores Berliner says what retailers need to figure out is what makes sense for physical store to be profitable to make sure that Rick and mortar stores are in the right place? The right size for you know I think stores could be smaller than. Alvin. Designed years ago Berliner says the pandemic has just accelerated a trend of store closures throughout the US that's because he says the country has been over stored for

Berliner United States Edward Jones BDO Justin Ho Brian Yarbrough Analyst Wanna Rick
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> This <Speech_Male> week we'll hear about <Speech_Male> how some of the biggest <Speech_Male> retailers <Speech_Male> have been doing <Speech_Male> throughout the pandemic <Speech_Male> one of them is Walmart <Speech_Male> which reports quarterly <Speech_Male> earnings. On Tuesday <Speech_Male> the company <Speech_Male> stores have stayed <Speech_Male> opened throughout <Speech_Male> the crisis. Giving it a front <Speech_Male> row seats on <Speech_Telephony_Male> how our <Speech_Male> shopping habits have <Speech_Male> changed. Marketplace's <Speech_Male> Justin <SpeakerChange> Ho <Speech_Male> has more <Speech_Male> one of the brightest <Speech_Male> spots of Walmart's business <Speech_Male> has been curbside <Speech_Male> pickup. <Speech_Male> A service where customers <Speech_Male> order things online <Speech_Male> drive to the store <Speech_Male> in wait while <Speech_Male> a worker <SpeakerChange> loads everything <Speech_Female> into their trunks <Speech_Female> and that <Speech_Female> during Cova <Speech_Male> has just accelerated. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> later an who follows <Speech_Male> Walmart for the research <Speech_Male> firm Kantar <Speech_Male> Duran says <Speech_Male> curbside. Pickup <Speech_Male> gotten huge because <Speech_Male> people are using the <Speech_Male> risk to buy groceries. <Speech_Male> That's an <Speech_Male> area where Walmart <SpeakerChange> already <Speech_Male> dominates. <Speech_Female> We show <Speech_Female> that half of all <Speech_Female> as online <Speech_Female> grocery. Shoppers <Speech_Female> are using Walmart <Speech_Female> for their <Speech_Female> online <SpeakerChange> grocery <Speech_Male> orders. Walmart <Speech_Male> success with curbside. <Speech_Male> Pickup comes <Speech_Male> with costs. <Speech_Male> Charlie O'Shea Moody <Speech_Male> says Labor is a big <Speech_Male> one. It's <Speech_Male> manually intensive <Speech_Male> process for workers <Speech_Male> to pick out and <Speech_Male> scan hundreds <SpeakerChange> of <Speech_Male> grocery products. <Speech_Telephony_Male> You'll see the employees <Speech_Telephony_Male> standing in front <Speech_Telephony_Male> of the Shelf. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Kinda scratching their head <Speech_Telephony_Male> every so often. Right which <Speech_Telephony_Male> one of these and all <Speech_Telephony_Male> we don't <SpeakerChange> have it. <Speech_Telephony_Male> What do I substitute? <Speech_Male> Groceries also carry <Speech_Male> lower margins <Speech_Male> than the other products. <Speech_Male> Walmart sells <Speech_Male> like barbecues bikes <Speech_Male> or clothes <Speech_Male> on Friday. <Speech_Male> The government said apparel <Speech_Male> sales dropped <Speech_Male> eighty percents last <Speech_Male> month. Oj <Speech_Male> says the crisis <Speech_Male> is changing. <SpeakerChange> The Way Walmart <Speech_Male> makes money. <Speech_Telephony_Male> You're going to see just <Speech_Telephony_Male> absolutely blowout <Speech_Telephony_Male> sales. <Speech_Telephony_Male> In you know <Speech_Telephony_Male> food consumable <Speech_Telephony_Male> you <Speech_Telephony_Male> will see obvious. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Softness in <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> discretionary <Speech_Telephony_Male> categories curbside. <Speech_Male> Pickup has one <Speech_Male> big advantage for <Speech_Male> Walmart. And it doesn't <Speech_Male> have to deliver those groceries <Speech_Male> to your house. <Speech_Male> Brian Yarbrough <Speech_Male> consumer research <Speech_Male> analyst at Edward <Speech_Male> Jones. He <Speech_Male> says curbside pickup <Speech_Male> is more profitable <Speech_Male> for retailers than online <Speech_Male> delivery it's <Speech_Telephony_Male> shipping cost <Speech_Telephony_Male> and the free shipping <Speech_Telephony_Male> that <SpeakerChange> really <Speech_Telephony_Male> eat all the margins. <Speech_Male> Yarbrough says <Speech_Male> the pandemic is pushing <Speech_Male> more customers toward <Speech_Male> online delivery <Speech_Male> to while <Speech_Male> Walmart loses <Speech_Male> money delivering products <Speech_Male> to customers. <Speech_Male> He says it <SpeakerChange> can still <Speech_Male> benefit for Walmart <Speech_Telephony_Male> and combat gaining <Speech_Telephony_Male> market share and gaining <Speech_Male> new customers <Speech_Telephony_Male> and offering <SpeakerChange> the option. <Speech_Male> He says <Speech_Male> what remains to be seen <Speech_Male> is whether those new <Speech_Male> customers continue <Speech_Male> to shop at Walmart <Speech_Male> when the pandemic comes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> down. I'm <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> just an Ho- for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> marketplace <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in New York. I'm <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> three you're <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with the marketplace <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> morning report <Music>

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"In Los Angeles. I'm Kai ryssdal eight. Is Tuesday Newsday today. The nineteen th day of November. Good as always to have you along. Everybody item on the government of these United States. A shutdown reprieve. Steve is in the works. The House passed a continuing resolution. Today the Senate is expected to do the same. Best guesses are that the president's going to sign it Thursday night is the deadline as of right now. The extension takes us to December twentieth. More to come almost certainly on that story item to retail in in this economy in the embodiment of the Home Depot Inc.. This country's biggest home improvement company in shorts not great shares tumbled almost must five and a half percent today after third quarter results. came out this morning. The two thousand nineteen forecast was trimmed for the second time this year and third quarter. Sales didn't deliver for in part because big online push. The chain started a couple of years ago. Just ain't paying off marketplace's Nancy Marshall Genzer has that story Home Depot unveiled. It's new digital plan. Almost two years ago it would speed up online deliveries by building new warehouses and make it easier to pick up online orders at stores from shiny new lockers but today Home Depot said the online. Overhaul isn't delivering as much to the bottom line is expected at least not yet Jamie. Amy Cats is an equity analyst. Morningstar you may have to invest now to Reap a benefit in six months or nine months that may benefit you perpetually actually for now home depot has cut it sales forecast for this fiscal year from around two percent growth to one point eight percent at Moya senior market analyst analyst and a Wanda says e commerce is tricky in the home improvement business. It's not like a with the the the Amazon or Walmart online effect where you know if I need to by toys for my kids I can easily just choose it and click it and not worry lots of times when you go into a home depot. You don't know exactly what you need you just know. Oh the toilet won't work. Brian Yarbrough of Edward Jones says less than ten percent of home depot sales are online another thing that limits digital growth. Almost half of the home depot's customers are professionals contractors. Yarbrough says they don't do a lot of online shopping when they leave the job set. One Day let's say today they leave and they like okay. Tomorrow's Wednesday I need Xyz. They usually just go in the next morning and pick it up and you are Bro. Says it would be pretty hard to fit say new roof into a locker but home depot depot is expanding its delivery network for booking materials to lure more contractors online. I'm Nancy Marshall Genzer for marketplace on Wall Street this Tuesday As we explained a couple of weeks ago I think maybe longer Dono. The Dow is a price weighted index. The higher a company's stock price more impacted has unware the downlands Home Depot is one of the more expensive stocks in the Dow. So if you do the math of the one hundred and two points the Dow lost today eighty-seven of it. It was home depot mostly though in equities today things were mixed. We'll have the details when we do the numbers..

Home Depot Home Depot Inc downlands Home Depot Nancy Marshall Genzer Brian Yarbrough Los Angeles United States Senate Steve Amy Cats Jamie Amazon Morningstar Walmart
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Here's a long hike drive deep in the right field heading back to the wall and more and it's gone homerun barracks saw guard with a solo shot. Maybe that wake something offense the race take a one nothing lead in seattle. That's from six twenty w._d. Not well settled one more highlight from that game vogel. The big square-shouldered burly left-handed slugger digging in yarbrough from his wine. The three to pitch strike trey called on the outside corner brian yarbrough with a pump of the fest and he has turned in a shutout innings and seattle to maintain the tiny leave. We've just nick the outer edge. Bobak didn't like it yarbrough would actually go eight point two scoreless in that game. He'd get pulled one out away. Hey from shutout. He was not too happy with manager. Kevin cash after that game but all is good and tampa. They swept the mariners the big series of the weekend. The indians took three out of four in minnesota including seven three win on sunday in ten innings. When this happened the pitch slung auto it hit high center this ball on a grand slam carlos santana. What a a grand slam. The left center and the indians are gone top seven to three here in the tenth inning. That's w eleven hundred the indians. Dan forty three and eighteen since june first best in baseball. They're now tied for first with the twins after being eleven and a half out in early june and a play from that game remember this one cleveland fans. If you win that division by one game francisco lindores cuts down the tying run at the plate in the bottom of the ninth would have been the winning run great relay throw from the outfield then santana hits that that grand slam in the top of the tests meanwhile the angels beat the red sox five four and another ten inning game tony lines a base hit through in the right field. Oh that's gonna give the angels the lead how about that. You gotta love that right there. He wasn't even here yesterday and he steps up to the plate in the tenth inning with two outs and brings in calhoun with an r._b._i. Single austin ben boom with that winning hit. That's from angels radio a._m. A._m. Eight thirty now are upset of the decade. The orioles beat the astros eight two seven the to swinging high playa. Oh all this is going to go. We all pixel walker run out of the plant cord and the orioles win. Take it from five point seven the fan. Here's justin verlander after the game playing baseball. It seems like the losses even heard that much more you you know we put ourselves in a position to win. Our guys did a fantastic job battling back one pitch merlin the game pitches that i made you know there were mistakes and you know i think sometimes like you said he'll the bigger picture and understanding. We're playing good baseball. Don't let this be too much of a debbie downer. Just keep going out and playing good baseball and and i mean we're trying to page me tomorrow. Then garrett cole and then you know it's team doesn't stop tonight's testament of that in the short window and i think the next sis- road trip will be a test that the picture will have to ask a tim kirkman about this game later on in the show dan because the astros were the second biggest favorite in the last fifteen years according to the las vegas sports books so i hope not put your life savings on houston to win that game one of the upset yeah love it big on finding the nationals after big glosses on friday and saturday finally demetz next bitch swung on hidden in the field deep. This is way back you may go gone aide and roadways tease aw two run homer for the slumping victory blaze was not in the lineup today and that has some folks gerring for the exits here at city field..

brian yarbrough baseball Dan Bobak seattle carlos santana orioles astros debbie downer Kevin cash tim kirkman justin verlander francisco lindores mariners nick minnesota garrett cole las vegas cleveland tampa
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

08:16 min | 2 years ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"You've got about twenty four minutes. If you need to be at work or some other place at the top of the hour Wednesday morning with first light. So I just was looking at a survey shows that when consumers are ready to buy a specific product seventy four percent of them. Don't even think about it. They just go straight to Amazon to do it isn't that amazing by the end of this year. Amazon is expected to account for fifty two point four percent of all of the e-commerce market in the United States. That's up from forty eight percent. Just last year. And of course, the key to their success is the getting people to sign up for prime membership. And that makes it really loyal base. We've got more than one hundred million Americans signed up now, and they pay I pay twelve ninety nine a month. One hundred nineteen dollars a year. You get things like know free shipping and to our delivery in some areas, you get discounts at the whole foods grocery stores that they own access to prime video prime music. They're getting into everything. And now, they're buying up grocery chains regional grocery chains. And they're launching their own grocery training chain. So I would like to do is we're going to bring in Rachel Siegel. Now, she is a writer with the Washington Post, and she's been covering this. So she joins us now. Rachel is Amazon. Now looking to just dominate the grocery business like it has been doing with retail. You know, it's it's a bit hard to tell at this point. But it is true that you know, Amazon is looking to increase its grocery game at that would be a pretty big sector for the company Amazon, I put a foothold in the grocery store industry when it bought whole foods a few years ago that was also a pretty big opportunity for Amazon to gain another foothold in a brick and mortar space. Learn the grocery game get sales data from its grocery shopper is. So this is, you know, part of their next frontier that would certainly be something to keep an eye on. So based on what you've been able to find out so far how is this different from owning whole foods or they have their Amazon go stores, which you go in there. You don't even have a checkout. You just use your phone, and you walk up and you pick stuff up, and you leave and it's all done automatically on your phone. So how how is this different? Somebody's questions are a little bit hard to answer at this point. But analysts were describing to me how whole foods is still somewhat of an inch grocery store franchise. So, you know, whole foods, the prices are relatively fire Ganic and natural products. And we're describing me how with Amazon is really trying to. To carve out share of the trillion dollar US grocery market that they're probably gonna lean towards something a little cheaper a little bit more accessible to everyday shoppers, more traditional items that aren't just organic or natural. So that's one way. And then as far as Amazon does stores go, you know, those stories are really geared towards people who are very comfortable with that level of technology. There are no checkout lion Serrano cashiers. There are cameras watching your every move seeing what you pick up seeing what you put down. And again, it's hard to say definitively. But my guess would be that if they're looking to watch these grocery stores with his wider possible that they would also want them to be as accessible to as many people as possible. So, you know, my guess would be that that level of technology. It might not be what they're trying to carry over to their grocery stores. But again, I mean who knows and if this is a plan that they're trying to take a few years down the line, or may even be some technology that familiar with yet. So something to keep an eye on we're talking with Rachel Segal of the Washington Post about her story on Amazon launching its own line of. Grocery stores. I was very interested to see that. Amazon. Got a lot of information. Just in the short time that it has own whole foods, which I guess they're not going to use to open up their own brand of stores. They obviously have grocery sales data from whole foods. But they also got a little bit more of a window into how its prime shoppers are shopping. So most shopping that its prime customers do is all online whereas with their whole foods stores. They have a little bit of a window into what kind of decision shoppers are making in real time. And in person to diet is a way to basically carry their data over into the brick and mortar space in addition to just you've seen generally what American shopping habits are what they're buying when whether they're migrating towards sales what they're choosing to buy what they're not choosing to buy. So if we think about all of the troves of data that Amazon has on our lives already. Now, they've got this window into our shopping for groceries. So you quote, a Brian Yarborough who is an analyst with Edward Jones. Who says that Amazon's going to be locking in shoppers who make base? Purchases all the time. So could this lead to less diversity in terms of what you can buy in grocery stores? If this is successful, what Brian was talking about is, you know, one of the best things that Amazon can use with data is figuring out what shoppers are wanting to buy when and he was describing how groceries are basically, you know, one of our most basic reaper, just as something we go to time and time again, something that we tend to buy in repeat patterns, and he was describing how you know, if you can really get to the if you can really pinpoint what shoppers are buying consistently predictably that that is a really strong data point for you to be able to have in grocery is sort of the perfect example of something like that, especially if we're talking about grocery stores that aren't necessarily more upscale like a whole foods, but a place that people are going to however many times per week to buy the exact same things time and time again, and that's a data point that Amazon could really benefit from the new reporting. Did you pick up how Amazon is planning to go about this? I mean will they just be building their own? Stories from scratch are they going to be buying existing stores or existing chains. Again. That's a question. That's a little bit hard to answer at this point. So on Friday, it's important to note, the Wall Street Journal site that their own sources saying that Amazon was looking to open these stores across the country. Some as early as this year, Amazon to me would not confirm details one way or the other. So there's a lot of speculation as to how Amazon grocery stores could disrupt the grocery game a little bit more broadly. But as far as you know, exactly what shopping centers they're going to be entering into exactly what types of customers are going to be targeting. A lot about is still pretty speculative at this plan. I guess it's probably also too early to tell how prices will match up with the existing store chains. It's so it's so early that I would assume that they'll come out and say maybe by a prime membership with that give it a give shoppers a deal. Right. So another thing that Brian Yarborough, Brian Yarbrough, they analysts Jones, and I were talking about is that this could be a huge way for Amazon to get access to a whole. Another crop of prime members. You know, if if there is like you were saying some link between a discount at their grocery store and having pre-membership or say an advantage to more pick up into livery options or something like that that that could be a huge way to tap into new prime. Memberships another interesting thing to think about in terms of pricing is that you know, I was wondering how Amazon we'll try and pretty clearly distinguished Lyons to make sure that whole foods its own grocery store line it, separate pickup and delivery services won't compete with one another. I imagine that that's something that they would be thinking about and trying to figure out ways to make all of those different parts of their grocery plan, you know, sort of sync together as opposed to compete with each other. So that's another thing to be thinking about in terms of you know, how their pricing how they're marketing how their advertising things like that. It's fascinating to keep tabs on Amazon broader plan. That's certainly I think it's certainly fair to say that this purchase of whole foods a couple of years ago with a staff into Amazon trying to assess what it would be able to. With grocery hopefully, we'll have some some firm details to get more of a sensitive. Exactly what sort of disruption or impact this can have in the near term. All right. Thanks, rachel. We've been talking with Rachel Siegel. Who writes about business issues for the Washington Post? Joining us this morning. Thank you very much. Rachel works for the Washington Post. The Washington Post is not owned by Amazon, but it is owned by Jeff Bezos who also owns Amazon, although Jeff Bezos is said to not have any editorial control over the newspaper. We are at sixteen minutes before the hour. Our number is eight hundred seven three six three six six six. So tell us you're gonna shop at Amazon stores if they get into now, the brick and mortar grocery chains. Do you worry about that? Do you worry about Amazon taking over everything having too much power over the freedom loving people of the United States of America? It's something we have to be concerned about because you know, the future is coming. It's about the run right over us and Amazon could be in the driver's seat. So call us eight hundred seven three six three six six six. First light is coming right back. This is John Greenhut,.

Amazon Washington Post Rachel United States Rachel Siegel Brian Yarborough analyst Rachel Segal Jeff Bezos Edward Jones Wall Street Journal writer John Greenhut Brian America Lyons Brian Yarbrough One hundred nineteen dollars
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

07:48 min | 2 years ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on KOMO

"Year. Amazon is expected to account for fifty two point four percent of all of the e-commerce market in the United States. That's up from forty eight percent. Just last year. And of course, the key to their success is getting people to sign up for prime membership. And that makes it really loyal base. We've got more than one hundred million Americans signed up now and they pay. I pay twelve ninety nine a month. One hundred nineteen dollars a year. You get things like a free shipping into our delivery in some areas, you get discounts at the whole foods grocery stores that they own access to prime video prime music. They're getting into everything. And now, they're buying up grocery chains regional grocery chains. And they're launching their own grocery train chain. So I would like to do is we're going to bring in Rachel seagull. Now, she is a writer with the Washington Post, and she's been covering this. So she joins us now. Rachel is Amazon. Now looking to just dominate the grocery business like it has been doing with retail. You know, it's it's a bit hard to tell at this point. But it is true that Amazon is looking to increase its grocery game at that would be a pretty big sector for the company Amazon, I put a foothold in the grocery store industry when it bought foods a few years ago that was also a pretty big opportunity for Amazon to gain another foothold in a brick and mortar space. Learn the grocery game get sales data from its grocery shopper is. So this is part of their next frontier. That would certainly be something to keep an eye on. So based on what you've been able to find out so far how is this different from owning whole foods or they have their Amazon go stores, which you go in there. You don't even have a checkout. You just use your phone, and you walk up and you pick stuff up, and you leave and it's all done automatically on your phone. So how how is this different? Some of these questions are a little bit hard to answer at this point. But analysts were describing to me how whole foods is still somewhat niche grocery store franchise. So, you know, whole foods the prices are relatively higher. It focuses on a Ganic and natural products and analysts were describing to me how at Amazon is really trying to. To carve out share of the trillion dollar US grocery market that they're probably gonna lean towards something a little cheaper a little bit more accessible to everyday shoppers, more traditional items that aren't just organic or natural. So that's one way. And then as far as the Amazon does stories go, you know, those stories are really geared towards people who are very comfortable with that level of technology. There are no checkout line Serrano cashiers. There are cameras watching your every move seeing what you pick up seeing what you put down and again, it's hard to say definitively. But my guess would be that if they're looking to launch these grocery stores with his wider rita's possible that they would also want them to be as accessible to as many people as possible. So, you know, my guess would be that that level of technology might not be what they're trying to carry over to their grocery stores. But again, I mean who knows? This is a plan that they're trying to take a few years down the line. There may be some technology that we're not familiar with yet. So something to keep an eye on. We're talking with Rachel Segal of the Washington Post about her story on Amazon launching its own line of grocery stores. I was very interested to see that Amazon. Got a lot of information. Just in the short time that it is own whole foods, which I guess they're not going to use to open up their own brand of stores. They obviously have grocery sales data from whole foods. But they also got a little bit more of a window into how its prime shoppers are shopping. So, you know, most shopping that its prime customers do is all online whereas with their whole foods stores. They have a little bit of a window into what kind of decision shoppers are making in real time. And in person, the diet is a way to basically carry their data over into the brick and mortar space in addition to just generally what American shopping habits are what they're buying when whether they're migrating towards sales what choosing to buy what they're not choosing to buy. So if we think about all of the. Troves of data that Amazon has on our lives already. Now, they've got this window into our shopping for groceries. So you quote, a Brian Yarborough who's an analyst with Edward Jones. Who says that Amazon's going to be locking in shoppers who make basic purchases all the time. So could this lead to a less diversity in terms of what you can buy grocery stores? If this is successful. I think what Brian was talking about is, you know, one of the best things Amazon can use with data is figuring out what shoppers are wanting to buy when and he was describing how groceries are basically, you know, one of our most basic repeat purchases, something we go to time and time again, something that we tend to buy in repeat patterns, and he was describing how you know, if you can really get to the if you can really pinpoint what shoppers are buying consistently predictably that that is a really strong data point for you to be able to have and grocery is sort of the perfect example of something like that, especially if we're talking about grocery stores that aren't necessarily more upscale like a whole foods, but a place that people are going. To however, many times per week by the exact same things time and time again. And that's a data point that Amazon could really benefit from the new reporting. Did you pick up how Amazon is planning to go about this? I mean, will they just be building their own stores from scratch are they going to be buying existing stores or existing chains. Again. That's a question. That's a little bit hard to answer at this point. So on Friday, it's important to note, the Wall Street Journal side that their own sources saying that Amazon was looking to open these stores across the country. Some as early as this year Amazon to me would not confirm any details. One way or the other. So there's a lot of speculation as to how Amazon grocery stores could disrupt the grocery game little bit more broadly. But as far as you know, exactly what shopping centers they're going to be entering into exactly what types of customers. They're going to be targeting. A lot about is still pretty speculative at this plant. I guess it's probably also too early to tell how prices will match up with the existing store chains. It's so it's so early that I would assume that they'll come out and say, you know, maybe by a prime membership without giving give shoppers deal, right? So another thing that Brian Yarborough Brian Yarbrough the analyst, and I were talking about is that this could be a huge way for Amazon to get access to a whole 'nother crop prime members. You know, if if there is like you were saying some link between a discount at the grocery store and having a prime membership or say advantage to more pick up into livery options or something like that that that could be a huge way to tap into new prime. Memberships another interesting thing to think about in terms of pricing is that you know, I was wondering how Amazon we'll try in pretty clearly distinguished Lyons to make sure that whole foods its own grocery store line. It's separate pickup and delivery services won't compete with one another. I imagine that that's something that they would be thinking about and trying to figure out ways to make all of those different parts of their grocery plan, you know, sort of together as opposed to compete with each other. So that's another thing to be thinking about in terms of you know, how their pricing how they're marketing how their advertising things like that. It's fascinating to keep tabs on Amazon's broader plan. It certainly I think it's certainly fair to say that this purchase of whole foods a couple of years ago with a step into Amazon trying to assess what it would be able to do with grocery it. Hopefully, we'll have some some firm details to get more of a sensitive. Exactly what sort of disruption or impact is going to have in the near term. All right. Thanks, rachel. We've been talking with Rachel Siegel. Who writes about business issues for the Washington Post? Joining us this morning. Thank you very much. Rachel works for the Washington Post. The Washington Post is not owned by Amazon, but is owned by Jeff Bezos who also owns Amazon, although Jeff Bezos is said to not have any editorial control over the newspaper. We are at sixteen minutes before the hour. Our number is eight hundred seven three six three six six six. Tell us you're gonna shop at Amazon stores if they get into now, the brick and mortar grocery chains. Do you worry about that? Do you worry about Amazon taking over everything having too much power over the freedom loving people of the United States of America? It's something that we have to be concerned about because you know, the future is coming. It's about the run, right? Over us. Amazon could be in the driver's seat. So call us eight hundred.

Amazon Washington Post Rachel United States analyst Brian Yarborough Rachel seagull Rachel Segal Jeff Bezos Rachel Siegel Ganic Wall Street Journal writer Brian America Edward Jones Lyons Brian Yarbrough
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:59 min | 2 years ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"So Cardiff Garcia. Yes. I have a couple of things to show you. I'm very excited about this. You're showing me too large full to the brim plastic bags. Yes. Okay. So these are two grocery bags from two different stores. These stores though, they have something in common ear both dollar stores. In fact, these stores are two of the biggest dollar store kind of behemoth chains in the US. There is Dollar General here in this yellow bag and in this bag their stuff from Family Dollar so dollar stores had this little retail renaissance during the economic downturn. While all the other stores will everybody else was struggling dollar stores were just killing it. But ten years later, we are in a very different economic world. And in this new world, one of these dollar store chains is thriving and one of these chains is really rough shape. This is the indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Vanik Smith, and I'm Cardiff Garcia whose interest is piqued right now. Because not only my curious to know, which of these two dollar stores is doing great in which not. But I'm curious to know, what's inside these bags? You will not be disciplined. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from zone when you can't be there in person zoom zoom is used by millions to connect face to face one easy platform for all your communication needs. Visit zoom online to set up your free account today. Meet happy with zoom. Support also comes from. Hello monday. A new podcast from Lincoln's at to'real team about the changing nature of work and how to get the most from Monday and your career find Hello Monday on apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Today's indicate or is a dollar, and you know, this is a powerful indicator. This idea that you would go into a store, and there would be a bunch of stuff in there that would only cost a dollar and during the great recession this meant a lot to people customers poured into dollar stores in two thousand nine Dollar General already had nearly six thousand stores today. It has about fifteen thousand stores Family Dollar was a bit smaller had roughly six thousand stores in two thousand nine now it has almost nine thousand and both stores were basically going after the same customers that WalMart targets. But these stores could go where WalMart's couldn't like in cities, for instance, New York, there is a Dollar General and Family Dollar both pretty close to where I live in Brooklyn. They also went really hard into small rural areas where the population was not big enough to support a whole WalMart superstore lake that three hours outside of Saint Louis drive down. There we go through this little town, and it's got like twelve hundred people to Family Dollar Dollar General and a little low. Grocery store. I mean, the nearest WalMart's like thirty five to forty minutes away. This is Brian Yarbrough. He's a consumer analyst at Edward Jones. When the economy slows down, they actually perform a little better because you'll see people trade down. So people will go into some of the higher price grocery stores and places, and they'll trade down into the dollar store environment. So in the teeth of the recession Family Dollar Dollar General. We're just having their moment the bad times for the economy or the good times for dollar stores. But when the recession ended, and the recovery started these stores made very different bets on how to survive during the recovery, and you can see the difference in these shopping bags that I brought back from both stores. So I up Dollar General Dollar General decided we are gonna go hard after the mini WalMart thing. They basically became a grocery store, and this makes sense, right? Because in good times and bad people always need the basics, groceries pet food detergent and dollar generals. Like, we are going to be the place where people can get cheap basics. So you can see. In here basics. Yeah. Got a got a carton of milk. Sure. Dollar General basically went hard after the grocery segment of the market. So buying Yarbrough says mall. It's convenient way home though. I need some milk or anything bread. You can be in and out in you know, two or three minutes versus, you know, go to a WalMart supercenter, and it could be a fifteen or twenty minute ordeal. That's journey. Exactly. So I went to the Dollar General store near me, and I could see all this right away. It was really nice. It was super clean and well organized, right? When I walked in. There was this big fancy. Starbucks display. They're selling some new kind of canned Espresso got you. Again. You know me. So well, that's exciting. And I got you a red bull. Just in case in case. And they had all the name brands like everything you might have on your grocery list. Chips. Ahoy the peeps. Of course. It'd be easy heaps. It's like a whole variety of things. Some of this stuff is like a treat at love it. All right. Exactly. So I spent about thirty dollars on all this stuff. You know? So the prices are good, but not super super-low, but it was very easy to navigate. It was really pleasant shopping experience that shiny yellow cards everything was organized, and then I wanna few blocks away to Family Dollar, so Family Dollar two very different tack. They went really hard on the dollar part. So after all there's a promise in the name of a dollar store. Right. And they kept this promise. But in order to keep things price low. You can't really have regular groceries. Right. You can't live like eight kinds of chips ahoy, and you know, Starbucks displays and things like that diversity, right? Like if you're enforcing the price. You're not going to be able to get everything you want for that same price and in order to keep. Prices that that low you end up having to kind of get a bunch of weird stuff. Right. Like, a hodgepodge lot of food and weird small packages very excited about this. There's this Honey nut Cheerios. That's like I like cutting Cheerios, but it's like yours. To servings or something it's like a packet bills. Have a lot of off brand stuff. Like, there's this energy drink red bull. I've got here a drink called rip it energy with a picture of a soldier holding a flag a gun in the colors of the American flag. This is like super patriotic energy, Drake. And you know, it takes the edge off of a heart afternoon card marshmallow offering marshmallows. Yeah. You also end up with this kind of grab bag of stuff that's made in India and China kind of whatever fell off the truck that week a little bit more candy holiday decorations seasonal type items galaxy allow that comes from China a lot of its discretionary nature driving people with these great deals. I mean Family Dollar brings in whatever. It can Mark down. The selection is more random. So like here is an Easter banner for you. I got to a paper crown check it out. This is my favorite purchase a skittles flavored candle handle, I know eight for my gift from me to you for your house when a glow sword. Okay, close. Yeah. I know. Yeah. We're gonna have to wear those around the office knows glasses a package of six gradu- marks knows last night with the mustache and everything six of them for a dollar. So in order to keep their prices, low Family Dollar did not invest in fancy stores the way the Dollar General did they kept overhead low, and you know, the stores as a result are a little hard to navigate I spent like three times longer in the Family Dollar store into the lots of poking around. And and honestly the experience of being in the store was a little bit unpleasant. Like, right when you walk in. This automated voice told you you were being monitored. I mean, all the stuff was just a dollar. So the deals were actually really amazing. I kinda couldn't believe all the stuff I could get for dollar so Cardiff who dollar stores to business models one chain bet on the dollar one chain bet against the dollar, which one do you think is still thriving? I'm gonna guess Dollar General. You are right. Okay. Dollar General has been killing it brought in customers with higher. Income during the downturn. And some of those customers are still customers today. They didn't leave them Dollar General has grown every single quarter. For nearly a decade. Brian Yarbrough said going upscale ish kind of paid off people like shopping there, and they like the deals so even when times got better and people could maybe afford to shop in a more expensive store. They didn't they kept shopping Dollar General because they liked it. And also because Dollar General is a big chain. They're able to get lower prices for a lot of the name brand stuff. They carry an offer better deals than like local grocery stores in rural areas or corner stores in cities Family Dollar on the other hand did not fare. So well as the economy improved people are willing to spend a little bit more on things like holiday decorations, and candy, and cutlery, and pens and skittles candles, and they wanted a more pleasant shopping experience and Family Dollar kind of went sideways again, I think when dollars was investing opening new stores updating and remodeling stores and family. Which is kind of plotting the loan. You know, I think Dollar General took a lot of market share and took a lot of customers. Now, I think, you know, Family Dollar struggling to gain those back Stanley dollar was bought out years back, and it just announced that it is going to close nearly four hundred locations totally rethink its business model, it'll probably also start to leave the dollar part behind things are probably gonna get more expensive there, which makes me a little bit sad because you know, where else are you gonna find like six Groucho Marx glasses for a dollar on the other hand if the economy goes into recession again, then maybe their fortunes will switch yet. They could be singing a happy. Tune with one dog. Purple plastic recorder that I purchased where else Family Dollar once took lessons in the report when I was a kid, but I don't I did too. Hoping I'm getting it.

Family Dollar Dollar General WalMart Brian Yarbrough Cardiff Garcia Starbucks US Stacey Vanik Smith analyst Groucho Marx New York Lincoln Saint Louis Espresso apple
A Tale Of Two Dollar Stores

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:47 min | 2 years ago

A Tale Of Two Dollar Stores

"You would go into a store, and there would be a bunch of stuff in there that would only cost a dollar and during the great recession this meant a lot to people customers poured into dollar stores in two thousand nine Dollar General already had nearly six thousand stores today. It has about fifteen thousand stores Family Dollar was a bit smaller had roughly six thousand stores in two thousand nine now it has almost nine thousand and both stores were basically going after the same customers that WalMart targets. But these stores could go where WalMart's couldn't like in cities, for instance, New York, there is a Dollar General and Family Dollar both pretty close to where I live in Brooklyn. They also went really hard into small rural areas where the population was not big enough to support a whole WalMart superstore lake that three hours outside of Saint Louis drive down. There we go through this little town, and it's got like twelve hundred people to Family Dollar Dollar General and a little low. Grocery store. I mean, the nearest WalMart's like thirty five to forty minutes away. This is Brian Yarbrough. He's a consumer analyst at Edward Jones. When the economy slows down, they actually perform a little better because you'll see people trade down. So people will go into some of the higher price grocery stores and places, and they'll trade down into the dollar store environment. So in the teeth of the recession Family Dollar Dollar General. We're just having their moment the bad times for the economy or the good times for dollar stores. But when the recession ended, and the recovery started these stores made very different bets on how to survive during the recovery, and you can see the difference in these shopping bags that I brought back from both stores. So I up Dollar General Dollar General decided we are gonna go hard after the mini WalMart thing. They basically became a grocery store, and this makes sense, right? Because in good times and bad people always need the basics, groceries pet food detergent and dollar generals. Like, we are going to be the place where people can get cheap basics. So you can see. In here basics. Yeah. Got a got a carton of milk. Sure. Dollar General basically went hard after the grocery segment of the market. So buying Yarbrough says mall. It's convenient way home though. I need some milk or anything bread. You can be in and out in you know, two or three minutes versus, you know, go to a WalMart supercenter, and it could be a fifteen or twenty minute ordeal. That's journey. Exactly. So I went to the Dollar General store near me, and I could see all this right away. It was really nice. It was super clean and well organized, right? When I walked in. There was this big fancy. Starbucks display. They're selling some new kind of canned Espresso got you. Again. You know me. So well, that's exciting. And I got you a red bull. Just in case in case. And they had all the name brands like everything you might have on your grocery list. Chips. Ahoy the peeps. Of course. It'd be easy heaps. It's like a whole variety of things. Some of this stuff is like a treat at love it. All right. Exactly. So I spent about thirty dollars on all this stuff. You know? So the prices are good, but not super super-low, but it was very easy to navigate. It was really pleasant shopping experience that shiny yellow cards everything was organized, and then I wanna few blocks away to Family Dollar, so Family Dollar two very different tack. They went really hard on the dollar part. So after all there's a promise in the name of a dollar store. Right. And they kept this promise. But in order to keep things price low. You can't really have regular groceries. Right. You can't live like eight kinds of chips ahoy, and you know, Starbucks displays and things like that diversity, right? Like if you're enforcing the price. You're not going to be able to get everything you want for that same price and in order to keep. Prices that that low you end up having to kind of get a bunch of weird stuff. Right. Like, a hodgepodge lot of food and weird small packages very excited about this. There's this Honey nut Cheerios. That's like I like cutting Cheerios, but it's like yours. To servings or something it's like a packet bills. Have a lot of off brand stuff. Like, there's this energy drink red bull. I've got here a drink called rip it energy with a picture of a soldier holding a flag a gun in the colors of the American flag. This is like super patriotic energy, Drake. And you know, it takes the edge off of a heart afternoon card marshmallow offering marshmallows. Yeah. You also end up with this kind of grab bag of stuff that's made in India and China kind of whatever fell off the truck that week a little bit more candy holiday decorations seasonal type items galaxy allow that comes from China a lot of its discretionary nature driving people with these great deals. I mean Family Dollar brings in whatever. It can Mark down. The selection is more random. So like here is an Easter banner for you. I got to a paper crown check it out. This is my favorite purchase a skittles flavored candle handle, I know eight for my gift from me to you for your house when a glow sword. Okay, close. Yeah. I know. Yeah. We're gonna have to wear those around the office knows glasses a package of six gradu- marks knows last night with the mustache and everything six of them for a dollar. So in order to keep their prices, low Family Dollar did not invest in fancy stores the way the Dollar General did they kept overhead low, and you know, the stores as a result are a little hard to navigate I spent like three times longer in the Family Dollar store into the lots of poking around. And and honestly the experience of being in the store was a little bit unpleasant. Like, right when you walk in. This automated voice told you you were being monitored. I mean, all the stuff was just a dollar. So the deals were actually really amazing. I kinda couldn't believe all the stuff I could get for dollar so Cardiff who dollar stores to business models one chain bet on the dollar one chain bet against the dollar, which one do you think is still thriving? I'm gonna guess Dollar General. You are right. Okay. Dollar General has been killing it brought in customers with higher. Income during the downturn. And some of those customers are still customers today. They didn't leave them Dollar General has grown every single quarter. For nearly a decade. Brian Yarbrough said going upscale ish kind of paid off people like shopping there, and they like the deals so even when times got better and people could maybe afford to shop in a more expensive store. They didn't they kept shopping Dollar General because they liked it. And also because Dollar General is a big chain. They're able to get lower prices for a lot of the name brand stuff. They carry an offer better deals than like local grocery stores in rural areas or corner stores in cities Family Dollar on the other hand did not fare. So well as the economy improved people are willing to spend a little bit more on things like holiday decorations, and candy, and cutlery, and pens and skittles candles, and they wanted a more pleasant shopping experience and Family Dollar kind of went sideways again, I think when dollars was investing opening new stores updating and remodeling stores and family. Which is kind of plotting the loan. You know, I think Dollar General took a lot of market share and took a lot of customers. Now, I think, you know, Family Dollar struggling to gain those back Stanley dollar was bought out years back, and it just announced that it is going to close nearly four hundred locations totally rethink its business model, it'll probably also start to leave the dollar part behind things are probably gonna get more expensive there, which makes me a little bit sad because you know, where else are you gonna find like six Groucho Marx glasses for a dollar on the other hand if the economy goes into recession again, then maybe their fortunes will switch yet. They could be singing a happy. Tune with one dog. Purple plastic recorder that

Family Dollar Dollar General Walmart Brian Yarbrough Starbucks Analyst New York Saint Louis Edward Jones Brooklyn Groucho Marx Espresso Drake Cardiff China India
"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"brian yarbrough" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Now, I think that the the natural counter argument to that is will, as innings are moved random, his different pitchers, throw different innings than the money will be spread around. The raves as opposed to reduced amounts going to the best pitchers. But I don't know because this is a different kind of pitching staff. We will. We'll have to see how many valves and the raise of never really paid their pitching staff a lot of money anyway. Right. So yeah, it's hard to say because right. I mean, you'd think that like arbitration, for instance, which still largely relies on traditional stats like wins and saves and so forth. If you get fewer those because the opener and it will hurt you. On the other hand, someone is still winning the games. And I think make petrello pointed out that it's possible that the opener strategy is actually enhancing the odds of winning the game for some pitchers. I mean, some guys, like if you are the opener and you're not going to win that game because you can't go five. But if you're the guy who comes in after the opener, maybe you have a better chance to win the would have if you would actually start at the game. So I'm not positive that I mean it might hurt some guys and help other guys like, I don't know, Brian Yarbrough is thirteen in five at this point. So he's winning lots of games even though he's been kind of one of the primary pitchers affected by the opener strategy. So I don't know that it necessarily hurts people across the board. And then as you're saying, maybe there's a short term hit in arbitration, but maybe the arbitrate. System or the free agent market changes to pay players what they're worth under this new opener strategy. If this becomes dominant, maybe I don't know. Maybe certain guys at the top end of the rotation will get less. But guys at the beckoned the bullpen will get more because they're pitching more innings than they're being the opener. I don't know how that will shake out it. It seems like a valid concern, but it's a little too soon to say for sure that it's definitely going to hurt players financially, right? I mean, we already have a system where money is being shifted more toward the bullpen. We saw last offseason the one class of players who didn't pay any sort of financial penalty work. Good relievers. Now, of course, maybe in response to those relievers generally being good that could go in the other direction, but money innings are already going toward the bullpen anyway and away from starting pitchers. And importantly, the rays have never been like a payroll leader like you don't look at the race to be the model of how money is going to be spent because at least as long as they operate like this, they're always going to be trying to bring players up. They're young and cheap, and they're going to be having some sort of taxi squad constantly shuffling relievers between AAA and the majors in now again, because every time we talk about the raise, we should address this point. I think it is possible to admire the raise for the way that they operate while wishing that they didn't have to operate in this way. But in the way that the rays are not all their owner, I think it is a the people who are responsible for running. The rays have done an incredible job of managing the roster with their limited flexibility..

rays Brian Yarbrough petrello