20 Episode results for "Brian Stevens"

Hollywood Dream Machines exhibit explores sci-fi vehicles used on screen

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:33 min | 2 years ago

Hollywood Dream Machines exhibit explores sci-fi vehicles used on screen

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini, founder and CEO at airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air. Find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet m dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. To solve the scourge of the car. Maybe we have to go back back to the future from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Jack Stewart info. Molly would. The future of causes always exciting and always just around the corner. Things like self driving cars have been five years away, for I'd say about forty years now, but there are times when pure imagination is exactly what's needed when vehicles have to be as out there as possible nearly incredible. 'cause or a big part of science fiction TV shows and movies. They're often characters themselves, and someone has to make them I went to see some of the creations of writers directors and designers at a new exhibition at the Petersen automotive museum in Los Angeles. It's called Hollywood dream machines. And there cause from Mad Max Bladerunner and the classic Star Wars amongst others. Brian Stevens is exhibition director at the museum, and he started by explaining how a car designer works with a filmmaker in the use of vehicles in Hollywood productions. There are a number of scenarios, one of, which is the need to design a car from scratch to fulfill the vision of the producers of the directors of the film, in many. Cases though. There are pre existing cars that do just that and there's no need to design a car from scratch, and when it came time to create back to the future just so happened, that this very exotic wild stainless steel bodied car existed. In fact, was very much in the public eye. Do some lawsuits at the time which which made it a perfect option for this particular use in this particular film. Doc. Are you telling me that you built a time machine? The way I see it if you're going to build a time machine into a car, why not do it from style now that we are up close, I can see. There are a lot of wires zip ties parts that look almost unfinished. Yes. Which is deliberate in this case, the producers and directors of the film didn't want something polished, they wanted something that looked like it was handmade in a garage. So you worked with designers of some of these actually put this exhibit together. How important, did they say it is to be accurate as opposed to just be entertaining when the coming up with these visions of the future. I think it's a combination of both if you're projecting fifty years in the future. I think accuracy is, is going to be difficult to achieve, regardless of what you what you propose, but they certainly do want some level of realism when you start getting into science fiction films as opposed to Pierce to pure fantasy films. You do want there to be an element of science basis, you want there to be something that seems even somewhat. Ause -able about what you're predicting. So you have kit here, for example, from Knight rider from what the voice of industry thousands microprocessor K IT for easy reference. A can't. If you prefer, do you think that, that was fully autonomous long before most of us had heard of even the concept of self driving, 'cause it's a 'cause like that an inspiration to real engineers and real designers, I think there's no question that when today's designers were children, watching these television shows in these movies that they are even potentially subconsciously gaining inspiration from what they see. And that's probably part of why we see some of the technologies that are shown in these vehicles. Eventually become real Brian Stevens, taking us on a semi nostalgic semi futuristic, look at the cause of Hollywood at the Petersen automotive museum in Los Angeles, fun facts. I learned from him in the early drafts of the back to the future. Script the time machine wasn't built into a cholera toll. It was built into refrigerator. I'm not sure I would have enjoyed the movie. Quite as much. And now for some related links. Check out the exhibition website if you want some inspiration for movies have been Joan this holiday. I'd forgotten how much I enjoyed some of them the Audi r s q concept from I robot made me want to watch that all over again. And I will be streaming the original Bladerunner as well as twenty four thousand nine to see that vision of Los Angeles with spinners in the dark and rainy skies in terms of making these sci-fi visions come true. The Atlantic has a great story with the headline flying cause a real and then not bad for the climate that describes the efforts to build a new type of electric flying machine that isn't a plane and isn't a helicopter but could fly building to building top skipping city traffic. And it's not just frustrated commuters who could benefit as sea levels rise coastal cities, like Miami, a going to have to go to ever greater lengths to mitigate the impacts of climate change. So we'll also link you to a court. Story about developers in that Florida city who are already designing buildings where rooftop observation decks can be converted into flying, taxi poets, if you didn't catch recent marketplace tech series on climate change at up, by the way, it's called how we survive in the podcasts are online to where we're going. Maybe we really need roads. I'm Jack Stewart. And that's today's marketplace tech. This is a PM. I'm Shepard from Lincoln Nebraska, and I listened to marketplace several times, actually every day because it's got the economic news and developments that are important to me. Donate the marketplace, so that it can be available to everyone and asked her hope. You'll join me in this effort. Thanks to join shepherd is a marketplace investor donate online. Marketplace dot org. This Mike in place podcast is brought to you by evident helping businesses create a solid foundation of trust and safety on their platforms. By seamlessly verifying workers unless time. And with more confidence evident also helps companies stay up to date on any changes to relevant information and readily adapt, if and when compliance requirements, evolve evident is bringing confidence and peace of mind, personal data interactions across the globe. Visit evident ID dot com slash tech to sign up and start running verifications immediately. That's evident ID dot com slash tech.

Los Angeles Petersen automotive museum Brian Stevens Jack Stewart founder and CEO Hollywood Michigan economic Development Max Bladerunner Michigan P. L. A. N. E T John Rimini Molly cholera Audi Bladerunner shepherd Pierce Mike
Asteroids Destroying Each Other

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

46:32 min | 1 year ago

Asteroids Destroying Each Other

"Love this podcast. Support this show through the. ACOSS supportively Joe. It's up to you how much you give and there's no regular commitment. Just hit the link in the show description to support now. Fifteen seconds guy internal. Ignition sequence. Space Nuts. To. Five radio. report it feels good. Hello again. Thank you for joining us on the space. podcast through your favorite podcast distributor. No doubt my name is Andrew Ugly your host, and with me as always is astronomy at large professor Fred. What's an for it? Hi, Andrew how you doing. Quite well my third week of isolation it's. Although I had to go out to do work on occasion. I spent eight hours driving a truck last Friday. Between a shop and a church believe it or not at church because we kind have services anymore has turned into a massive storeroom. Of course, that's what happens. You got space despair you. Should see the study that I'm sitting in the move. would. Fuses to come in here because she said it's. It's an absolute mess and I. Agree with her probably agree I do. Now this is. This is this is episode one hundred and nine, thousand nine hundred. That's stoning, will we? Will we make it to two hundred? who defends all sorts of things? Check next week. Folks notwithstanding a global pandemic. So anyway. I'm confident with Mike It. To. Today Fred. We're talking about a possible event. A possible event involving ninety two asteroids in another solar system they might have annihilated each other I. Love Astronomy. We could have seen something that might have happened at some time. We done a win. Here, that's what. Nutshell. Listen. It's not there anymore. We're going to look at the thirtieth anniversary of Hubble. which. By the time this episode is released. We'll have been celebrated. Thirty years I was I actually was staggered when I read that headline thought not Cathy but yes, it is and some questions from our audience Brian has done a bit of a follow up on our discussion about the mercury mission that we spoke about a couple of weeks ago. He's a little concerned that we might have got wise. Croston turned everything upside down. So we're going to try and clarify that you're right, and you're wrong Brian as it turns out. Oh, you are wrong and you're right. Either way could be to. Just just to just to. Make Brian. Feel it, too. I'm right and I'm really as well they are. And ALICEA has come up with some ideas on the expansion theory of the universe which we've talked about many times. It's continuing to expand at an accelerating right. but their variables, so we'll, we'll look into that and plenty more on this edition of space nuts. Now. Let's talk about this possible event. That might have happened involving to potential asteroids, and now the solar system five our way. Indeed we. We should. Just conscious that we might have been a background noise at the moment because I forgot to shut the door. Line. Money for me. Money now because she was on one of recent programs. She was. The. Thank you. Trading live radio. Of course. The way we should do it. That's fine. So yes, really interesting piece of work actually has quite a long history. And it you know it's one of these stories that had various levels of excitement around his career It's about. A disc. Around a star whose name is? Usually pronounced formula. It's spelled F.. A. L.. H. A. UT, and it is in the Southern Hemisphere. To start very familiar, enough skies down here but about. I think it's kind of twenty years ago something. Observations were made of this star that revealed that it had a ring of material around it. In other words the The the the residue of what we call a protoplanetary disc. This is how we believe planets formed. Gas and dust clouds collapse. In the central region becomes the star, and because of rotation you get this of material swirling around the star, and that is called the protoplanetary disk, and that's what's the planets forming? And in fact the Alma. Spe Elmer Radio Telescope? The Atacama large millimeter array, which is in northern Chile. Has Made. A. Big Business Finding protoplanetary disks around other stars. Sadly is closed down at the moment because of the covid nineteen. Pandemic, but We've seen many of these examples of planetary systems in the formation so go back to show. It was discovered, and in fact I believe this discovery might be made by the Hubble rather than. Rather than? Alma, but this is going back several years virtually two decades. And it was discovered to have this this ring of material around it, but in two thousand and four. It was discovered that there was a planet. Very close to this ring sort of on the inner edge of the ring. And obsolete observations showed us this planet rotating around the around the star it actually. Offered Puzzles from the word go because. The things that? That seemed a bit weird about it. One of them was that. The the planet though it was too big to be wearing. What's in the sense that? If it was as big as it was, it should be disturbing this ring of material. Probably putting a gap into it. There was no sign of that a tool. And then another problem came up when So. The idea of from what was saying I was he got a big planet going around a star it must be. Big enough to be a super gas. Giant is a large planet. which should be very strongly nipper read region of the spectrum, so scientists tried to image this object the infrared. And you know it it. It was something like Jupiter. Larger Than Jupiter you'd get a strong infrared signal. But actually this style was completely invisible infrared. There was nothing there. So. That sort of made people wonder what it was that they were seeing and so over the. Last. Decade so It has been engaged. Several times by the Hubble telescope, and in particular, two, thousand, six, two, thousand, eight, two, thousand, ten, thousand and twelve to the voting. What we've seen, is this object just getting bigger and bigger and Fainter and fainter? And now. It's disappeared altogether. And so the interpretation of this as you said, it's full of might have been maybes and things of that sort. But the interpretation is that what we've been seeing is actually a clump of dust, a large dust cloud which has been orbiting. On the inner edge of this ring, but doesn't have enough mass to disturb it. And is now dissipating in fact is now dissipated to the extent that it's an invisible. There's a lot of physics involved with this totally over simplifying the story Andrew. That is the YUP shot. Work that's been done at the University of Arizona. and. Their view is that. This this planet was never there in the first place we've been observing. Pile of daybreak where did the pile of debris come from? That is the sixty four thousand dollar question, and and the the or suggest space. That's a sixty four sent a question. Or the sixty four trillion light year question. The answer seems to be. The physics. Soda works out that if you had to large asteroids, sort of several hundred kilometers in diameter in orbit around. Around foam low, the the star and there was a collision than this is exactly the result that you would get. So the interpretation now is what we saying is the results of a Bingo between two pretty big asteroids that probably white themselves to pieces. Now we, we know once again from planetary. Our understanding of planetary origins that. Part of the process involves these proto-planets which are large objects, actually think proto-planets are usually planet symbols are usually considered to be bigger than these asteroids being. Because you've got to account for the amount of dust that you're seeing length of time, it takes to discontinue it and all that sort of thing, but that seems to be the current answer of. Why we have seen this planet. Not a planet and is now no longer there anyway. Collision between two asteroids, so we we started thinking it was a gas giant. Then we started thinking that it was probably a rocky planet, the size of earth and now we think it's Neda, and it's two asteroids that smashed into each other over parking space, but yet very likely. That's probably the. The sense that's right because they were both trying to be in the same stable over the stars. Think of that as a parking space new guy, exactly the you suggest you see. This is why you're on the radio, Andrew. Goes Straight to these and yet beautiful. I always find the lowest common denominator. But it works for me. You want something more intellectual. Display the man. Put up a great? Series of photos to show what happened since two thousand four and you can easily say why initially I think it was a planet big circular. It's bright and that have a time. It's sort of just fe. Do Wildlife Smoke, doesn't it? Yep, that's really smoke and mirrors. This, is all. The A few new sources that have this. You can go to the story on the Hubble Space. Telescope website! Does, space, telescope dot org okay, very good, right? Well if I've got itself, we may not need to talk about this one again I could change their minds, they could. Be something else judo you. You're listening to space nuts Andrew Dunkley here with Fred. What's an episode one hundred and ninety nine? Let's take a break from the show and hear a word or two from our sponsored Gramley. Now I have to say I'm a big Fan of Gramley because I've been using it for a few years now very helpful for authors, but also really good for everyday life I've site may on a few occasions. Particularly with spelling, but also with a few issues that didn't quite make sense. It's built by linguists and language. Lovers, and grandma is writing APP. Fines corrects hundreds of complex riding areas. So you don't have to do it. Yourself would by word day-by-day. You can easily copy and paste any English text into Grammy's online text editor or Justin Stole Grammy's free browser extension for chrome. Safari! Five Fox and quite a few others. Grammy's algorithms flag potential issues in the text suggests context specific corrections for Grammar spelling and vocabulary. Gremaldi explains the reasoning behind each correction, so you can make an informed decision about whether and how to correct an issue gramley helps you right mistake. Free Mile facebook twitter linked in and nearly anything else. You ride on the web. For you, the listener of space nuts. Grandma is offering a free download of the grandma. So if you'd like to download Gramley today, go to get grandma dot com slash space nuts again. That's get gramley dot com slash space nuts to download gramley for free and let them know you came from us. All include. The link in the show notes as well now back to spice nuts. Systems. With the GALS. and. Hello to all our youtube. Follow as we have a very solid following on Youtube these days I. Love the way they do it Fred one point two one thousand we have. One point one thousand followers on Youtube Channel for. Twelve hundred and ten would-be. YouTube dot com slash C, Slash Space Nets. You can hear all our back. Catalogue of always wanted to say that now back catalogue on Youtube is, you can press play and just let them run. Play all option love that, but I think you get the listened to the backwards. And are not doing me episode one ninety nine and I think they just play backwards. OUGHTA. Good Really good. So, thank you for following us on Youtube or twitter or instagram or facebook or where wherever you? Listen to spice nuts. Now, we're GONNA. Talk about an old friend. We've already mentioned the Hubble Space Telescope but I was stunned and amazed. When you sent me the idea of discussing this Hubble turns thirty on the twenty fourth, of April, which may or may not have already happened depending on when people listen to this podcast spent twenty four, th of April. So it all began in Nineteen Nine T. Did and You know it was very exciting. Of course because we've been in well of astronomy. We've been waiting for this fellow time. It was delayed of course because of the challenge is. Nine hundred nine six. The telescope was supposed to be launched I think in nineteen ninety six. In the aftermath of the challenge disaster it was. It was delayed until the twenty fourth of April the story. I'm sure you're not spoken about this before we were. Privileged in the world of astronomy to have. Daily updates from the commissioning of the telescope, and to the it was launched on the twenty fourth of April and Orbit shortly after that bill, the final obits took a little while and also. started the process of commissioning and we were all. kind of waiting for these gorgeous images significant. Because the? That, there was this era with the mirror. The world's most perfect mirror might to the prescription. which was eventually directed in an nineteen ninety-three and To get an optometrist into orbit. That is just not an easy to do. It was. Thankfully contact lenses yeah, put into orbit, but that's. The space shuttle mission that did not was I. Think one of the great face of all time because it is actually quite high. Oba's if I remember at six hundred kilometers, which was certainly the at the extreme end of the the shuffled space shuttles Rachel Parisian. Anyway that's the backstory. What we now have of course is a thirty years of fantastic. Work. Not just in imaging, but in spectroscopy and all the other. You know clever bits of science strong due to. Prove the universe but. We've we've got this now. This huge talking of back catalogs I'll those about catalog that makes the space one like peanuts then. You. Could get. Jokes like that could. Yes. The. Day. was. Still. I was asked I was very honored to be spun ABC The stranding. Broadcasting Commission to choose my top ten Hubble images which I did. And the now the ABC's websites. And I thought we you know just very quickly might be nice just to go through them and tell you I think they're exciting. If you if you think that's appropriate to. -solutely appropriate Fred and people could probably find this website and look through them Walla listening to the podcast and it's on the. Dot Net dot EU slash science page or slash new slash Russia, and you'll. You'll find the story there or just do a search for it. I think if we just give the the title Hubble Space Telescope Turns Thirty in your search engine. You should find it and put Fred Watson's name there and it'll turn up the web. crawlers probably found that already. I think a lot of people will recognize these images thiab become famous a lot of the the iconic absolutely. So I tried to do. Come out in a slightly different order from what I selected them. Because I was strictly in this Tilda, but that's all right. I have no problem with the fact that just a little bit. changed because it makes for artistic Pro Beauties probably the world. Completeness House. But we started off with Jupiter a marvelous image of Jupiter, which was taken and actually I think in twenty sixteen. As part of a series of images that were it preparation of the Juno spacecraft, which is currently in orbit around Jupiter but this. His best because it combines visible light, admit which shows the richness of the data in the cloud battles, which of course we're seeing an even more data from the Juno spacecraft, but Hubble's view show the whole planet well. The crowd bounce the great red spot. They're looking very red and a little bit less great than it used to be, but I think that stabilized now, but because Hubbell has this extraordinary capability in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum which actually won't be replaced when it finally you know when when he demise comes about four. We will lose that access. To the ultra violet sky because of that there's superimposed on the image of Jupiter. We've got the know that Aurora. The North Aurora around the Doth Pelagic. which it made strongly in the ultra violet, we can cheat a very clear each in amazing image which. Is One of the comic ones about the most iconic of all the Hubble images, the famous pillars of creation image which. was made very early in the the central central part of the Eagle Nebula. Has, been repeated with a new camera that the telescope was fitted with a few. Actually several years ago, so we've got this data picture of these three pillars of dust, which contained embryonic stars at their tips, but this is now combined and in some browsers. You might be able to flick across. Movie customer across the switch between the two images. It's now combined with an infrared image. HOW HEAD So If you if you looking at the left hand version of the imagery, say the pillars. The dust clouds and a few stars, but if you slide right. It just. Changes the picture Dolly that's very clever. May Not work with all browsers noticed with different browsers. Crime so it works with crime. and. It works with Fire Fox, too. But the. Infrared image essentially infrared light penetrates the dust, and so what you see these. Is these. These outlines. Of the dust clouds. With with? The. Almost like a ghostly view of the and you can see the newborn stars tips in certain. Some of them, but what also is clear with this? Is that the the background dust? has almost been swept away. You've got glittering background of stars there behind the pillars, great stuff very nicely, and it is one of the conic images. From, Hubble think most people will recognize year. Next one fred. Is the. It's just a star feel but I love this. Because it kind of reminds me why distraught to me in the first place it's actually. The central region of a very rich What's called an open cluster? Fairly young cluster of stars. This is a big one. He's got kind of ten thousand dollars in it but he's. So got all these lovely different colored stars, but you can also see right through it, too distant galaxies which are in the in the background there it's about thirteen thousand three hundred light years away very much very much. A products at its best, absolutely crisp imaging, showing the kind of cross section through this through the open cluster. Then this one of my favorites, this is on the front cover of the US addition of. While exploding stars in the invisible planet, and it's The star. V Eight three eight motto. suratis usually abbreviated to the mom. and. This is not. It looks like. A star embedded in a cloud of dust. That's what it is, but the cloud of dust that you sing is illuminated. Really in an unusual way, because star had an outburst. A few years ago, two thousand and two, it sent out. This kind of pulse of light got to I. Think he's. Really Intelligent. Something colossal. Brighter than the sun intrinsically. Until, what you have is this expanding shell of light which illuminates the NAS cloud almost like. So as you watch it over time, it changes. It's almost like a computer tomography. Say getting slices through the through the dust, cloud Then the next one I chose was and eighty one. Eighty one, which is perfect spiral galaxy. It's the most beautiful spiral in the Sky I think it's in the northern hemisphere because look. Major Perfect spiral arms are perfect. DISC material. I just think that's elegance personified in terms of galaxies. And then really looking much further out into space, the to a distance of four billion light years. This is a cluster of galaxies that's called L. Three seventy s very rich cluster. It's just in the same way that the. The open cluster of Stars Dazzles the is this what does is, but with galaxies rather than stars, but it's important because we got all these. Little Arcs of light which are the Lens Images Gravitational Lens images of galaxies in the far background. A really amazing image, which I am very fond of once again. That's actually in the book. Is One of the pictures were used? Then! A. Memorable Valet Che one twenty and fifty. That that! He's. In the large module Lennick cloud. It's not particularly spectacular. It is a cloud of gas. It looks a little bit like a butterfly. Because of the dark dust lane in its middle I what I really watch again. Men of war to be honest. Well. In fact I suppose they butterflies upside down so it probably does look like a Portuguese man of war. but what I like again is the fact that this embedded on a lovely field of study is, but he's got four bright ones surrounding it in a perfect parallelogram, which for some reason reminded me of? Deco Jewelry. It's got that look about symmetry. The not here looked loved. Moving on another perfectly symmetrical thing, this act on cross one of the Line Crosses. What you've got here is a bright point of light with four. Sort of similarly bright points of light around in this perfectly symmetrical quintet. And it looks like you know. Oh, we've got this quarter of five stars. Why are they like that? But actually it's not once again. This is due to. To to gravity Stein's relatively. What's in the middle is a galaxy. On the four. Images that surround or actually four images of a very distant quiet. Almost directly nine the. Okay so the light is lend. We I remember we got very excited about this sort of thing back in the seventies and eighties when they were first starting to be found not not so much perfect cross like this but passive quasars. Wait the reason why you can tell. Apart from the fact that theory works, but the reason the the way you can tell this is the same quasar that you looking. Quasars. Delinquent Cause of young galaxies very bright in light and radio emission, but they vary, and so you can see these things varying downing brightness, but because those four images of all taken a slightly different path, the lightest taken a slightly different path around the lensing galaxy. They're out of sync with one another, so you see the same up and down traces in brightness, but they're actually staggered. And that's the kind of clinching proof that you look at the same object because he's brightness going up and down in the same way. But with the slightly out of phase, because each one of these has taken a different path past the galaxy. Associated Really Amazing Image Tudor then to think you're looking at what two things technically, but this five separate. That's right. So! The next one is another very famous. Set of images. The exploding star, the Supernova one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven A. When Hubble came online in nineteen, ninety eight had faded back, too. Much Brilliance, then how did nine thousand nine hundred seventy? This is in the lodge modulated cloud, but the Hubble with its exquisite imaging qualities could actually reveal the details of the rented, and once again. We've got the sliding cursor arrangement here and and I I. Need to I was going to do this. At the end I'll do it now. put up a big. Thank you to the person who actually wrote this website and prepared it, and that's John elway. Who's part of the ABC's science unit. She did all the you know the arrangement of these images and it's thanks to that. We've got this lovely. cursor view of the Supernova remnant showing what looks largely. The central region is is a is a blob surrounded by a ring of materials. What's happening here is we're seeing the shock wave from the explosion hitting a cloud of debris that was emitted by the star before the explosion took place so this celestial fireworks in a big way, yes. And finally the last one is the extreme deep field, which is looking back in time almost the full history of the universe, probably thirteen point two billion years of the thirty point seven billion year history. We see back to these. Infant galaxies little ragged blobs of light, which have not yet got the beautiful spiral structure that some of the later ones have so. It's a very deep using the imaging qualities of the Hubble to make a very deep image. Back in time almost to the birth of the universe extraordinary stuff it is rather I've we question for you, Fred? Who owns these photos? So that, yes, that they actually NASA and Esa the two agencies that run the telescope but they are freely available as with NASA images. All you need to do credit what we do time. Yeah all they fantastic. We might just put that link on our website, so people can Have a look at these while listening to the podcast I think that would be the way to do it and I can just scroll down and across is two days that have good alternative. Viewpoints Great job, great jobs and once again. Thanks to Gino from the city to. Festival inviting me to do it, and secondly putting together a greg website. hobbled coming towards the end of its life and will be replaced by the James. Webb telescope which as we've discussed before has been delayed, but it promises to take all of this research to a whole new level, doesn't it? I think that's right, yes. Still do to next year. Okay? Well, we wait with bated breath. I take a look at these images from hobble some of the greatest fetters of the universe. You will ever say you're listening to space nuts with Andrew Dunkley, and Fred Watson. Space nuts once again a big. Hello, and thank you to our patrons. We were asked some time ago from the audience how they can support base nuts, and that led to us, creating a patriotic can't patriots dot com slash space nuts where you, the listener can choose to put a few dollars in eighteen eight optional, so thank you those who have certainly done that. With. Enthusiasm and we we love you for it. Course as a patron bonus material. You get commercial free access, and you get early exit to the podcast on the weeks where we can actually recorded early enough for you to get early access. But yeah, we do appreciate support. Thank you for being a patron. If you'd like to be Patriot least check out the option. Patriarch dot com slash space nuts now afraid. We've got some questions to tackle, and you've been very naughty boy, it's. Brian Brian Stevens is a malice high nuts. Fred is usually amazingly good. At explaining complex scientific theories and occurrences in simple easy to understand language has because he's talking to me. Brian. That's that's. GotTa talk that way however. I fear. He may have confused some of the audience including possibly Andrew Volatility. With his description of Bibi Colombo's path to mercury. He kept referring to its close encounters with earth, Venus and Mercury, giving it boosts not sure about the one with earth, but the other cat is especially the six with mercury breaks not boosts. He did mention slowing it down, but kept saying the slingshots gave it boosts might be useful if he clarified this in the next episode. Yes. We're going to do that right now. Brian Explain Yourself Fred. Okay so it's totally counter intuitive, but in order to get spacecraft into the inner part of the solar system. You've got to speed it up. You think you just kind of let it go from birth. Drop it towards the center. But the process off. These. Two one encounter with the earth the to encounters. With Venus have actually given energy to the space craft. In terms of. Speeding up to go at the end of the solar, system. But. The you know? The. Question is. Right on the money I'm sorry. I'm I don't whether you can hear that drew, but I've just got. Noise from a website that was looking at okay. Okay good. That's because I was going to. Going to? A! Blanket Pardon I've forgotten the name provide. Ryan Bryan I. Thought it was Brian Yeah Oaks Brandon thought them mixing it up. Brian sorry about that I apologize. How to look at the ISA website on Pepi Columbus trajectory and exceed quite clearly that. He probably look at the you can look at the the numbers, but there is a lovely animation which is why the music was playing. He buyers that. I couldn't hear Andrew. The animation shows certainly those encounters with the planet Venus. Actually speed up the spacecraft to to to push it into orbit. Essentially to to basically match the orbit of Mercury, which of course has much faster orbital speed than we have here on earth because of Cavalier Ian Mechanics. But you're. You're quite rise the encounters with mercury self all about slowing it down to to bring it into. into the the region where it will be captured by Mercury's gravity, so it's a complicated process and thank you very much for picking me up on that because I think I oversimplified, probably doing again, but I certainly did before. It's clear the that if you have those emotions, and you can see what's happening and see how these slingshots work, so you cannot. Yes, you're right that you can do it. Either way could boost. The speed of Well you can reduce it. And, that's what is being done here. Certainly in the case of Mercury Okay so speeding up and slowing. Dan Ran Mercury so that it can get into an orbit. Exactly that's right all right, so they were broken hopefully that cleared the air and thank you for bringing that up and we'll move onto Alex Smith. Question Why Andrew and Fred. Thanks your reports and explanations that are presented in a manner that ordinary people can enjoy. Understand are glad I'm glad he's asking about acceleration accelerating expansion of the universe. We are told after the Big Bang. There was an initial very rapid acceleration and expansion followed by day celebration of expansion and now more moderate acceleration and expansion. Is that correct on a recent space time podcast at Gary reported that the acceleration of the expansion of the universe vary depending on which direction you looked. It can be imagined. There are other big bang's forming other universes around Al Universe similarly, it can be imagined that other universes could be collapsing around us. These events would be deforming our universe. Could this explain the varying acceleration of expansion of our universe and therefore doc energy? The answer is I. think that it's possible to know. Impulse? No, sorry so. It's impossible to know butt. Fritz going to try and answer it anyway Allaster, so we'll see how we go. Yeah thanks very much for a hoste I. Appreciate the question and. You. Quoted. Stewart Gary A. The podcast, suggesting that the. Expansion the acceleration of the expansion varies depending on which direction you looked now. This was something I hadn't heard about. That up not through GATT. Stewart Gary, but just by looking for. Cell therapy of acceleration self therapy is the. The. The big word that means different in different directions. Anything that's ISOTOPIC is the same in all directions, but if I should tropiques not, and that was the first I'd heard of it, but it comes about from a paper that was published last November. By a group of people, including scientists from the University of Oxford, and some from Paris and Denmark. Which is all about? The. Presenting evidence full as they call it, and I self therapy of cosmic acceleration, the suggestion that the acceleration rate is different at depending on what direction you look in now, let's just. Track for one second year because the expansion itself. As far as we can, tell is the same in all directions. That is. One of the major observations that we make when we look we, we believe that we are finding an expansion that is the same in all directions, more or less. But if but we also know that they. Are, I think he can look back. You know four or five billion years and see that it was actually less than. An acceleration. Of the expansion than it is now, but this was the first time I've seen the suggestion that. The. The acceleration itself is not isotopic, so I looked at the paper and it's quite interesting. It's got lots of. Very complex calculations in, but what I did was I got in touch with. Colleague and friend of mine. Who is one of? The world's leading cosmologists and said so. What about this? and He. Did Respond. He said he's still actually working through the paper, but he said he got off to a bad start because of some of the assumptions that were being made. In particularly, in terms of frames of reference that things that sort so I suspect he's not convinced I hope you'll get back to me with any further thoughts he has. I suspect he's not convinced but I also think that the cosmological community in general is not convinced, and that's why we haven't heard of this paper until now. Is published in November. So It seems like this is something that often happens you get. People, who are? Looking for really small signatures. In our understanding of the way, the universe is behaving and you know I for many years worked for with a scientists who had similar ideas about our galaxy expanding. which was certainly counted to common, you know what was accepted as knowledge then and it turns out. The community was right, and and he wasn't very interesting guy, but it was a great teacher as well He. He he told me about how you deal with data, and how you try to avoid putting your preconceptions on the although in the end that turned out to give a different answer for money. And I think this might be the same to it something where you teasing information. That might not really be there. Very interesting stuff, though and you know it's challenging you. You need people coming along with this kind of thing in order to challenge the global view that we have. It's how science progresses. Just going back to Hollister's original. Email. That, so Alyssa says the Big Bang. That was very rapid. Expansion. That's what we call the period of inflation. Followed by deceleration of expansion. That's correct now. The more moderate expansion acceleration dot is actually exactly what the world view is at the moment, and we still don't understand the mechanism that causes the expansion of the universe. We call it Dr Kennedy, but we don't really know what it is but I. do think that. It. You know we. We need to be cautious looking at things like. The acceleration varying on which direction you looking at. The moment it seems like a very. Tenuous conclusion, typically drawing particularly when the cosmological community. Seems to disagree. Okay, so what we're saying is that the paper might be slightly off. The mark and the expansion of the universe is awesome tropic. As far as we know at the moment that's right, but look at Alistair sentences interesting. He says I think it's impossible to know whether. Things like the universe is could be very. That's certainly true at the moment. We're not looking at ideas like that, but it may well be that future observations revealed that there is an isotopic. The Universe is not. Is Not expand accelerating the same everywhere and then we've really got to think about that and work out what it means, and all bets will be on the table at the time. Indeed they will Alyssa. Thank you for your question created some fascinating discussion. Now I will remind people not to forget, which is the same thing as reminding them to guy. It was kind of the special shop on our. BITES DOT com website because all goodies today. You can go to the bookshelf and check out all these publications I'll by thank you to everyone who's already bought a copy of the terrain Ian `Nigma and I've already had a couple of people. Message me back saying I loved it, and they did not pick the twist at the end. which is Great. Well. And I really appreciate the. Fact that you have enjoyed the story and got to be kicked out of it so fantastic while you're at the shop can also get a taste, shirt, or Polo, shirt or capital, Maghera, cap anything you. Desire is a supporter of space nuts. You can find at bots dot com slash space and that sets be I tie be it. A. S. said DOT COM. Don't know always felt that way. Somebody probably took the real stuff. But thanks. Supporting space nuts in whatever form. Most, particularly listening to us, which still after one hundred ninety nine episodes. We find extraordinary, but we do. It is one of. The universe. Bread thank you so much I look forward to your company on episode two to route it. We haven't gone. To. To me about the. We, we were having to do something big for episode two hundred. Unfortunately this this pandemic. Restricted movements, but we will still have a great Tom. We'll figure something out they might be. OUGHTA. We'll work something out, but. Why by the State of Pants? Thank you so much. We'll catch you again next week. Sounds Great. Take care all the best look after yourself and. Fred what's astronomer at large. Team here at well one third of the keep forgetting hugh sorry. But yeah part of the massive team that is space nuts, and for Andrew ugly. Thanks for your company. Catch you next time days. Available at Apple podcasts Google podcasts spotify iheartradio. Playa. You can also straighten on demand side stuff. This is another quality podcast production from DOT com.

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Steve Farber On How To Be A Leader Even Without A Title Or Position

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

30:40 min | 1 year ago

Steve Farber On How To Be A Leader Even Without A Title Or Position

"Kiani founder of Mine Valley the School for Human Transportation. You're listening to the Minor League podcast where we'll be bringing you. The greatest teachers and thought leaders on on the planet discussed the world's most powerful ideas and personal growth for mind body spirit and welcome back to the Mine Valley Saudi podcast. Today's episode is going to cover it. The topic of how to be a powerful leader regardless of your position in your company and and regardless of your title leadership is a choice and leaders important because they truly get to shape the feelings the emotions the inspiration. Berezin of the people around them lead us at the people who create a better world for the future yet so many of us in our jobs feel helpless. We feel powerless. How how can we adopt the mindset of great leaders so that we can truly serve we can help elevate other people and we can show up as the best selves in the world and so I'm so excited to be bringing to you. Steve Fiber get this Steve. Bobber is a guy who rope radically. It was voted in fast company. Magazine is one of the top one hundred best business books of all time he was also in INC magazine's magazines global top fifty leadership and management experts. His website is called extreme leadership and he is one incredible able speaker. I heard him speak in Mexico around four years ago. I was so blown away at the way he presented his models for creating extraordinary organization so steep really inspired me now. His new book coming out has got a really kick ass title. I love this title. It's called love is just just damn good business. It's going to be published in September twenty nineteen again. Love is just damn good business so please welcome onto the mine valley podcast. Steve Barber ambitionless Kiani and this is the Mind Valley PODCAST Steve. How are you. I'm doing great vision. Thank you so much. What a great introduction Steve. We're GONNA be talking about leadership today now. Why is this important to everyone listening. Surely if you're a manager if you are running your own company of course that's important but well would be important to everyone at every every level of an organization yeah. I think leadership has become a word that we used to loosely. We throw it around without giving a lot of significant thought to what the implications is really are and there are some pretty pervasive myths about leadership so the first thing is that we all understand that it's important even if we haven't thought it through and you know. I've been doing this work for thirty years. That's all I do think about leadership but all of us understand at least instinctually and intuitively that leadership leadership is really important. The Myth is that we tend to relegate it as the sole responsibility of people who are in positions of authority who have title or in a company who sit at the top of the organizational chart which means for a lot of us. It's got nothing to do with me and that is absolutely not true. Leadership has nothing to do with your position listener title. It has everything to do with who you are. How you live your perspective on the world and your ability to influence people people around you to change the nature of things for the better so who you are how you live your perspective on the world in your ability to influence others in a positive positive direction yes to influence others in a positive direction. I mean technically you can lead somebody off a cliff. Is that leadership perhaps but maybe not the Kinda I would want to follow so I think that caveat is really important. Especially nowadays we have an opportunity. You know we throw around. The phrase changed the world to such a degree that that's become become a cliche nonetheless that is what our job is as leaders whether it's changed the world with a capital W or change the world of our immediate environment our team or company or whatever and that's an opportunity that is open to all of us. You know what I would really love to do vision is. I'd like to cover four points so wherever you are you're. You're a twenty one year old intern at a company. If you're a solo preneurs your if your more senior than organization it doesn't matter where you are. There are four things I'm going to recommend that you do to from wherever you are right now begin to develop your ability ability to influence people around you to change things for the better four things okay well. Let's get started. WHAT IS THE FIRST ITEM so number. One is starting right now. Re Frame Your Perspective on how you view yourself as a leader we see this happening every we certainly see it happening in the political arena and the world that I live in an have focused on for the last three three decades is the business world so this principle applies everywhere it applies in politics that applies and family life at applies in your community and I've seen a play out over it over again in business and that is a perspective that says I see what's going on around here and I'm not happy with it some day. When I I reach exposition someday when I've got a lot of money some day when I'm older some future date when I am in that leadership role dammit. I'm going to change things around here. So what I'm asking you to do is to shift your perspective from some on future day too right now so the question is starting right now. Can I view myself as a person who can and help make this place better from where I am by this place. You define what this place means whether it's displace quote unquote the country. Are you living or the company that you work for right and you know why. What you're saying is so fascinating today? Something interesting happened in my organization so I'm GonNa see you of the three Hundred Person Company and we had around twenty new employees join this month and when New People join the company. I typically take them out for lunch. I do an induction with them. I spent about three hours in the first two weeks with new hires and I always give them my phone number. So anybody can what set me would ideas now today. I I noticed something interesting. I receive ten ideas from the Group of twenty. People and nine out of ten ideas came from one person. One Person Person Out of twenty was responsible for ninety percent of all the new ideas from this group of twenty new hires and I asked myself why well firstly that one person brilliant firstly. I called up her manager today on like I think we need to look at this lady and give her every opportunity she can to rise up in the company. 'cause I like her ballsy nece and by the way half of the idea she suggested I sent to the respective departments or heads so they could look into writing. Some of them will probably get done but it's interesting that one person had the balls to do it and an eighteen people didn't summit a single idea in one person's minute one idea now. Why do you think that happens wise such a difference in how people respond onto these things so that it's a great question and these are new hires right new hire right so there are many possible reasons but I'm just trying to put myself self in their shoes. I'm starting at this company. I'm really excited to be here. The CEO just gave me his phone number. I heard him say that he wants my ideas but does he really mean it and what if I give him ten ideas and they all suck what if he thinks my ideas are stupid. These are all the conversations that we have with ourselves so on some level. It's lack of confidence. It's the trust hasn't been established yet. Is You know. Does he really mean it. Do I have of something to say arm ideas valuable and frankly these are all valid questions but the leadership approaches. Let's find out through through my actions which is that one person did so out of curiosity vision the ideas that this person sent you. Would you put them in the category of quote unquote good ideas some some got me thinking in a different way while five of them are not applicable because she's new. She wasn't aware about certain aspects of the company. Five actually got me thinking about things in a different way you see I think what many new people fail to realize so if you're in a company after this doesn't just apply to new people supplies to anyone in an organization the High Gordon Organization more complexity you have to deal with and the more complexity deal with means that there is never one idea that is doom it rather the big light bulb is a collection of tiny little bits of information that come together and so this woman in. I'll give her a name. A name was Martina so Martina didn't suggest to me any any idea. That's going to be our next product or anything but she planted tiny seeds that will stick to other things. The company is working on and make does things better and I think that's something that people often fail to understand and fail to realize that they have the power to do yeah so I heard you say you did a couple of things you distributed those ideas of the people that they're most relevant to in terms of potentially taking action then you communicated with whoever this she's reporting reporting to instead keep an eye out for this one because she came out of the gate with these ideas. Did you do anything else. I went up to her. The company social and thanked her for the ideas and I recorded quoted a message back to her getting her feet back on every single idea yeah so that's fantastic so what you're doing in which we all need to emulate emulate again from wherever we are is being really clear on what's important and being overt in your response to it as opposed to what a lot of people would do is. They got all these great ideas from this person. She's cool period right right so it has to follow through with action and to our point that's why this starts with re framing for all of us to reframe my view of myself as a leader so if I really thought of myself as a new hire or early on my career as somebody who really can have a positive influence now today. I'm going to start thinking about how you know what I do you and how I interact with people from that perspective versus on just a cog in the machine man in the reason I wanted to share that story is because so many people you're listening to this podcast in similar situations. They fail to understand power that they can have to transform an organization even if they are canoe hire Gary Vena Chuck Gary recently put up a really interesting video he spoke about how he would notice that employees of his would come up to him after the third year when they've been with the company for a while and they have a great deal of passionate trust and they know that this is the place for them. They're they come up to him and suggest the idea that he would go to executed near like Whoa. That's crazy and he's like well. It's not crazy. I like your idea. They want to execute on this and they would explain to him and he confessed this that for the first three years they never bothered to share the ideas because they didn't think it would be listened to and then finally when it gets listened to an executed they can't believe the number of ideas that probably never had a chance to shine because they were too afraid to speak up and I want to just urged people here who are listening to not fall into this trap. It's a very classic trump that so many of us fold into yes exactly and if you are in a traditional leadership position and by that I mean you have positional authority than your responsibility. I believe is to create an environment that encourages people to think of themselves as leaders and way you create that environment in part. It's about being explicit in that expectation from the get go like you did. This is what I would love from. You can share are your ideas with me and here's why this why this is so important to our organization and then when somebody actually steps up and takes you up on it then to reinforce it by you know through the actions and through the gratitude gratitude and through implementing ideas that you can implement and the other thing by Kinda fast but I wanna make sure that we don't lose it. There's an element to this perspective that you know on the surface. It sounds like an ego based. EGO oriented perspective. I'm GONNA prove to these people that I am a great leader because that's it's GonNa make me feel good. It does feel good but that's not the motivation so the motivation has to come as much as is humanly possible which is a challenging thing from somewhere other than my ego. I'm not doing this to tough myself up. I'm doing this because I want to have. A positive impact packed now. What that means is that when I'm in a position for example of offering ideas that doesn't mean that my ideas are all going to be used. I that my idea even though it's not used in the way that I recommend it and this is the effect that some of these head on New Vision can spark a thought that wouldn't been sparked otherwise and even though I can't attach my name to it saying hey look but that was my idea this company we have no idea the impact that we have in a non linear way through the ideas that we put into place and through the conversations that we have answer the way that we act and it's a very important point now. What was the first principal again that you were saying the first key idea reframe your personal leadership perspective too. I can lead today versus sometime in the future reframe your leadership perspective Nice. I like that okay now. Let's go on to the second idea so let me give a little context for it. The subtitle of the book loves just good business is do what you love in the service of people love what you do so. I just want to break that down on for a second teaching love as a hardcore success principle for a very long time and I believe that some baggage with it right. It's a very powerful thing and and yet there's some baggage. I like to break it down to three sections. Do What you love section. One in the service of people is the second one who love what you do is the third section so so to be more successful from wherever you are developing yourself as a leader right now today from wherever you are is finding your heart in the work. Do you love this. It's using that to give great value to the people around you. That's in the service of people and then who love what you do is the reciprocity. That happens is when you do that. They'd love you return and it looks I'm not talking about love is a sentiment here. I'm talking about love is the discipline and a practice so yeah. It's nice to be liked and it's nice to be loved loved but when there's that connection in a team for example we push ourselves to perform at a much higher level and to be more creative and to work faster and love the process right so do what you love in the service people love what you do so point number two relates to that. First Section particular right so that's why I wanted to give the context and it's very simple. Ask yourself the following question. What do I love about. This work work that I'm doing what I love about this work that I'm doing. You know you can pick the context. What do I love about this work. What I love about this team that I'm on. What do I love about this business that I'm starting what I love about this customer that I'm working with what I love about. This client that I'm serving you pick the context. What do I love about us and what I'm suggesting here is you may not love everything about your work and that's okay so I'm not suggesting that you have have to fall in love with every aspect of myself as an example. I love my work. I run around the world and I speak at conferences. I write books consulting the whole thing love all of that. I'll tell you what but I don't love. I don't love airports. I really don't love the sales function. I don't love finances but there are things that I have to do that. I don't love in order to do the work that I loved and there's a technical term for that is called being an adult salt so by identifying the things that we love about our work. How does that make US leader. So this is where it's it's all grounded so a lot of times we tend to think of leadership we go right to the external we go right to the impact on the environment and the ability to motivate people and get people to rally to a cause and that's all great and gets there but it's got a start internally. There's gotTa start with your connection of your heart to your work so to put it simply. There's no way that I can create safer example a team that people love working out if I don't love it myself i. There's no way that I can ask people to really engage with me to change things for the better of. I don't love what we're trying to create together so you don't have to love it all but you've gotta find something that lights you up right and if you can't maybe on the wrong career that's entirely possible. It's entirely possible but there's another aspect to this. There could be something in people fall into this trap a lot particularly early on in a career and this is a trap that I fell into so I started out wanting to be a musician. I mean I am a musician but I started out way back when wanting to do that for a living and way way back back in one thousand nine hundred eighty one. I two things happened. I got married and I had a family right away and I quickly discovered that music and feeding people were mutually exclusive ideas so I gave up my dream to pursue music which was very painful thing and what I did in order to manage that pain rain was that I stopped playing a completely stop. It was like a gunslinger hanging up his guns in the old westerns right and over the years. I brought it back little by little and here's what I've come to discover. There may be something that you really love to do and your vocation what you earn a paycheck is not that thing hang. The mistake is to say oh. I guess I can't do that anymore. Because obviously I wasn't good enough at it to make money or I couldn't and figure out how to make money or now seems frivolous now. I don't have time or not so even if it has nothing to do with your work you owe it to the people that you're leading or will be leading to do that for yourself because again. That's where your juice comes from. We're not to different people I mean we play different roles at work and at home and our private life public light whatever but were literally the same person literally the same person and literally is a word. I use literally in the same heart yet the same brain in your head. You've got the same values the same things that you love so cultivating what you love to do outside of work is going affect the way that you work and actually enhance your experience working there so point number. Two really is very simple. Ask yourself the question. What do I love about this work and I am the first to admit that some days that question is easier to answer the other days Steve. I'm just to be conscious of time here. We have about fifteen minutes left left and a one and make sure that we still get to get two point three and four. Let's get on with point number three in four point number. Three is where that love is starting to move externally so point number three is about the people that you're working with so the question at play here is how well do you. We know the people that you work with. I mean to know them. As human beings not as functions that they fill the practice here is to take a story inventory and what I mean by that is pick the people on that you work with people on your team. Whatever the context and start by asking yourself how well do I really know them and the way that you can answer that question honestly is. Can you tell me their stories so take a story inventory meaning okay some vision of Heaven working with vision for six months or a year and I I yeah I think I know him. I know I can count on is e but what God that is a powerful idea. It's a really really really powerful ally gear yeah thank you and I'll tell you where it comes from in the second but the idea is to literally sit down. Take each person around around you one at a time and write a synopsis of the story that you know about that person and here's what you're going to discover. Either you know a lot about the people around you or you don't know Jack About Jack Right so obviously where that takes you to. Is You got to build your story inventory that means to sit down and have a cup of coffee and just be curious and learn about this person so you see. We're not using this energy to tell everybody. Buddy are stories. We're using this energy to learn. There's and what will happen in this happens anytime. Human beings share their stories with each other but you're you're going to have a really amazing experience of connection on a level that you haven't had before because when you understand somebody stories you learn about what's important to them. You learn about their dreams. Their aspirations challenges the things that really trip there trigger the things that they love the things that they're struggling with and the more you know that the more you can and not only understand that empathize with people but you begin to help solve some of these things. This is beautiful Stephen Stairway. You suggest we stopped to do this without teammates. Yes so you have to experiment with it a little bit depending on the relationship it could be kind of a guerilla style right like let's just sit down and have a cup of coffee and you just. I know that your intent is to learn about this person so it could be as simple as that or it could be overt it could be. Hey guys. Here's what we're GONNA do. We're all going to spend time getting to hear each. Other's stories know each other so we can actually make an overt stated agenda item. I'll tell you a quick story about this. One of my friends and colleagues and I've actually wrote about him in the book. His name is Brian Stevens. He's incredibly successful in the food franchising industry so when I met him he was the president of Marco's pizza he came came out of yum brands which is a huge food organization it really remarkable career so he shared with me that his first position as an and executive so he had been a phenomenal leader from the time he was freaking. Dishwasher at the Holiday Inn in his hometown Indiana so he did exactly exactly what we're talking about here from the beginning of his career and we're that led him to was positional leadership and his first executive position was given to him by his mentor. WHO's also his boss loss and Brian looked at his team and he had a problem with one person on his team so he went into his boss's office and he said I'm going to have to fire her and his boss. I said okay man you're team. Do what you want said but just one question before you do. What's her dog's name. Is What what what's her dog's name he said. I have no idea exactly okay see letter so what Brian took from that. Is Holy Holy Crap. I don't know her at all so he sat down with her and I'm sure he didn't sit down and say hey. What's your dog's name. He took that as evidence that he didn't know anything about our so he sat down there then learned her stories and they ended up working together for many years after that had a very powerful working relationship. I love that was such powerful idea. I'm beginning to get so many takeaways from this folks on one of the things I'm thinking about doing right. Now is ensuring that the next time I organized a dinner or lunch for one of the teams unrepresented and we do a story sharing session yeah. Oh it's very powerful okay. Let's go on to point number. Four so point number. Four is asking yourself. What is in my estimation. I won't say the most but one of the most powerful leadership questions there is and I have posed this question to everybody from frontline solo or Solo preneurs all the way up to CEOS and it goes like this verbatim. What can I do right now. Regardless of what anybody else around here is or is not doing to change my piece of this this team organization World Family for the better. What can I do right now. Regardless of what anybody else around here is not outdoing to change Mike piece of this world for the better so that is the leadership question because what led to this is almost a universe. Seoul resistance that I've heard voiced from every level for every company and that is as a nice idea farber but you know you don't know my boss. You don't know this place. You don't know this culture. You don't know these people. They won't let me do this. I'll never get away with it. Some variation of they won't let me and really the reality is if you're telling me that you'll choose to lead when the environment is right. You're reporting to the right people bowl when XYZ happens. What you're telling me is you choose not to lead? You're choosing not to lead and that by the way is perfectly fine choice to make this is really all about choice but understand that that's the choice that you're making so I've literally heard that from a president of accompanied by board will ever never let me get away with this. It's like are you kidding and what point. What point do you need to start taking action on this. I mean there's always a higher position to go to so for always looking at data and waiting for that to happen. We're never going to do anything so if we put all this together vision you know these four points starts with reframing your perspective respective right so now you're choosing to step into that leadership role from wherever you are number two. You're starting on the inside. What do I love about this or about these people or about this place or about this work mark and then your beginning determined that focus outward to the people around you do I know their stories. Take a story inventory. How well do I really really no the humans in my environment and then given all of that given everything that you've learned so far what can I do. What can I do right now tom to change my piece of this world for the better. I love that Steve. That is such a beautiful for ideas that anybody can bring into the workplace. Thank thank you so much for sharing that so it's become the end of this podcast all of you listening if you found these ideas interesting the key of this podcast that you have the power to to change what you're experiencing at work do not do not assume that you are powerless. I see this over and over again. As with the story shed with people who want you to an organization of organizations but three or four years underestimate just how much power they come in with their own insecurities you come in with your own own self doubts and that prevents you from truly speaking up from sharing ideas doesn't mean you're always going to get listened to or that. Your ideas are always going to make a dent but but the fact is when you claim that power and fomented that Steve outlined are really beautiful protocol that you can bring in when you claim that power. It's wonderful because you change your work which consumed seventy percent of your waking hours if you're the average man or woman alive in the industrial world today now if you find that interesting do checkout. Steve's new book love is just damn good business. Do What you love in the service of people who love of what you do so check it out. Steve's website is ST FATHER DOT COM that Steve S. T. E. F. A. R. B. E. R. Dot Com Stephen in closing works. I really love this conversation vision. Thank you for taking it so deep. I'm passionate about this. I really believe that we can literally change the world not as a cliche but inaction and I think our job is to take that phrase from the category of Cliche and put it into action and exerting are influenced through the power of our own hearts is the way that we can do that. One person at a time amazing beautifully said so thank you guys tuning into this broadcast. I will see you next week. AAC and if you enjoyed this episode leave a review and mentioned Steve's name so we can share it with me because I know he'd love to see your comments now. If you're listening to this mind belly podcasting you on following mind valley or vision on instagram what are you doing. We have some of the most interesting instagram accounts out there because I'm a writer just like Steve and I love sharing ideas on instagram. It's become a new blogging platform so Foley AP at vision the I. S. H. E. N. and Votto Mine Valley Act Act Mind Valley M. I. N. D. V. A. L. L. E. E. Y. And I will see you on instagram one thing when you follow me on instagram. Leave me a message right to me. Click on message and let me know that you heard about the from this podcast I love hearing from my users and actually respond to quite large number of messages so you you might just hear back from me. I'll see you on instagram daycare guys ah I'm Bishen Lucchini and this is the mind nine Dali podcasts.

Steve INC magazine CEO Hundred Person Company Steve Barber Mine Valley Saudi Mine Valley Steve Fiber Minor League president Mexico founder Brian Stevens instagram School for Human Transportatio US intern High Gordon Organization Gary Vena Chuck Gary Bishen Lucchini
A Poet Gives a 360 Degree View of the Criminal Justice System

At Liberty

36:26 min | 2 years ago

A Poet Gives a 360 Degree View of the Criminal Justice System

"From the ACLU. This is at liberty. I'm Emerson Sykes a staff attorney here at the ACLU and your host. Our guest today is Reginald Dwayne Betts, a published poet memoirs and legal scholar who's currently pursuing a PHD in law at Yale his accomplishments are not worthy by any standard. But the fact that he spent more than eight years of his youth in prison makes his story exceptional. We'll discuss his journey to the legal profession his three hundred sixty degree perspective of the criminal Justice system and his art Dwayne Betts. It's a great honour and pleasure to have you on the podcast. Welcome tat liberty. You're my pleasure to be here. Thanks for having me. So doing is. I mentioned you're currently pursuing a PHD at Yale Law School, but your pass to the legal academy has been anything. But typical can you describe your earliest interactions with the criminal Justice system yet? I guess that's pretty straightforward question. But acid and straightforward at all because I think. Everything is about what you start to tell your story. So one might say my in action with the legal system started. When I heard stories about friends of mine peers of mine getting sent the boys village was the local Maryland June out detention center, and I might say at one of the things I remember hearing was the way that the place operated like soda gladiator school in was premised on like how violent you might be orchestra was high school and having friends get shot having friends get murdered having friends and classmates get arrested sometimes for those shootings, I say started the first I'm a heard about somebody carjacking a person that was before has might have been eleven years old. I heard about police brutality. I probably was eleven twelve. I could say was knife grade when a friend of mine's brother, attempted to carjack somebody and. One of the people that was Woodham was shot by police, you know, even as ever countess's wit because one is sort of just a fraction of my inactions. Maybe a big fraction, but a fraction no less, but two none of those things have anything exactly to do with me. But I think they say something about trauma in about. How everything is premised on win you begin collecting evidence. Because I know the question that signaled to say in some ways, you know, I I became involved with the system back in nineteen ninety six when I call Jack somebody which is true, you know, nineteen Ninety-six Kojak somebody with a friend of mine got called the next day and was sentenced to nine years serve eight and a half. But that's the kind of thing that's true. And the truth is is only satisfied if you want willing to think about everything else the both contributes to that. But also contribute to that kind of thing. Not being aberration and allows like a lot of. A young black boys. No. And that's exactly I think what I was trying to get at was, you know, Brian Stevens says where more than the worst thing we ever did in our lives. But also, you know, those things come with a legacy and a history background. And so I can you tell a little bit more about what you were like as a kid. You talked about what you're exposed to. And what kinds of things going on around you when you first heard about these types of things. But what were you like when you're in absorbing these things I want to say that I do not all the way remember, but that isn't necessarily true. I think I was like no sixteen years almost fifteen years. I was sorta obsessed with basketball obsessed with books and didn't necessarily have expectation, and it had the expectation that will go to college was somewhat of a dream. But I was kind of typical released for my neighborhood. And I don't know I think most people actually would means to get locked up sixteen that you forever. Minding your childhood to kind of figure out what the hell happened. I think most people don't really think too much about who they were fourteen fifteen sixteen because you know, most fourteen fifteen sixteen years nothing. You know, I'm constantly like kinda figure out who was them. But I have no real answers. Well, you talking about this sort of mindset of fourteen fifteen sixteen year old than when I was reading your piece in the New York Times magazine talking about your journey from prison to becoming an attorney, and you talked about your cell mate. Marquees Turnage a really resonated. He's facing a lengthy sentence. And you're both teenagers at the time. And I have a cousin who's facing multiple decades in prison Ali Wayne Hawkins junior. So he he got locked up for about sixty some years when he was sixteen and he and I last saw each other. And we're about fourteen we seem so similar at fourteen but our lives have diverged so much sense and occurred to me as I was preparing speak with you that you're one of the few people who's sort of seen life from both of our shoes. I'm now. An attorney and he's in federal penitentiary in California. So thinking about what it means to be a sixteen year old either going about your business or facing lengthy time in prison. I wonder when you think about your past what do you say to you younger self, or what do you suggest that I say or think about my cousin who's on that other side chasm, I think? Hadn't thought about it that way, you know, the reality is that people I talked to have no notion that the chasm actually exist, and so like, they're understanding of it all witness over this kinda so theoretical, you know, just imagine what it means to be an attorney have somebody who you will close to locked up. I think is different than for me is being an attorney heaven people who actually served time with talking to me about might be an attorney in token with me about them being a prisoner on new answers. Probably this probably sorta devastating thing about at all, especially when you saw people doing decades and so frustrating, I mean on the phone with you. I'd be remiss if I didn't mention this because you mentioned marquees when we were seventeen and we went south hand correction center in Virginia. I don't know how we heard ACLU, but we would try to figure out a way to get his time. Reduce I thought the world was on my shoulders. I had his nine year sentence. But my I had thirty five years mckee's my second. He had like sixty two something like that. But his guys all around with these huge lengthy numbers. And a lot of them were sixteen seventeen. And I remember writing ACO you and me and work on his a we send it today. CEO you, and we got form letter back, and they said that we didn't work on this issue. And with me up, as you know, thinking about would say to somebody on the end of the chasm on the other end of the bis somebody that didn't need a wrote the put himself out or whatever they were in. You know, I think about what ACO you said us, which was that. We can't help you know, and I still to this day funded profoundly disappointed because the only reason that I had this conversation with the law school. The only reason I is conversations because I wrote multiple books and so interesting when when even brass Steve's, and when we say that we shouldn't judge people by the worst thing that they've done. I mean, we actually have a habit even the best among us of doing. If we say the first way you judge somebody is by deciding if you have to listen to. Them. I don't know what to say. I'm stuck. I'm constantly China for I would say, ultimately what happens is scrambling fast mall ways to help people that I know I wish I had some sort of grandiose game of really all it is right and Perot lettuce for friends is going to roll to for people idea town would not even necessarily people that France. But just like people, I know that reached out and said will you help? And I say, yes when I can to shit, I say, yes when I can't. Yeah. I wanna come back to the idea of the platform that you have now because of the books you've written in and the places you've been more recently. But I think it was important to bring up the story you told about reaching out to the ACLU for help. And and not getting any on. I can only imagine how disappointing that must have been at the time. And what struck me is that, you know, I'm not a public defender. I'm not a criminal defense attorney. But I understand that one of the frustrations of living that. Life is that you there limits to what you can do. And I don't obviously know this specifics of why or for what reason they weren't able or willing to help you at that time. But I'm wondering if you're now working as a as a clerk as an attorney in your clinical work. If that's giving you a different perspective on that interaction or not really. I mean, look it's helped me a few things in nineteen ninety seven. This is a decade before Graham more than a decade before Graham, this is like a decade before Roper before it's really been a change in eight members prudence around what kind of sentence juvenile could get winter as an adult in retrospect that teaches me that we were on something then it had ACO you listen to meet in or listen to us that we might have been a part of a compensation canes was for wishing in two thousand and five when it was held at the death penalty was unconstitutional for juveniles. We'd literally sort of litigating these issues that I was thinking about in nineteen Ninety-seven and my friends with thinking about nineteen Ninety-seven because we were suffering from harm. So I mean, if it told me one thing we need better ways to listen to people who suffer from the home, and I have to say no to people. Sometimes I mean, I'm usually saying no to strangers. I mean, if it's something about it. You could be honest with people, and sometimes honest is just. You know, we not at quipped to deal with this right now. And this is not the issue that we do. And we wish we could. But you might go here here or here and say that they weren't resource enough to do that. I don't know how to respond to the idea that they weren't resource enough to give thoughtful answer just because this nineteen Ninety-seven for emails, and I think that each of us gives thoughtful to sentence I asked people dozens of times a day. But anyway, in a grand scheme of things, I think it did teach me something and told me that if you want to have a voice in conversation, then you gotta had expertise that demands that you had voice and back, then I didn't really think about it. But it's like a chip on my shoulder. I mean, if nothing else acu gave me a chip on my shoulder. Well, if it resulted in your amazing poetry that you're putting out into the world now, then maybe there's some silver lining. But on behalf of the ACLU. Certainly I regret that that was your experience. I want to move on to talking about your life after you got out of prison. But one thing I did want to just touch on before we move forward in time is when you sort of discovered poetry and your love slash talent for writing poetry. I understood that was while you were in prison. Can you describe what that process was like in terms of you discovering that Jan let me mode of expression? Let me say one thing here you so's not all. No need to sugarcoat the thing. I appreciate that. You just said because usually when you talk to somebody what they express it's like, you know, I'm sure they had a good reason in which you just said it's like aggregrate that happened which is to me fall meaningful. And I think far more Representative of what I want to organise -ation be thinking about and that's the best that organization, and that's why we wrote orgnization in the first place, but like for longtime when I interacted with folks from the ACO really really defensive and they needed to have reason. Right. Sometimes they is no good reason. There is no good reason that we can't call the good in the world that we want to happen to happen. Besides we just don't have enough people. We don't have enough resources. We don't have enough time. We don't have enough power. But when somebody suffering sometimes, I think, it's just nice to say grit. X what I'm hearing. You say is that it's not just a matter of whether you can say, yes or no. But it's about giving people the respect of listening closely and responding honestly, right? It's a lot of people guilty. And it's like, it's not. Really much. Do you got three murders? And you've got eighty nine years. You know, sometimes that's the situation. Sometimes it's just not anything that you can do. But for me a lot of does relate the poetry because I was in a whole I was sixteen seventeen. And I got this book the black poets and eat on the road thing is I'm trying to get a sense of the world. I'm trying to assess who I am. But I don't want that sense of being circumscribed prison. I don't know how to eggs for more in. It's not just a novel. 'cause now was present a world per se. Right. But opponents present. Intellectual space alert space. It makes you like contemplate meaning in a way that that novels don't necessarily do right as I was reading both of reading poems was the first time that I really started contemplating what it meant to be me Ethridge night on call for freckle-face Chiro, which is about a teenager who's locked up in prison with adults ends up getting rate. And it's this thing that I want I didn't know that you can make poetry out or something like that. But to at didn't know that my situation as somebody who was imprisoned as juvenile. I thought I was new I thought that was a part of the generation where they just started doing this. But I read that poem, and I was like wait they were doing this in the sixties. So poetry also hit me to a way of. I'm educating myself in others, right. And something that was consumable in a minute or two because you know, you educate people novel soon, I got all kinds of learned a lot from reading novels to. But I would learn things from read one poem that others will put in five hundred page book. So so I started and I is persistent mainly because. I started doing it when I have much. So now that got a little bit more on it when you talked about when you got out your ill-equipped in so many ways to deal with your new reality. But poetry was a through line. Did you leave knowing that you wanted to become a poet or continue to be a poet? I mean, that's the thing in prison. You don't know that being a poet thing. And maybe the note me thing about being a poet as thing now because I'm contemporary writer got books out now, but ninety seven I didn't know Cornelius eighty use of Jakko Lucille Clifton, Sonia Sanchez, like I was reading these folks. But I wasn't even really aware whether or not they were living day because I wasn't even processing them as like people. I was processing them as words. So I think connect being a poet to make an eleven and just connected being a poet like being Dwayne. It was a pot of whatever makes me I came home, and I figured out right? But. I didn't think about that. As like a something. He was studying school. I think about it is something people were pay me to do. And then for some somebody pay me to poetry workshop at the wait a minute. I could get a little bit of money teaching, and I also never considered myself a teacher, and it just kept expanded from there will just go in into a little bit more detail about those first steps after you got out of prison. You talked about all of the barriers that you faced not just you. But the millions of people who have been incarcerated and the challenges they face in terms of housing in terms of employment, and in terms of education, and it struck me in reading your story. How many things had to go right for you to overcome those barriers. Can you talk a little bit about the challenges that you faced? But also how you were able to find a way through. Yeah. I mean, a lot of that stuff. I'm writing about in a book that I'm doing now both in felon, which is the book upon but also income. Home which is the book of prose some of it. I wrote about and by New York Times piece came out and Tober and. The truth is, you know, you always wanna threat needle one of the things is if you get a chance to tell your story that means a lot of things went rate, which you wanna three the needle on which or at least I wanna three of the needle until a story in which like is not some bootstrap story. So it's hard to parse it out. But I will say that I've benefited and some serious ways, and I came home, I was still relatively young. I was twenty four I was kinda preserved because you know, no alcohol in prison. No drugs. Writ was drugs for some people. But I wasn't using drugs. I was like exercising a lot. You know, my mind was kinda clear I was like relatively safe in prison. So whatever scars I have other canon scars just come with on time and being in a hole and just being locked up. But they also deeper darker wounds that some people have that I came home without that. And I was blessed with a good disposition in a sense that I already sorta failed. I guess so I felt like I could only go up whatever that might. Be that was young enough that I go to school, and I had a mom a live with. And so I miss school. I got a job, but I'm not burn. What would it mean? So like having to pay rent. So it was just sorta these small things that helped me be able to navigate the new world in a way to some others. And a lot of just had to do with timing. I couldn't imagine coming home now and having to figure out what a smartphone news. I learned how to use a smartphone at the same time as everybody else. Well, I mean, it's as you said, it's always this tension between, you know, celebrating your accomplishments, but you're obviously, an extraordinarily talented and brilliant person. And then it's not as if it's necessarily quite a replicable model that other folks who are getting out should be able to just, you know, published books of poetry and impress folks with our long discussions of literature. Have you thought about what sorts of things our society, our legal system, our education system needs to do to provide opportunities to folks who aren't necessarily blessed in the certain ways that you were blessed it where I mean, I think it starts with inside. Obviously, I think stars with kind of training programs, and I think it starts with you know, it was funny because we think about re entry programs, and what I think about his own opportunities think, you know, I think about literature. I think about the arts thing about. Opportunities to do stuff which hands, and it's so funny. You can do ten years in prison and come home and think that you have no experience, but you might have been working the same job for five or six years. It's like how did not experience like we don't even told to think about time in prison as being the foundation of anything except maybe more time in prison. Saba Starwood that people don't make different decisions if they imagined that time in prison has some relationships that time home, but it means a whole list of things I would think of starting with them. None of his possible with relative safety. And none of his possible without good mental health care for people who need it. What it cost rate 'em? Really? Nobody gets what ain't cost to now unless they're profoundly mentally ill. Most people are afraid to ever go talked with is locked up because it just give putting jacket in might get you put on a prison that you don't wanna be on. So I start with those basic fundamental things. And then I would spread out think about the relationship between arts and growth thing about the relationship between actually thinking about the crimes that you've committed and trying to talk through those crimes a lot of people. I know only do that when it's time to go for Perot, and some people don't even do that when it's on for parole because they never talked to somebody that emphasize the importance in importance of that is not about really just convincing the parole board if she should be free. But is seriously about thinking through who you are in which data how you changed because everybody recognizes that they changed. But I think a lot of people don't get to think through with. That means because it's how at work, you know, that figuring out where things went off the rails is a word, but their whole work. I think becomes the foundation for how you become somebody else. If that's what you need to do. And for me, it wasn't as if I needed to become somebody else. It was just any the become somebody, and I could have become many different things in prison. But I think the work of literature the work of trying to be a community member with imprison. You know, if you talk to people who knew be imprisoned. They say I was a community member part of his spot in ways that I never was when I was on the street. I think that a lot of decisions I may have a lot to do with my personality. What's fascinating to hear you think back on those times. And for those of our listeners who haven't read the memoir or the New York Times magazine piece. I thoroughly recommend that they do. So, but you ended up at community college in Prince George's county and then transferred to university of Maryland. And got you. Bachelors and I believe your masters from there as well. I got my bachelors from university of Maryland. But I got my masters roughly the same time from Warren Wilson college in Asheville, North Carolina. Okay. And it seemed like you were sort of on the path to poetry potentially teaching poetry. But at some point along the way law school entered the picture, and I think for folks who've been in prison, maybe it seems like an obvious question. Why would you have gone to law school, but given your love of poetry, what did push toys law school? I couldn't get a job at a plan for jobs out plan for teaching jobs, and I couldn't even get an interview, and I had this fellowship at Harvard and just figured would go to law school, I met somebody. There was a poet fiction writer, she was in law school, and I just thought I could go to law school kind of random honestly, but I've been doing now Justice work addicts for longtime I figured going to be unemployed out should be unemployed a trained attorney. Instead of Harvard you into the number one school you ended up a year. Yeah. Ended up going to. And that was at thought it was for some crackle reasons. But it was also because Harvard didn't necessarily treat me as if I had dignity during emissions process. I remember him asking me things like, you know, have you talked to your victim. How you classmates respond to what you know about criminal law, and I know nothing about criminal law. So really they wanted to know how classmates respond to the fact that I fell knees. And I'm not sure what they wanted to know about whether or not spoken victim. But maybe don't really blame Harvard as institutional particularly the person was responsible to dean of emissions 'cause we offer out guess, how many people with felonies end up seeming seemingly credible candidates to law school. But that's not because I was exceptional because I think most people were records told time and time again, what they can't do that is probably not many people who try I decide to go to law school just because. It was a way to a student loans woman. It it also it was the agency thing to still remember the conversations around Graham in two thousand and seven and just filling like will would the world. Look like if I had a better hand as shape in some of these Scotties will my friends lives. Look like if I had the ability to like make them the Senate a summit this stuff. Like, if the case was to the medication and that this other case, so I decided to go law school. I think if anything illustrates the amazing dichotomy and tension in the story, it's the fact that you couldn't get a job because you were a felon and then ended up at the best law school in the world. But it seems like I'm lying. What you talked about it. In terms of the admissions process to law school also resonates with what you faced after you've finished law school and taking the bar, and then had to confront what's called the character and fitness stage of the bar admission process. Do you want to say a bit about how you had to overcome that barrier that was real? But I don't want to overstate it. I mean, look, I I think you just expect not to have to deal with it or you expect to have to do with gracefully. But again people have to deal with this stuff. And institutions they haven't necessarily thought through how to deal with this form let evacuate after passed the bar. This is like we haven't made a decision on whether or not you'll be omitted is that we need to look for advocation, basically. So it wasn't a no. But I knew I wouldn't have gotten had gotten locked up. And it was frustrating those that was damaged twenty years ago, by that point to think it was twenty years ago at that point as I just wonder, you know, it just felt like you. Always running from your past. But it's always chasing you in the past is quickened in the present. And so on it was a little devastating and at the same time. It felt like the thing is you do all the time in prison. Rob somebody. He counted wonder with these things available to the rest of the world you have a right to have. So, you know, part of it was frustrating part of it was like. What kind of world do I live in a part of me felt like a day, rob somebody? And so I'm not really going just complain. 'cause I gotta go through this process, and is almost relentless the way in which you move the way in which we back and forth between filling a huge amount of resentment towards the system. It didn't sort of knowing that it was gonna work out in that. I was probably overdoing it for denim resentment. Again, resolve what criminal Justice system lab, but we don't really talk about what it means to have committed certain crabs effect is not even a part of our sort of logic public psyche. You know, you'll read a book watch a movie, and it will head a trope of like, what is it mean to kill somebody and always have Kirk this grappling with that? But we don't have people grappling with a means to just rob somebody. And I think that carries the same kind of impact. Or what is it mean just sell drugs? I mean, I think we still talk about it in a way that suggests that these things don't like sit on your heart. And the truth is if they don't to no wonder we need prison because we need prison to make that shit Madden. Right. If we can't seriously say that. Assaulted this person any haunts me at beat somebody up in haunts be like if those things don't ever matter. The folks that's why we need prison because we need prison to make the way people aren't paying suffo- matter. So I think when I think about how respond to that whole piece maybe part of me is okay with it. Because I don't want to pretend like what I did didn't matter. And I also don't want to pretend like I'm the one who should say that enough is enough. Maybe we can turn now to your current work. What's your PHD topic? I mean, it's criminal this really administrative law honestly figuring out. But I think what I'm seriously interested in, you know, just got your obsessions. And I'm interested in a way to Graham, be Florida and McGovern release. Hannah Miller reality Bama, how all of those cases the cases of like, what can you do to a juvenile commits a crime all those things sort of x one what kind of break. Do you get a really clear that we give people break who young when it can make grams and for me those cases made administrator low really important parole clemency things like that. So interested in thinking through what it means that clemency and parole now have outsize importance compared to the import that have half dozen years ago doesn't. I don't think many law school PHD's are going to be as eagerly anticipated as yours is. Appreciate it though. I don't think anybody who's right and dissertation in any subject eagerly-awaited that mean to salads like, you know, you want to do something and you want to kinda race up matters. But at the same time, it's just been a lawyer you want somebody to be free. But you gotta right emotion. That goes through the procedure, you got to walk through the technical tease. You got to pay attention the Fallon deadlines sometimes. The necessary steps to get you where you wanna go mean as such you gotta do things that is not as many people who care about as you might want. And that's kinda how feel about legal scholarship anybody shake for legal scholarship. Maybe that's why was a challenge to me, you know, how to make some legal scholarship funky enough that it'd get rare by my mom, my aunt or somebody that doesn't have a law degree somebody in prison. Challenge will very buddy can do it. I think your wealth laced. But you're also doing a clerkship at the same time as if that was not enough, and this sort of as I loot it to gives you really the three hundred sixty degree view of the system because you've been a client you've been a prisoner. You've been an attorney. And now you're seeing behind the scenes of what it's like to be in the judge's chambers. What has that perspective? Given you fat a private attorney declined representation from a public defender. I got another private attorney is one of those those who I wanna paint lawyer. I guess the public defenders. Worked for free. Now hate people who talked trash about percents now, especially when a grown cut myself some slack. I was like sixteen seventeen but I won't even name the number of like so-called spokespersons criminal Justice reform. We've talked trash about poke defenders anyway, NA, do it states that have really good public defense units to it is three six depth worker for just gives you respect working for federal judge gives you a different perspective both about how hot it is always have to say, no for procedural reasons. And also how ugly somebody cases are people. Just don't spend time with how painful some of this stuff is. And also for me how like the law is pervasive is not just criminal law. But also, you know, civil law also somebody suing somebody because they got in a car accident. Some of the stuff is frivolous. And some of the stuff is not. But it's gonna wow, we got this thing maybe humanity's greatest invention because even when it's most absurd. Is seems to have ordered that we respect, and that's more than we can say for like Candice will end you have a third job, which is a published poet. I want to highlight you have a new show coming up at PS one MoMA with Titus Cufar called redaction. Can you talk a little bit about your newest project year? Yeah. That's that's interesting. You know, you get obsessions, and you just push them. But I would say that me and his friends, and we live in New Haven. We both follow this coming from similar communities community college to Gail and on different routes, you know, and I coach myself team. Both my sons, what's actually we just went undefeated whatever went undefeated season we still play. But that has nothing to do with interview. But I did is just want to say that that I'm not mad. I got two little boys myself plug away because honestly, that's the work too much work goes into being a father and then being a member of the community. Coach basketball means that you. Really are a member of the community. But the product that we're doing is a at six most was written by the civil rights goal against different locales one was a habeas in San Francisco. But other ones civil suits filed for just locking people up because they couldn't afford to pay Bill all because they couldn't afford to pay traffic tickets, and I felt like these will really important cases, and they would big wins. But I ain't trying to read a sixty five page complaint annoying. Nobody else trying to read a sixty five page complaint. So I thought what if I got rid of it was superfluous? And usually we think about redaction as getting rid was to top secret to privilege for hours. Like I wanted to take over d'action as a way of getting religious superfluous and a lawsuit. So that what you could see what really captured the grit and anger in the frustration in audacity of what these folks grappling with. And so Titus the actions of people who suffered on the bail conditions. He did it modeled after the mugshot because a lot of times it's mugshot becomes your calling card to the world. We wanted to Greece something that was a stark imputed, food, and humane the mugs that is not the world looking at me. And judge me this images me looking out at the world and saying something about how fucked up this thing is that we've been experiencing so we created a series of prince in the prince include the poems redacted poems that six creamed on paper in etchings on paper tight as did a number of big pieces. Couple big pieces, and I had some paper made from prison material. T-shirts Taus things like that some friends of mine semi that's weapons sweat shirts, long Johns, and it was kinda crazy because they sent me to stuff, and then we start talking about it. And they would tell me how they didn't realize that that stuff has sentimental value. But they've been wearing you know for years, and they sent it to me. So I can make art out of it in some ways. It's the same thing, you know, turning out our life and suffering in art. But it's always the same things right now. Let it today. C you produced this stuff in the whole thing is like can you get somebody to listen. Marquees does have an attorney, you know now. So it all worked out in the sense that that's the way from the ACLU when I was I just it's apple when all of it when trying to apply to law school, his sister found meal Facebook, and then she was like, I think, you know, my brother and. And. I didn't know what to say. But I was trying to figure out what happened was he actually sent me the letter that we wrote he didn't even realize I was applying alot school. He just sent me a letter like you'll remember this. I hadn't talked to me probably twelve thirteen years like that. So he sent me the letter in. I get it when I realize I know exactly what I wanted to write in wrote about it in law school in the whole time. I was in law school. I was really just trying to figure out how to get him an attorney. I mean figure how to be lawyer, but you don't get into tiny was always in the back of my head to in some ways, you know, the redaction project my poetry Titus etchings, his poetry's paintings all of this is about trying to figure out how to make people's lives matter in ways to do with social Justice. But in ways to deal with people just be people and be heard sometimes it works. It's an amazing idea flip the script on the redaction. And i've. A few of the images that tight is put together and they're extrordinary. So we really look forward to the exhibit opening at PS one moment. I think it's on March thirty first so we encourage all of our listeners to come. Check it out as I said, your life story has been anything, but typical in at were predictable. So what are you looking forward to next finish clerk right next book some articles for the New York Times magazine and working on my poetry book felon comes out in October. I mean, I keep move from day to day. I think the interesting thing about it is that a I've never had a plan necessarily. And a challenge thing about is that I've never had a plan wanted to be somebody. We really look forward to having you back once the new book is out and thanks again for taking the time to speak with us today. EM in our pre she that was a good. I mean, you know, all the questions will go. But you got me thinking really, what do I say? Because I actually haven't thought about it. What do I say to my friends? I mean, we talk about it. But they do a better job. But tell me what it means not do telling them. So. Think about that a little bit more. I have a better answer. Next time. We talk. All right. Sounds good. Thank you very much care. That's it for this week. So if you're pre shaded this conversation, please be sure to subscribe to add liberty rate us and tweet at ACLU with any feedback. We'll be sure to read every message until next week piece.

attorney ACLU the New York Times magazine Graham Reginald Dwayne Betts basketball Yale Law School Harvard ACO Maryland Brian Stevens Perot Dwayne Betts Yale Rob Woodham writer Jack Ali Wayne Hawkins
Jamie Foxx, Charlize Theron, Awkwafina, Eugene and Dan Levy

Ellen on the Go

31:13 min | 1 year ago

Jamie Foxx, Charlize Theron, Awkwafina, Eugene and Dan Levy

"Hi It's Ellen Degeneres welcomed with my podcast. We're GONNA listen to some of the best moments from the show. Oh and it's going to be hosted by four executive producers that I love happy listening on Today's episode of Ellen on the go Jamie Fox shares his hilarious fitness goals for two thousand twenty. Shalit's gets a surprise visit from the one and only Michael B Jordan Aquafina. Graham walks out doing her movie. You hear that story story Eugene and Dan Levy guest host our show and it was hilarious but most importantly in why you don't want to turn this off one of our listeners is about to get by reword yeah. Mary's Mary's had it me not so much. But did you get any gifts. Forgetting rear ended by ED. I you know I was. I was handed a card. Oh little insurance insurance cards liberty mutual mutual. WHO's ever settled faster than my rear end? Rear ends he makes mix it right quickly and that's why today someone's getting day twelve all the gifts we gave away twenty Andy Lasts ner. I'm Ed Glavin. Everybody could anybody me happier than a submission. That's I'd like to be considered to be rear ended by this good though so right before the New Year we told a story about Mary. Getting rear ended by ED by vehicle. And we had so. I think this was our most entered. Contests really entries up to over eight over. Yes all eight listeners applied applied. Wow yeah was it was. We had one hundred percent participation from our crowd which is unbelievable so ineligible that was married her name out. Do we want to mention some of the people who applied for this finalist. But who didn't certainly would runners owners up our. We had a lot of runners up. We liked we actually had a ton of people submit for this one Xoan at Zoe's two thousand and eight. I only found you guys two months ago but thanks for making me laugh all the time ellen hit the Jackpot with you guys couldn't agree more. I need talk to Brenda Kurt. She wrote I love listening to your podcast. I've tried to emulate the podcast through creating our own school Friday morning. Club podcast Brenda. You've got to aim higher do you. You can do. We believe in upper end and from our legal send us some ideas of how we make ours ars better room and we want to do that. And then Sun Sun Flower with a P. H.. which is very philly sunflower? What I love about Alan on the go? podcast is how funny everyone is on the show. Just like Ellen and how amazing of a team you guys are really yeah. I'm going to promise you're not worthy of that. But I'm proud theories Ashley England. So she's either Ashley England or she's Ashley in England matching which she writes. I Love Ellen because she never fails to put a smile on my face Jason. She is so generous. I feel incredibly weird using this Hashtag but the podcast is so funny and I figured why not. Oh aw so sweet so actually you understand. That's exactly what Kevin is God. I Apologize Having that contest is for you to feel strange using ASHTEC Brett who included a Selfie of very handsome jacket in front of a beautiful Christmas senior. Thank you guys so much but there was one clear winner. There was this. This person made a video. She posted a video. The rest of you failed by not in. She posted a video in the video. which we I will tweet? She slow walking first of all. Yes you know sucking up to Andy. We'll always andy the host of the show. We're not going to hold. We're not GONNA hold again. She actually believes Andy when he says he runs things. She knows it's true. Yeah go ahead. Yep and she's wearing an Indian friends hoodie and she's big big be slow walking but she doesn't have a treadmill so in the video you'll have to stay tuned in watch what she does and she says that she loves my laugh. So that's something have because most people don't mention me and she didn't mention me. I created that dumb contest. So then she because because I can't agree with her more that we are lucky to work with an aunt. Yeah can we say also that Andy. Today in the podcast is nearing his Indian friends sweatshirt. Yeah we're not taping this. They're things like Tattoo. Say That only when I wear it which is very rarely and it smells. Aw You so can I say your name Yes when you are the winner. You weren't getting things from us you. You are getting all of the day twelve twelve days giveaway our biggest day day twelve. We save the best for last. You're getting that and and because you don't have treadmill slow Walker. Andy would love to send you a Nordic track treadmill. He's GonNa gift you a treadmill. Yes I will. It's a kind of guy he is. He's a very kind. I don't know what else I can do. It's like I just give I give I give and the three take take take take. It's what what I do. It's who I am a big contest posted another video when you when you hear this Lydia. Yesterday we know that you've received this information and we have another big contest. Obviously we we are only ten days away from Ellen's birthday very we've all been planning secret behind her back. What together? Who knows trying to figure it out? But here's Ellen if you're listening listening to take. We decided military expectations. Tell Porsche what you'd like and then have Porsche tell us we have a a birthday contest. Coming up we'll tell you about next week we do and right now you can. Actually there is a deep tease. This is a less deep tease right now. You can win tickets to Ellen's birthday show if you play the game of games APP. That's birthday event happening right now. You have fun and in exchange for US providing you with you also could win tickets for free. I don't know what more you once. Can we talk about. Jamie Foxx down please. Yes he's I. I honestly think he's one of the best talk show guests I've ever known in my life. He's a terrific terrific talk show. He's just money any man and he he has this gift. That Ellen has where he can be is a very serious move. Yeah he's on the real deal but he can. He can have fun at at the same time and I just love that about him he an owner sort of perfect together. In my opinion. You know you have to watch it on television but he gets talking about his workout routine and gets talking about how African Americans don't do legs they don't they don't they. Don't do skip leg day. They skipped they skip leg day. And he's he's just there's a moment where he stands up and then just falls down on the stage that is so funny because his legs because he's worked out the top of his body and his legs can't hold up. His massive upper body makes me happy. But here's a a little bit of Ellen and Jamie talking about his workout so you're on a boat you're fifty two now and there's some video of you doing some I pull ups or something you look good. Oh you look out that yet. That's AH impressive. You know you see this only the top brothers. I'm saying two thousand twenty. I gotTa do legs. I don't ever delays because you know brothers don't do eggs really non on our. We're big at the top SORTA small at the beach. But I can't chase you because the brothers brothers do black guys. Doing I did legs one time in two thousand nineteen and I took one of those of females squat classes of but burn. Burn all days and I couldn't I couldn't. You'RE GONNA be sore tomorrow from that because my I don't have cavs. Yeah so I think this part of my heritage but whatever you do and we have smaller cavs now. I also think we should play a clip of Jamie talking about just mercy. Yes so just mercy is a movie about I. I can't remember Ellen being this passionate about seeing the film to our audience as well to every as well yes everybody in this office. She has been about. Just mercy is so important to her and I well. It's important her like you know I don't know I. Just yeah. She's she got my attention with it and it turns out the the real guy that Bryan Stevenson. He's an Nyu law professor Nice. He came and spoke at crossroads. Did your your daughter Emily. Haphazard did not but he's a really hard class to get into it it's the law and race and she really loves him. She thinks the world right. So Jamie Me Fox here talks about why. This movie was so personal to him. Here's the thing about Jamie. Not only is he amazing. Human being wonderful big warm heart hilarious as we know great dramatic actor musician so talented talented in so many ways. This movie is so important for everyone to see. It's called Jess mercy and really. Everyone must see it. He just got a nomination for Saga Ward. You'RE GONNA get nominated for an academy award. I I believe you'll win credible in this. It's a true story retail. Everybody with this is about I got I. Thank you for that anything that we get nominated for. We're GONNA share this Michael Jordan. I can't say enough about him. He brought this project. He asked me to be a part of this project and I commend him for what he did behind the scenes and in front he brought me this story Brian Stevenson who he plays this law are you who tirelessly his whole life has been exonerating people off of death row. I play Walter. mcmillen his first case and there hadn't been a case overturned turned in Alabama ever. And so we start on this incredible journey of telling this man story Walter mcmillen who was accused of murder in a city. He never been in person he never saw. They put him on death row for six years without a trial and understand this. This is nine hundred. Eighty six this isn't like the sixties and the fifties and not only that from talking to Brian Stevens and he. Lets us all know that this is still going on so it was an incredible project. And it's a personal. Being a black man sometimes jail synonymous with us which. I don't like that when I was getting the character together. It was personal deep personal for me because my father was placed in jail for twenty five dollars I was worth of illegal substance for seven years. This man taught in the schools for twenty five years. Educating kids the very kids that he had the judge come talk to that just presiding his case and he put him in jail Knicks of the kids that he taught but what they didn't understand was is that father taught me how to play football basketball. He taught me how to play tennis playing tennis man. That's that's that's what they do. Is it now I want you to be. I don't want you to be limited so some of mind. Childhood heroes is a kid growing up was beat us. Carolina's ailing the Stasi John McEnroe Jimmy Connors Arthur ash. But my father sits in jail. And I don't like visiting jail because I don't like seeing people like that so I wrote him one letter and I said he listened when you get out. Things are good for me now. And he's been living women now for twenty years. So should we talk about Charlie's yes so Shirley's thrown is beautiful. She he is is that she has become a better and better talk. Show guest over the years and I thoroughly enjoy every time she is he she is she striking like. She's she just hall and she just has a presence about her and this movie that that she's promoting bombshell. I mean she she embodies Megan. Kelly traces Meghan Kelly. It's insane it's so good. It's so oh good. So we'll play clip for here. Let's play a clip of her talking about the movie. He's a brief bit of her. Talking about bombshell. If you haven't seen bombshell yet you you must see it and she plays Megan Kelly and you keep really. It looks like we're watching Megan Kelly and Megan Kelly last time you hear you. She hadn't seen the movie yet but she has now all right yeah. She posted something on Instagram. Just about how emotional was for her and I knew that it would be emotional for her. It's emotional channel for for for a lot of the women from Fox who've seen it but tell everyone if you don't know we're talking about bombshell is about. It's about the the the year and a half box. Six one Gretchen. Carlson filed a lawsuit against Roger ailes and it was just it was unheard of like nobody sues their boss and everybody thought it would just go away and she was very diligent and had all this evidence she kept all this evidence and so he was let go and Fox issued issued an apology which was unheard of but really it was the catalyst what happened when this happened at Fox it was before Harvey Weinstein. It was really before me two two times up. It was before we had this cultural conversation about sexual harassment. And so they I mean when you think about it for the story like this to happen at a place like Fox. It's like the least the last place you would think of feminine. A story like this kind of like feminist movement would happen and you know Megan Kelly really very proudly refuses to call herself a feminist. Yet this happened there. Yeah and it really kind of started this conversation in a strange way it was amazing. Amazing because there were so many women who would not come forward and poor Gretchen was just waiting for knowing that this happened to other women there and nobody would come forward and so it it she was completely league alone. Yeah completely alone it was I. It's so good and it's going to do so much good and and it's time there's a lot of things that need to change in this world as we were just talking to Michael about and this is another thing so yeah I mean I feel like what's been so amazing about screening. This film is how this movie makes a lot of. Not just women men to WanNa talk about this and also share their own experiences. which to me is so beautiful because I do think? There's so much stigma still around a a lot of women who experienced sexual harassment. And if we can just I mean there so many women who have been so brave to come forward and change that and take ownership back doc and not feel shame because there is no need to feel shame they did nothing wrong. We all should be able to go to work and feel safe dot something right all right now. The last time Shirley's was on the show. She's here she's been here she's here. We don't go too long without having which I love She she works and she laughs. She was here. She humid with a little game. We play called. Who'd you rather? She said it was singles. You single and so that gives us the opportunity to show pictures of potential partners partners. Yeah and she has to choose and then declare a winner and Shushi ended up choosing the last time was Michael Michael B Jordan. Well she to to her defense she was on the show with her other bombshell co-stars and they were also picking on her behalf because she was very very shy about the idea of playing this game right so they were picking on national television. Either way we're helping to pick Michael Jordan. Was the clear winner winner at the end. So Ellen priced her with Michael Jordan in Studio yes take a listen now the last time you here we did. Who'd you rather eh ended up on Michael Jordan? That's that's Joe's you ended up. You chose him over Brad Pitt. I think Nicole and Margot No oh did picking what would you. Don't you WanNa tell them anything. He's probably still here are so terrible. L. Michael Eremita the the coin of these moments. Thank y'all WanNa talk. We have from the new share. Everybody friends I know his really good friends. We all know about his. I'm going. ooh That was fun. That was cool. I love our job. Sometimes we've good job YEP This is one of my favorite people to come into my world in the last couple of years. I can't wait to hear Aquafina. I'm crazy about her. I saw her on crazy crazy. Rich Asians and then just went down a rabbit hole. I just wanted to know everything about her and she really. She really broke out and she did a video. She did a video radio on Youtube. She made a video like she was a rapper video on Youtube. I WANNA say about China. And it's really really funny and it went and it blew up. And then Seth Rogan saw it and he put her in something. I back in like just I. I wanted to know I just love her. It was like the same reaction I had to. Ali Wong look when I first saw alley along that stand up on Netflix. I want to see everything Allie long ever done. And that's how I feel about Aquafina. I think she's funny and fun. And smart and like also vulnerable will and the and the new movie that she's in is so I really really sweet and it's not a big subtitles guy as you might imagine I would and and half of its. I think in Mandarin. It's a really cool movie and she globe I think for it. She wanted to Golden Globe. And she's done a lot of comic roles and then she did this and and really really impressive and she was on our show and Ellen asked her how she got the name Aquafina and she tells the story about how she got the name and about her hell. Her default position is awkward. And you just couldn't love her more here she is here she is talking. You Bet it Aquafina is not your real name now. Your name is Nora Nora. And when did you into Aquafina when I was like fifteen or sixteen and for for what reason I I've always been very awkward Just this this is a part of my by my own right. So there's a play on words right of that so you said Ah instead of awkward because that would have been just to on the money right awkward. Yeah if my name was as he made it fancier Yeah Canisius all right. Yeah maybe you can always change it again. There's no rule you can't change it twice so you can change it to awkward later if you want unless you're not awkward anymore. Do you still feel awkward. Yeah I feel awkward right now but I mean it's my default right. I run on it right right. Yeah you don't WanNa get comfortable. No no because then who knows. Everything's boring yeah yeah it's good that you embrace it. He Yeah you should just. I have a lot of a lot of experience as being awkward for all right. I want to hear about all of temp. Yes dear. Should we talk about Eugene in Dan Levy. Oh Gosh Oh my gosh. That was so much fun eyebrows on a lot of that. And that I've live known of Eugene Levy for years really really funny from second city tv what's he on Letterman. A lot he would be on Letterman of Paul fairmount. aww that whole group was was friends with Paul Short and then the movies he did with Christopher Gas. That's where he got me that yeah Joining forgotten favorite movie high school the best of show best. God loves a terrier and Catherine O'Hara God laws terrier and so and then his son Dan he and his son called Creek. Dan's Big Star. Now you're a big star. The you know the two of them the two of them guest hosted and they were hilarious. It was so fun to watch a father son like go through the material together. Yes really I have a great relationship with my parents but as your parents get older sometimes your patients way s right. Dan was so patient. I don't want to like he'd he really wanted to go everywhere to the jokes. He wanted to say and he would sit there for a long time. You Gene Gene. We'll go through the joke word by word of mouth. Great and then Eugene would like work it out so that he got it exactly the way he wanted you know and then knocks it out of the park when he does it was so the two of them had great patience and respect for one another. That's pretend it was a it was a lovely it was. It was really lovely to watch. Here's a little bit of their Monologue that they worked so hard. Wow that is a lot of applause. I am almost certain. They think we're here to introduce news. Ellen well fortunately for US Ellen isn't here today so we will be stepping in for her. The took the day off because she can. Because that's what you can do when you're ellen. We did not take the day off because we are not ellen. I wish we were. That kind of money looks fun does uh-huh I wouldn't know my name is Eugene. Name is Dan and this is very fun for us. And shockingly we're related. This is a crazy coincidence. We just happened to be guest hosting the same week that our show Shits Creek is back for its sixth and final year almost as if it was was planned by a gaggle of publicists and producers on the show we played father and son in real life we play father and son but even though we're related we don't always see eyebrow eyebrow apologies so anyway that was a good one. Yeah work since we are father and son Ellen asked her followers on twitter if they needed any father and son advice on anything which was her first mistake nevertheless we are going to try to answer a few of those questions as best we can. Here's a hint. Do the opposite of what we say so here. These are the questions. Thank you so much. I question Yup. No this is. I don't have a car for you all right. Here's the first question Vaughn tweets. I need to be able to play a musical instrument now immediately I'm thinking piano or or maybe the bagpipes how can I learn instantly as a millennial that is the most millennial question I have ever heard bottom line. If you WANNA play the piano you have to learn how to play the piano. I spent eight years learning how to play the piano and can't play a single note anyway but like the philosophy. I want to go to Greece next week. Can I learn it in. Dana House. Answer her. Yeah no and then like we talked about last podcast. Dan Really wanted to do one of those like L. in your ear cases where we hide the cameras. We put the thing in your ear and you have to say whatever they want and they decided to torture their co star. Annie Creek right since it was her very first talk show appearance they. I figured you'd have no clue what was normal. What was not normal so dan had a very specific idea? He wanted to send someone into her room to say he. They were her personal assistant for the day. Yep and normally if that was happened maybe would say that and then leave the room. He wanted her to sit in the room and just completely ask way over the line questions. Play a bit of that funny. So what many of you don't know is that this is Anne. Murphy's first talk show appearance. Aw obviously because we're all family at this point we couldn't go smoothly. We had to play a prank MHM and annoy the heck out of her enjoy so cozy so just I wanted to say hi. I just wanted to say hi. I am basically your personal assistant day literally anything literally. I can hook you up with whatever you want. I can have you up with water. I have I hope even offered massages have taken measures and they wanNA massage. No no actually price it down ramp stressing. Do you mind if I sit down. Purchased a hot SEC. Okay thank you know. I think we'll get up. Yeah I'm so sorry I'm so okay just nervous. I love your show so much so much. Thanks so much would you can offer you any of my balls or so. You know what. Here's what's it like working with Dan in Eugene. What's it like working with Danny gene gene is my father. The brother they're both so handsome. They're both an Eugene. He's getting like war handsome as he gets older. The Dafur Dude is he really. Is He really gay Dan. Yeah no I met you. Don't use it for like forty five. I'm shocked DOC. I'm so shocked. And just say then the fourth cast member who's Catherine O'Hara and she was a guest on the show and she first of all or she were fabulous dress and she got such a kick out of the dress and had so much fun with addressee. Should go look for that On Your DVR or Annella Tube. And and then she is just got such a kick out of watching the two of them host and And they were so cute was very sweet and Shits Creek is such a great show. Yep Yep I love that show. I love the woman. I don't know her name but I love the woman who plays the hotel clerk. She's fantastic. Yeah she's fantastic. It's just a it's just a great show and it's got its it's six season which is also its final season is I can't wait to see how it ends. How they how they end? Go Watch the whole Hidden Camera Prank. It is well worth your time on Ellen Tube and I was over in our warehouse the other day. No you're right after you volunteer over there. We're cleaning up and we found some kind by ellen boxes. Oh I didn't know we had leftover. I didn't know either they. They opened a thing in there. They were the winter boxes. Totally sold out. But you can sign up right now to make sure you'll receive Ellen's springboks which is launching in February. So we'd like to give you ten dollars off if that sounds good to you. Oh you're going to go to be kind by Ellen. Dot Com. Listen carefully here. That's be kind by ELLEN DOT COM and you can use the code on the go. That's us that's the podcast. CAST on the on the go. And they'll give you ten dollars off The springboks which looks insane. Nice very sweet offer from you. If you want to pay ten dollars more they should watch a send cash ashes great. WE'LL SPLIT IT seventy five bother with the code if you WANNA pay full price the on the go word don't put in the code and then you'll just I subscribe today on Apple Podcast or spotify or wherever you are listening right now. Really subscribe wherever you want strong strong. podcast you wanted subscribe all your friends. Tell your family. Don't tell your lawyer. Don't forget to watch Ellen Weekdays for even more Ellen Fund. We we love all of you a weekend. We would so love to know more about you here at l.. An on the go please head over to wondering dot com slash slash survey. It's a really short survey. That will help. Make this show better the wondering DOT COM Slash Survey W. O. N. D. E. R. Y.. Dot Com slash survey. We'd really appreciate hearing from you.

Ellen Ellen Degeneres Eugene Andy Michael Michael B Jordan Dan Ashley England Aquafina Dan Levy Jamie ELLEN DOT Jordan Aquafina Meghan Kelly Ellen Tube Shits Creek Gretchen harassment Sun Sun Flower Ed Glavin Jamie Foxx
Mini Crush #65

Movie Crush

35:15 min | 2 years ago

Mini Crush #65

"Welcome. Welcome. Welcome back to the Bob left sets podcast. That's right. We're back with all new episodes with your favourite musicians, comedians promoters, and behind the scenes people just like my newsletter where I analyse the issues I'm gonna go deep with the guests. So if you want to know what's going on in the entertainment industry, you've got a tune into the Bob left sets podcast on the iheartradio app. Apple podcasts. Wherever you listen. To your podcast. Welcome to movie crush a production of iheartradio. Good morning everyone. I'm Charles W Chuck Bryant and today, we're doing a masterpiece theater edition of movie crush. I wish wouldn't it. Be fun Schuermann. Just do just read some Jane Eyre, you know. Yeah. Needs to do that. He's to read. That's right. He read was a great expectations. Wasn't the great Gatsby. Oh, it was one of the great. The great cats. Just dull. Man, college audience, isn't shed. Yeah. What a guy. What a guy know what a guy here. What a guy for you too. I miss Andy ole smoky velvet, hey, what are you? Now fifty percents. Oh, half Chuck half. Fuck Chuck is that the same as two buck. Chuck. Oh, no, no. It's much worse. Does that mean, you don't does that imply that you don't care about things? I don't even know you don't know. But it became a thing kicking around for a while. For my words for my mouth. What's that saying from your mouth to Aaron Cooper's Photoshop? Yeah. That's the saying how you doing doing really well man things are fun and wild and having a really good time with this job. Oh, good. That's great. No. Yeah. Good doing a lot of cut a lot of big stuff. Come in like music based stuff, which is really cool. We'll do you have things outside of life that worked that satisfies you though because it can't be about were. No, I do that too. It's kind of been. Yeah. Complete man. Well, I'm working on it. I'm a fifty percent, man. I'm seventy percent, man. Oh, I thought you said that because I'm fifty percent I dead because because that's just how I roll, man. I'm seventy five I don't know. I'm approaching eighty I would say, I'm eighty two okay? Okay. Good. I'm got a girlfriend things going. Well, we're doing a little getaway to cabinet and the Blue Ridge mountains. Oh, well with an outdoor Hutto, man. I should've didn't know you. I'm sure you found a great place, but back when Emily and I were doing the cabin thing. Every now, and then we a great little small place, which is what you want when it's just a couple, you know, to find small place, we've got a small place. Yeah. This this was a great little one bedroom. And it was like literally sitting over the river. This is on a river. Yeah. Well, there are a lot of those same place. I think it might be the same place. I I wanna believe it's the same place. But remember that we talked about this last week? I think the will Ferrell sketch where he's the Hervey dude and they pronounce it the Hutto. Well, you know, it's funny. Bring that up because this is all coming around. All. Yeah. Couple of four years ago or so we rented a big cabin for Emily's birthday weekend. Invited a bunch of people love doing that ten. Here's what I recommend. If this place has guestbook sign, and this is it by to everyone if you ever stay anywhere with the guest book. My God, you need to take advantage of that comedy opportunity and sign that guestbook in a fun way. Because that is there forever. I agree. And so we went to that cabin. And like that welfare I took my inspiration from that bit. I wrote this page long screed about me, and all my friends, and like just disgusting sexy times, we had there with your fine wines and cheeses. Oh my God. All funny. Yeah. And I sat there and busted out and read it out loud to everyone. And they're like did you plan that did you just make that up? Yeah. Like, my guy that seemed like he wrote it, you know, took hours to write it, really. That's great Chuck. Yeah. I'll find that one day in read it on the air. Shirley, you have a record of this Airbnb took a photo of okay the page. Yes. Got the page of the page that I wrote because I want to go and stay in that exact house. And then try to one up you in the guest with the funnier screed what I really want to do is create people out like my God. What happened here? Let's also true. Yeah. All right, everyone. That's what you should do with your life. Go fill out twenty guestbook stuff. I agree. All right. I'm going to delete catch up because we just did that. And I'm gonna go right into corrections corner. There's not a lot of corrections. No have noticed that. Either people aren't catching our mistakes. I think that's what it is. Because we certainly make them. You know what I'm saying? I know we're doing our best Chuck, maybe we're doing our level best. And then people are putting things in here that aren't if you got deleted everyone. That's just because I'm trying to keep tidy and organized on the corrections corner. So if you make some funny comment, that's not a correction. We read it. We got a laugh and we're moving on with our lives. So this one though, no pertains to you. And it's a it's a guest at a correction because they think you might have meant something else that I'm sure I did. Of man, what a great name Elanie Calamar says this mini crush sixty one no refers to we're talking about Susan Sarandon. And he said she should be in a she should do apart in pretty little liars. And she said did he mean big little lies? Yes. Did I did? Is that there's a show called pretty little liars? I think there is a show called pretty little liars. I almost got. But I absolutely meant big little lies, and she knew that because I referred to the new season Meryl Streep in it. Yeah. Pretty little liars is a show. It's like ABC kinda show. I believe it's not it's not premium. It's up standard. Bargain-basement television. That's what they call the network these days. All so good job Elanie that is in Christa Mora says I caught that too. And Danielle Gingrich says I was also confused things for cleaning it up so nice job. Sorry guys that right? I'll do better. And that's the only one we have because we're going to say this other one because there's only one more for the next episode next week. What I really mean is in twenty five minutes while sh let's not let them peek behind the curtain that far. But Chuck Bergen question. Should I say fiery icy question? How about that game of thrones season premiere my man dowward? No man haven't seen that show in years. You're not into what do you mean? In years. I watched like the first couple of three seasons failed. You bailed after three seasons. Yeah. Like it. You don't like it. Now. It's my Lord of the rings problem. We're just wrong this to other quite a lot of people that don't like game of thrones, my friend as that. Right. Who are these people people like good TV? Whoa. Oh, he's through down the proverbial gauntlet. I know it's heresy to not like the most revered show. Yeah. You know? I it just I got confused. It went on and on and on. There was too many just was a lot. I can see that shock. I kinda felt good on myself. Because we were there was a big old hiatus between these seasons. It was like longer than they've ever had. I believe how did you survive? Well, that's I don't know Chuck lots of booze and many crushes mainly, but I was really surprised because everyone in the room who were also totally caught up confused about who was who. Yeah. Shit. Yeah. But I kept mail in it. I kept now all that's that's Marjorie, Terrell. She was Loris is sister. Who was the night of the flowers who is betrothed briefly to sunset? But then it turns out he was gay. And he actually was in love with Stanislaus brother who ends up getting killed by a ghost in the mirror. What if you just looked over right now is hanging from a rope surprise you? I mean, the look on your face is approaching that kind of slack job, man. I I like to game of thrones. While I was watching it. I'm not I'm not bagging on it. It's not bad TV. I enjoyed it. While I was watching it. But it just got to be too much. And I was just like now, I gotta stop. It's like a buy-in thing. Right. Like, you're either like on onboard with these characters, and you give shit about happens to them or you kind of just drift away casually view, it you cannot cash, and I think that's where I found myself. I have you'd the seasons multiple times each which is also. You know, what shock? I'm not that guy. Man. I'm not that guy. I just really really really really like him. Thrones a lot. Okay. I'm putting myself out there. You're certainly not alone. People love that show. All three thousand associates an eighteen thousand characters dare I say, I like it better than Harry Potter. That's not I find it to be a richer universe. Much more grounded in our current reality. All right. All right. Good stuff. You made the game of thrones people happy because they're they're into it. I don't begrudge them. No, I'm right there with them. Not yet in anyone's yum except that. I totally. You know, what feels great everybody paying off high interest credit cards getting a lower rate and saving cash money. That's why you should refinance your credit card balances and save with a credit card consolidation loan. From light stream, you can get a fixed rate as low as six point one four percent APR with auto pay you can get a loan from anywhere from five grand to one hundred thousand dollars, and there are no fees. You can even get your money as soon as the day you apply plus light stream as division of SunTrust Bank, one of the nation's largest financial institution. So you can have complete peace of mind. So if you wanna save even more movie Crushers can get an additional interest rate discount and the only way to do so is to go to light stream dot com slash movie crush that is L I G H T S T R E A, M dot com slash movie, crush subject to credit approval rate. Includes point five percent auto pay discount. Terms and conditions apply. Offers are subject to change without notice. Visit light stream dot com. More. More information. All right. We're gonna start off with social studies. Social. The listening audience in all recasts, this recast the movie that has your biggest casting gripe to make it great. The example. I gave a course of talked about it many times gangs of New York throw Kate Winslett in the role of Cameron Diaz. And it's a it's a great film and not a good them. Yeah, you're right. Because to me something about you're no, you're never even occurred to me. But something about Cameron Diaz in that role. Did get sick quite right with me. I didn't know what it was. Maybe the fact that she seems like she's a Venice beach surf girl that's true and not a period nineteenth century Irish. Lass also true. Yeah. All right here, we go. No, Jeff Clarke RO pal says this right off the top of the dome Vince Vaughn in the second season of true detective put same Rockwell in that role out of in good even say that about most roles put same Rockwell in that role. It's going to be pretty great. I'll tell you. That's very true. Our boy Aaron Cooper has a really funny one of these that I caught I hope. Get to. But if you don't all remember, but knows the season to detective was confounding on a lot of levels. But that one constantly stuck in my craw. I'm like, Vince vaughn's, a big old goofball. That's how I think of him. And you know, that's unfair. I guess that's just how it is for Vince. Vaughn he's earned. I'm sure he's a fine actor, but in this one a he's not that good an actor seems just a little like he was quite know how to play the character. He's he's he's meant to be this brooding kind of mob boss, and it just doesn't read it just reads kind of silly. You know that was. Yeah. That was bothersome. I I heard so many bad things about that season that I just didn't watch it. I going to do it. I found it a chore to get through and I loved season one so much. So so that's the problem too. Is people are telling me revisit season, two wasn't as bad as you. Remember, you're looking at it through the lens of season one and your expectations were so high that you gave it shit that it may be didn't deserve what you and the rest of the planet are exactly so that's why. Now, I'd rather not thank you. I have other game of thrones to rewatch, Christopher gangs. Denzel Washington as Christ. And passion of the Christ make some waves came putting Denzel Washington in a film is never a bad idea. Although I will say it's not like we'll default. He was great in the movie, he didn't ruin that film. Talking about passion of the credit passion, the Christ networks as the passion of the Christ. And then that's the last temptation of Christ really hashing of the crisis. Jim caviezel as Mel. The torture point one. Where Jesus gets thrashed, right? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. What about to Christ to furious? That would be great. Then diesel is a rock and VIN diesel. They were both. Yeah. All right, Louis Silva or Lewis can ever going to mispronounce your name for the rest of your life. Is it L U S might be Louis Louis Louis or Lewis Ega Silva, the matrix love the movie, but when I see canon can't help, but think that Christian bale would have been perfect controversial. That's the thing that movie so ingrained in the guys you can't you can't go back. I'm trying to get Canada. By the way, Kiana is Neo. Really? How's your super-secret interview? There looking going that was. What are you talking about those Chris walking? Oh that was the one. No, you told me you had another like super duper Blake. Oh, yeah. That was tarintino didn't happen. Yeah. And go ahead and reveal that one. Yeah. When ad sales. Believe it or not had a deal going for once upon a time in Hollywood. And they were like we're trying to package something for this with the movie company. Would you have Tino on what do you think? I just hope he doesn't listen to the show. And it fell through it, just, you know, how those at sales things like you hear about it once and you just never hear about so many things happen. That's what if he came in. And he's like, I need an editor was the first thing out of his mouth. Didn't you guys did a whole Tarantino extravaganza with the drunken lizard, guys? We covered. Drunken lizard, the trunk unless that was Reservoir Dogs. Yeah. That was on the fly. That was that was that was clutch episode in the way up stairs. They were like can we talk about Reservoir Dogs? Do it. Sure. That'd be great. All right. Our old friend Kayla h says Halle Berry is storm men. She's an African Princess and goddess much more powerful force than what Howie portrayed one thing. I've noticed here. Okay. Let you did not recast the film. Sure, she didn't alternative to offer the Ternate whoever's playing her in the new one that's about to come out, which I heard we had a very troubled productions called like dark Phoenix. I'm like that. I heard that Reshad all kinds of stuff it's got Santa stark from game of thrones. And oh good. The trailer. Look pretty good. But I read some, you know, Hollywood insider stuff saying that it wasn't going to be good. It was over. There was a really problematic production that they had to reshoot all kinds of stuff. And then it was maybe gonna feel member. There was that fantastic four reboot pretty recently that like was very similar to that. Where it's just like people hated it didn't make any sense. It was like sure continuity was all messed up. I think it's like one of those. But hopefully, I'll be proved wrong, but the person who's playing storm in that is awesome. And looks like looks to be yet Nigerian or or South African or something like that or have leading think you're correct in because she makes it very brief appearance in it. But I was like, oh, wait a minute thing this when right now. So Kayla goes onto not recast like for other things so come on Kayla. Get it together. Nick Kelly's picking on Kennedy. He says replace Cheonan when Brahms Stoker's Dracula fair enough that wasn't his best role replace him with Sam Neill. K does need to be a little younger though. I feel like that character needs to be younger. The Kino's as Sam kneels more over the hill for that role. Who while was he in nineteen eighty eight or whenever that came out track ULA. Yeah. Sam kneels old since the beginning of time. Certainly older than canneries. All right. We're gonna look no, let's do it. I'm going to do it right here in real time. Sam Neill age, except I typed in biz Amal Besse menial age. Besse my mutual. I've gotten so lazy man, I'll just let things autocorrect. Oh, dear God, he seventy one. Canyon is probably fifty at the at the most things like fifty two or fifty four. Okay. All right. Yeah. See him Neil getting up there. Yeah. But he's still. He's just a lot of stone handsome, man. Joshua Brennan has Chris Pratt instead of Shiloh booth in Indiana Jones in the crystal skull hell, yes. Yeah. He certainly especially at the time before the physical comedy before. Chris Pratt became a adventure guy. Venture guys would have been his first sort of roll like that. It's true. And that would have been great men. Get the la- buff out of there. Yeah. I think the problem is Chris. Well, no, yeah. No. I think that would have worked. Yep. That would have been good. You. Why do you? Why are you so antilock both? He's only been public persona. Yeah. Yeah. That's it. He's kind of a prick. Yeah. He's done some really Dushi stuff. Yup. Yup. I make sense. That'll do it man. Totally fair to he's not a terrible actor, but I don't know. I can't get over that stuff. Mitch hocken says this put Danny de Vito instead of Arnold Schwarzenegger in any of his movies. What I think he's suspending Evans and like in twins, aren't they twins? They're both in it together. So he would play. Well, he would play twin they played within. You lose the joke. You lose the joke. Yeah. I can't believe ever made twins too. I would have been fun. Oh my God. Someone twins too. Yeah. It's still not Houma. It's not that's from kindergarten cop. Oh, was it. Yeah. Jesus minutes. Okay. Then mixing metaphors. I didn't see either one of those movies believe it or not. They're not good. Yeah. They're not good. That's not true. That's not fair twins was pretty funny kindergarten cop is a I've seen parts is a culturally important film. I just remember hot take. I just remember boys have appeanas girls have a Jain ah. That's a very a child says that in the movie, and it's just tickles me to this day. Oh, goodness. Chris good says basically anybody other than Russell Crowe in layman's, rob. He was real bad in that real bad. I don't know much about forty odd foot of grunt. But he he's not a great singer now. And the thing is though that movie they were definitely leaning on like the singing not being perfect that was part of it. And like most of them were actors who were not Broadway people. Yeah. But everyone crushed it. Obviously, Hugh Jackman is a incredibly well trained Broadway singer. But everyone crushed it. But then you've got this weird. Russell Crowe kind of just limping along. And it just was sad. And it right out of it right out of Mike secene says jeeze, I don't know if he's trolling or not. But he he stood up. Some I r- take Jeff Goldblum out of Jurassic Park and replace them with Hugh Jackman. Mike. He shrugged into said, I don't know. I like, Hugh Jackman. I find it hard to believe that somebody wants to take Jeff Goldblum out of anything. It's like he thought Jeff Goldblum ruined that movie. I guess everyone has their own opinion. No way, which one sorry. I got distracted said he said take Jeff Goldblum out of drastic park now. But in Hugh, Jackman, lots you kidding me. That's crazy talk. I mean Goldblum is going to go bloom. Okay. That's how he's going to be. But that worked for that role. Yeah. He's going to bring it up Aaron amorous Seino says Jake Jilin halls young Anna, can I I would totally have Doug that he would have been near the right age. I think. Brian Stevens says replaced Jared Leto and suicide squad with Jake Busey. Take certainly kind of a creepy. Looking guy. You know? He always plays kind of an Bino colty freak. That makes sense. Can you picture that with his with his weird grin, and his like, blond eyebrows? You know, there's the show blonde. A so blonde that they're almost invisible. He was in something where he played a blonde weird, Al Bino like psychopath. Yeah. I'm what is it? It's like it was like he was a notoriously. What you're talking about? It's colty guy. Let her know. Policy genius presents the easy guy to comparisons. You should compare life insurance and save up to forty percent. You should not compare your friends engagement rings. You should compare home and auto insurance, even if you already have. It bundling conceive you big, but you should not compare babies. That's all the comparing talk. We have time for today to compare insurance had the policy genius dot com slash iheart. That's policy genius dot com slash iheart policy. Genius the easy way to compare and buy insurance. Caroline, gaston. Our old friend. Says Johnny Depp has no place in the fantastic. Beasts franchise are any movie ever. Yeah. They're they're getting a lot of heat for that. For sure. Unless you one more here. Let's recast one more film. Well, we're going to do two more because our old friend, Jeff. Noel has a funny funny line, Mike casting change would be to replace rob Schneider in every movie he's in with a potted plant. I like it. Oh, rob Schneider. Ran gets a lot of shit doesn't. He. Yeah. I just kind of you know, it's so hard to be an SNL and to be one of those people. They're like some of the most talented human beings in the world. And he's always struck me as kind of attorney like he's not he's very funny. He just kind of does the same thing qualities interred like potted plant to him. You know, it's like someone took a shit in the potted plant. I'm kidding. That's not nice. Maybe it's all the corn. I don't understand why he gets to be in that lustrous crew of like talented people. Oh, sure. Like, why was he even on that show? And that's my question is what what was the what was the hook with rob Schneider? Did he what were some? Did. He have any do making copies was that him. And I mean, I never thought that sketch was funny, but it became part of sort of psychiatrist like people are walking around talking like that for a little while the copy, man, hey, rob Schneider. Remember, the he had a run of really sub Adam Sandler movies, like sub Sandler. Yeah. Like the animal. There was one where you like. I mean, it was just just an interest Broadus abroad, you know. All right. Let's go with one more here from Nicole parks. I still think the fifty shades series would been better with Charlie Hunnam as Christian grey. I know it's trash, but it's a guilty pleasure for me. Fair enough coal fair enough. All right. Not bad everyone. Those of you who follow the directions, pretty good. And now, no we are going to move on to another social study segment, and I am going to have a weird name for this. But I'm just going to say the worst movie title ever in a bad movie, title can really take away from a film. Don't you think? Absolutely. And I don't even know like first of all I said name the worst movie title that does not contain a colon because all movie titles with colons are terrible titles know lot of times it stands chance of being a bad movie as well. But there are certainly geese movies with Colin's, but it's just lazy. Don't put a colon in your movie title. But like, what did I see? I didn't see the movie what was that? Matthew, mcconaughey movie Free State of Jones? Yeah. I'm not aware Free State of Jones terrible title. There was also that one that I wanna say he was also an called like John from Cincinnati. That was a TV show. Yes. But wasn't that kind of a bad name to the made you like what I don't? And it was a weird concept in the first place in the the name just didn't do it any favors. Well, I mean. That's a very divisive show because it was I loved it. It was the great David milch. So that's right. I thought it was awesome. I think it was very misunderstood in did not get to. I think it only had one season did. And it was building. This whole thing was like is this Jesus like what's going on? I was intrigued I I remember like enjoying first season very much like to do you think that the title was a little weird and didn't really give you much of a sense or even make you intrigue because it was kind of like, a wait what? Yeah. I don't know. What else you got? Well, Samantha H L says edge of tomorrow doesn't reflect the movie to her. And it's just bland, do, you know, they rebranded it chamber live die repeat. No, no. I thought lived. I repeat was the original title. I thought it was the other way around when they when they released it because they thought edge of tomorrow was so bland and nothing that they released it with the with the other title after the fact, no I mean, it was. Released as edge of tomorrow. And I know saying like when they released it on video or demand or whatever let me see. All right. Check it out. No while you're doing that. Oh, well, here's someone says when it came to DVD and Blu Ray lived, I repeat was given equal billing. So the spine reads live die repeat edge of tomorrow. Thank you. Eric alt- for that. Got it make sense. I thought I knew lived I repeat was the it was like the tagline. Yeah. Vegetarian. Kind of. Agreed not not the and it was a really good film. I thought NAT home in with the names net. Zouqi says you can count on me. And I absolutely loved this movie will not that's one of my favorites. And on its face. I would agree that it's not a great title. But in the movie that plays a part because if I'm not mistaken, I haven't seen in years and years, but Mark Ruffalo and Laura linear, brother and sister. And they had that scene at the very end where he saying, you know, remember what we used to say to each other what we used to say to each other, and they never say it out loud. But what they were always used to say to each other. Was you can count on me? So sure I think it fits because of that. But I I do agree on its face. It's a little odd. And Bennett Duckworth said the same thing about you can count on me Vanessa Lopez our old friend says tinker tailor soldier spy almost as long and boring movie itself. Oh, and she said, I know it's the name of the novel. But she a lot of applause for that. I think it's kinda fun name. But that's just me. Let me see Kayla. H R O Powell says lucky number sloven. Yeah. That's a bad title. The David good says lock stock and two smoking barrels you like that title. Don't you know, I do? Rob Dixon says the assassination of Jesse James by the coward, Robert Ford. That's just a very descriptive title. It for that reason because so sort of over this. It sounds like a like an old timey newspaper resolving that. And that's exactly what they were going for. I get it though that people have problem with that. Well, Julia Lert says this any movie that follows the naming formula verb ING noun. Always sounds corny uncreative. Julia. I agree. There was a time. Those really really hit heavy in the nineties, and I got so tired. I don't know the first movie to really do that. But I mean, surely remember all those movies, dude. And it was there was a plethora of them. Oh, gosh. There are so many of those. There was like surviving the game, you know, regarding Henry like you said chez all those like with the gaming, and yeah, I'm sure if we that would be a good list. John malkovich's in John Malkovich is is a good film man that I mean, I don't like it when something takes over the industry, and all of a sudden everyone's doing the same thing, what's sort of band names, where there was like a, you know, whatever's that was a big there's a big moment for that. Like the strokes the well, which is funny because the oldest van naming. Invention in history absolutely as but then there was like a gold and time for there was also a band with animal names that was a big thing with bands for awhile animal names like parade, and frog is my old friend from Athens. Who's a garage punk guy said if you're band and start with the in with an S, and you're doing it wrong you doing wrong? Yeah. Interesting. But that was like in the history of like the cramps in God like that. Yeah. The kinks. Yeah. Sam smother says The Shawshank Redemption ham smother. Yeah, see one of the smothers brothers think. So. Shawshank redemption. That's a great title. Maybe a little. Maybe if you don't know what about what it is. It's sort of like the Hudsucker proxy. It's another one where it's like what the hell is this movie about now, what is the Hudsucker? And what even as a proxy? Yeah. Nick Kelly agrees about edge of tomorrow. But he says lived, I repeats and even worse title. It's very bad. I don't know about that Zach pointer old for him, by the way, Zach friend in Japan cynicism. Japanese movie flyers male very like like promo type stuff. Yeah. They they give away these little promo flier handbills. Yeah. Step cool. I would love to see him. He says bass get ball and Beavis and Butthead do America. He'll come on. That's really going to go for the that. Like, the baseball was that was a stupid name on purpose. It was a stupid concept. Sure. What else gonna do? They were going to do America. Oh, Jonathan Cooley eight heads in a duffel bag. Yeah. I get where you guys are coming from. But these movies seem like really easy targets because they're meant to be dumb an offensive insurance. You know, like tacky, right? It heads in a duffel bag is a very tacky movie. Yeah. This is a bad title petty. Little Chang says how to lose a guy in ten days, that's pretty bad and his Ben. But it again within the movie that was the name of the article that she was writing. But still not a good movie. Is it any worse or better than fifty ways to leave your lover by Paul Simon? It's a great song. Exactly. Get off the bus. Get it off get off the bus making plans back Jack Koi. Yeah. Get yourself free. Jordan Ramirez, says the Hudsucker proxy, no to she's right there with you know, I stand by that one. And I didn't see that move for years because it seemed I was confused about what it was. Yeah. And it's an odd little movie. So it makes sense that you know, what are you gonna call it? You know? Hey, it's for kids the hoop story. Like, I don't know. Remember, the hula hoop is at the center of them. Sure. Yeah. Very very much, Alex. We're gonna finish. With Alex says extremely loud and incredibly close again, it's a novel. Sometimes they'll they'll change the novel title though, and just call it like incredibly close, and then people that love the knob will be like, why do you gotta do that? I would have just called it extremely loud extremely loud. That's a that's a nine eleven story. I think so. Yeah. Believe it is. But a kid searching that I read that isn't it by the guy that wrote everything is eliminated. I think so. Yeah. Jonathan Safran four four four four is for. Ferrari. Right corrections corner. Hope you're paying attention everyone. Give it to us it doesn't count. If we are knowing about our in ignorance. How long have we been going my friend thirty two? All right. I think that does it then I like it is a nice tight thirty as they call it in the world. They call it. Well, thought it was a tight five I wouldn't tie ten thirty seems interminable for a comedy says unless you're really good not a thirty. It's a loose. Tin. Exactly. All right. That's it for me. I guess I got nothing. Thanks for being here. Man. Thanks for being a friend. For more podcast for my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Maybe it's who you woke up next to this morning. Maybe it's what you had for dinner last night. Oh, how you getting to work right now. It's invisible. But hey, I is already making decisions for us on sleep walkers were speaking with the smartest people in the world and taking you inside the headquarters of Facebook, the NYPD and a secret lab Google to find out what the I revolution will mean for us. Listen and subscribe to sleep walkers. Apple put costs on the iheartradio app. All wherever you listen to podcasts.

Chuck rob Schneider Jeff Goldblum Aaron Cooper Hugh Jackman Kayla h Apple Hutto Vince Vaughn iheartradio Emily John malkovich Russell Crowe Jones Bob America Nick Kelly Denzel Washington Chris good Mike secene
Lacombe: The Fire

Bardstown

43:59 min | 2 months ago

Lacombe: The Fire

"This podcast is intended for mature audiences. Only this is all studios production. The wave the house was burnt looking at it. Just all makes sense as this was planned out to be done this way. We all know that incendiary devices can be set the timer. Anytime reveal fire height similar because fires three. We've covered it's mid afternoon on a friday july fourteenth twenty seventeen when the camera trips on inside the vehicle. There are two men inside seated in the driver and passenger seats and through the rear window. You can see the road behind them is disappearing quickly. The trees lining the road or a blur of green on either side. Clearly there driving fast both focused on the road ahead appearing concerned. The video pretty choppy. But i can see what appears to be the st. tammany fire district twelve shield on the right breast of the drivers polo shirt. And on the left side. You can just make out the words fire chief below that a name s criminal which i know to be short for steve crandall think tammy fire district. Twelve chief steve clinton's huge the vehicle. Steve is driving. Isn't a fully equipped fire truck. It's a department vehicle. Meaning there's a device on board. That's often called a tattletale camera. It's a camera that sits on the dashboard and kicks on whenever the truck goes at a high speed or suddenly changes direction. All you can hear in this footage is the thunk of metal the weight of the truck as it speeds over the roadway that and the blair of sirens in the background steeds unit is responding to a call for a house fire in an area that most of us would probably consider the middle of nowhere deep in the backwoods of an unincorporated part of southeastern louisiana. It's a community called lacomb too sparsely populated area where houses are few and far between and the home. They're responding to is at the end of a dead end road surrounded on all sides by thick woods. It's remote but steve rental. The local fire chief knows this area like the back of his hand. He's driven this very road countless times so many that he can no doubt picture the home at the end of the road before it even comes into view he knows there will be a locking gate just off to the left with the home beyond it at the end of a long paved driveway and in his memory. It's a sprawling property without buildings on the side and in the back the home itself is a single story residence with a brick front and green trim around the garage where a lives with their dog and two cats. at least that's how the home exists in his memory but what he doesn't know is what shape it's in now. How bad the fire is how much has burned. The video and watching is a split screen with one side tracking. What's happening in the cab of the vehicle. These two men focused on the road and the other side facing forward showing what they're seeing as the vehicle approaches the hall and steve crendall. The fire chief drives up to the front lawn. The forward facing camera shows the house. It's bad and based on his immediate reaction much worse than he was expecting over the howl of the sirens you can hear and say. Oh my god. The house in front of steve. Parental is completely engulfed in flames. A cloud of thick black smoke is rising from it almost blending in with the dark green tree line. The dash cam footage is a little grainy but the bright orange and white glow of the flames is unmistakable. It's clear they didn't get here in time to save much if any of the house for a fire chief. It's usually not a surprise to see a house fire even one as bad as this one. It's part of the job but this isn't just another call and it isn't just another house fire. This is his house and parked in the carport. Steve sees a familiar vehicle. A red mercedes. suv the vehicle driven by his wife. Nanak frontal katie moore and i'm an investigative reporter and anchor with wwl tv a local news station in new orleans louisiana. I've been a reporter here for over fifteen years. And i wanna tell you about a story. I haven't been able to stop thinking about since i started reporting on it a few years ago. It's the kind of story that every time you think you've figured it all out. It takes a sharp turn and leaves you re thinking everything you thought you knew third ways to get out. It's not like the house suddenly is just burst into flames. It's one of the most heartbreaking frustrating and mysterious stories that i've ever covered in my career and it's one that still raising eyebrows around here to this day. You know you're getting the runaround here. Thanks like that. It starts tucked away corner of louisiana about seven hundred miles. Southwest of bardstown kentucky. Where shea mcallister took you through. A series of unsolved murders in our first season. But now we're traveling from the bourbon capital of the world to a fifty miles from bourbon street and new orleans a village in southeastern louisiana from volt studios this is beyond bardstown lacomb. There is no place like louisiana. Festivals are some of the best in the world. We have creole and cajun cuisine. You'd just can't find anywhere else. At least not if he want the best of it and honestly we just do things a little differently. It's even reflected in the way the states divided. If you live anywhere else in the continental united states you call the part of the state where you live a county. But here in louisiana instead of counties we have parishes a nod to the state's colonial roots when the french and the spanish settled on native land and set up local governments based on actual church. Parishes it's been like that. at least. Since the early nineteenth century today third total of sixty four parishes in louisiana the biggest is east baton rouge then jefferson and then orleans parish where new orleans is located. Then there's the parish where. I grew up the fourth largest parish in the state saint tammany parish situated on the scenic nor shore of lake pontchartrain across the water from the twinkling lights and round the clock jazz and blues of new orleans. But even though it's one of the state's bigger parishes. It doesn't really feel like it when you're here. Because for the most part saint tammany parish is a maze of small towns tied together by miles and miles of pine trees. It's a big part of why louisiana's called sportsman's paradise. Lots of nature woods swamps and by us. It's a nice break from the bustle of city. Life if he asked the tammy parish tourist and convention commission they call it a natural choice for families as users. Museum of st. tammany is holding their annual celebration. Fried shrimp fried fish baskets. Course everybody's nature and art lovers thirty one mile long bike path and into hiking and golfers having lived here. I can attest to it. Saint tammy parish can be charming all the trees. The lonely roads the peace and quiet. That's the appeal. The charm of saint tammy communities like lacomb a small unincorporated village hugging a by you. That bears the same name where people around here go to raise their families in a place where nothing eventful seems to happen. Lacomb is a quiet community where neighbors relish that. They can't always see each other. But nowhere is all peace and quiet all the time and for some in lacomb. The promise of peaceful life in the woods went up in smoke in the summer of twenty. Seventeen well we were just kind of reminiscing about Just times that we've shared when we were in high school and Again recently when we were Kind of reunited couple years earlier. Laurie rando had been chatting with ninette frontal on facebook the night before the fire ripped through the nets house. They were just chatting catching up a pretty regular thing for two friends. Who'd known each other for nearly four decades now both around fifty years old. They'd met all the way back in high school during their freshman year so there was no shortage of memories to reminisce about just the fun times that we had and the memories that we shared both Summers that we spent it at my house as well as all the time that we went horseback riding and and just all the the silly things that we did it was just it was very light. It was very fun. You know it was just like a normal a normal day and you guys were chatting on facebook messenger. We were touting On the wall we were chatting on on the wall so is instantly going back and forth with each other and we would you know normally you know talk for however long the conversation would naturally go and then when you know one of the other of us had to go you know. It was always a okay. You know. i'll talk to you soon. I'll talk to you tomorrow. I love you and you know we would end. The conversation like that lori tells me that's how she and annette always ended their conversations by saying i love you. That is the one thing i will never regret is that we always always said that. We loved each other after our conversations. But this time on the night of july thirteenth twenty seventeen. Laurie says that didn't happen that something. And she doesn't know what interrupted their back and forth. I wasn't able to say that night. Why weren't you able to say that night Like i said we were talking back and forth and it was you know. Pretty regular shooting back and forth with each other And then all of a sudden it was she had stepped away from the computer for a minute or two but the minute or two lasted a little bit longer and then a little bit longer in a little bit longer. So is is if we were talking and chatting back and forth and then it just stopped it just ended and there was no goodbyes. There was no. I'll talk to you tomorrow. It was no. We didn't wrap it up like we normally went under conversation so i found that very strange But you know sometimes people get called away it was. It was getting kind of late. it was summer. So you know i was up I didn't have to work in the morning. So you know i was like. Oh well i guess you know something happens. Something came up. she has pets. Maybe one head to go outside you know. I wasn't sure what had happened. All i know is that it was very unlike heart to just abruptly end the conversation like that. Hi everyone. i'm reid redmond a producer on this show. You might know me. From the list of names of the end of the episodes. Sometimes i just don't have the time or energy to cook especially something healthy between work trying to exercise keeping my apartment clean ish and binge-watching old seasons of reality shows all the important stuff. It's just tough to find the time to put together a healthy meal. Which is why. I'm glad i discovered a healthier alternative to take out. That's where daily harvest comes in daily harvest delivers delicious food all built on organic fruits and vegetables. Right to your door. We're talking smoothies for breakfast. Chris flat breads for lunch and dinner. Harvestable soups i'll tell you. I've recently discovered there minkah cow smoothie and now i just want that every single day. Daily harvest is undeniably delicious clean food without the prep. You've got gotta love it to get started today. Go to daily harvest dot com and enter promo code bardstown to get twenty five dollars off your first box. That's promo code. Bart t o w n for twenty five dollars off your first box. Daily harvest dot com daily harvest dot com said. We grew up together in the same household so i shared a room our whole life. We never had a run rooms so until about nineteen twenty years we and we worked at the same place and we had horses at a stable together. We always were together as ninette. Crendall rental sister. Amy bernard remembers. It was about two thirty pm on the day of the fire when she got a call from her brother telling her there was something going on it in a net nans house. I was leaving work until me. That i thought he was going to need something to do with that. But don't be. There had been a fire at nanny. House and steve. How's that nance car was found under the carport but she was not this call would have come in shortly. After steve pennells fire unit had arrived at the house and spotted annette's mercedes but net herself might be at this point. Nobody knows so left. Work met my husband. Tailed it over there and we took a wrong turn because we were just kinda hurrying so turned around and went down philip smith and got to the gate. Amy had driven over from the nearby city of covington. Maybe a twenty or twenty five minute. Drive away from the crunchers property and lacomb end of philip smith road that remote dead and roadway steve crendall had sped down not long before amy. There's one other house on the left. Hand side everything else is woods and then there's more woods and then you would come to their house which is at the end of the property and there's woods all around they had a nice house Big sign that said colonel in front of it the kind of lit up but you would be very secluded back there. You really have no neighbors. Those other neighbors which i believe relatives are quite far away so once you got to that property. There's no one else around. And so you know anything could have happened the driveway and it's locking gate is the only roadway in or out. The only other way to get to the home is through the woods that surrounded on the other three sides it just felt kinda desolate is late. Mary isolated variously are headed to the rental property where the fire was. And it's pretty remote It's an lacomb you can see as we're driving through here. There are lots of trees and this is not a private road. Leads up to one Curious to see what it looks like now with property looks like now i've driven out to the criminal property a couple of times since the day of the fire in july of twenty seventeen here it is an enemies right. I don't know if i'd say it feels desolate but it is certainly isolated since beautiful. But it's quiet here a rooster and the distance behind the fence. There used to be two houses. Steve's cousin has a house that's further up the property and his daughter is who called nine one one. The day the fire pass. That house is where stephen and at crystal used to live. And that's the house that caught on fire so it's quite a long driveway. It is remote out here and you can see that there's plenty of security around just by the number of cameras The fact that there is that locking gate that has to be activated for people to go in and so. This is a pretty secured site. If i've ever seen one in two thousand seventeen when amy bernard russia's out to her sister's home it's not so quiet as she pulls up she sees. The property is packed with emergency vehicles for the fire department. The sheriff's office. And maybe even another agency or two. We're able to drive in but there were so many vehicles that emergency vehicles lots of different entities. Were there so we part a good ways away and we walked through the property. And as i was walking i knew there was a gate or offense or something between the only house on the property. a little clearing on the left so i looked at that clearing and i saw husband has a steve cuddle looking down walking around kicking the dirt. A little bit. Steve's had been the first fire unit to arrive but by now others are at the scene where it's hot and not just louisiana in july hot. The house is still kicking off. Heat as the firefighters work to control it. The fire was just being put out so it would be about three thirty. By the time. I got from covington there and walked down the property so about an hour after the call and The next person. I run into brian. Stevens brought his mother and another friend of theirs. They were there that soon. That's the first person that i ran into after. Actually talk to brian brian. Crendall steve's brother nets brother-in-law a lot of people in the nets. Life would tell me she hadn't had a great relationship with brian to this point. Which is maybe the reason. Amy surprised to see him at the house. With the rest of steve side of the family. I did think it was a little odd. That he was there and he did tell me he was sorry that he had just seen nan. According to amy. Brian tells her the last time he saw net. She had her baby with her meaning per dog. A long haired chihuahua named harley who's also nowhere to be found the day of the fire stevens mon. Just kinda shrug in. You looked at me. And that was a quick in brief encounter. Because i wanted to get to the scene smoke and ash hang in the air as amy makes her way toward. That's smoldering house walked. As far as i could to see very hot just put out a did see when i looked at the property that it was totally devastated. The more i looked at all the corners there was no area that seemed to be. Maybe like a stove fire. Maybe it started there and the other part they had gotten out or something but everything seemed to be almost completely devastated. Amy quickly spots. What steve criminal had seen earlier that afternoon and what her brother had told her over. The phone nets mercedes. Suv is still in the carport. But still no sign of nenet. Herself as firefighters go in and out of the burned rubble. Amy rocks or brain trying to piece together where her sister could possibly be. Would if she'd been taken abducted if she had gone out that morning and come back home would be very easy for someone to get her when she got out of the car. Be waiting for her very easy on that property in. No one would've known another possibility that runs through amy's mind is that ninette could've walked off into the woods earlier in the day and gotten lost or maybe even hurt as we were sitting there and watching us down was coming. I knew nana's nature walker so if she was out in the woods somewhere in that was highly unlikely She would've seen the fire and come back so you know common told you that she was in their in their meaning in the house or what remains of it which isn't much and we just kind of watch the firemen try and get in there with their left no walls nothing and you know you might have a little remnant of brick here there but now the fire had burned so hot and spread so quickly that the entire house had burned to the ground within a span of a few hours so that is where the questions came in because if i was called at two thirty there by three thirty in the house was completely gone. I've felt like if there was a stove. Fire or something like that that there would have been more remnants of the house there an how hot it was as the hours go by and the hot summer sun slowly dips below the tree line. Amy keeps her eyes on that ash. Rebel hoping against hope that somehow some way her sister had made it out that maybe she would come out of the woods or call from a payphone somewhere with a ridiculous story that she wasn't somewhere in the smoldering remnants of her home that she might still be alive. That's when amy notices some commotion among the firefighters and quickly realizes what's happening they all congregate at you can see that. Look down. And i told my brother they've A woman's remains later confirmed to be the body of ninette crendall had been discovered on the tile floor of her and steve's master bathroom so then they immediately came over and chief haley had come over and give in told steve he was the one steve was directly behind me and so of course he told him and hunt him in. I got upset for a minute about thirty seconds but then something snapped in my head. You know what her soul is gone and we can deal with that later but for her investigation or for her to see what happened. Need to snap out of it and start paying really close attention. Her is quickly. Turn toward steve. Crendall i look to see where steve was in he was behind. The town couldn't see his face he was kind of shaking or bet Like he was crying and then he got up in the Ambulance people came and asked if we wanted to go he went in i ambulance and she asked me decline and someone ever did get an stated looked at the whole just watched. Amy starts to ask herself a question. The question that would haunt her and the rest of nets family for years. How exactly had internet died. I you know sapna chair. And i had a firemen friend that i've known a long time young. I started asking him about smoking. Because you know it's normal you want it to suffer at the least amount of suffering possibly could have happened so i was thinking. Well maybe this meal smoke. Whatever happened. got her first. And she didn't feel any of this and the dogs and the animals and we talked for a while when you talk to me about smoking relation but as amy sits and looks at the scene in front of her more and more questions creep into her mind. I really went back to our roots. A little bit with a little bit a law that our family grew up in in some of the fire investigations that my mother grandmother talked about my mother with the depth of that she did and I thought you know. I think was fire was set as this is an accelerate of some sort because there was to it was too far gone into short of time and also i said i think she was incapacitated whether it be from even though shows young maybe a medical issue but i felt like she was deceased fire remember. It wasn't the middle of the night when the fire started it was around two. Pm the middle of the afternoon on a sunny day so why hadn't gotten out where they found her body. Your what i could remember. It seemed close to where she could have gotten out through a window or some capacity if there was a fire that started somewhere else. That was a little slower moving that she could have gotten out of the house. One of the first explanations that comes to mind is the animals ninette loved her. Pats her two cats baby. Kitty and smokey and harley. Her chihuahua who family members say went everywhere with her. We even talked about her going in and getting an animal going get because she was such an animal lover We grew up with animals. So you know she. And i both love our animals and thought well it would be like her to want to save them all but cats are probably a lot harder. If there's a fire they would scatter would go take her dog. Throw them out the door. Get him out go in again another one and get another one and then succumbed to that. I didn't feel like sh- i think she would have. You're trying to get whoever she could. But if the fire got into intense that she would have stayed out but she wouldn't try and gather them all at once to get out. So i feel that way so the more i sat there i was filling. Stop wasn't right. Laurie rando nets friend. Who'd been chatting with her on facebook the night before. The fire had a lot of the same questions the night. Obviously that i had heard about the fire I was. I couldn't understand it. I could not understand how at two thirty in the afternoon. A perfectly healthy woman could not get out of a fire. It was just a couple of weeks before nets birthday when she was found dead. She was forty nine years old about to turn fifty. And when. Laurie rando heard the news she was actually online shopping for gifts for her front. So i just order from amazon. And i put it all of her information in to have it sent directly to her and those probably around seven o'clock in the evening and it was around ten o'clock ten thirty that night. I got a private message from a girl that we both went to high school with and she said that she was really sorry to have to tell me this. But there a fire at a nuthouse and she didn't make it. And i didn't understand because this girl i although we knew each other it wasn't that we had Communication rarely at all. So i was like no i said. I think you're mistaken. I think you have me mixed up with someone else and she said no laurie. I'm sorry it isn't a net. It's the nets house. The friend tells lori to pull up a local news article about the fire so she does and it didn't have her name at the time but it did have the address that i had just put in to amazon three hours earlier and so i i knew it was her house and i just pretty much lost it from there and i actually did. I called her phone. I called her Obviously got a a voice message. And i said i needed her to call me because I think somebody was playing a really cruel joke. And i needed her to call me As soon as she got this message. And obviously i never got that phone. Call like nets. Sister amy. Laurie also considers the possibility that nannette went back in for her pets but she reaches the same conclusion. That explanation just doesn't add up even as much as she loves. Those animals and harley probably would have already been arms or on her lap. She loved her cats. But i still won't believe that she would have gone back in the house to save them. She was a fire. Chief's wife she knew how dangerous it would be to go back in the house With the smoking. And what have you so when they tried to tell me that She went back in the house to save the animals. I know how she felt about animals. But i i didn't believe that support for this. Podcast comes from progressive. What would you do with an extra eight hundred dollars by plane ticket paid on your student. Loan treat yourself to those shoes. You benign with you. Find out drivers who switch and save save an average of seven hundred ninety six dollars on car insurance get your quote online at progressive dot com and see how much you could be saving national average annual car insurance savings by new customer survey who save with progressive and twenty nineteen a fire. Chief's wife found dead in a fire. It really does sound like the premise of a movie or a dusty old mystery book. Not something that happens in real life and yet it did back at the scene of the fire net sister. Amy is still sitting in a lawn chair trying to make sense of what she seeing. Play out in front of her. People were walking everywhere. And i hope they don't touch anything and then that machinery did leave and people started to leave. I did have a fire marshal or someone who's in white that worked for the firestone truck. Come and tell me that there has never been these many fire chiefs at a fire. Normally so you know. I guess that made me feel good. You know that they were gonna really look at it while this is going on as smoke continues to drift upward from the charred wreckage as the sky turns dark nets. Body has not been removed from the rubble and decides. She's not going to leave until net does as close as i could and they said well we're we're gonna make a screen or they were gonna put a screen up. He had to just kinda shield us a little bit and i thought that man Like a piece of tarp or something that we're gonna hold but they didn't. They each stood next to each other which was for a long time. Very very sweet nice. I guess this is what they do. And kinda shield us in. They had equipment and they headlights and they had sounded like sauce or something something to probably get her up so that she was intact. They did a really good job trying to be careful. I think and i could see a little bit through with the light that they were down there and they were working. Maybe they were taking pictures too. I'm not sure so. I could not see them. Put her in the van. But i saw when they picked her up. And she was in the amy follows. The body bag with her is watching as the body is removed as her sister leaves her home for the last time they put her in the van in then i waited for them to drive away so i knew that she was going. And so when. I saw that then we turned around and we left the first part. Whenever you you get get sent to a death it's the equivocal death analysis for the equivocally evaluation. Basically you're dealing with homicide accident suicide. Whatever this is doug johnson a career homicide investigation supervisor. Who would take interest in this case later on when he would serve as a consultant for some of the members of nets family. Anytime we're dealing with fire. You're gonna heightened sense of alert because it could be anything and fires a great way to cover up a crime and it's also a great source of accidents especially around here. Doug has spent his career in the midwest where he says a lot of house. Fires happened in the winter and our sparked by fireplaces or kerosene heaters something we can safely rule out for a house fire that happened in july in louisiana but when the nets body is found. We still don't know if the fire was an accident stove fire or something like that or if it was intentional if for whatever reason whether they knew ninette was inside or not someone had set her house on fire. Two other questions. That are still unanswered. When and how ninette had actually died. I asked doug johnson to walk me through how investigators would typically go about to answer those questions. After arriving at the scene of a fatal fire arrive new. Assess the body and try to determine the cause of death. You also tried to determine how long the body may have been deceased. And if you've got somebody available like a pathologist one to come out the scene we notify them and sometimes come out. Sometimes it can and they will make an assessment. Kinda give you some insight as to what you might be dealing with. And then the body would be secured because at this stage evidence and sent to somebody medical examiner for examination and then we would canvas the area for anything out of the ordinary. You know people come and go on. People were seen also depending on the neighbourhood look for security cameras. A lot of people have security cameras anymore for to cover their property but they may also show something in the background that you're interested in and you talk to the regular like the mailman anybody else that might have a regular reu pass that residents you're involving residence and you always try to define the individual who's got the most information generally speaking it'd be a family member and if it's a woman if if the body is the body of a woman that change things while you're probably contact her husband because the husband should be intimately involved with of her life that day and those when she gets up knows what she eats knows where she's gonna eat all the habits. The downside to that is a family member may be suspect. In this case the family member closest to ninette or at least the only family member who lived with her would be her husband. Steve frontal retracing his steps. On the day of the fire he'd rushed out to the home around two pm when that tattletale camera and department vehicle shows him arriving at the scene over four hours later but still before the nets body was discovered. Steve leaves a voicemail message for his father-in-law. Dan watson who lives in iowa by the time. Dan receives the message and calls back. The news has gone from bad. There was a fire to the unthinkable. His daughter is dead sitting in marshes fiftieth class. Reunion and a little flip phone and it was ringing. But i couldn't. I couldn't get to it. So when outside. And i played back steve message to call him and then he told me that that had died after noon in a house fire as dan begins to process what he's hearing. He says the conversation gets a little more difficult to follow. And then he was sobbing to time and and he stopped sobbing and said. Oh no i can't. I don't want us to get in front of the news media. This is going to be bad. And he wasn't sobbing when he said that it was a real break and the conversation he had been talking about. Nan i kind of lost track right after. He said she died in a house fire but when he got to the social media was such a break in in the dialogue. This i what what who cares anyway. so i wished him well and so forth and we hung up. Have you handled a fatal fire before you have identity issues. You know who lives there man. Yeah this is probably that person but you got to go back and positively identified individual and dental records dna hospital records. Whatever you can use identify individual which is generally a step you don't have somebody that's visually identifiable and then the other big issue is where they alive at the time of the fire or was the fire said cover up another crime in an effort to help answer that question while the saint tammany parish. Sheriff's office is beginning. Its death investigation. The state fire marshall's office is beginning a separate investigation into the cause of the fire. And when state fire marshal butch browning arrives at the scene. It is quickly apparent that it's going to take some time the preliminary stages where we're just trying to determine the area of origin and then from there is a number of scientific things that we have to do so the cause of the fire. That's really the first thing we have to do. And and bobby by the looks at the same as several days to do that as for the sheriff's office about nine pm after nets remains had been removed. They secure the scene. Not knowing what evidence might be hiding in the ashes this early on the next episode of beyond bardstown lacomb. Dad called and said kim. Then that's what then just immediately started. Kersey they killed her. My gosh he if if you knew or loved her she was so much fun. Her laugh like you hear repeated like she had a very infectious and In the middle of the day of you sleep normal hours away. You don't i in a house. Fire said we're are you these fires. How is this open to the public. How are we able to drive in here. Then was scared to death. Perfume show beyond bardstown. Lacomb is a vault studios and wwl tv production. You can learn more about our podcasts including the daily crime and true crime chronicles at volt studios dot com special. Thanks to wwl tv. News director keith. S farrah's and visual journalists. Derek waltrip volt studios executive producers. Are brian wice and will johnson read. Redmond is a writer and producer. Richard humphreys at tacoma media in silver spring maryland messages and edits the show for volt studios. I'm katie moore.

louisiana steve steve crendall Laurie rando ninette ninette new orleans amy Amy Steve steve crandall steve clinton steve rental katie moore wwl tv philip smith shea mcallister volt studios
The Gatekeepers: Chris Turgeon

Cults

40:32 min | 10 months ago

The Gatekeepers: Chris Turgeon

"The graphic nature of this cult's crimes listener discretion is advised. This episode includes discussions of abuse and murder that some people may find offensive. We advise extreme caution for children under thirteen. Dawn wasn't wet on March twenty, nine, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight. This was the norm for the sleepy hamlet of mountlake terrace on Washington's puget sound but thirty, four year old Chris Turgeon and twenty seven year old Blaine Aplin didn't notice the rain they were deep in thought preparing to carry out God's latest demand Blaine had spent the roughly nineteen hour drive from San Diego California manically praying from the passenger seat. He studied his spiritual leader who seemed so calm. So focused Blaine wondered why he couldn't match Chris's serenity. He begged God for a sign as the pair near their old neighborhood Blaine. saw it a magnificent rainbow. Chris claimed it was a sign from God that they were on the right path. It seemed it would be blessed journey. Finally, they reached their old friends trailer after a day of non-stop Driving Chris only managed to not to blame as if to say, it's now or Never Blaine exited the car with each step blades prayers intensified. He muttered it's God's will. It's God's will he knocked on the door and his old buddy Dan? Jess opened up Boyne said Dan I need your help Dan smiled and his eyes overflowed with sympathy for his estranged friend. But before he could welcome him in blame put a pin stole to his head. Hi, I'm Greg Poulsen. Richardson and this is called Apar- cast original every Tuesday we look at cults practices, their leader, and their followers. You can find all episodes of colts. All other podcast originals for free on spotify over every listen to podcasts just dream cults for free on spotify, just open the APP and type colts and the search bar this week in a one part episode, we're taking a deep dive into the tight knit community known as the gatekeepers. The cult was established as a casual Bible Study Group in Nineteen ninety-one. But born again, founder Chris version believed God called him to bring judgment on Earth. In the late nineteen ninety s Chris grew paranoid that a secret satanic branch of government was after him. He armed his members to the hilt and convinced them to carry out illegal acts on his behalf including murder. Coming up, we'll put Christopher turgeon under the microscope. This episode is brought to you by hub spot is your content management system. You back managing your website doesn't have to be complex with CMS hub. You can move quickly grow your business and deliver a great customer experience all from one platform learn more about cms hub at hub spot, dot com slash spotify. Stories of Christchurch's upbringing are few and far between but he claimed his biological father was a strong. Coo beat his mother Lucky for Chris. Father? Didn't stick around. When Chris was still young, his mother met his stepfather Edward. Turgeon, was a relatively decent man who adopted Chris and his two siblings. Edward Love the children, but took a special interest in Chris when they bonded over. Music. Edward can recall Chris's many school concerts where he played the saxophone and clarinet. Edward. Remembered, Chris as a quiet child with a short attention span who kept to himself as a teenager friends used to call Chris Opie a shout out to the kid from the Andy Griffith show in his free time he spent hours reading the Bible alone in his room. While the rest of Chris's earliest years remain a total mystery. We do know he left home to attend a Bible College around Nineteen eighty-three at nineteen years. Old Chris knew the Bible inside and out classmates often came to him for life advice and he had a knack for coding just the right piece of scripture to help. Chris was also known for his musical talent whenever you got the chance he sat in the campus quad playing his saxophone students gathered to hear his jazzy renditions of their favorite hymns while he didn't advertise it to his schoolmates. When Chris Started College, he heard the Voice of God. Early in his first fall semester, he locked himself in his dorm room to read the Bible cover to cover out of nowhere everything went dark a pinprick of light illuminated a passage from hezekiel thirty, three, thirty, three. And they shall know a prophet has been among them. Then the Lord appeared to tell Chris that he was the reincarnation of the Prophet Elijah God said he was chosen to prepare Christians for judgment and I Chris wondered if he was dreaming but then he heard God's voice a few nights later affirming that he was meant to lead clerics life Vanessa's going to take over and let psychology here, and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist, but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks. Greg. For the British Psychological Society Researchers Simon McCarthy. and. Long note that hearing God's voice has often been interpreted as a symptom of brain disease synonymous with schizophrenia while Chris believed, visions were genuine. He was aware that others might think he was psychotic afraid others would mock him. Chris initially kept the divine visions to himself fresh out of College Chris took the Lord's message to heart and started preaching wherever he could. He made his way around the garden variety suburbs of Seattle. But he had trouble finding stable pastoral work at a church Chris needed to make money somehow and eventually found a job managing a. Small apartment complex in Everett Washington just outside of Seattle Chris's life remained relatively uninteresting until around nineteen ninety one when God began speaking to twenty-seven-year-old Chris turgeon. Once again, according to Chris God ordered him to form his own church right there in his little apartment Chris reached out to a handful of guys he'd connected with around town and invited them to participate in a casual Bible study. Group they met regularly and Chris called the congregation to be a a saw prophetic ministries in Hebrew that meant to act with God's love intent on growing his congregation. Chris. Tenants to attend group meetings while recruitment wasn't his strong suit. A couple of lost souls accepted Chris's invitations. The seven members that joined felt soothed by his presence. Chris Listen Dan feigned concern he offered his members thoughtful responses when they asked about the meaning of life for where loved one went after they died not only was he comforting to his mini flock but he made gathering for a Haba Assam meetings fun. He offered snacks and played biblical Trivia Games some members recalled that Convening in Chris's apartment felt like a family get together as the new preacher in town. Chris made a lasting impression on local pastors disappears admitted. He was articulate and well versed in scripture but they were concerned Chris seemed to centrist message on destruction in the final days. This worried some preachers it seemed Chris pushed all the right buttons to get his congregation to depend on. Him instead of God the more Chris Claim to hear the Lord's speak the more he claimed that he alone could sense. God's will on Earth Chris then tightened his grip over his church members by implementing strict rules. He even dictated when they could engage in intimate acts or what television they could watch the members trusted Chris. So they complied Chris tried to expand his church. By poaching congregants from the neighborhood clergy earning him much of their ir, but it seem that may have only felt empowered by the competitions disapproval as it meant, he was getting noticed Chris escalated the disagreement in nineteen ninety two when he claimed that the local church's teachings were deviant that he warned church leaders that Jesus instructed him that a mighty wind would set Washington churches. Aflame later that same year Chris's prophecies began to come true churches started burning down around Seattle suburbs devastating the parishioners even churches increases own neighborhood were affected one night. The streets near Christmas apartment complex were filled with a warm glow. It's possible to imagine Chris Waking Up to the light through his window their foot he might have stepped out the front door as a hungry. Fire devoured the roof of the church down the street he couldn't help. But SMIRK, he said they were all damned but nobody listen and now the Lord's wrath brought smoke and flames to Chris the destruction wrought by the serial arsonist was affirmation of his creators message while other passengers were comforting frightened congregants. Chris used the tragedies as marketing opportunity. Chris told his followers to recruit. As many people as they could one area preacher called the local papers to out Chris for his total lack of sensitivity. But the time media criticism didn't stop his exploitative response to the devastation though Chris was in no way responsible for the acts of arson he did exhibit a blatant disregard for the people who had been affected by the tragedies and by early nineteen ninety-three. As, his congregation grew in size twenty, nine year old Chris's teachings grew more radical. He constantly gave sermons about the end of days. He routinely preached about male dominance over women considering feminism and abomination. You also had an intense hatred for homosexuals and he condemned almost any alternative point of view. His clerical peers were deeply concerned in fact, one pastor called him a dangerous man. Instead of worrying about his reputation among other men of God Chris Focused on spinning his influence to snare those who came to hear him preach sometime after the fires subsided, he changed the name of his ministry to the gatekeepers Kris, told his followers that they were chosen by God as the keepers of the gate to salvation. He said, he was the sole gatekeeper to their spiritual evolution and only he. Could answer their questions about sanctity. If his congregants grew skeptical, he would simply remind them that he was the one who spoke with God. He said the Lord showed Him a vision of the apocalypse. He warned his followers that the world as they knew, it would end in twenty two years on March twenty second two, thousand four they were either with him and God or they would end up in hell. Next Chris turgeon's radical teachings lead to radical violence. Pi It's Greg podcast has a brand new series. Sure to become your next podcast obsession. It's called medical murders and it exposes a dark and disturbing diagnosis that not every doctor wants to extend your life. Every Wednesday medical murders introduces you to the worst to the medical community has to offer men. Women took an oath to save lives, but instead use their expertise to develop more sinister specialties. Join? Host. Alistair burden has he examines the formative years and motives of history's most infamous killers dissecting their medical backgrounds with expert analysis and professional insight provided by practicing MD Dr David Kipper. You'll investigate a wide range of heinous healthcare workers like the general practitioner believed to be the most prolific serial killer in modern history for the dentists to lead a double life as a Hitman or even the doctrine gang member who mixed deadly potions for unhappy housewives to use in their husbands. When it comes to these true crime stories. The only thing the doctor ordered is murder. Follow medical murders free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. This episode of calls is brought to you by simply safe. Simply, safe was designed to be easy to use while protecting your whole home twenty, four, seven, order it online with the click of a button when my box arrived I was able to get started on it right away. I didn't have to wait around for a technician to install it. The, directions are very clear and easy to follow. I just had a place the sensors plugged in and connected to my Wifi I headed up and running in no time. One of the things I was happy to discover is that simply safe offers water leakage sensors as well as why you're in carbon monoxide alarms as add ons at those features to their twenty, four, seven professional monitoring and emergency dispatch, which starts at just fifty cents a day and your home is pretty well protected. It's no surprise that simply safe was named best overall home security of twenty by US News and world. report. Head to simplisafe dot com slash colts and get a free HD camera that simply safe dot com slash colts to make sure they know that our show sent you. Now back to the story by Nineteen Ninety three, twenty, nine year old preacher Chris turgeon was growing his casual Bible, study group. The gatekeepers in his small apartment though generally disarming the young religious leader had started to exhibit characteristics that some saw as dangerous Chris tergence church consisted of a few voted families and three minute. Their early twenties made up the core of the cult they receive Chapman Blaine Aplin and Brian Stevens the three of them were vulnerable and Chris. Was There Blaine Aplin was addicted to alcohol and drugs and looking for help chapman had low self esteem and no career prospects Stevens had no idea what he wanted to do. He was still in college and searching for greater meaning Dan Jess a man almost fifteen years older than the others was another key member. He was a former marine also looking for meaning in his life. All of these men needed guidance and Chris was the only one offering it to them. The group also included some of the men's wives and young children all in the total number of congregants in Chris's flock grew to between fifteen and twenty five members. But what they lacked in size they made up for in devotion to Chris Chris controlled everything the gatekeepers did he monitored what they said and what they were allowed to watch on television even determined who they could marry and when they were allowed to hold a ceremony by the end of nineteen ninety-three, Chris had managed to isolate his flock from their friends and family members. He wanted to pit his tiny army of disciples against the evil world and ensure their dependence on him. To cement their loyalty he shared an important story. This likely made the gatekeepers feel special like they were part of some divine mission. He told them God wants came to him and said, you are the Elijah to come I did not allow your father to kill you or your mother to kill you. You are to bring a message of restoration and judgment on this world in the Old Testament. Elisha was a vessel through which God performed many miracles. The profit brought a dead boy back to life and some in fire from the skies he was also one of the only people able to pass through the. Gates of Heaven Alive Chris also told the group Elijah was God's law enforcer and the God wanted them to kill the wicked to him that meant the deaths of those in the LGBTQ plus community healthcare workers who facilitated abortions and witches which seemed to be his blanket term for anyone who supported women's rights. She even decided that people who casually read their horoscopes were on the gatekeepers plunder list but Chris wouldn't just tell his minions about these evil tours. He presented God's vision in Song whenever he had an important message to deliver he off his chair sat with his musical instrument and welcomed Elijah's spirit as he. Started to play like the Pied Piper Chris Played Eerie Tunes and Sang indecipherable lyrics. The ritual was his version of speaking in tongues but if anyone questioned his teachings, Chris, threatened them with eternal damnation. In fact, he often lost patience with the groups child members for asking too many questions and the penalties for acting against the prophet were harsh according to some accounts one night he allegedly ordered the gatekeepers to line up their kids single file than he had their parents beat them hard with paddles even family pets weren't free from Chris's violent bidding. One story claims that when a dog scratched him while playing. Fetch Chris. Had the animal shot shortly after Kris began teaching that the Holy Father urged certain infractions as a way to eradicate evil in the world. Then Chris, laid out plans for the gatekeepers to commit fraud and theft assuring his followers that God wouldn't let them go to jail with Christ behind them. They gatekeepers had no problems swiping food from liquor stores pickpocketing or beating up in this and people to get the cash they needed. They thought they were doing God's work but in reality there, thefts and indiscretions were just away to subsidize Chris's latest plot amassing an arsenal of weapons intended to protect his group from the apocalypse. By nineteen, ninety, six, thirty, two, year old. Chris was reciting passages from right wing survivalist literature almost as much as he quoted scripture his desire to arm the group became an obsession. Many of Chris's sermons were drawn from the book of revelation. His lessons highlighted the apocalypse one day Chris told the group God wanted the gatekeepers to declare war on the government without hesitation most members agreed to the mission but one member didn't accept Chris's ominous rhetoric and the resulting criminal activity. It was the ex Marine Dan Jess Dan believed in a loving God and questioned the version who spoke through Chris Dan voiced his dissent but Chris shut him down saying if he wasn't with the gatekeepers he was against them. Dan Did, what he felt was right and excommunicated himself from Chris's Church dense departure left Chris feeling endangered though Dan had done nothing to inspire it Chris obsessed over the thought of someone reporting the group to child protective services. So in fall of nineteen ninety-seven, thirty-three-year-old Kris told the remaining gatekeepers they were moving to a town called Paula located forty miles north of San Diego. California Chris found a home in the middle of nowhere situated on five acres of a vast Indian reservation. They're the gatekeepers basked in unbeatable privacy and all shared the same. Chris secured the property by building a high chain link fence but new compound consisted at the house, a chicken coop and a few rickety storage sheds from here. Chris could protect the gatekeepers from the influence of outsiders because the outside world posed such a threat to the sect. Both men and women carried weapons with them at all times, guns and other end days provisions were hidden throughout the property to cover the costs of their basic needs. The gatekeeper is sometimes broke rubber checks that collected to pay. Their rent and ignored their bills again Chris used bits of scripture like eye for eye or tooth for tooth to convince his devotees that they deserve to take the property of the wicked in order to survive members had to agree with Chris, they depended on their leader for shelter food for themselves and their children, and even for emotional support. Chris successfully fostered their utter dependence on him with the exception of course of Dan. Jess. Dan was a low key guy, a forty year old often described as. A gentle giant who wouldn't hurt a fly get always been deeply spiritual even before joining the gatekeepers and while the enjoy the Camaraderie of the faithful members, he felt their mission had gone awry when the gatekeepers skipped town Dan was left confused about his beliefs he tried to reintegrate among old friends calling people. He hadn't seen since he joined the sacked a couple of years prior struggling with his faith after his departure from the group he told one front he thought about just giving up for Dan. Staying away proved to be almost as hard as witnessing the groups corruption and these thoughts are normal for former cult members according to Marlene L. leaving the fold means the loss of friends and family support at a crucial time of personal transition leaving also means debilitating anxiety grief and anger. Furthermore, the phobia indoctrination makes it difficult to avoid the stabbing thought that one is made a terrible mistake thinking what if they were right but in his heart of hearts Dan New Chris sent the gatekeepers weren't trade. He turned to his childhood friends for help with rehabilitating his faith they prayed with him for hours. Slowly, Dan repaired his spiritual practice. He found a new job and work to adopt a more outlook on March twenty seventh nineteen, Ninety, eight, forty year old Dan just went to see a friend and pick up a new Bible. Dan said I know what? It's like to have the peace of God and love in me. Around that same time, Dan received a phone call from the bank. He was implicated as having signed a bum check. Immediately, he called Chris. Dan told Chris he didn't agree with sex continued criminal activity. He said his God wouldn't condone that dishonesty. He wanted no part of hurting others even if they were wicked Chris. Likely. Insisted there would be hell to pay have. Dan. Didn't join the group Paula that's when Dan called Chris a false prophet Dan said if Chris didn't leave him be he would let the police know about the group's transgressions. Those in the House with Chris Remember him being unusually Andri after the call fuming Chris called an emergency meeting up the gatekeepers he told them Dan was going to disclose they're frauds and location in a panic. He ran to the piano to summon the word of God Chris hit the keys hard as gods sang through him. He called on the gatekeepers to destroy their number one enemy Dan jess suddenly. Year Old Blaine. APLIN. Jumped up. He confessed God told him to shoot Dan Jess. The other members erupted with praise and blame just kept singing. This is God's will. This is God's will as they sped up the interstate that spring morning in nineteen, Ninety, eight, thirty, four, year, old Chris blasted Christian speed metal. He was psyching Blaine up to carry out God's. Mission but blamed didn't seem to hear the music instead he kept mumbling his mantra. This is God's will. This is God's will clad in camouflage. Chris was cool as a cucumber by the time they crossed the Oregon Washington border they've been driving for about sixteen hours straight but Blaine couldn't sit still he begged God for a sign anything the skies opened up. Their beat up sedan kicked up lots of water but they drove on when Chris finally pulled off the highway. The threat of rain had subsided. The men made their way to mountlake terrace though it was barely dawn Blaine got the sign he'd been hoping for through the windshield. The men saw the sky light up with the most beautiful hughes cutting the horizon was a rainbow. This was the undeniable signal from God. Blaine. Needed excited. He chanted this is God's will. This is God's will Chris and Blaine pulled up to an old trailer park behind a dilapidated house it was still. So early the street was silent except for the slow drip of residual rain on the trailers Tin Awning. Chris Part Blaine got out of the car and made his way to the trailer door. A few seconds past before Blaine, her to rustling inside within a minute. Dan. Jess, opened the. Though half asleep he was genuinely pleased to see his friend but blame looked distraught Dan asked if he was okay Blaine could only nod but not convincingly. He said he needed help that Chris was out of control. Dance Eyes Widen with empathy having recently struggled to cut ties himself. He assumed to know what Blaine must have been going through. He wanted to invite his friend in and calm him. But. He wouldn't get the chance blame raised his glock nine millimeter pistol and sent several bullets racing into Dan's body. He watched his friend hit the floor in shock. He stood in the doorway looking at the corpse. It wasn't until the site of Dan's blood him that Blaine came to and bolted for the getaway car. Up Next Chris and Blaine stand trial for the murder of Dan Jess. With more free time, my hands I've been playing my new favorite puzzle game best fiends quite a bit lately it's a classic match three game and it's lots of fun best fiends is a casual game that anybody can play. It takes place in the world of Minutia at it has all these cute characters. The fiends best beans has thousands of challenging puzzles to. Solve and each day I play I, get a free daily gift which I love each month new levels, events and challenges are added. So it always feels fresh and never pouring and you don't even need the Internet to play. You can play as long as you want without having to worry about Wi fi access or using cell data. I really think you like it. Engage your brain with fun puzzles and collect tons of cute characters. Trust me with over one hundred, million downloads. This five star rated mobile puzzle game is a must play download best fiends free on the apple APP store or Google play. That's friends without the our best scenes. Is there something that's interfering with your happiness are preventing you from achieving your goals if so it's time to reach out to better help better help is it self help? It's counseling from licensed professional counselors specializing in depression anxiety relationships, sleeping self esteem, and much more. You can connect in a safe and private online environment that means never having to sit in uncomfortable waiting room anything you share is confidential plus it's more affordable than traditional. off-line counseling and if you need it, financial aid is available in fact so many people have been using better help that they're recruiting additional counselors in all fifty states start living a happier life today. As a listener, you'll get ten percent off your first month by visiting better help dot com slash colts pod join over one million people taking charge of their mental health. Again, that's better help H. E. L. P., dot com slash colts pod. Now, back to the story throughout the nineteen nineties. Chris. Turgeon the hyper intellectual preacher who sometimes displayed sociopathic tendencies convinced his flock the gatekeepers he was born to bring judgment to this earth in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, thirty, four, year, old Chris, and his disciple twenty-seven-year-old. Blaine Aplin drove from the southern California desert to the suburbs of Seattle Washington to murder former cult member Dan chess mountlake terrace wasn't a town familiar with crime in fact, homicides only occurred there on average about once every twelve years though there were no. Glaring. Signs of forced entry the police did have a few leads for one thing dance neighbor saw white male running from the scene of the crime to the getaway car. Another acquaintance explained to the police that Dan used to be involved with a fanatic religious sect based on his description authorities pulled the images of four possible cult members without hesitation. The witness identified Blaine Aplin as the primary suspect. Blaine. Also left another clue at the crime scene a collection of discarded shell casings though Chris and Blaine had wiped the casings of their. Investigators discerned the type of gun used it was a glock nine millimeter. If they could find it, they'd have their murderer all signs pointed to the gatekeepers but their whereabouts were unclear investigators entered the cult members, credit cards, and other information into a national database. Then they waited Chris and Blaine thought they'd gotten off Scot free feeling totally backed by God they went back to San Diego and stepped up their criminal activity. They robbed what they considered to be evil businesses usually taking a few hundred bucks from each establishment in June nineteen, ninety eight, the authorities finally got a hit a wife of one of the male cult members used. Her Social Security number at a postal store in Carlsbad California just north of San Diego this confirmed the colts location on the Indian reservation. Then in July thirty, four year old Chris and twenty-seven-year-old Blaine entered the risque lingerie store in San Diego, wearing wigs and sunglasses. Once inside, they held a young model at gunpoint, they demanded she fork over her cash when she refused Chris and Blaine handcuffed her stole her earrings and made a run for it fleeing the scene. Chris. Made an illegal turn sped off a radically right away. He was spotted by San Diego PD officer Leonard. Laughter. Officer. Leffler was hosting his young nephew on civilian ride along. To show him the ropes Leffler radioed in for a license plate check. Then he flipped the Siren and trailed the speeding duo officer leffler tried to pull the men over to no avail. He followed Chris and Blaine onto the interstate suddenly the officer and his nephew heard a gunshot. Then another Leffler called for backup blamed pocketed his pistol and grabbed the loaded AK47 from the backseat he fired relentlessly at the officer in the kid penetrating their windshield to protect the child leffler pulled to the shoulder. But by then highway patrol and a few other city officers had arrived to take over three new cars trailed krizan Blaine until one officer was able to enact a pit maneuver forcing Chris and blame. To turn abruptly sideways Chris lost his hand on the vehicle and spun into the shoulder surrounded. The men didn't put up a fight and the police got there suspects immediately following the chase the cops took Chris and Blaine into custody identified the two criminals as the cult members. The mountlake terrace police had been enquiring after they discovered two revolvers a semiautomatic rifle with a scope in the men's possession. Finally, while padding blame down the cops found a glock nine millimeter pistol, it was just the piece of evidence. The Washington team had been looking for in addition to being accused of shooting at the San Diego Patrol car the men were charged for a string of California robberies attempted armed robberies and false. Imprisonment the authorities in San Diego contacted the investigators from mountlake terrace. The Washington team flew down to test the glock. It didn't take long to confirm the gun was Dan Jessica's murder weapon. With this physical evidence, the investigators could obtain the warrants they needed to search the Pala compound. A SWAT team was sent to the Desert House, and they found weapons everywhere. There were firearms in the living quarters and hidden in the bushes. The garage was full of handguns and AK47's by catching Chris. Then the police felt they had prevented a much more violent act in the future this might explain why visitors didn't rush to see Chris in jail Blaine on the other hand was quickly visited by his parents who Travelled down to see their saen during their visit. Blame was STOIC. He seemed slightly remorseful but he told his parents, God made him kill Dan Jess. He said the Lord wouldn't let him rot in jail blades parents knew he was caught in crisis snare. They tried to reason with their boy but Blaine wouldn't have it. He stood up and left escorted from the room by the guards from their prison cells Chris and Blaine awaited their trials. Justice was swift as they were soon convicted of seventeen felonies in California alone. Blaine was sentenced to one hundred one years in prison while Chris. TURGEON was sentenced to nine years after facing justice in San Diego. They were transported to Washington for the homicide hearing. Throughout the Trial Chris Sat Upright Confident, the Lord was on his side he testified to hearing God's Voice instruct him to carry out Dan's execution. Almost all courts consider this type of hallucination as a sign of mental illness but Chris refused insanity pleas instead Chris insisted God's commandment to kill. Dan was real though passionate about his claims he seemed sane in every other respect according to Linda Ross Myers article in the pace law review entitled unreasonable revelations God told Me To kill divine revelation is the only sign of unusual cognition. In this case, the two murderers seemed to be following traditional religious doctrines for evaluating their divine communications including being filled with hope and passion after being given instruction and feeling at. Peace with your actions at the trial Chris and blamed testified that together they had prayed and asked God to stop them. If they were on the wrong path, they even told the court, God sent them seven rainbows though Chris Dawn his defense throughout the trial Blaine apologized again, and again, he described intense feelings of remorse for taking his innocent friends life. Ultimately, his defense laid out that Blaine was deceived and manipulated by a masterful psychopath Christopher turgeon. The defense's psychiatrist testified that Blaine new his acts were illegal but they couldn't say whether or not he possessed the ability to tell right from wrong. Still the jury rejected his plea of Insanity convicting him of first degree murder Chris on the other hand put. On quite a show in court he said his defense team who tried to prove his insanity was working for Satan, he maintained he was entirely saying but took timeouts during his testimony to condemn the country for its wickedness. He also relentlessly repeated that destruction was Ni- he the national anthem and attempted to show the jury photos of abortions. Additionally, he said if God asked him to, he would do it all over. Again. Chris was also found guilty of first degree murder in addition to his one hundred and one year sentence. In California the State of Washington Sentence Blaine, to thirty nine years for the homicide. As Chris awaited his punishment, he delivered a stirring ten minute sermon to the court he railed on. America for legalizing abortion, supporting gay rights and allowing equal rights for women. He begged the court to repent from their wicked deeds. He reminded his audience that judgment was at hand, and in fact, his was Chris was sentenced to fifty years in prison. For Dan, Jess's murder after Kris and Blaine were locked up the rest of the gatekeepers disbanded members were devastated. They trusted their leader, the supposed Prophet Elijah and had to work to accept their new reality. Their hero was just a mad conman. Strangely Chris's prediction that the world would end on March twenty second two, thousand four was somewhat accurate for it was on that day that the State Court of appeals upheld his conviction for the murder of Dan. Chess. Today Christopher Turgid remains in jail inmates say he's welcome because he can still be heard preaching and on occasion he even plays his music for all to hear. Thanks again for tuning into colts be back. Tuesday. With a new episode for more information on. Chris turgeon and the gatekeepers amongst the many sources we used, we found the justification of religious violence by Steve Clarke extremely helpful to our research. You can find all episodes of called sent. All other park has originals for free on spotify not only does spotify already have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals. Like Colts for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream cults on spotify. Just open the APP and type colts in the search bar will see you next time colts. What's created by Max Cutler, and as a podcast studios original executive producers include Max and Ron Cutler sound designed by billy pace with production assistance by Ron, Shapiro Carly Madden, and Joshua. Turn. This episode of cults was written by John Levinson with writing assistance by cannon and Starts Greg Poulsen and Vanessa Richardson. Listeners remember to check out the new podcast, original series, medical murders. Every Wednesday beat the worst. The medical community has to offer men and women who took an oath to save lives, but instead use their expertise to develop more sinister specialties follow medical murders free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

Chris Chris Chris Listen Dan Chris Part Blaine Chris Turgeon Blaine Aplin Chris Dawn Elijah God murder Chris God Chris version Dan jess Chris Claim Chris tergence Chris Opie Christopher turgeon spotify Washington San Diego Dan Jess Chris's Church
Metta Sutta - All Day Sitting - July 25, 2020

Everyday Zen Podcast

50:56 min | 11 months ago

Metta Sutta - All Day Sitting - July 25, 2020

"Morning everybody. In our a seminar we've been studying the. Meta. Practice reading. Sharon Salzberg Classic Book? Loving kindness. So I thought this morning. I would just talk a little bit about. The Meta Ceuta which is the. Pali Canon text. That is chanted and we'll. Soon after my Dharma Talk. That's chanted to. Remind us of loving kindness practice. And in the Pali, Canon. There are several. Main collections. The long discourse is the middle length discourses and the connected discourses. Those are the sort of. Main Torah of the. Pali Canon, but there are some other A. Shorter collections and One of them's called the suit NAPATA. and. We were reading some text from the suit partner when we were studying mountains and rivers Sutra. Maybe you remember a couple of months ago, two or three months ago. So the Meta suit is actually. In the suit Napata, it's the eighth. Sutra in the first. Section so. The suit to the pot. Has Five sections seventy short. Texts in the. Meta Ceuta is number eight in the First Section and. Every section has a name. And the name of the section in which the Meta Ceuta appears this called. The chapter of the snake. So And that's because the first Ceuta in that section is called. The snake's skin. And that Short Ceuta. is about it uses the metaphor of a snake. Shedding its skin. Bright because the snakes as we know. Do that. And so do we. We're shedding our skin all the time. We're always in transition now. The whole world is in transition. Maybe we're all shedding our skin. Right at this moment all around the world. So, but in the SUTA, the metaphors used of a snake, shedding its skin, and it has many lines that say just the wise person sheds anger, the wise person sheds fear, the wise person sheds lust, says speculation, and so on and so on. And in doing so. Sheds some Sarah Sloughs off some Sarah? Birth and death and suffering. Like a snake! Her skin. And so the Meta Sutra then is on telling you all this because the point is the Meta Ceuta is part of the process of sloughing off some sorrow sloughing off skin. And so the medicine is taught in that context. Now I don't know if you know this, but. It's not the Meta Ceuta is really not at all. Part of the Canon. In Chinese Japanese or Koreans in. Since it's in the Pali Canon and these these schools are Zen. Schools are more or less my schools. That follow the emptiness teachings. It's the heart Sutra. That's chanted in Zan every single day. All over the world, the same heart surgeries Janet, the Meta Ceuta. Is Not chanted. Ever I think. And just. A little historical note, the Meta Ceuta was introduced into the book of the San Francisco Zen Center because the Zen Center in San Francisco just. Adapted the Sutra Book from Japan. and which did not include the Meta suit, but the Meta Souto was chant began to be chanted. In the San Francisco's enter temples. In the Nineteen Ninety S. And I think I do not. Rely on my own memory, because I have a bad memory, but I believe. That we started chanting it when my teacher Sojourn Milwaukee I. Led a practice period together. At Green Gulch. In the mid early nineteen nineties. And we decided that we would make the Meta practice the seem. Of our practice periods, so we made our own. Translation of the Meta Ceuta and we put it in the Sutra book then. And we did every day. For that practice period and I think that we just never took it out of the central book. We continue to chant it ever since then I believe it's still in the Sutra Book of the Center and I. Think it's still chanted at the. In the in the sample, just goes in center and I don't know maybe some of you know. Whether it's chanted in other Zen centers that are not affiliated with San. Francisco's in Center I. Actually don't know whether others centers meant to Ceuta. Now the version that we now chant at every day in. And that we will chat in a little while. Is Not the one. That Mellon I I use. I can remember the two of us working together to reword. The Sutra to make it fit our practice. And I can't remember where that version is says we can find it somewhere, but but the one that we chat now was a further version that was made. By the San Francisco Zen, center and I think we. At every day's end have taken that one on. It's it's more or less. An English version of what it says in the polly. except. For the last line, which is actually quite different. In the last line in the original. says. The pure hearted one. Will no longer be born into this world in other words. Practise loving kindness, and so on and so on, and so on the fan result will be. That, you will no longer have to be reborn into this world. Of Some Sarah, you will shed some SAR once and for all like snake sheds her skin. Which is the goal? Of Theravada Buddhist, practice to shed some Sarah. But our version. Doesn't say that as you know, our version says. One Who achieves the way. We'll be freed from the do -ality of birth and death. And, this. Altered line. reflects. The Mayan empty teachings. And also against teachings. which don't recognize any true or fundamental distinction? Between birth and death. So in our practice as we all know. The goal is not to shed some Sarah. But to clothe ourselves in some Sarah. As Nirvana So we can remain forever in the cycle of living and dying. So we can be of benefit. To others and so we. Therefore, Translate the line. Not a translation we alter the line. For our chanting purposes. So I'll just you all know this and you chanted in a minute, but? I'll just read it. This is what should be accomplished by the one who is wise who seeks to good and has obtained piece? Let One be strenuous upright insincere without pride, easily contented enjoy us. Let one not be submerged by the things of the world. Let one not take upon oneself the burden of riches. Let one senses be controlled. That won't be wise, but not puff puffed up and let one not desire great possessions even for one family. Let one do nothing that is mean or that the wise would reprove. All beings be happy. Joyous and live in safety. All living beings whether weak, weaker, strong and high or middle or lower realms of existence, smaller, great, visible, or invisible near or far born or to be born. All beings be happy. Let no one, deceive another, nor despise any being in any state. Let none by anger or hatred. Wish harm to another. Even as a mother at the risk of her life watches over and protects our only child. So with a boundless mind, should one cherish all living things? Since using love over the entire world, above below and all around without limit. So let one cultivated infinite goodwill toward the whole world. Standing or walking? Sitting or lying down during all one's waking hours, let one practice the way with gratitude. Not Holding to fixed views. Endowed with insight. Freed from sense appetites. One, who achieves the way will be freed from the duality of birth and death. So. This is what should be accomplished. By the one who is wise. Six? The good in has obtained piece. He's the things we. Aspire to. When we? Wise enough to know that we wanted to seek the good. Piece! One, be strenuous upright, and sincere without pride, easily contented enjoy us. So in a way that the suitor right in the beginning. IS A. Whenever we hear phrases like let one be or may we be? Those are prayer phrases right? We're saying we hope in the future we hope for we ask for we pray for. Such and so. That such interest, so you know would be the case. That we, so we pray, we hope. That, we can be strong. That we can have maximum integrity. That, we can be completely honest. Because, these are the main qualities that we need for practicing Dharma. We need to have integrity and honesty, and we need to be strong. Also. If, we have those qualities. We need to not be prideful of them. And we need to be. Easily contented have some. Contentment with whatever is in front of us. And some joy we need this kind of. State of mind. In order to practice. And, so we're praying for. We're praying that. We can have such a state of mind. Let, one not be submerged by the things of the world. Let one not take upon oneself the burden of riches. You may know that in the my honest sutras, which are the called expansive sutras, they're very very expansive and then those interests. Great Wealth Fabulous Wealth. Is often depicted. And there are many worldly body. Saw was fabulous wills, kings, princes, great matrons who command gigantic. Pots of wealth and they do great things with their wealthy support people, they support the poor. They supported the Dharma. They give extravagant offerings. Two Different Buddhis-. But. The Meta Ceuta. Very much like Zen. Comes out of a much more modest. Low Key style. Of course there's no way to avoid the world. But. To practice in the style of the Meta Ceuta. which maybe we could say is that. On tradition. Or is then. You need to be careful. Not to get so involved in the world. That it overcomes you. And this means as specifically here not to be too wealthy because being wealthy. Is a great burden. It complicates your life. If you have a lot of wealth, it means you have enormous responsibility. and. You have lots of people depending on you and you have lots of stuff that you have to keep track of and take care of and then you have to have people to take care of that stuff for you, and you have to keep track of them, and you have pay them, and so there's a lot of burden involved in. In being rich, it's not a picnic being rich. It's very hard to be wealthy. And that's good for your practice. Have all that stuff to think about? So. Let's not take upon ourselves the burden of riches. Let. One senses be controlled. and. This doesn't mean that we're going to be like a sex or control freaks with our senses. Just means that we're not going to get too hooked. into our senses. Addicted. Or obsessed with our senses, which is so common. People get. I mean all kinds of central. Addictions, which we might not consider addictions or call addictions are. Really really common. So the idea is that we won't go there. Will Be. Able to enjoy simply what appears to us, what's there? So we're going to eat food which we're going to have to do every day we want to do everything we should taste our food and enjoy our food, but not overdo it right. So our food should be just enough for us not too much and the same with all other sensual experiences. Let one be. Wise but not puffed up. And let one not desire great possessions even for one family. So a lot of people who? Are Quite focused. And spend a huge amount of energy in their life focused on wealth. And the protection of wealth. They say I don't really care about. Wealth But I care about my family and the reason I'm. Spending my entire life energy so much of it on on the amassing of wealth is not for me, but because I care about my sale. What my family to be secure? But here the Suture Says No. Actually. You're not doing your family any good. By accumulating. Too much wealth. Don't don't go down that path. Don't desire great possessions even for your family. Let one do nothing that is mean. Or that the wise would reprove. So, This implies. That you're connected to community. Which has at least? A few wise people in. So you think of those wise people. And when you're about to do something that might be a little, shady or crooked. You'd think well, you know, but what about someone? So I don't think they would do this. And if they knew that I did this. I. Don't know if I would be that happy to have them know that. So maybe I won't do it. Maybe it helps me had these wise people in my life. Kind of keeps me in line. So that's the idea that you have a community with some wise people that would help you. To make good choices. So, that's the beginning. Part of the Sutra. A prayer for you, no one's own good conduct. And good circumstances. Now. We have kind of another kind of prayer. That would be a prayer that you would practice. Maybe the ideas you would memorize this per, and you would recite it again and again. And Try in the recitation of prayer to condition your mind. To really feel. What this prayer is saying, so you really mean it? Even, though maybe it's not the natural thought that comes into your mind, but through repeating this prayer a little by little, it will be your sock. May All beings be happy. May Be Joyous joyous and live in safety. All living beings whether weak or strong in high or middle or low realms of existence small great. Visible or invisible. Near, or far born or to be born and they, all beings be happy. So now. We all wish our families will. And? We get upset when they're not doing well. But now let's wish all beings well in just the same way, not only. Our family not only are clan on only our local SONGA. Not only people that we respect and love. Your far away. But even people in the God realms and the Demon Realms, even insects, even the unborn. Even ghosts, and so on all sorts of beings. May All be happy. And let no one deceive another. Despise any being in any state. Let none by anger or hatred wish harm to another. So we wish for all these beings. There's. And they're not behaviors that they not be angry. That they're not wish harm to another. We want this for ourselves. We don't want. To feel those things in our own hearts. And we want this for everyone else. Think to yourself, you know. Of the face of a person. Who in that moment is full of hatred and vindictiveness? Look at that person's face. It's the not happy right. The not, content. A person who's full of anger invite. And vindictiveness and wanting to harm. This is not happy. This painful state and we know it actually literally. If you if you have if you're in that state of mind all the time, you actually hurts your health. It, you can die an early death. If you're obsessed with anger and hatred. We don't want that. For ourselves and we wish that no one. Will have to experience that. Even as a mother. At the risk of her life watches over and protects her only child. So with a boundless mind, should one cherish all living things so fusing love over the entire world above below, and all around without limit sold one cultivate an infinite goodwill toward the whole world. So here. The example of a mother given. and. This is meant to be inspiring to us. And, maybe somebody could be critical of this using this. Of Mother to idealize love. Maybe. It's not so good to overly idealize motherhood. Maybe if you're a mother, you might think gee, that's putting too much pressure on me or maybe you think Jesus. My mother was not loving you. So, so maybe we have problems with that idealization, but the Sutra doesn't have problems with this from the sutures point of view. Yes, a mother. Caring for her only child is the ideal. Of Love. It imagines you know. Some kind of perfectly idealized mother. And so when we imagined such a mother we want to be. Like that mother. We want to have that kind of love for everyone. Everywhere without limit. It's a beautiful thing. I mean it's very idealistic. Of course it is, but it's a beautiful ideal right. Ideal is ideals are beautiful, even if they are buying large unattainable, they've they spur us on to what's best ourselves, so we want to have boundless love. Like a mother for only child for all beings, and we wanna feel even imagine maybe when we're chanting this or are saying this that love is literally like a substance pouring out of us from all of our pores. Top of our head infinitely up above from the pores in the body all around from the bottom of the body down through earth through everybody on the other side of the past them all into space in all over the place. That's the mental prayer. The capacity to beam love from on of our bodies all over throughout the universe. So. That's the end of Meta prayer. That's embedded in the Sutra. And now comes a little. Coda a wrap up. Standing Walking. Sitting or lying down during all one's waking hours. Let one practice the way with gratitude. Now that. We've. Cultivated this intention. Let's not forget it. All the postures of the body. All Day Long. Let's remember this intention? And let's be grateful. That we are capable of. Desiring. To cultivate love, and we can do it that we can practice it. Let's be grateful for them. Not Holding to fix views. Endowed with insight freed from sense appetites, one achieves the way we'll be free from the duality of birth and death. So. This practice of Meta. Will free us from fixed views of self and other in the world. So, our all of our thinking. And all of our feeling based on our thinking. Comes through our views. Now. Let's be free. Of those fixed views so that our mind can be pliable. And flexible. Welcome. Everything that comes. Clear Vision. Clear practice. So we don't have to be confused or act out of confusion. And we'll be able to enjoy this physical world. Enjoy. Every, act. Of Seeing And hearing and tasting, and touching and smelling and having thoughts and having emotions will be able to freely enjoy all of that without craving grasping. And when it's time to die. We can. Appreciate. Dying, we can die peacefully. Say Good now. It's my time. And we will think. There's any such thing as death. So, there's nothing. To be afraid of. And we know that. We will be carried forth. Over and over again throughout space and time back and forth in and out of living and dying. Out of love. And caring for others. Anyway like I said. That's the my spin. On this last line of the Sutra. Okay now I want to. Switch Moods. And say a little bit about. Applying this? To our contemporary moment. Which is why I wanted us to study. The loving kindness teachings in particular. Right now, although it's always a good idea, it's always time for Meta study, but now in particular I felt like this is a really great time, maybe the most important time for us to study love. Because now in this time if we're paying attention and I know we are. Things are pretty scary. And unsettled and upsetting. There's so much uncertainty. And you know we could imagine anything. Happening next. It would be easy to imagine the world getting really really dark. And that the darkest forces within us. That come naturally from our enormous trauma. Over countless generations. That that darkness in US would produce. Some really horrendous times. And we've seen this before. We know in our recent history horrendous things unimaginable horrible things have happened. And we could easily imagine. Them happening again. Or, on the other hand. It would be just as easy to imagine. That this big hiatus. Occasioned by the pandemic. Is Bound. To change the world for the better. In radically in soon and that the because of the pandemic. In a way, it was not able to change before we can easily imagine that happening. That the pandemic is showing us the injustice and the folly of the world. We had been living in before that world stopped. We knew it before, but now. It's unavoidable. To see it. Now. We can restart. We have time now to think about how we restart. We have time to protest the injustice and make it clear because we not working. Our offices. So maybe now. A Miracle Happen. which seems very plausible actually. Quite possible. But the thing is. We don't know what happened, right? Anybody. WHO SAYS I I know? There's lap and I know that we have no idea. Will it be a good world? Will be a bad world will be will be an in-between world where we all just continue to muddle along. We don't know. So the point is. That in such, dramatic and uncertain times. When. The mind is so subject. To instability. And being beset. By fear. And confusion. Loving kindness becomes especially. Important to cultivate. And I was just thinking about this the other day in one day I went up and down. Probably you've experienced this, too so I was reading an article in the New Yorker. About. Robert Manoukian you all know who that is. He's the secretary of the Treasury. Now. So. It was all about like Robert Manukyan's career. And about how Robert Manoukian. Made, unbelievable fortune. On People's misfortunes. Everybody had misfortune in Robert. Manuka had great fortune. And you know when there are bad economic troubles. Somehow or other? You hear about the bad troubles, but you don't hear quite as much about all the people who are making tons of money. And more amassing even more power. Profiting directly. On the misfortunes, how do they do that? It's unbelievable. People lose their homes. They're out in the street. Lose their, jobs their health, insurance go bankrupt. And people are making tons of money. As a consequence. And Poor Mr Manuka doesn't want to hurt anybody. He's not doing this to people. He's just a good businessman. SMART well-connected businessman. Who grew up well, connected and smart. And, he's just using the laws and financial arrangements. That are in place. To do what anyone would do in his position, maximize return. Everybody does that. So I read all this? And it was very discouraging. is really distressing. To realize that there is such a network, grossly unfair, financial arrangements built into the framework. The detail. Of the ECONOMIC ARRANGEMENTS OF OUR COUNTRY I don't think anybody actually under stance the whole thing because it's. Built up bit by bit. And the idea that we could clear all that up. That, we could change it. So that now it becomes fair. and. People don't get screwed. While other people. A few people. Gain A lot. It seems hopeless. Maybe you could change a little law here and there you know. And we can all get excited about it, but it would leave in place. The vast network. The creates the economic injustice that runs the world. So I was feeling very discouraged. About this. On the other hand, a little bit later I was listening to a conversation with Brian Stevenson. You know who that is right. He's a black lawyer who? Has Been working for three or four decades to. Free. People. On death row unjustly. Convicted? And he was talking about. The truth. He uses the word truth he says finally we're beginning to see the truth and tell the truth. About our country, and it's long racist past. And he said the truth is really powerful. In the truth will turn hearts. And bring us to a new world. And Somebody said you know his conversation partner, said Yeah, but wait a minute now, because a lot of people don't WanNa, hear that truth. Or they dispute it. Creates. So much backlash. So he's the truth, really that good. Maybe we better slow down here or Maybe not be so big on the truth. And Steven sinned did not blink I said no, no, no, that's not right. We are better than that. We are better than that truce is stronger than that. Yes I understand. Maybe there's some backlash. Maybe there's some resistance. That's natural. But the truth is more powerful. It will overwhelm all that. And he said he's looking forward to a world. That will becoming. That, we will be better for all of us. The backlash comes because you think it's better for the other guy. But, he said No. It's better for all of us. When we really understand. With the truth is. So I know that many of us in our, Songa. Like myself have been doing a lot of self reflection about racism and study about it. And I don't know about you, but I know in my own case. I have been. Shocked. By my own. Blindness! I never meant any harm of course. We didn't mean any harm. But that doesn't make any difference. In our blindness, we've enabled harm. So in a way. It makes our sin and our guilt even worse. That, we were able to go on for. Almost an entire lifetime. Of aiding and abetting and benefiting. From great harm. because. We didn't know what we were doing. Maybe it would have been better if we had evil intentions. Racist maybe then we would have come to our senses sooner, right. It's worse. that. We didn't have any bad intentions that we were aware of. So I. Think you know there's a lot here? To feel badly about if you. Are Open to it. and. It's not a comfortable feeling. It does not make you. Happy. The truth. Is Very uncomfortable. And I hate to bring it up today I feel a little bit like I'm harping at you. This is a nice day of peace. Right sitting in peace. And, love and harmony, and here I am like bringing up these unpleasant. Things I feel a little bad about it. But my point is. Because of all this, we really really need. To spend time cultivating loving kindness. To sustain the ups and downs of what's coming. To sustain the guilt and the discomfort in the absolutely inevitable backlash and the fighting and the general upset. We really need. A firm basis in loving kindness. Starting with ourselves, we need to have a lot of loving kindness for ourselves. We need to have loving kindness for the. And the qualities that we aspire to in the Dharma. We also need to have enough. Just enough love. FOR THE BAD GUYS! That we can understand how they got to be that way. And we can respect them and understand them without hatred and aversion. which will hurt our hearts? And also. Fuel. The backlash. Afford to do that. So! White people in America are in a really important moment. The idea of white supremacy. Is Very hard to take. But when you look into it, you can't deny it even though the term makes you cringe. But. How can you sustain? Such looking. Keeping on with it, so it's not just another. Flavor of the month. You know so many of these issues that we're passionate about. Replaced by new issues, and then we forget all about them. We can't forget about this. It's even though it's so tempting. To think about something other than? The discomfort. And the paralyzing guilt. Fortunately We're not stuck. With those feelings. Every religious tradition. Including ours. Has the practice. Of Confession and repentance. I think that's what Brian Stevens is. Talking about when he says. The truth sets you free. Because you don't just let the truth, sit there. You Practice Confession. And repentance. We own. The past. We vow not to repeat it. And when we confess, and when we repent, we are cleansed, and we have the strength to renew ourselves. So in our practice. We everyday's N, don't have the. Set Up to do this. We ought to every month. But in in our practice, there's a monthly. We do it once in a while quarterly. I think we do it the practice of confession and repentance. We, chant diverse. On dissolution of Karma. And we take refuge Buddha Asanga. We chant to four vows. We reaffirm our commitment to the precepts. And we do this. As a regular practice, all my ancient twisted Karma. For beginning less greed, hate and delusion born through body speech mind I know fully avow. This is a serious thing. To Avow. is to acknowledge to confess to own up to. It comes from a word meaning to be called out the goodness in us. Calls out to us. To face our failures. And when we do that. In that moment for that moment. We are pure. And then we can take precepts again. Vowing not to harm others and to be proactive in our effort to be just an affair and loving. So I. I don't know if you know this, but. Years ago, we founded an organization Soto Zen Buddhist Association of America which is an organization of North American. Soto Zen Buddhist priests. And they meet that organization meets every two years for a conference and I have gone many many times. I was on the board in the beginning. In two thousand eighteen. They met. And they wanted to address all this that and talking about. and. They wanted to have a ritual. To address it. And so they decided to write a piece of liturgy. That would be chanted. Just before the Buddy Safa ceremony. That we usually do. Although I wasn't able to go. To that meeting in two thousand eighteen. They asked me if I would help them. With the liturgy and I collaborated with many others and. We produced. This liturgy and I'm going to read it for you. This is the. Statement of recognition repentance. Which I think now is a standard ceremony and. Soto's in may be from now on. We could include in our own. Buddy sought for. Ceremonies when we do them. Gathered here today. As so zen Buddhist priests and custodians of the Dharma. We pledge to face acknowledge understand, and the weight of our collective Karma, so that we may practice and teach with clarity, vulnerability and honesty. With heavy hearts. Aware of our own complicity. We understand. That across time and culture. Men have harmed and dominated women. Creating Patriarchal cultures of fear. Buddhist Zan culture have been as guilty of this as any other, sometimes even distorting the teachings to allow for such misguided power to be wielded. That we in this moment, and in this very place. Stand on sacred ground. Of Indigenous peoples that has been stolen from them. And with cruel deception and religious doctrine. Maintain as a right of those who have taken it. Our nation has capitalized on this theft and they're in tournament in genocide. A theft that continues as indigenous people remain on knowledged and uncared for by cruel social system. They had no hand in shaping. That the colonization what we call. The Americas? And the rise of the United States as a global power. Rests upon the enslavement of African people, taking violently from their homes and forced to Labor under brutal and oppressive conditions. That we as individuals and communities live in a world in which some. Only because of the color of their skin. Are accorded social and economic privilege. We recognize the willful blindness. That upholds this privilege. As well as the indignity and pain of systematic oppression, exploitation, enslavement, and deportation, those who skin does not accord them this privilege. We atone. For the suffering caused by racism in all its forms. And vowed to dismantle the white supremacist systems that maintain oppression, including mass, incarceration, and the deportation, persecution and exclusion of refugees and immigrants. That we as individuals and communities. Have systematically treated people with discrimination. Disrespect. Cruelty and violence because of their sexual orientation. And gender identity. That, we as individuals and communities are complicit in an unfair classes economic system. That divides humanity into winners and losers. Exploiter exploited. And that encourages selfishness conflict. That as human beings, we cannot separate the gift of our own existence. From the violence, being done. Shortsightedness greed and self importance. To our planet. And the many beings with whom we share it. As individuals. As ASANGA. And on behalf of all who came before us? We atone for our participation. In all systems which perpetuate domination, violence, greed, disrespect and unfairness. We pledge ourselves to overcoming these forces in ourselves. And in the world. For the benefit of all sentient beings, victims as well as perpetrators. Now as we chant the verses of repentance. And renew our vows in the full moon ceremony. We bow in reverence. Sorrow and determination to overcome, and he'll the forces that caused such pain. For ending suffering. Within and without. Is Darnest true gateway. The Buddha's. True Heart. All my ancient twisted car of a From beginning lists greed. Ten delusion. More nobody speed Chan Mine and. I O fully of now. I was happy to. An honor to be able to participate in. In that. But Sadly I lost a really good friend. Over. Somebody whose presence in my life I valued a lot. So, does priest. was outraged. And upset. By this. Liturgy. Furious! He thought! That was A. Bleeding heart lefty knee-jerk. Jargon filled. Mayor Culpa. That distorted. And politicized the Dharma. So that. Many many people would be uncomfortable. Entering a Dharma Center When they heard of this. And he was so angry with me. He sent me enormous lengthy emails denouncing me in this document. He attacked me on facebook. It was awful and in the end he took off his robe. Renounced Sodas and Buddhism renounce his commitment as a priest. And I never. Had Any connection with incense. He's a painter. A really talented. Painter. I love his paintings and I bought one of them. And, it hangs up in our house. We have a lot of paintings in his painting. It's probably my favorite. I. Look at it every day. I think about him every day. I could really understand. His anger. Is Upset. It is so important. That we have stability of practice. Grounded in kindness firmly. Grounded in kindness. We don't know. What the near future or the far future will bring. Or, even if there is a future. And that's why. In these times, we really have to take it as an assignment for us a necessity for us. To strengthen our practices as we never had before. In an our. Acts of body, speech and mind. To Be guided by our practice. It's very very crucial for us. So thank you very much for. Listening to my dorm and talk. And for participating. In the sitting today. Although? It seems like we're wasting our time just sitting here breathing. I don't think so. It's very very important, so thank you for for knowing that enough to to be here today.

Sarah Canon US partner Ceuta Mr Manuka Americas San Francisco Sharon Salzberg San Milwaukee Nineteen Ninety Napata San Francisco Zen Center Sarah Sloughs Zan Robert Manoukian SUTA NAPATA. Green Gulch
Asteroids Destroying Each Other

Space Nuts

46:19 min | 1 year ago

Asteroids Destroying Each Other

"The fifteen seconds guidance journal Chan nine technician sequence spence nets to space yields. Good hello again. Thank you for joining us on the space nuts. Podcast through your favorite podcast distributed. No doubt my name is Andrew. Dunkley your host and with me as always is astronomer at large professor Fred. What's an hollow for it? Hi Andrew. How're you doing a quite well? My Third Week of isolation. It's all although I I've had to go out to do work on occasion. I spent eight hours driving a truck last Friday between a shopping church. Believe it or not at church because we kind of have services anymore has turned into a massive storeroom. Of course well. Let's see what happens. Yeah when you've got supposed to spare you should see the study that I'm sitting in the movement fuses to come in here because she it's it's an absolute mess. I started from agree with her. Probably agree to now. This is this is this is episode one hundred ninety nine for it. That's astonishing will we? Will we make two hundred who descends on all sorts of things you check in next week folks notwithstanding a global pandemic So anyway I am confident Mike It. I hope so too Today Fred We're talking about a possible event. A possible event involving ninety to asteroids in another solar system they might have annihilated each other. I love astronomy. We could have seen something that might have happened. At some time we done. That's a nutshell is not there anymore. We're also going to look at the thirtieth anniversary of Hubble which by the time this episode is released. We'll have been celebrated but thirty years ago I was. I actually was staggered when I read that headline thought Kathy But yes. It is and some questions from the audience. Brian has done a bit of a follow up on our discussion about the mercury mission that we spoke about a couple of weeks ago. He's a little concerned that we might have got their wise crossed and turned everything upside down. So we're going to try and clarify that. You're right and you're wrong Brian. As it turns out. Or you're wrong and you're right either way could be to. Asan just just to just to make Brian feel to them. I'm right and I'm really as well. They and Alastair has come up with some ideas on the expansion theory of the universe which we've talked about many times. It's continuing to expand at an accelerating right but their variables. So we'll look into that and plenty more on this edition of space nuts. Now Fred let's talk about this possible event that might have happened involving potential asteroids in another solar system our way. I indeed we we should. I'm just conscious that we might have been a background noise at the moment because I forgot to shut the door. Mind money for me money. Now because she was on one of our recent programs not strike she was your show. Thank you thank you bad. Trading live radio that of course I ought to do it. That's right so yes a really interesting piece of work actually has quite a long history And it you know. It's one of these stories that has had various levels of excitement throughout his career. It's about A A a disk of material around a straw whose name is usually pronounced foam. It spelled F. A. and A. L. H. A. Ut and it is in the southern hemisphere to start very familiar in US skies down here. But about I think it's kind of twenty years ago something. Observations were made of this. Stu- that revealed that it had a ring of material around it in other words. The the the residue of what we call a protoplanetary disk. This is how we believe. Planets have formed gas and dust clouds collapse. In the central region becomes the star and because of rotation disk of material swirling around the star and that is called the protoplanetary is and. That's what the planet forming and in fact the Elmer Spe Alma Radio telescope the Atacama large millimeter array which is in northern Chile has made almost a big business finding protoplanetary disks around other stars. Sadly our is closed down at the moment because of the covert nineteen pandemic. But we've seen many of these examples of planetary systems in the formation so go back to foam alot. It was discovered in fact to believe this discovery might have been made by the Hubble rather than rather than Alma. But this is going back. Several years virtually two decades and it was discovered to have this this ring of material around it but in two thousand and four it was discovered that there was a planet a very close to this ring. Sort of on the inner edge of the ring and opposite observations showed us this planet. Rotating around the around the star. It actually offered puzzles from the word. Go because the things that that seemed a bit weird about it One of them was that the the planet looked as though it was too big to be where it was in the sense that if it was as big as it was it should be disturbing this ring of material. Probably Putting a gap into the there was no sign of that tool and then another problem came up when the idea of from what. We're seeing it I was. He got a big planet. Going around a star. It must be big enough to be Super Gas. Giant is a large planet which should be a very strong Region of the spectrum so scientists tried to image. This object in the infrared. And you know it it it it. It was something like Jupiter module than Jupiter. You'd get a strong infrared signal. But actually this star was completely invisible in the infrared. There was nothing there so that sort of made people wonder what it was that there were seeing and so over the the the last decade or so It has been image D- Several times by the Hubble telescope and in particular two thousand six two thousand eight two thousand ten two thousand twelve to fourteen. What we've seen. Is this object. Just getting bigger and bigger and fainter and fainter now that it's disappeared altogether. And so the interpretation of this as you said it's full of might have beens and things of that sort but the interpretation is that what we've been seeing is actually a clump of dust a large dose cloud which has been orbiting on the inner edge of this ring but doesn't have enough master disturbed and is now dissipating and in fact he's now dissipated to the extent that it's an invisible. There's a lot of physics involved with this Totally over simplifying the story Andrew. That is the YUP shots it's worked from. That's been done at the University of Arizona and their view. Is that this this? This planet was never there in the first place. We've been observing I pile of debris. Where did the pile of debris come from that? Is the sixty four thousand dollar question and the or suggest space? That's a sixty four cent question or the sixty four trillion light year question so the answer seems to be the physics so works out that if you had to large asteroids sort of several hundred kilometers in diameter in orbit around around foam loved the Star and there was a collision than this is exactly the result that you would get so the interpretation now is what we saying is the results of a between two pretty big asteroids it probably white themselves to peace. Now we we know once again from planet a our understanding of planetary origins that the part of the process involves these proto-planets which are large objects. Actually I think proto-planets usually planet seasonals usually considered to be bigger than these asteroids might've been because got account for the amount of dust that you're seeing the length of time it takes to district by it and all that sort of thing but that seems to be the current answer of why we have seen this planet that he's not a planet and is now no longer there anyway collision between two asteroids so we we started out thinking it was a gas giant. Then we started thinking that it was probably a rocky planet the size of earth. And now we think it's neither and it's two asteroids that smashed into each other over a parking space but very likely that's probably the the sense that's right because they were both trying to be in the same stable obiter the star so think of that was a parking space. And you've got exactly the that you suggested you see. This is why you're on the Radio Andrew because it goes straight to these yet beautiful. I always find the lowest common denominator. But it works for me. If you want something more intellectual disabilities right but I'm put a great series of photos to show what happened since two thousand and four and you can easily say why initially it was a planet big. It's circular it's bright and but over time it sorta just flew away like smoke doesn't it. Yep that's relevant smoke and mirrors. This is all a few news. Sources that have this album. You can go to the story on. The Hubble Space Telescope Website Does Space Telescope Dot. Org very good all right. Well if I've got itself we may not need to talk about this one again but could change their minds. They could be something else and you don't you worry you'll listening to space nuts. Andrew Dunkley here with Fred. What's an episode one hundred and ninety nine? Let's take a break from the show and hear a word or two from our sponsored. Grandma Ollie. Now have to sign a big fan of Gramley. Because I've been using it for a few years now very helpful for authors but also really good for every day life. I've side on a few occasions particularly with spelling but also with a few issues. That didn't quite make sense. It's built by linguists and language lovers and Grammy's writing APP finds incorrect hundreds of complex writing errors. Say you don't have to do it yourself. Would by word day-by-day you can easily copy and paste any English text into grandma's online text editor or just install. Grandma he's free browser extension for chrome Safari Five Fox in quite a few others. Grammy's algorithms flag potential issues in the text suggest context specific corrections for grammar spelling and vocabulary Grandma Ollie explains the reasoning behind h correction. So you can make an informed decision about whether and how to correct an issue. Gremlin helps you riot. Mistake Free J. Male facebook twitter linked in and nearly anything else. You ride on the web for you. The listener of space nuts gramley is offering a free download of the Gramley software. So if you'd like to download grandma today go to get gramley dot com slash space nuts again. That's get Gremaldi dot com slash space nuts to download grandma for free and let them know you came from us all include the link in the show notes as well now back to spice nuts contact with nuts and hello to all our youtube follow as we have a very solid following on youtube these days. I love the way they do it for at one point. Two one thousand. We have one point two one thousand followers on Youtube Channel. Three B twelve hundred ten YouTube dot com slash c slash space nuts. You can hear all our back catalogue of always wanted to say that at back catalogue on. Youtube is they can press play and just let them run. Is it a play all option a love that but I think you get the listen to the backwards and are not episode? One Ninety nine to one. I think they just play backwards. It's good it's really gauge. So thank you for following on Youtube or twitter or instagram or facebook. Where wherever it issue you listen to Spice Nets now fred. We're GONNA talk about an old friend. We've already mentioned the Hubble Space Telescope. I was stunned in amazed When you sent me the idea of discussing this. Hubble turns thirty on the twenty fourth of April which may or may not have already happened depending on when people. Listening to this podcast. Twenty four th of April so at that all began in nineteen ninety did and It was very exciting. Of course because we've been in well of astronomy. We'd be watching this alone time. It was delayed of course because of the Challenger disaster in Nineteen eighty-six. The telescope was supposed to be launched. I think in one thousand nine hundred six in the aftermath of the Challenger disaster it was it was delayed until the twenty fourth of April. The story I'm sure you're not spoken about this before that. We were privileged in the world of astronomy to have a daily updates from the commissioning of the telescope and to It was launched on the twenty fourth of April and to orbit Shortly after that bill the final orbits took a little while also started than a process of commissioning and we will Kind of waiting for these gorgeous images because the eternal there was this era with a mirror of the world's most perfect mirror might to their own prescription and which was eventually corrected in nineteen ninety-three and you get an optometrist into orbit. That is just not an easy to do. It was some contact lens into But that's right. Yeah it's this special mission. That did that was. I think one of the great fatal time because the hospital is actually quite high obesity. Remember it's six hundred kilometers which was certainly at the the extreme end of the shuttle. Space Shuttles Rachel Permission Anyway. That's the backstory. What we now have of course is thirty years of fantastic work not just in imaging but in spectroscopy and all the other clinical signs strong due to prove the universe. But we've we've got this now this huge talking back catalogues hopefuls. Go about cataloged makes the space not one like peanuts. Then you Allah grief lawyer jokes like that. The Day who is still I was asked. I was very honored to be by the Broadcasting Commission to choose my top ten Hubble images which I did and the now the ABC's website. And I thought you know just very quickly. It might be nice just to go through them and tell you. I think they're exciting. If you if you think that is appropriate to appropriate it in paypal could probably Find this website and look through them listening to the podcast and it's on the IDC dot net dot us slash science page or slash new slash songs. And you'll find the story. They're just do a search for it. I think if we just give the title. Hubble Space Telescope turns thirty in your search engine he should find it and put Fred Watson's name in there and it'll turn up the web crawlers of probably found that already. I think a lot of people will recognize these images have become famous a lot of the the iconic absolutely so I tried to do. They've actually come out in a slightly different order from what I selected because I was strictly in distance soda. But that's alright. The I have no problem with that. Just a little bit changed because it makes for artists Promo Beauties. Probably the world completeness. How's that but we started off with Jupiter there's a marvelous image of Jupiter which was taken actually thinking twentieth sixteen as part of a series of images that were it preparation of the Juno spacecraft which is currently officer g percents but this Hubble his best because it combines visible light image which shows the richness of the data in the cloud battles which of course. We're seeing an even more data from the spacecraft. Hubble view shows the whole planet. Well the crowd bounce the great red spot. They're looking very read a little bit less great than it used to be. But I think that stabilize now. But because Hubble has this extraordinary capability in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum which won't be replaced when it finally you know when it when it comes about we will lose that access in Dade County the Ultra Violet Sky. Because of that There's superimposed on this image of Jacuzzi. We've got northern Aurora The North Aurora around the North Pole of chip which emits strongly in the ultraviolet. We can see the very clearly. It's an amazing image which is one of the comic. The most iconic of all the Hubble images the famous pillars of creation image which was made very early in the central central parts of the Eagle Nebula. That has been repeated with a new camera that the telescope was fitted with a few actually several years ago. So we've got this data picture of these three pillars of dust which contain embryonic stars at their tips. But this is now combined And in some browsers you might be able to flick across movie customer crossing the Switch between the two images it's now combined with Mitch. How the head so on? If you're if you're looking at the left hand version of the image you see the pillars the dos clouds and a few stars. But if you slide right it just changes the picture. And that's very clever may not work with all browsers. I noticed with different browsers crime so it works with crime and it works with Fire Fox too. But the infrared image. Essentially infrared light penetrates the dust. And so what you see these. Is these You know these are lines of the dust. Clouds with with you know almost like a ghostly view of the And you can see. The newborn stars tips In certainly some. But what also is clear with this is the background. Dust has almost been swept away. And you've got this glittering background of stars there behind the pillars great stuff very nicely it is one of the conic images from Hubble. I think most people will recognize your next one. Fred is the just a star field but I love this because it it kind of reminds me why did astronomy in the first place. It's actually that the central region of a very rich. What's called an open? Cluster fairly young cluster of stars. This is a big one. He's got kind of ten thousand stars in it Buddies so you got these lovely different colored stars but you can also see right through it too. Distant galaxies in the in the background It's about thirteen thousand three hundred light years away very much You know very much. A Hubble products at its best absolutely crisp imaging showing the kind of cross section through this through the open cluster. Then there's one of my favorites this is on the front cover of the US addition of while exploding stars and invisible planet. And IT'S THE STAR. V Eight three eight model of suratis usually abbreviated to the mom. And it this is not you know it looks like a embedded in a cloud of dust. That's what it is but the cloud of dust that saying is illuminated really in an unusual way because star had an outburst few years ago two thousand and two it sent out this kind of pulse of light got two million times brighter than the sun or something like that was colossal brighter than the sun. Intrinsically until what you have is this expanding shell of light which eliminates the cloud are almost like so as you watch it over time it changes. It's almost like computer. Tomography Cet getting slices through the through. The Dust Cloud Dan the next one I chose was an eighty one eighty one which is perfect spiral galaxy. It's the most beautiful spiral in the sky. I think it's in the northern hemisphere because look major perfect by alarms are perfect disc- material I just think elegance personified in terms of galaxies and then really looking much further out into space to distance of four billion. Light years this is a cluster of galaxies. That's called L. Three seventy it's Ed Larry Rich Cluster. It's just in the same way that the the open. Cluster of Stars Dazzles. The is this one does the eyes but with galaxies rather than star search. But it's important because we got all these little arcs of light which are the lens images gravitationally lensed images of galaxies in the far background. A really amazing image which I am very fond of once again. That's actually in. The book is one of the pictures were used Then a with a memorable name Valet Che one. Twenty one fifty that Nebula. He's in the large cloud. It's not particularly spectacular. It is a cloud of gas. It looks a little bit like a butterfly because of the dark dust lane in its middle men of war to be honest. Well yeah in fact. I suppose the butterflies upside down so it probably does look like a Portuguese expanded war. Yeah but what I like again is the fact that this embedded a lovely field of stars. But he's got four bright ones surrounding it in a perfect parallelogram which for some reason reminded me of Deco Jewelry. It's got that look about symmetry. The air looked but loved moving on another perfectly symmetrical thing. This Act Stein Cross. A one of the Line crosses what you've got here is bright point of light with four. Sorta similarly bright points of light around it in this perfectly symmetrical quintet and it looks like. Oh we've got this quintet of five stars. Why are they like that? But actually it's not once again. This is due to to to gravity to Stein's relativity. What's in the middle is a galaxy on the four images that surround it actually four images of the very distant quieter Almost directly nine the cost so the the light is land. We I remember. We got very excited about this sort of thing back in the seventies and eighties when they were first starting to be found. Not Not so much. Perfect crosses like this but passive quasars. The reason why you can tell apart from the fact that theory works but the reason the the way you can tell. This is the same quasar that you're looking at and quasars delinquent cause of young galaxies very bright in light and radio emission but the very and so you can see these things varying downing brightness but because those four images of all taken a slightly different path the lightest taken a slightly different path around the lenzing galaxy. They're out of sync with one. Another so you see the same up and down traces in brightness but they're actually staggered and that's the kind of clinching proof that you're looking at the same object because he's going to say up Adele in the same way but with the slightly out of phase because each one of these has taken a different path past the galaxy. That's really amazing. Image to then to think you're looking at what two things technically but this five separate politics. That's right so the next one is another very famous set of images exploding star the SUPERNOVA. Nine thousand nine hundred seven. A Hubble came online in nineteen ninety had faded back to a much lower brilliance than it had in one thousand nine hundred seven. This is in the large magic cloud but the Hubble with its exquisite imaging qualities could actually reveal the details of the Reynolds and once again we've got the sliding cursor arrangement here and I need to. I was going to do this at the end but I'll do it now. Put up a big. Thank you to the person who actually wrote this website and prepared it. That's journal World. Who is part of the? Abc's science unit. She did all the you know the arrangements as images and it's thanks to her that we've got this lovely sliding cursor view of the Supernova remnant showing what looks largely the central region is is a is a blob surrounded by a ring of materials. And what's happening here is. We're seeing the shock. Wave from the explosion hitting a cloud of debris that was emitted by the star before the explosion took place so a celestial fireworks in a big way and finally the last one is the extreme deep field which is looking back in time. Almost the full history of the universe probably thirteen point two billion years of the thirty point. Seven billion year history. We see back to these. Infant galaxies that little ragged blobs of light which have not yet got the beautiful spiral structure that some of the later ones have. So it's a very deep using the imaging quantities of the Hubble to make very deep image back in time almost to the birth of the universe extraordinary stuff it is rather I have a question for you fred. Who owns these photos? So that yes that they actually Nasir. Isa The two agencies that run the town scope But they are freely available as with NASA images. All you need to do is that's what we do all the time. Yeah all the fantastic. We just put that link on our website so people can Nam. Have a look at these while. Listening to the PODCAST. I think that would be the way to do it. And it can just scroll down and slot across those two factors that have good alternative viewpoints et great job great jobs and once again. Thanks to Gino from. Abc Two trusted inviting me to do it. Secondly putting together a Greg website. Yeah sent across hobbled coming towards the end of its its life and will be replaced by the James Webb. Which as we've discussed before has been delayed but it promises to take all of this research to a whole new level doesn't it? I think that's right. Yes still due to launch next. Okay well we wait with bated breath take a look at these images from Hubble some of the greatest photos of the universe. You will ever see. You're listening to space nuts with Andrew and Fred Watson space nuts once again a big. Hello and thank you to patrons we were asked some time ago from the audience how they can support space nuts and that led to us creating patriotic cat patriot dot com slash space nets. Where you the listener can choose to put a few dollars in eighteen. It's optional. So thank you to those. Who have certainly done that with enthusiasm and we will. We love you for it. As a patron you get bonus material you get the commercial free excess and you get early access to the podcast on on the weeks where we can actually record it early enough for you to get early access but yeah we do appreciate your support. Thank you for being a patron. If you'd like to be a patron or at least check out. The option patriarch dot com slash space nuts. Now frayed we've got some questions to tackle and you've been very naughty boy it same Brian. Brian Stevens is a modest high. Not Spread is usually amazingly good at explaining complex scientific theories and occurrences in simple easy to understand language. That's because he's talking to me Brian. That's gotTa Talk However I fear. He may have confused some of the audience including possibly Andrew. Let's with his description of Colombo's path to mercury he kept referring to its close encounter with Earth. Venus and Mercury giving it boosts not sure about the one with Earth but the other end cat is especially the six with mercury breaks not boosts he did mention slowing it down but that kept saying the slingshots gave it boosts might be useful if he clarified this in the next episode. Yes we're going to do that right now. Brian Explain Yourself Fred Okay so it. Totally counter intuitive but in order to get a spacecraft into the inner part of the solar system. You've got to speed it up. You just kind of let it go from birth and drop it towards the center but the process of you know they and To encounter with the two encounters with Venus have actually given energy to the space craft in terms of speeding up to the system bought. You know the the the question right on the money. I'm sorry I don't whether you can hear that Andrew but I've just got a noise from a website that was looking. Okay now okay. Good that's because I was going to a the direction pardon. I've forgotten the name Brian Brian. I thought he was Brian. Yeah Brandon Mixing Brian. Sorry about that. I apologize and have a look at the ISA website on Beppu Colombo's trajectory and you can see quite clearly that you probably look at the economic at the the numbers but there is a lovely animation which is why the music was playing admires ears and I couldn't hear. Andrew Animation shows certainly those encounters with the planet earth and Venus actually speed up the spacecraft to to to push it into orbit essentially to basically match the of Mercury which of course has much faster orbital speed than we have here on earth because of Cavalieri and mechanics. But you're you're quite rise. The encounters with mercury itself a role about slowing it down to to to bring it into Into the the region where it will be captured by mercury is gravity. So it's a complicated process. Thank you very much for picking Liepa because I think I oversimplified probably doing again but I certainly did before. It's clear that if you have those emotions and you can see what's happening and see how these slingshots work C- cannot yes. You're right that you can do it either. Way could boost creative space craft or you can reduce it. And that's what is being done here. Certainly in the case of murky so speeding up around earth and INNIS slowing down around Mercury. So that it can get into orbit exactly. That's right all right so they were Brooklyn. Hopefully that cleared the air in Thank you for bringing that up and we'll move onto Alice to Smith's question Andrew Fred. Thanks your reports and explanations that are presented in a manner that ordinary people can enjoy an understand architecture. Glad I'm glad he's asking about acceleration accelerating expansion of the universe. We are told that after the Big Bang there was an initial very rapid acceleration and expansion followed by deceleration of expansion and now more moderate acceleration and expansion is that correct on recent. Space Time podcast. Gary reported that the acceleration of the expansion of the universe vary depending on which direction you looked. It can be imagined that they other big bang's forming other universes around our universe similarly it can be imagined that other universes is could be collapsing around us. These events would be deforming our universe could this explain the various celebration of expansion of our universe and therefore dark energy. The answer is I think that it's possible to no impact to know sorry. So it's impossible tonight but fred's going to try to answer it anyway. We'll see how we got Yeah thanks very much for the hoste. Appreciated the question and you you know you. E. Coated Stewart Gary that the podcast suggesting that the expansion the acceleration of the expansion varies depending on which direction you looked now. This was something I hadn't heard about so I chased not through gap Stewart Gary. But just by looking for I filter. Pm Acceleration because after is that the the big word that means different in different directions. Anything that's ISOTOPIC is the same in all directions but if tropiques not and that was the first I'd heard of it but it comes about from a paper that was published last November by a group of people including scientists from the University of Oxford in some from Paris and Denmark which it is all about the they're presenting evidence for as they call it self therapy of cosmic acceleration the suggestion that the acceleration rate is different at depending on. What Direction you looking now? Let's just track for one second year because the expansion itself as far as we can tell is the same in all directions that is you know. It's one of the major that we make when we look we. We believe that we are finding an expansion. That is the same in all directions more or less but if but we also know that they are. I think he could look back. You know four or five billion years and see that it was actually less than an acceleration expansion speed than it is now. But this was the first time I've seen the suggestion that the the acceleration itself is not isotopic so I looked at the paper and it's quite interesting. It's got lots of a very complex calculations in but what I did was. I got in touch with colleague and friend of mine who is one of the world's leading cosmologists and said so what about this and he did respond. He said he's still actually working through the paper but he said he got off to a bad start because if some of the assumptions that were being made in particular in terms of frames of reference and things of that so I suspect he's not convinced. I hope you'll get back to me with any further thoughts he has. I suspect he's not convinced. But I also think that the cosmological community in general is not convinced. And that's why we haven't heard of this paper until now when it was published in November. So seems like. I mean this is something that often happens. You get people who are looking for really small signatures in our understanding of the way the universe is behaving and you know I for many years for with scientists who had similar ideas about our galaxy expanding Which was certainly countered to common. You know that what was accepted as knowledge then and it turns out that the community was rights and and he wasn't very interesting guy but it was a great teacher as well. He he told me about how you deal with data and how you try to avoid putting your preconceptions on although in the end that turned out to give a different answer for me I think this might be the same to it. Something way teasing information. That might not really be there very interesting stuff though. And you know it's challenging. You need people coming along with this kind of thing. In order to challenge the global view that we have It's how science progresses just going back to. Alice does original email dot so Alicea says the Big Bang that was very rapid acceleration in expansion. That's what we call the period of inflation followed by deceleration of expansion. That's correct now. The more moderate expansion acceleration is actually exactly what the the world view is at the moment. We still don't understand the mechanism that causes the expansion of the universe. We call it dark energy but we don't really know what it is but I do think that it we. We need to be cautious looking at things like the acceleration varying on which direction you're looking at. It seems like a at the moment. It seems like a very tenuous conclusion. Typically drawing particularly when the cosmological community seems to disagree. Okay so what we're saying is that the paper may be slightly off the mark and the expansion of the universe is tropic. As far as we know that's right but look Alice. Last sentence is interesting he says. I think it's impossible to know whether things like other universities could be very. That's certainly true at the moment. We're not looking at ideas like that but it may well be that future. Observations revealed that there is an I saw. The the universe is not is not expand. Accelerating the same everywhere. And then we've really got to think about that and work out what it means and all bets will be on the table at that time. Indeed they will alison. Thank you question Created some fascinating discussion. Now I will remind people not to forget which is the same thing as reminding them to why guys kind of space not shop on our box dot com website. Because all goodies day you can go to the bookshelf and chat always publications all by the way. Thank you to everyone who's already bought a copy of the terrain Ian `Nigma and already had a couple of people message me back saying they loved it and they did not pick the twist at the end which is great and I really appreciate the the fact that you have enjoyed the story and go to kick out of it so fantastic while you're at the shop. You can also get a t shirt or polo shirt or capital Megara cap. Anything you desire is as a supporter of space nuts. You can find at bites dot com slash space and that sets. Bi Tie B. I T. E. S. ZAYD DOT COM. Don't always felt that way. Somebody probably took the real stuff but yeah thanks for supporting the space nuts in whatever form most particularly listening to us which still after one hundred ninety nine episodes we find extraordinary but we do it is one of the universe Fred. Thank you so much. I look forward to your company on episode to turn rooted. We took me about them here. We we were hoping to do something. Big FOR EPISODE. Two hundred but Unfortunately this pandemic got in the way restricted air movements. But we will still have a great Tom. We'll figure something out they might be We'll work something at live aid of pants as we always do. Thank you so much. Catch you again next week. Sounds Great Undertaker? All the best look after yourself and sees Fred Watson astronomer at lodge half off the team here at one third of the Taymor keep forgetting Hugh. Sorry Hugh the fusion but yeah part of the massive team that is space nuts. Andrew Dunkley thanks to accompany. Catch you next time outs. Podcast at Apple podcast. Google podcasts. Spotify radio all your favorite podcast plan. You can also stream on demand. This is another podcast. Production from thoughts dot com.

Brian Brian Hubble Space Telescope Andrew Fred Fred Watson Mike It Andrew Andrew Dunkley Kathy But Mercury youtube US Fred let ABC Alice Grammy Hubble
Rod Cate | Living an Amazing Life Regardless of Your Circumstances

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

54:33 min | 9 months ago

Rod Cate | Living an Amazing Life Regardless of Your Circumstances

"He dropped the ball, but when I hit him, I lowered my head too much. You know, I remember I spun around I crushed the crush to cervical vertebrae in my neck and badly damaged my spinal cord. And so after I had us spin around I'm laying kind of face face down on the ground with my head turned to the right. And so and I can see you threw my helmet I can see my right arm, which was only twelve thirteen inches stay away from my head or from my face, but man it's worth is like it wasn't even my arm wouldn't even attached to me and I remember going through the motions of trying to get up and I watched my arm just roll over and when I watched the rollover, I couldn't feel all over I couldn't feel anything and that was the that was the last movement I had for, you know, at least another another month off. I'm sorry near out and this is the unmistakable creative podcast where you get a window into the stories and insights of the most Innovative and creative minds who started movements built driving businesses written best-selling books and created insanely interesting art form or check out our five hundred episode archive and unmistakable creative. Com. Rod welcome to the unmistakable creative. Thanks so much for taking the time to join us. Well, it's great to be here. Yeah, it is my pleasure to have you here. So I actually found out about your story by way of somebody who do you and thought I read, you know sort of the description of your life story. I thought yeah, this is definitely something that really resonates with me. But before we get into all that I want to start by asking what I think is very relevant question given where this begins at. What social group real part of in high school and what impact did that end up having on the choices that you've made with your life and your career you mean you mean social group being like the popular kids or yeah, that's exactly. Okay. Well, I would have to say I was definitely one of the popular kids and and probably one of the leaders of the popular kids and that was even even after my injury and after everything and you know about paralysis that that resulted, you know in junior high so my knob Ready to hear which of I was in junior high that was kind of my last year of being physically normal and I was you know, the quarterback on the football team played basketball baseball game. He did very well academically to even before the injury then the injury happens before I even before I'm even a student in high school. And so I come in as a sophomore in high school after the injury and but you know, it's amazing how things kind of plugged back in to normal but but still part of the, you know part of the popular group, but you know what thing, you know and it's interesting. You should ask the question one thing that's interesting is, you know, even though you know certainly in the popular group, you know, and and I think you may be today in high school is a lot more clicking back when where I would win and where I was in high school. You didn't have that much click Enos. I mean, I you know, I would I probably had a group of you know, fifty friends thoughts. Or you know, we were all friends, you know, there there really wasn't a lot of you know, you know pointing to the hey look at look at that group of nerds or something like that. We we just didn't really we do that. You know, you'd go to the cafeteria T lunch and you know, you'd sit with you know different people every day. Yeah, so four people that are many context about the injury take a take us to that moment because you know, like I said, you know before we hit record here as I was reading the story, I was like wait a minute. This is literally the first episode of Friday night life in your life story, you know, when I was as hearing that so take us that moment, but I do want to ask you quite a bit about playing football because that's one of those things that especially quarterbacks are people that I've always been fascinated by Jake sure. Well, okay, so I said, I'm coming into High School invite a 15 years old finished finished, you know, Junior High and the ninth grade which wage So yeah, that would have been around met that summer. I'm practicing all summer, you know just doing drills and just practicing football getting ready for the fall off the week before school supposed to start this High School where I went to South Stokes High School and Walnut Cove, North Carolina and just to give you some context I mean a country High School the largest city to to us was Winston-Salem North Carolina. We were north of Winston-Salem were about maybe 30 minutes north of Winston-Salem home. So so we we started the week before high school. We had thumbs don't want to play football. We we went to was called football camp. And so everybody lived at the high school track and sleeping bags and we slept in the classrooms for a week and practice that just intense practices for that entire week. You know, I was I was a pretty good athlete and I was one of the fortunate ones only two of them. Sophomores made the varsity and I was one of them. So at the end of the week, we had the inner Squad scrimmage. We're we're we're we're dressed out, you know full uniforms like we were going to play at regular game, you know, the the scrimmage is open to the whole town. You know places is full of people, you know, I've never played on a page that large in my life, you know is all you know, Junior High's that's almost the the largest no big stadiums with the you know, the really manicured grass and you know, this is a pretty big deal for me some a little jacked up when I'm out there. So I was actually the starting free safety earned the starting free safety job just in football camp and it was you know was pushing to be the starting quarterback. We just hadn't gotten there yet. So how how it happened? And so in the in the scrimmage, you know, we broke up into you know, the we started with the first-string defense going to play the off. Offense but you know back then as opposed to now, you know, they're really the the the really good players played both ways. Now, you have a separate offense in a separate defense typically and so the offense with each of you know, makeshift kind of put together type off. It's just to give us a look and run some plays against this. Well, the the tight end on that offense. What is the normal who is typically the starting guard on on offense just for fun. He wanted he split out and played tight end and this kid was about six three probably way to 65 to 70 a huge guy went on to play college football at Lake Forest. So he went out and goes to tidy and I'm playing free safety and I'm probably I'm probably six feet maybe wage 160. I'm not you know, I hadn't at this point in my life. I had been in the gym, you know, I'm just not old enough, you know been in junior high, you know, these guys don't just got was a trade-in was a senior been, you know log. Awaits for three solid years. When was the first play was a pass across the middle. I saw him, you know come across the line saw the quarterback sneak tracked his eyes saw where he was going with the bulk couldn't get there fast enough to intercept it. But when the when the ball got close when it hit his hands I hit him as hard as I could and you know, you know, you know, I was just like I said, I was I was kind of jacked up, you know, I want to show everybody there, you know new guy here. I want to show everybody how hard I can hit home and I did and he dropped the ball, but when I hit him, I lowered my head too much. I mean not not an intentional trying to spear him or anything but hit him hard time Hitting off the crown of my head or my helmet hit the top of his thigh. And when I hit, you know, I remember I spun around I Crush dead. The crush to cervical vertebrae in my neck and badly damaged my spinal cord. And so after I hit us a spin around I'm laying kind of face face down on the ground with my head turned to the right. And so and I can see you threw my helmet I can see my right arm, which was only twelve thirteen inches stay away from my head for for my face, but man it's it's weird is like it wasn't even my arm wouldn't even attached to me and I remember going through the motions of trying to get up and I watch alarm just roll over and when I watched the rollover, I couldn't feel it rollover. I couldn't feel anything and that was the that was the last movement I had for, you know, at least another month or month. So that that's kind of a Breaking Point in the story if you want me to stop there. Yeah, so, you know like I remember cuz it was the you know in the very beginning of the book you said, you know, I was fifteen years old in nineteen. Eighty one when I bought My net playing High School football and you mentioned that you know, you were you know, one of the most heralded athletes in the school's history. And you said, you know one game I threw for over four hundred yards and five touchdowns. I averaged twenty points in a game in basketball. I played baseball and ran track you seem like you're almost this athletic Phenom as a freshman who is destined for really really big sort of athletic success and may have something like that happened so early what did it do for your sense of identity because you know, I've talked to people who are professional athletes and when their careers friends whether it's through an injury or whether it's through just the shelf life of an athlete. This is one of the biggest challenges they have is finding who they are in you know, after something that is defined them for so long right? Well, well, you know what maybe a little bit different from me than like these professional athletes is I was so young when this happened. I mean only dead Fifteen years old and and but really my my whole life before that I mean Athletics was such a large part of it and I think it was kind of hard in the book just you know lists of my stash because I didn't want to come off as you know bragging or anything, but I thought I thought it was necessary to kind of set the table or set the tone as to kind of, you know, this was a pretty this was a kind of a far fall off for being from really being kind of pre vet kind of that good. But as far as the how it changed my identity like I said, all right, so I'm only fifteen and so the truth of the matter is I don't think the fifteen-year-old brain could really comprehend what had happened and it's so so once I you know, and we can talk about going through the, you know, the next 3 and 1/2 months of rehab and then back absolutely but God, but you know when I plugged back into school My identity I don't I don't think it changed at all and it's because you know, I was I was pretty smart, you know, I made really good grades, you know before the injury and then as I continued to make good grades, I mean my identity I guess my identity changed as an athlete which and there were some tough times about that. I remember and especially like going to break a ball games and sitting in the stands watching my friends play and doing well knowing that if I were out there I wouldn't be doing just as well and he just having a good time and here I am, you know, no longer an athlete sitting in the bleachers and that you know, that that was kind of tough. Oh and all admit that and that was tough to get over but but as far as them identity and far as my life went I really when I plugged back into school, you know, personality-wise the way I was treated about my friends my you know the song The my competitive Drive, especially like a bit of drop it didn't it didn't end with the injury. Yeah. Well, so I want to come back to this but I have to ask you about the actual experience of becoming is good because I played one year One Semester of seventh grade Junior High football in Texas and you know this from playing football in Texas, there are seventh-graders the size of grown men as in a as a scrawny Indian wage, I quickly realized football was not for me I even remember when the coach called me in eighth grade was like are you coming out for football this year? I was like, why would I come out for football to get the ship it out of me? Like it was the kind of thing where you know, those packaged girls where you this was my hero moment like the coach complimented some kid who wanted to be a wide receiver who volunteered to play center and I was like a coach was like I need a guard and I you know, I thought this is it. This is my perfect opportunity to be validated by the coach. And so we get up we do these tackling drills, you know, when you have lineman drills and literally it was me against this huge kid, and he pushed me back like em, Yards and everybody just started laughing and I think that was my bone realize. All right, this is not meant to be but what is it? I mean, what is it that leads to the level of skill and performance that somebody like you had particular? It's such a young age. Like what enabled that well I think you have to have some natural ability or some god-given ability, but I tell you I think he'll why you know, I became a good athlete is when I was a kid. I was outside playing constantly. I mean I was you know, there's any, you know, it is today with video games and that kind of stuff there was none of that and I was just I mean, I was outside. I mean I would you know, I started playing backyard football when I was five years old and just played and played and played and I think that, you know, just that the constant I mean you so you age Develop early you develop your athletic skills, you know out there, you know by doing it and I think that that had a lot to do with it. But I mean there's you know, there's just different people have different Talent levels. I mean, you know, some people are smarter than others. Some people are better looking than others and some more athletes than others. You know, you get what you get, but I mean, I must have had some natural ability because you know, I did I mean I did well, you know even starting in Lubbock football, you know, I did well and I did well and and basketball also well actually in in baseball too, but just as long as they give me like said it's natural Talent Plus. But plus playing a lot. You know, I remember in junior high above my buddy. And I used to in the summertime. We would play basketball one-on-one, you know our box in the in the hot sun. I remember doing that as well. We just played and played and played and that's how you get better is by playing. Hm. Yeah. No, I remember the seventh grade. I was the most impressive on my basketball team and I was a little always joke cuz I gotta just means her the shittiest player on the team, but I remember this summer between seventh and eighth grade my math teacher Coast the coach the girls basketball team and he had watched more practice. He said wow, you've gotten a lot better off. There's what you know, one other question about this. So I remember that seventh grade summer when I played and you know this from you know, being out in the Heat and the North Carroll and the Texas humidity and heat you get out there and you're thinking oh this is going to be so much fun and amazing and the moment you put on those pads and you put on those helmets you realize I'm going to get sick or I'm going to throw up and I had two friends who are huge kids and they quit after two days and I stuck it out the entire season. Why do you think That is like what is it that differentiates people because they definitely were far more probably prone to actually succeed than I was. Yeah. I don't know what it is. Well what it is that makes some people stick it out and some not I'm going to guess like for your situation and and for mine too, you would probably you probably had parents that are instilled say that that the thought process in your head that once you start something you're going to finish it and you know this and you're not going to be a quitter I couldn't have I couldn't imagine and not the sports but just quitting anything in the middle of it that I've committed to doing something man. I couldn't imagine and and it's just thought I was brought up. So I was an unprecedented Times Like These. It's great to know that the American dream lives on that's right. Shark tank is back in business and it's more inspirational and crazy than ever when you see what they did to God. Show back on the air it'll blow your mind as well. The wild inventions the most driven entrepreneurs from around the country will bring to the tank. There's no better time for an uplifting show like this and with some amazing new guest sharks including the creator of TOMS Shoes Blake bykowski and jewelry designer and CEO Kendra Scott one thing's for certain and the tank the streets are still paved with gold from self-cleaning water bottles to pizza cupcakes when the sharks see a great idea The Feeding Frenzy is on Shark Tank returns Friday, October 16th at eight 7 Central only on ABC East. Well, I mean, you know now that I know the timeline of the 80s and you know, you mentioned your Mobile Home, Alabama and you know, just giving our current cost after a Sloop what were race relations like at the time when you grew up and how did Sports play a role in that? Well, man, that's that's a great question and let me go back to and and and I put this in the book and I put it in there for the you know for a specific reason wage. Talk about race relations a little bit, of course as part of my growing up. But before I moved to King North Carolina when we went to the seventh grade, and that's where it was throughout the rest of the my near Junior High School. I lived in a town called Emporia, Virginia. Now Emporia is probably about fifty percent at least 50% black 50% white it was that was the first time I'd ever gone to you know, Public elementary school when there were, you know, just as many black kids as white kids, although as far as I'm concerned in that town by the race relations I had with with with my friends who were black box was really good. However, in the head down you still had it was still segregated as far as like the the youth sports teams not that off. Really rules that they know blacks can come over and play in the white league and I think maybe one or two would but but it was just it mean it was just kind of the the culture of the town but it's interesting that the some when we we moved to that. I think we bare only 2 years the first Year my brother and I my brother's a year older than I we played in, you know football in the white League. Well the next year my mom had decided that he wanted to but had always wanted to coach us and he wouldn't you know, they they weren't wouldn't allow him to coach and and basically the white seems so he went over to it was it was called the Communication Center cyc. That's where all the black kids went. And he he became he coached that team and my brother and I was about sixty kids on the team. So there's two white kids age fifty-eight black kids and we had played that football season together. I was in the let's see sixth grade and my brother was in the seventh and it was one of them. Greatest experiences of my life even today looking back on it because we were I mean my brother we were actually friends with these kids. This wasn't you know, just the two the two token white kids that you know, you know, that's kind of in Reverse of what what you normally here. But and it was it was one of the greatest experiences that I've ever had now, I'm going to King North Carolina completely different in high school because there just weren't nearly the amount or the number of black kids there. But there were no problem that'll think the word there wasn't any any problems any race relations problems that they're but now when I moved to Alabama and because this was after, you know graduated from Law School in ninety-two, there's and you know, not that there were any big race problems down here when I got here but dead. It's a different. It's different kind of attitude. I think about race relations in what I will call the bulb itself which is like Louisiana, Mississippi Alabama as opposed to Tennessee and North Carolina and Virginia. Yeah. I mean, I think the reason I asked the question came up for me when I was hearing you right about football and sort of South as you know, like I said, I grew up in a small Texas town and there were definitely undertones of racism. Like I I remember very distinctly I had a friend, you know, we had a black kid who got stabbed her school like they gotta fight and you know had this very close friend and his parents were very very kind to me and there were days when I would hear things come out of my mouth and it was just like blatant racism towards black people yet. They didn't have the same attitude towards me and I think what's always struck me about that was we weren't talking about uneducated rednecks really talking with people wage. HD is who come from the wealthiest families in town? And I just found that so striking that somebody who is so educated somebody who is that wealthy could have that attitude it really I you know, and it was just it was shocking every single time. I heard it because I'm here I am his kid in seventh grade hearing his mom. My my friend's mom like make these racial slurs while driving me to school or is it just really struck me as so strange? Yeah, and and I've grown up with that too. I mean, it's that that that's I don't think that's uncommon but I tell you what I do think is happening right now or I think it's every every generation like I don't think our generation is does not have the issue is racist as the last and I think the as you get away from say say slavery and you know, I guess with eighteen sixties and you know, the farther you get away from that. I think the better the better it has become I mean my kids art. I mean there there's no racist thought I think ever enters their heads, you know, but but I did grow up, you know, and and as you said too yeah, even other kids parents would make you know, just got off the snide comments sometimes and you just I wasn't raised like that. So I mean and it's not I wouldn't say anything. I just kind of you know, listen to it and I think it's it's you know, it's interesting you're being an Indian person like, you know, we're like, you know, and then I'm not saying this out of ego, but like people kind of you as a sort of a model minority, right? Like what do Indians do we start companies? We become doctors and Engineers lawyers and so yet but I mean, I've even heard racist things here on my own parents house where I'm like, okay, that's a little weird. Why did you say that but you know, I want to come back to the race thing when we talk about your career as a lawyer wage. Is I think there's a lot of interesting ties there but let's go back to those moment, you know in rehab, you know, the thing that really struck me at the beginning is new you said maybe because of my youth of a British and I was always upbeat in the days following surgery miles left my family and friends who came to visit. My smile was actually genuine oddly. I was never depressed my life had been forever changed, but for some reason I was always genuinely upbeat and that students such stark contrast to that page a moment in Friday Night Lights when you get to the second episode and Jason street is like, you know on the verge of breaking up with his girlfriend and all hell breaks loose and what is it? Like, why is it that you had this response to such a tragic situation and other people don't You know, I don't I'm not sure although I'm not sure everybody, you know would have a different different attitude on with with the month, you know, their tragic situation, but you know, I think I tell you what they goes back to you know, you know, when when I had the accident, you know, I had my wife prior to that was was was out of spectacular as it could be and you know, I had so your personality is based on that. And so you had this level of confidence, you know that that it is ingrained in you and so when this happened, you know, you're perfect just does not change overnight. So you're still the same person inside that you know, this this whole fifteen years of your life this person that and personality that's been created you have this horrible song. The event now you're you're lying in a hospital bed and you cannot move anything, you know below the neck, but what you brought into it stays with you and so do you know what? I don't know why it was that you know, I did some I mean I did I I generally stayed upbeat now. That doesn't mean I didn't have a nice day or two where you know, I had some bad days. But but for the you know for the most part, yeah, I mean I was genuinely an upbeat person, you know, I guess it was awful, you know, especially once I started being able to move, you know some stuff again. It was all right lets you know, let's get into rehab and let's see what we can do and see what we're going to have left move on with my life. Yeah, Well, I think that what's interesting to me is you did far more than move on with your life. I mean you went on to become class president you had girlfriends you were valedictorian. I mean, that's that's pretty extraordinary considering that wage. You know you face adversity that would probably you know, derail the average person. So I guess we're going to start is you know, how did this end up affecting your friendships and your relationships because again, like, you know your story like other than the moment of the injury when I compare it to the the, you know, Friday Night Lights TV show where this guy's girlfriend dumps him. His friendships change yours is like the polar opposite you you know, your girlfriend stayed with em in class president. So I had to ask, you know, how did this end up in fact affecting your social relationships and you're you know relationship your family. Well, the social relationships were not affected at all, you know stayed friends with this friends had a you know had more friends even after it, you know, even today I'm very close with my best friend from high school. He played we we play basketball. He didn't play football. He played basketball. We're still great friends today, you know, my girlfriend, you know here I was coming off. Was going to be Big Man on Campus. I decided I needed to break up with her before before high school started which I did and this happened but see that's basically took me back but you you talk about a a hit there and makes you makes you a little bit more humble, you know, when you have something like this, but and I dated her throughout high school and you know when I'm off to college and it's kind of you know, how that goes. But but no and that's that's really My friends never I said earlier they did not ever treat me any differently and and and my family relations family was was basically the same name to I mean my brother's a year older than me. We've always been close. You know, I've got three sisters, you know, I mean my parent my parents are divorced now, but they were dead vary throughout all of my schooling and getting a divorce to later on in life, but still very close to them, you know, but you know one thing when you have a an injury life is, you know, it's taxing on your family, you know, my mom was at the hospital and the ribs Center every day, you know, and we've got at the time I had my brother was at home and and may I have two sisters at home, you know, they've got lives going on. You know, my dad's right, you know out running his business, you know, even my grandmother came over to to live with us for a while to wage um, you know to do the cleaning and the cooking and it's it's taxing and so it's not just you that's that's for me that's affected by this is it it affects everybody and I think when I made when I first got back to high school, they my friends may have been a little you know, a little tepid maybe or may not nervous but I mean, you know treat me a you know, a little nicer or anything, but just you know, like I was a little more fragile, you know that of a person that goes but but it didn't take long because I didn't really change as a person inside and then things just you know started going on as they normally did so do it on to become, you know, trial lawyer what prompted your interest in the law of all things, you know, my grandfather was a lawyer and a judge and log So that was kind of it, but but I didn't have some burning desire to to be a lawyer. You know, I was more interested in business. I was economics major undergrad and thought you know, a basically went on to law school because you know, I knew I wanted to go to graduate school and I didn't really know you know, really what I wanted to do. So I just bought I just signed up for law school and then off I went and then you know, I did the once I got there I did the did the JD MBA program to get my Masters in Business just cuz I thought you know, I was really probably more interested in that but but I've not I mean but in my career, you know, I've just been a straight-up lawyer without that business part of what I am studying has had nothing to do with being a lawyer. Yeah. Well, I mean part of why I want to talk about law in particular is because I think it's such an interesting career particularly in the context of rain. The fact that your lawyer in the South, you know, like when I think about the fact they're in Mobile like I mean, I'm guessing you're probably very familiar with Brian Stevens work on the you know, his Equal justice initiative project. And you know, I mean, I read a story like just mercy and you see what happens, you know, I've had you know criminal, you know, criminal defense attorneys here. So I think we love the idea of you know, Justice black and white but it's not you know, I mean and your lawyer why is that you know with like why is it it seems to me like this system does not really it's not equal justice. Well, first of all I said I do not do any criminal work. Yeah, so that that's but banality one of my best one of my best friends, you know, I thought I hit the gym every morning, you know before work and and my one of my best friends, you know does the same and he is a criminal defense lawyer and you know, you tell me they'll say look, you know, when we we live on the other side of Mobile Bay, we got about a 10 mile, you know, or eight to ten mile trip across when we Mobile downtown mobiles where we work and we you can one of the ways you can get across either the interstate or what's known as the cause way which is the highway that goes across, you know, some of the stuff is part and and part part water park bridge, but he said he tells me he goes look when I see policemen, you know have people pulled over on the cause wage. Because nine times out of ten. They're black not the policeman who's getting pulled over and you know, I've never noticed that because you know, cuz you know with him being a criminal defense lawyer. He sees he sees this more than I do and it's so it's more you know, it's more apparent and it's more part of his life. That's what he sees and walk. You know why that is I you know, that's I guess that's why we're going through what we're going through today with, you know, the black lives matter. It's you know, it's it's real found out about it, but now but Further further to what your what Your the question was, you know why Justice isn't the same and and or fair or and I don't know. I mean just getting on Beyond not a black-and-white or racial thing is, you know, I remember when I first started practicing I thought judges, you know, you know, here I am, I guess what I'm 20, 20 24 or 25 years old, I guess twenty-six when I first started practicing law and so you go in you're just some you know, your new you get into the courtroom for the first time and these judges, you know, they're also much older than most of them. Most of them were male with white, you know, white hair and gray hair and you thought that that oh my God, these must be the wisest people that you know bush is and they just don't follow the law and they they're going to they're going to make these incredible wise decision well, but the thing is what I've learned is, you know judges you off. They make make decisions on cases or illegally, you know in legal matters, you know, they bring their personality and their political views into that awful. You know, you got playlist oriented judging got defense-oriented judges. You got judges that are down the middle. I mean, there's some judges down here that you know, you know how they're going to roll on something. But before you even you know you before I file a motion, you know, if you're going to win or not because if they're I'm a defense lawyer and if I mean some of the some judges are very plainest oriented and they're they're not like say you file a motion for summary judgment, which is something that you know to get get the case thrown out as a matter of law, even though you think it's due to be granted, you know going in it's not going to be and that's just, you know, you don't have like these are computers up there that that just they get all the information and and process it and come out with what what should be the correct decision and these are people up there dead. Making decisions and their their past and their experiences go into to their biases go into their decisions. Yeah. I was that's what I was going to spend next to his biases. So I you Shawn Eskenazi here who was a you know, former criminal defense attorney made turn chocolate maker and one of the things that he said that really struck me we were talking about plea Bargains and he said your people take plea Bargains all day long for crimes, they didn't commit because they're so terrified of the alternative which is basically a much lengthier sentence. He said if anybody went to trial though, he said if if half these people actually went to trial the way, you know are supposed to be able to the entire system would break down. So, you know, what I wonder is when you have the bias as embedded in two people and you know, of course all of us have biases is there a way to achieve some level of objectivity in the system. Well, I yeah because of the way the jury system works, I mean you're going to have wage And what I'm saying, I mean so you're going to have twelve million Alabama. You're going to have 12 people on a jury in a criminal or any case that's in that's in state at the state court system. And so the way you get objectivity is if you get a juror if you get get jurors that naturally you want the you want the biases to equal out, you know you so you got one you got people on the left you got people on the right. So what you want is a decision that comes out, you know, that that takes away biases cuz they're going to they gotta work it out and then you get that final decision or you know pervert it and and that's the way that's the way that's why I'm what I do, you know jury selection is so important, you know, making sure you it's not that you get the right jurors. You just want to make sure you don't get the wrong jurors. Yeah. Yep, so kind of extra money. I mean you being a lawyer in a place like Mobile Alabama mean, you know, it kind of alluded to it when you see what's happening right now in this country as a lawyer, you know, particularly Alert in the South, you know, what do you make of it? You know, do you know in your mind where what is our path to change here that change that actually leads us to a better wage place. We will see you mentioned the problem with with all this, you know, see the demonstrations, you know some peaceful I see the riots and it seems like it's all really I mean what what what the stimulus program that was or what was the you know, it started with you know, the one up up in Minnesota with the Papas Nealon on the guy's neck and then then he died off which you know, everybody sees that video. He was like, oh my God, this is I mean if you watch that and think that's okay. I think there's something wrong with you, but that that's I mean and then how long Past it was it's it's the white cops killing the black guys and that's kind of the that's the way this is kind of all started and there there must be some sort of a problem there but being down here in Mobile, Alabama. I don't and and I don't stay in some Ivory Tower where I go to work. I mean, I'm out in the community of somewhat. I don't see this systemic racism at ground level. I mean, I've got a I've had I've got a black head as my little brother. We start off in Big Brothers Big Sisters when he was probably in the third grade. I did not see him at his elementary school once a week and now he is a sophomore in high school and what we do now is, you know about once a month or maybe a little more frequently, you know, I've come pick him up we go out. We you know, we have lunch we go to movies we hang out. We just talked and so, you know, I see nothing getting between the two of us. Of course. I mean, it's just it's a wonderful relationship. But I mean I'm in you know, I'm in I'm I see his friends and stuff. And you know, I I don't see this this racism at least not in any form that is you know palpable or or just just you know, right out right out in the open and it may be because Alabama was like in Mississippi were so awful bad for so long that I think racism down here is probably not as bad as it is in others other states. Yeah, it's that makes me kind of Wonder. You know, I think what I wonder is what misperceptions cuz you know, I mean, I'm a liberal person who grew up on in California of all places where it's incredibly diverse and you know, I mean, it's very clear like, you know, very few people in Iraq where I live, you know tend to vote Trump and you know, I wonder what misperceptions do you think that somebody like me or people like, you know myself and and you know, my peers who basically consumed with that would be considered, you know, left biased media have about places like mobile because I think that in our minds I think our our stereotype of Alabama which isn't entirely accurate and you know, this is something I even learned in Texas my mom commented, you know, when we moved to California, she said, you know, she was like, I think I miss about being in College Station as people are so friendly they're like you go to a bar in Texas or you go to a restaurant people are just friendly they dog View whereas, you know, you go to a grocery store in California people like get on get on there's other people here. Yeah. Well, that's how it I mean in Mobile it's it's a friendly place else, you know, you go you go to the grocery store you go to bars got a restaurants. It's yeah people people talk with each other. It's I mean, it's kind of a nice nice place to be I you know, I think there's a perception of Alabama going so far back and and the way it was it's been portrayed in movies, you know, although you know a burning of course that was over in Mississippi. But but then you got like the the up and sell more the the the march across the Edmund Pettus bridge. I mean that stuff happened in the home. So it's I think it's hard to think it takes a long time to to even attempt to erase those memories that which I mean, I don't I don't think you ever want to completely erase that memory foam Anyway, cuz you know you think you need your history out there. But I mean there was some bad stuff going on in the Deep South and you know, I think there's there's a there's a museum in Montgomery. I think of that has all the it's got, you know stories or or at least the names of all the the black people that were lynched and killed in Alabama and it's just I've not been there I want to go but I mean it's got to be haunting just to go into a place like that and then that really happening and you know, you think today and you know me and I mean, I've always grown up in the South although Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee. I don't know that's for those are real. I mean, they are the South but it's really kind of them somewhat Mid-Atlantic States or at least that'll I don't consider that the Deep South But but down here it's I mean there was some bad stuff that went on and like you can't even like sitting in today. You probably can't eat. It's so hard to even imagine that people could be killed like they were you know, what it was forty fifty sixty seventy years ago, you know in the United States like that. So I I think though that so the perception that you get, you know, if you're not from you know, this say you're not from Alabama that you get this perception Alabama such a racist place. It's probably just from the from the past. But but if you know you spent any time here, you know, there's I don't think there's there's a huge racial problem down here. I mean like even in Mobile, there's not been like huge protests. I've been any rioting down here and you know mobile of the city of mobiles like 40% black. Yeah, well, so, you know, the other thing I wonder is having a life experience you had, you know, having had such a tragic injury. How did that shape and influence the kind of package event and in the messages that you've passed on to your kids? Oh wow. Yeah, I'm not sure. It is it has shaped me as far as a parent that much because I still even after the injury. I went on to lead the life of wanted to lead regardless of the injury. And so, you know the way I leave my lead my life in and have always since I've had my injury is I mean, this is just something I've got to deal with but I'm not going to allow it to affect, you know, the decisions I make and how I go forward in my life. I mean, although I'm not going to other than a well I'm not going to take a job as somebody who's being, you know, building houses or do anything. That's not that's not in the realm of possibility. But and it's really, you know, even looking back and when you ask me that question, I guess it's really kind of almost surprising how Albert that my injury didn't affect my personality so much then I just I continued to you know, I was continued to be competitive. I continue to strive to do the best I could like when my my one of my sons played football, you know as a kid for a while and I didn't put any prohibit it but I say I did not encourage it. I mean I wasn't going to be one of those parents like, you know by God you're going to get out there and play football because you know, you're going to be a man, you know, that there's no way I could have done that because if something would have happened bad, I wouldn't be the you know to to have pushed a son into that, you know the god that would have been the worst thing off. But you know and my kids my kids have you know from day one, they they've known nothing else other than having a father with a major physical disability job. And so, you know, that's and I don't think they've ever been I've got great relationship with my kids. I don't think they've ever been like embarrassed to you know be walking around with me or even you know, when they're younger, you know, because you know, you know kids have gotten used to you know, I would suck older son. It was when he was in kindergarten I would I would I would walk him to class every day because he was you know, he was scared to go in so well, I watched like thirty days. So, you know, I'm walking and all young kids over there just you know, as a walk you can just see him staring and you know pointing and that kind of stuff but about my kids have never you know, they never they don't think they've ever been like, you know, there's like all there's there's my dad who walks so funny. So I you know, I'm trying to think if I become a different parent because of my job Injuria, I don't think so. I think I've taken the same about the same personality. You know what I brought into the injury and then what I learned after it, you know, I'm being a parent and just trying to be a loving supportive parent who you know of wanted my kids to be, you know, a successful as possible. But I you know, I don't that I didn't my wife and I really didn't push our kids but maybe that's maybe I I didn't push my I didn't really push my kids, you know took a drink of them like, you know, just you know, I can't take this anymore by or like push like you, you know, you gotta get your grades up. You gotta make all age. You gotta be the best athlete you gotta be this. Yeah, but you know, we we've never done that we've kind of let our let our kids kind of become their own people. Of course, of course the problem with that is, you know, they you know, they made okay game. It's certainly part of where to develop for their class. But but but they're not two of them went to college there. They they've graduated they're out working now and so they they seem to be very well adapted kids. And I mean, I think we my wife and I did a pretty good job parenting them. Yeah. So there's a steam that has, you know, shut up over and over a conversation of the fact that you weren't going to let this thing Define you on you're going to live your life and you know, push it to the the limits of what's possible regardless, and this is something I've asked people in some form or another that the sort of Relativity of of grief, you know, so people have far worse responses too far less dire situations than the one that you're in. Why is that, you know, I don't know what's going on in the heads of some other people on why they do this. I mean, it's it may be you know, what happens what happened there life before what event they had who were whether whether it be minor or a major event. I mean if you if you if your personal life or your level of confidence or you you know, if you're if you're not a heavy person going into something and then something bad happens and it may not even be you know, when you you know about that I've ever wanted to to compare tragic events. But but if somebody, you know as something that you would think maybe not be that big of an illness and they just fall apart, you know, it's it might be that because you know, the type of person they were coming into it like, you know, I was a very strong confident person dead. When this happened and so I continued with that, you know, I guess if I you know had issues of self-doubt or you know, you know problems like that when when this happened mate, you know, I don't know maybe the the effort or the you know to move on and try to live your best life. Maybe it wouldn't have been a you know, it's it's it's hard to say really to me what what people don't why people some people just kind of quit and fall apart why they do, you know, I I really don't know how well this has been really really fascinating. I've really enjoyed chatting with you and learned time. So I have one final question for you, which is how we finish all of our interviews Democrat of what do you think it is that makes somebody or something unmistakable? Give me give me the definition of unmistakable bucket. So my definition of unmistakable because I wrote a book called unmistakable and you have to Define it. Apparently when you write a book called that is something that is so distinctive that nobody else could have done it by you well. I don't want and it's hard to say that nobody could have achieved what I did after my injury cuz I'm sure there's people out there that have done they've had horrible injuries or horrible physical things happen to them that have done just as well or better than that than I have but I think what's what's different about me is well, I mean it was it's just caught it was the constant drive to to to be successful and to to live to live a great life. It was I mean knowing I've got this physical disability. So knowing I'm going to struggle physically every day. I'm going to struggle to walk, you know to class in college. I'm going to struggle to walk into the office every day unless struggle to wait until it's a walk in the in the courtroom. But but you don't let the physical struggle. You know change what you want the outcome to be which is you know, I want to live my I want to live a great life know we we got one life. Mm. Is it off? So you have one part of your life? That's that, you know, not the greatest the physical like for me the physical part of it. I'm not going to let that screw up the rest of it. And so I mean it took me it's all in this quest for just having a great life because this is all you got, you know, and and you know, if you quit, you know, well, then there goes your life. So so I guess to sum it up. I'm just I'm all about just having the best. You know, I want to leave the best life. I can lead. I want to be as happy as I can I want to do as many great things as I can. I just want to want to home life amazing. Well, I can't thank you enough for taking the time to join us and share your story and your insights with our listeners. Where can people find out more about you your book. You're working everything else. To yeah, well, my book is the best way to do is is go on Amazon and get it. It's called get back up. Although I do have a website which the website that I was not much more than a landing page is www.broadcastify.com. But, you know, if people want to follow that I've got a YouTube channel that you want to you know, put wrong date in there. I've got some documents and talks. I've got some videos of me working out on there. It's okay, if you're curious to see what what I really what I how I walk and I do my physical stuff. I put some of the work out stuff on YouTube and you know, I've got an Instagram account just you know, look up Rod Kate had some photos on there that kind of stuff. Awesome, and for everybody listening we will wrap the show with that. Thank you for listening to this episode of the unmistakable creative podcast while you were listening. Were there any moments you found in a meeting inspiring instructive maybe even heart-warming. Can you think of anyone a friend or a family member who would appreciate this moment? If so take a second and share today's episode with that one person becomes a good ideas and messages are meant to be shared.

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2: Dumoulin's Giro ambitions

The Cycling Podcast

57:14 min | 2 years ago

2: Dumoulin's Giro ambitions

"The cycling podcast in association with Rafeh. From grand tours to group writes, the Shawn's Elise to coffee shops Rafeh exists to celebrate the world's most beautiful sports. Welcome to twenty nineteen injured should Moore. I'm with Donyell free. However, Tom said Lionel Bernie there, but we're not with Lionel burning night this week. He is in copy in southern Spain the team, oh, God of giving myself a challenge already the team formerly known as quick step their training camp reporting, the coining, I haven't practiced this. One of the things that one of the things that em that Lionel will be doing there is establishing exactly how to pronounce the new sponsored coining is good to me. I could get used to that. And so we're going to hear from him that she in a moment. He's going to have unused round up. And and a brief report from declining quickstep and before next week's bumper edition from copy, but Donyell will happen. You your Daniel happy new year it out, I must've nice. He's not now is that roundabout? Now, I'm Hogmanay Josh Hogmanay is the thirty first of December and the other one there's another one there's another thing. Coming a Scottish thing. Wins fifth January twenty fifth giant said the am. Yeah. The annual festival where we love Highgate sneaks and tattoos to commemorate Robert burns the national put played by 'em. Mel Gibson famously. Of course, all kinda different. William Wallace wasn't a what about ROY ROY? Roy was was another kind of warrior freedom fighter. So we call him. Well, right. So that need to know about any of this until Scotland declares independence, and then I call this really. Officer an interesting non cycling star by two cycling. Daniel you ended the year attending team training camps, and you began this year team training Coundon you why not exactly training camp team. Sorry. I mean a presentation Haitian. Yes, it was it was some webs presentation in Berlin the fourth year in a row they've helped that presentation in Berlin just you'll fixture for you as well. It is it is walk to the presentation we snowing pretty grim pot. Berlin, say that used to do the presentation they watch also off to think cow bay maybe Dennis somewhere in Spain for their training. The men's team was at least the following day. So they'll congregated in Berlin. And then getting on a flight to Spain. Great. And it was it was oh, we're going to be hearing from that in later. Naps owed. You spoke to Tom Milan. His coach and. Nickless Roach among others. What was the atmosphere like the team? Pretty good rich. They've got nothing New Jersey. Those people getting very people get very exercised judges, particularly national champions jerseys in in the seasonal Spurs is one of the few things the cycling fans have to talk about in the dead periods over Christmas. But people get very angry doesn't they read. Mislead your famously Dino knol vary attached to the idea of nationality and patriotism, and so and so imagine the issue the issue of national champion jerseys isn't one the exercise you a great deal. No, not terribly should distinguish between patriotism, and nationalism course, two different things. But I didn't say nice to be clear. But no, I something. I don't well. The jersey things something don't doesn't really cause many sleepless nights. What about you? Well, t- not appreciate a really. Classic kind of national champions as the coining do very well FD J very well, where where they just you know, give over the jersey to the flag, the talian the talian jersey is particularly striking as the French. I think I think about it. I'm about the country myself and say that yes, I do very much did very much appreciate for example, and the Mapei Swiss national champions jersey worn by Oscar Commons in nineteen ninety eight but was fantastic just red background with white cross. And yeah, like, you say when a nice big Italian trickle that one one the baffles me always baffles me slightly. I always think it's a bit of a missed opportunity is the British national champion jersey, which can easily be could easily be confused with the chore, even in the right light looks and Bergische national champ. Jersey. Would you the Union Jack who is a little bit busy, isn't it for a jersey? I remember. Albeit small Union Jack on his BANESTO kit. I'm in the late. Yes. When he was trumping the US nicer car Rivera was there for some web. Of course, not tends to be I can be can be more stylishly done famously. Of course, Larry war by survey. Nice US national champions jersey, when he was I quit blue spore. It can be done quite well, you'd think the British one could be done in a similar in a similar way by a very simple, you know, presumably white with red and blue bands. I quite like actually just further simplicity of it. But it's it's good to get the year start with you. Arguing with yourself already. Diane disagreeing with yourself as fantastic, and we are going to return to team son web a little bit later on. And here your interviews from there, shall we cross over to napalming county and use roundup from him here is Lionel burning. Yeah. Thanks, rich. Hello from Cal pay in Spain. Where the sun has now set and the sea is lapping on the very quiet out of season beach. And I'm sitting in not to freezing cold here. Having been to the earning quickstep team presentation and launch fake good effort there on the pronunciation of decoding. They make. Here it confirm. I'll see the the boss to coning. And he said he didn't really care how anyone pronounces it as long as by. He's windows and doors and patio doors and garden office type windows and doors they make so I guess he's with with me angling for the season. And then I should do my best. Well, they will be quick that one. They won't be happy with that. No, well, quickstep of just back down to the second spot in the hierarchy of sponsors for Patrick favors team long running relationships pushing twenty years, and I still involved, but yet occurring quickstep have to get used to have to get used to that as season unfold, and well that's going to be very soon, isn't it because the tour down under starts next week. Whoa. Tour crushes back into action with the first race of the season. Well, there is already some racing. It's been happening in Australia, the national championships in particular, a couple of interesting stories from those championships because do you remember Michael Freiburg winning the Omnium Nash the world championships doing two thousand eleven I was he was a young writer part of the Ozzy endurance group didn't get selected for the Olympics. I don't think in twenty twelve and drifted cycling, and he. And he's invented. Training system, which some of the pros us and he's back. He's come back to cycling two thousand seventeen and he won the road race. Over the weekend. But he hasn't been selected for the Ozzy team Unisa team for the tour down under. So he's a bit disappointed about that. But he will be writing the Cadel Evans. Great ocean race. Meanwhile in the women's road race, the Ozzy nationals there was a stunning and Pap surprising win for eighteen year old Sarah g again guarantee who beat the world championship, silver medallist. Amanda Spratt by fifty seconds law season, you can t broke both of her arms in a crash during race. This fall. The biggest victory of her career. So far, though, she doesn't have a professional contract yet. It surely will be a matter of time in the time trial, rowing dynasties three Iran as time-trial championship. It's come to an end loop coverage one that Dennis does have the considerable compensation of wearing the rainbow jersey this year, though. So I'm not sure it'd be too disappointed. Couple of bits of news from our friends because today's sport one is that. Trek Sigfredo wanted to sign Vincenzo nearly when he's current Marie to deal. At the end of this season. But borrow Meritas manager bring is quoted by Zetter saying that they are already in the process of offering nearly a two year deal to keep him on the team another story that Zetter reported is room, swirling around team sky. And because to say that Comcast which is sky's new owners committee to cover seventy percent of the team's budget for twenty twenty twenty twenty one that would be enough for day to carry on with the team, whether it would enable them to bring in another sponsor just to talk the budget up to the level that he is accustomed to. We will have to wait and see meanwhile, she'll van Adams, the owner of the Israel cycling academy and the man who basically took the Jiro d'italia to Israel last year. As also suggested developed news that he'd be interested in a merger with teams guy as you'd expect teams guy being very tight lipped about all of this at the moment. And finally, we've already had the first doping story of two thousand nineteen and it's a pretty. Equal. He won because ninety year old call grow from Bristol, Indiana, tested, positive for banned steroid under for Tila drug when winning the ninety two ninety four age group in the time trial for an individual shoot. At the US masters track nationals last year now the thing about this. He was the only competitor in his category. On standing. Don't think to win a race only. You can win a stretch even for cycling you saw. You saw accepts the one of the substances may have come from some tainted meat that he'd eat. And and the other was from. Stop limitation, which didn't list any banned substances on the packaging. Nevertheless, it does look like called grove will lose his titles, but well bruise rules. I guess interest one, isn't it that won't because. You know, I think most people will look at that and go he's clearly something's gone wrong there. He's you would imagine. He's not to cheat himself. You know, and there's a double standard thing there. Because had it been a a young writer in his prime taught writer. It would have been, you know, described as as an other kind of dog ate my homework type story, but it may be shows that that, you know, mistakes or things like that kinda kinda actually happen. We'll you turn to he looked at the star sheet sore that he was the only man on the list and thought, well, I better not take too many chances here and make sure you know, I I think that's quite unlikely. He would into the realms of speculation already Lau. But the thing is again, I mean, I use I this is a bit of a doll thing to say. But you know, you saw it, you know, we know the budgets for anti-doping efforts are incredibly stretched under a lot of pressure. And but I guess if you're going to have Raissi's to run under all of the rules, and you have to be doing random testing you have to test people in the ninety two ninety four years old age category as well. I guess. A community around the world. Stories and films with the most compelling characters the world's finest apparel. Explore the world of cycling with Rafeh. Thank you very much to Rafeh are headline sponsor again third full year with rougher, very grateful to them for their support. It really does enable us to well plan the program that we've got this year, which will include again, all the grand tours and lots of other things. Besides and Rafa have a big event coming up this weekend in Australia where the kit for the new education I yet. Yes, -education first team will be unveiled the their writers. Some of them have been competing already and writing and training, and in blocks being kept under wraps than you get on the well, I mean Rafeh do produce. Nice. I mean, the they're the kind of shrimp. Is very nice and deed. That's the women's team, of course, and it really sex Sabar in the women's site of the sport so expectations fairly high. I would think for the e f -cation first kit unveil this weekend you looking forward to that Lionel. Oh, yeah. I'm not gonna speculate on walked might look like I'm gonna just wait and see be slightly under. Well, even if is just block. Stuff. They've been great. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. Excellent. Anyway, Lionel and before dynamite crack on this week's podcast, which will be largely son web themed, you Aren copy just tell us a little bit. But what you're doing there? Well, yeah, I've come for a couple of days to the hotel that Patrick favors teams of used several times for that preseason training camps. They had that team launch here as well. They had in Belgium in recent years and Lefevere was telling me that sometimes have sort of fifteen hundred people turn up. They were keen to avid sort of a slightly lower key launch this time round just to just rebalancing emphasis back to the training. Some of the right is here because everybody on their way to Australia and some on the way to South America for the first race of the season. With a few people at the team launch. Bob, young girls who is going to be writing coupled classics not powdery bay. But quite a lot of the other ones. He's not really written on the couple's for in quickstep colors. He is a course and under twenty three zero by winner did very well on the stage two of the France in the summer finished seventh. So preps nor surprise he's going to keep the couple's bash. He's also going to ride the Jiro again, go back to the Talia when I down and talk to him. He told me through the difficulties and disappointments of his Toyota fronts, and that was quite interesting and quite revealing we'll hear from Bob goose next week. I think I also spoke to eve Lampe the Belgian champion about the the weight of the Belgian champions jersey on his shoulders and also to the Czech writer. Peter Vacher who you may remember how to terrible accident in training where basically hit by vehicle. About this time last year. I think in South Africa, basically wiped out using tire season and one point. He wasn't sure whether he would make a return Patrick favorite, basically has given back orcher years contract because contract was actually the end of December. But because he didn't raise tall last year. And he's been working very hard to get back the team giving him an opportunity and another years contract. So we will also hear from him at some point maybe next week as well. And something else I sat down this morning for quite long chat with lefavor himself. Very interesting was initially we're going to be a lunch with but things got changed about it. So it ended up being coffee with lefavor this morning. Cycling team car the back of the tax voice PK race radio at the two of the FRANZ to remind us to tell you that this episode of the cycling podcast is sponsored by the economist, and you can get a free print copy of the economist by texting the word cycling, two seven eight zero seven zero the economist is about far more than just economics and finance. It covers a range of subjects from world, politics and business to science technology, the arts the environment, and even sport, the economists sift through the noise focusing on the essential information that tells the real story in a time when facts matter more than ever it's for the kind of person who never stops asking questions and wants to know why the world is the way it is. Now, Richard you've been reading the economist week walks caught your eye well much caught my eye in the first edition of the columnists of nineteen story thought mentioned grab my attention. For the headline mainly when hipsters ruled the world it says is back in the boots. And art section. There's about how language changes. Certain words and phrases disappear. We've known about this process oversee for forever. But it's one that seems to be exceleron corruptly so expressions like instant message or poke for example in a Facebook context barely use nowadays. Metrosexual? Remember that useful for about five minutes into those three says economists to describe men who likes to care of the hair and Simone metrosexual fade, not because of date, but rather the opposite because of the success of the underlying concept, even though men started wearing beards and lumberjack shirts. They did. So with exquisite care, maybe all of them. Every man is a metrosexual says, they communist hipster is in the same Kathy. Great. They article argues hipster culture is. So ubiquitous the scary any reason to notice it Google searches for hipster the word peaked in America and two thousand eleven on worldwide and twenty fifteen though as an article says using Google searches as a measure when word is fashionable is. Inaccurate. The people looking out by definition what it means. So they're behind the curve, the cool kids have already moved onto something else. Similarly with the term woke they seem to move from compliment to jibe in a matter of just weeks says very quickly these days, the conclusion for the second podcast is a hipsters. Definitely I either that or they've taken over the world. You wanna hear the term hipster on the podcast here because it's so twenty fourteen the economist into small guide to the forty changing your world. So we've never stopped often questions. Get your free print copy now by texting cycling two seven zero seven zero. That's the word cycling two seven eight zero seven zero. Already wanted last year. I think he made a few mistakes in the last week. And he knows it and he will not make them again. I guess so he's going to be strong opponent and nearly vogue Leach now. So it's doing to be a hell of it's going to be a challenge. And I I think my chances on being very good at Tuta fronts are pretty low, especially with the week less. A last year bras myself already I'm one year further one year more experienced one year stronger. So I hope to surprise myself again in two of the France. And yeah, we'll see about that. But yeah, main focus will definitely be Jiro. And then we'll see the tutor fast. But I I hope to do really well on both replayed in their by will familiar voice of Mulan? We'll hear a little bit more from him in a moment. But Daniel was Damola talking. By is I'm business for twenty nineteen minutes decision. To focus on the G around the front. Yes. Or it's quite. Could we contentious decision or suddenly a holy debated merge? Told about decision to to prioritize the Jere game won't could argue that he's done for the last three years. He is going to ride the total FRANZ as well. But he made no bones. Really in the somewhere presentation about the he hadn't liked had an appreciated. Frans was involved in Taba his original intention had been on the team's intention hopping onto prioritize fronts in two thousand nineteen and stop them in their tracks. When they saw the the FRANZ for specifically what was about the tour. They didn't like well, mainly lack of time trawling. Twenty seven kilometers. A individual time trial is the only individual time trawling in the Toyota FRANZ this year in in po- that's going to be there's a similar teen time trolley comes earlier in the race butts. The Jiro has a much larger slice of time trialing, which is obviously to do Milan's liking there to decent size. Tom charles. I'm the Ray exciting looking for stage. I'm the Madani some new climb in bologna, which finishes is very steep climb isn't it, but I think right kilometers and not will ready probably do decent Sean taking the pink jersey pretty early in JIRA. So we hear from the rest of your with him here. Molyneaux the decision wasn't made in Paul. But the the buckle of the on tour came out when I was in pole and a high mountain at three thousand meters. And I started thinking with my wife about it like this was actually quite disappointing. When I when I looked at the two popular I couldn't I was at my honeymoon. But I still couldn't avoid checking Twitter and just looking at the book, and I was I was a bit disappointed that because the focus while the bland was fully focused on the two fronts, and it made us reconsider so a send from the three thousand meter through this and team message, like don't decide anything. Let's yet. Let's talk about it first, and we did that. And eventually we still didn't know about afterwards, actually. And then the team it final call to to do this. So very Christian predawn bragging about the highest Toda fronts have a new at three thousand meters. Look to them thought it's not for me. Yeah. That's a good summary. Tell me more about the trip to Nepal. Why did you want to go there? And what did you do was always a dream to while? I really like traveling to places I that are very far off my my comfort zone or something. And nipple was like that too. Was cool. The highest declined three thousand meters. Or did you do some really big mountains when hiring training camp share and vodka actually one time up to three thousand two hundred or something? So it wasn't. I wasn't going into highest, but it's supposed to go much higher. Nipple, of course. But we avoided that and just from a technical physiological point of view, Tom. We saw the figures that you release the power to you released through. It's quite surprising. The difference between the year and the tool, and how you seem to produce more power the Jiro, even I mean how much does that fit into your decision making processes well. I wouldn't I wouldn't take too much conclusion with only one year those data. The could be various factors playing role in in in those data. I mean, maybe the raise was easier before the last climb because it was actually the data of the laws Klein's of the in Jiro and tour, but it could have been much harder to before with all the stress and with all the racing. So it's not to say that pushing a higher power. And last month of of a sage in Jiro means that I was in better shape or was better there. To easy to say that commercially. Everyone is always surprised when you say, oh, I'm going to get the jarrow. And I'm not going to be my first priority on thinks sponsor will want to go to the tour and focus on that. As there any pressure on you from that point of view, not on me, maybe on the team. But you have to ask Yvonne. But I guess there's also things like, okay, let's say I'm into shape going to JIRA lets him until shaped going to tour. Maybe I would end up third into the it's very nice, very commercially. Interesting. But what would be commercially more interesting winning the Jiro or being third at the tour at it's even if I'm paper the fields and the levels very similar in those two races. Look the much weaker than the tool harder. Definitely not with the opponents, but it's much better suit attuned to my village. The course, that's the main reason. So much on on winning. It would be higher than in the two fronts. We think but still winning one of them. Extremely difficult. But so demille on their on honeymooned in the poll. Adventurous. And that's where he he learned by the on to decision to focus on the Jiro. Instead on a lot of people as you suggest there will be scratching their heads about because he went to the he was second Jiro twenty teen. And then also second at the turn of France. And you felt that had he focused entirely on the tour e it might have been there for the taking perhaps from for him. I don't know. I mean who knows he might have a similar. That might be smart. Commits here where he he's good at both races. Who knows? But I think people would like to see him all his eggs in the tour basket one year. I think people kinda thought well if this year then when? Yeah, absolutely. You're it's difficult uninteresting to get a read on executable fats as a prompting these decisions on the on the palm do Milan on some web the teams in on right? As I think I mentioned an interview with him, or I'll tell them about the power numbers that he submitted to one of the big Dutch newspapers over the winter album die, blah, and I find them pretty interesting in that they seem to suggest that the to the level the gross level of the competition. The Jared lost year walls was higher in the sense that the the wattage numbers the power numbers on the final climb ten. It's a bit higher. And that's as Tom doing onset needs. A little bit misleading pops. I think you know, a lot of these decisions now all based on sort of physiological modelling of Walt exactly those two races. And also the other major toll the Welte entail. I mean, I also spoke to Tomlin's coach Hendrick van we'll hear from him in a minute about the physiological factors which tight the ride will be more suited to one. The other exactly how the two races differ. And and he said the one thing that you do really notice east if you put the two sets of data, for example, Tom demons powers from the Jiro. I. His Powell's to a one thing. You do. See these consistent big jumps in in power which correspond to accelerate throughout stages throughout the three weeks of the race. So you'll go ride as will frequently go from one hundred to six hundred walls in the course of of a race. And this has a big affect on fatigue over the coolest race. Hendrick said the lost year the fronts and the Jiro the total workload of the two races killer Joel's were almost identical. But it was very different the distribution how how much walls how much energy was expended in each as in initial phase of each stage. So that was kind of interesting and some Weber no done will they do a lot of work with KPMG who've developed software for them which housed into model the these races and the cool says, and and they can literally over. Lay ride as to Ristic's on top of of of a cools of profile and and presumably with the help of tools like that. They've they've made the decision. Yeah. Yeah. Interesting juxtaposition there with the image. I have of moolah checking his phone in the Paul and almost making emotional decision rather than an evidence based decision clearly the team then had to approve an on on the front of discussions. But you get a sense. The we've seen seen from before in races. A slight v of peak, you know, Saudi-owned Algo by to the Jiro because I'm sure the tour would like to go to their race with his main focus. He's a very as we've said many times he's very appealing appealing stars Charisma's good king. And he's kind of what the sport needs in ways. So is is a bit a slap in the face for the tour. And in contrast to what you say there by the you know, all the kind of scientific data that goes into deciding race program on a target. The does. Seem to be a bit of emotion involved in this too and on a positive emotion too. In the sense that he has talked about she he loves the enjoys it. Yeah. I mean, he did cite any the he's halt is very much in Italy. And with the Jiro, I'm obviously he's going to go to the toilet FRANZ off the woods, but he's pretty pessimistic about doing well, then not least because there's one week less between the two races in two thousand nineteen in the walls in in two thousand eighteen but the does seem to be fundamental sort of disconnected view looker the number of ride as for the euro in two thousand nineteen those pedantic for the tool, I'm sending the the field. Almost looks fixer the JIRA and a lot of the the reasons being cited four riders wanting the year rather than the toys that they think it's going to be less controlled race on basically, they've got more chance of breaking they have perceived. To be skies stranglehold on the rice is completely not really jaws with everything we're hearing from Esso and unchristian prude on when they announced to FRANZ for Tiber. They think that is owning rates will particularly the latest route in two thousand for two thousand nineteen that will do precisely help to break one team skies stranglehold and on the defensive way of writing. But you know, the coaches and the ride is looking at it and thinking that is going to do the opposite opposite. And I just wanted to whether the teams and the ride is looking at the roots in race scientific way on that breaking the down in wolf these Adam with more insight on whether in the Toda FRANZ. So also. Basing barrow days on kind of all dogmas, and and just sort of presumptions may be based on what has been like in the post. Most presumptions are based on what's happened in the past on. And I mean premiums glaciers of similar case in a way to demean LAN road, very well of France and just Masailand the podium twenty teen isn't going back or may go back, but he'd ride the Jiro. I am really target that and on again, he's a strong time trial than may be looking at the time of the Jiro favoring him. But then there other writers Simon Yates who's is not likely to be attracted by the time trialing, and yet is also going back to the Jiro. Again, it seems to be an emotional connection or unfinished business. He has there that seems to be drawing him back. So as you say, very is a very interesting field, assembling for the Jiro. Kind of equal mix talent between the two zero have to say the moola in twenty teen was also very pessimistic is chances of the tour having ridden Jiro. And then and then finished second. Nd? So I take with a pinch of salt thing. I think the basic price race presumption that all of these guys do Milan another's rogue lich and finding they seem to make when they see re with not much time drawing is that it's going to be written defensively, and it's an sky all going to control, and he not gonna see many types. You don't see the rice decant before the lost climbs? And that's partly because you know, a lot of Reuters own coast. It's still feel as they've got a lot to gain until very late in the stage and relate in the three weeks. So, you know, they're not gonna show that cause. And we've talked about it before, you know, there are so few writers in the peleton. Now, if you contend as a total FRANZ foam, a podium place would not be life changing career changing. So they will defend a third place or full place or place. In contrast to the JIRA where you give them on a two minute volunteers by virtue of time trial. Then it forces everyone else to to sort of come out from the from the show come out with this show early on and not creates all kinds of Castanon craze excitement. So you ain't away it seems country the doom and I'm would want to go into a situation like on with the race season controlled. But I think he feels and probably other people feel that sky all Batra controlling than what would be. You spoke to his coach coach Hendrick verners while than data. Rich must hate from Hendrick showy while we have some people in the in the Baker onto Kaya Canadian old kind of face to mations about the cause of all the time kilometers about the climbing percentages into about his abilities with they would fit the best like just physically and what we also learned from last series like, yeah. Already focusing on this and also take this benefit with him to the to also gave something like addiction wise, and it would pretty well. So it had a good experience was it and to the cause suited much much better in the Jiro this year on much much it it's you'd better and to his quite some love for Italy. And also for the calls, and it's when he said like, well, if a really think about it would be up for the same option. Last year. I was talking to writer Khudzha few a couple of weeks ago, and he was talking about this phenomenon now with riders they look on straw, and they look on even Instagram on. And they they're more aware everyone else is doing and they develop almost paranoia. And do you find that sometimes? Yeah. It's it's the same sit in the last team. They also some really looking for the so basically if you want to get better in something if you want to get burying your interviews if you want to get better in doing presentational something, but if two two injuries your. What is it readiness? But you'll open also for fail of. So you have to if to switch from performance zone in races way, do everything right way. Either item on the way to everything. Right. And you don't think in learning zones? So that means you are ready to also tolerate mistakes. But you also like on purpose getting too hot. And in the end don't eat enough. Basically, you have to get used system out of comfort that the system reeks Shen and for this. Sometimes if to switch from this performance this learning own, and it's definitely something was stop ice sold that you know, that all this visible, you tend to train more in Graz zones because you know, like, okay, this everage speed. You can see later their people seeing whole facia right the climb and so on so probably you don't allow. Oh yourself too, right? Twenty per hour somewhere and enjoy view or to do the recovery just little easier. But you put just a little bit more or the time way really want to do it easy. Probably also go from numbers go for probably don't also allow was that was what I was talking with the bunking that you don't allow your heart rate to to explode and go through the roof. So that he do everything right and probably don't get the same addictions, then without using straddle. If you want to show transparency and also want to share with your doing, then it's all good. But the moment you sides and doing this in comparison to others, then you own the room trick. Kosta supported by sciences, sports, science and sport fueled by science. Thank you to scientists sport for supporting the cycling podcast again, very grateful to them for their for their long term support. And that you can get twenty five percent off all your scientists products sciences sport dot com with the code SIS's p twenty five s I s c p twenty five science sport dot com before the break there. We heard from Hendrick Verner the coach Tom to web on one of the coaches team son web. And and what said by while. Strive an and writers clocking other will other writers doing the level of transparency that that there is if our on 'em strove and even on social media Instagram, and so on I mean, the thing this this question of yours Daniel came from a conversation you had with. With in bows. Well is not right. Did rich this phenomenon of I'm going to call it straw, annoying. Basically, this alita looking closely at observing other people's training over the winter and getting into a bit of a a taste about it and thinking that you're not doing world, Gilead dorm. We have handled through more and. Yeah, and Hendrix says it's actually can be quite a an obstacle. An inconvenience for someone like him as a coach you setting people specific exercises today specific types of training, and in some cases in the past with him. He says they've been guilty of trying to basically keep up appearances on on straw, not doing the exercises and making sure that maintain decent speed or making they're going for KOA. King of the mountains. It's why I'm on strata. Don't want people to see how. But I am on serve never turn on because I really do want to be judged for those also something I remember bunny Eisele mentioned to me the stall last year just about the social media by pride is that, you know, even picture on Instagram of someone having a coffee. With a big chocolate with whipped cream. It can be used it come be used or it could conceivably be used as I munitions against ROY too. It'd be bluffing. But it does it puts. I will. I thought was paranoia strategy Neue by team sky a few years ago into perspective for me because when there is a law of, you know, noise around team skies, refusal to release power or training data. Am I kinda wondered why they were so protective of that data on really what the big the big deal was I think I kind of understand a bit more now as the stuff's become more. Ubiquitous the am I, you know, these are writers kind of trade secrets I suppose and while the transparency is is fantastic. I can understand why some rate is want to keep this stuff, quiet. Yeah. I would agree. And another thing that comes up in comas aching the riders and sticky older riders now is how focused the younger generation is on dissecting and studying pouring over that training data. I mean that was another thing that in both will mentioned to me, but some of the younger rods contusion will out of training. They'll come back from the group training, right? And they'll spend pretty much the rest of that. While spend hours, they're off the going through power falls and comparing notes on what they've done what they've not done. Interesting little tip as well. In an insecure read in pro cycling magazine with Chris from a couple of months ago about how one big change with him lost years. His south beautiful case was rumbling on was that instead of coming back from training and really having a deep dive into his figures from the day session. He was doing was talking to lawyers on the phone, and he sold is symptomatic of how he lost focus on his on his training law spring in nugget as well felt that was really interesting. The you know the. Eat. It wasn't just that. That case was on his mind was practically, you know, taking time and attention away from the recovery and the the stuff that you would do after train, right? It was interesting I fell, and I mean, you were east both other people team son web while you were there Daniel on a few changes of that team nNcholas roaches in. I'm back. Lots is in he's come from Asia to our I'm on on the coaching staff. Villers former writer has has moved on as well and Brian Stevens who joined the team last year is still there and has quite important role starting helping Michael Matthews there and anyone else. I mean, I think you spoke to Nicklaus Royston did ranch before we have from him. Yeah. Just on that the change of personnel. I mean, we talked about it before somewhere. They have this mantra of keep challenging, and it's very much the view of. The team principally Yvonne spec and bring the people have to continually be moving out of one comfort zone. And well. Always challenging themselves. And I think some people have fallen by the wayside from that team. Because the teams felt that they've been doing that anymore. So yes, you say there couple of changes in the coaching stuff. They've also got a new head of our in d-, which is a title job, which sure exists in many teams, the the individual point that position is Pete. Roy accuracy used to ride for Scotia moaner, but few few changes in the writing stuff as well. I mean, backlands and Roach are suppose could be seen as direct replacements for Lawrence ten Simone Geshe to experience writers have been with the team for a long time, and is a very young team and presumably somewhat felt they needed to out of bit of experience. So Roach on backlines of come on stuff. I did speak to nNcholas Roach bouts, let him choosing somewhere up, and what his role is going to be in two thousand nineteen end on what he's vision of his career is beyond two thousand nineteen as well. Still with. Able to ride in and support the rotted. I could win deter or winner granddaughter again. And I think I did this team. In a way offered the perfect spots where you know, I realize that I'm I'm not as young as before I believe, I can sympathize some good performances over the year Nassir. It was a bit exception. A lot of things going on in my my person. I I kind of paid the price into bike. But that's that's a page that I had that I've turned now. And I think this year having this this is sluggish roles of being a rider. That's there to shares experience to be there and support its broader and get a chances like, you know, for me, it's it's up to Monroe you've been in different teams and all different types of environment. Now from Asia to guide to saving. We'll have you come to firm conclusion about what kind of environment. She the kind of people you need to be working with how they need to treat. Yeah. So I think that, you know, over the years like you said I've eaten teams where you have freedom or two teams that are. Really controlled teams are a bit about I realize what suits me as the more organized the better. I feel that having the pressure of. Constantly reporting of conscious being demanded things and all that kind of have to keep me focused even more. Yeah. Exactly. I was told you it was like, you know, in like somewhere like, you know, I can school and military about men, exactly. And, but you know, the Adleman if I was twenty and the rebel say, I'm in so lose twenty minutes a day, ending, this and voice and five emails for this. Like, I say going through the years of my career. I realized when it's organize it just makes your life so much easier and younger. Spend so much energy and losing so much energy true stress because things organized that today looking back. I totally welcome organizing because at the end of the day. Yes, Morgan is Asian. But once again that that routine going it just makes your life so much easier. You don't need to stress things as much as a as when things kind of sorta for you. I'm not I'm not ready to retire yet. Couple of years ago. I said I wanted to go to that was forty. Oh, okay. So I won't I don't think I'm making ten forty. But ideally, I would like to three to four years. You know, it's just I just love this work too much. And I'm mentally. I'm not ready to give up liking it upon often. A few things going on, you know. Distribution company would friend of mine in Arden's where we dispute someone the main bronze and in psyching business. So I haven't quite pushed to develop dash, and my friend is kind of looking out in Arlington. We're we're slowly. But surely growing it and also invested for my best friend from school in London in a in a restaurant in the city. So we'll kind of it's. It's kind of is not a healthy takeaway office food. So it's your, you know, it's going farm. So she'll get it from on Instagram. It's you know, like your prearrange chicken with a bit of that white rice and broccoli or not going into the fantasy office quite efficient. You know, you have your porridge or soup, and as we went for the option, we didn't go for Ganic because organic, you know, it's it's label. It's sometimes also scares people, and you know, being in the city your work, quite a or main goal is business munch. So we have a we need to be quick. And and how it works. You know, we use all hundred percent recyclable dishes and all that. So it was just a isolated project. Nicklaus Roach there. I mean, what strikes me listening to nNcholas roaches enthusiasm? He's thirty four nine. He said he's been and lots of teams, maybe that's one way of keeping it fresh. But he doesn't seem like. The guy who is going through the motions certainly in conversation. He signs fool of enthusiasm and still, you know, still talking about getting his chances in summarizes. But also being quite motivated by you know, helping other writers. Yeah. Read Chaman to hear him talk about doing four more years potentially surprise me slightly. But it's interesting the end of last year particular the Welte where he read the BMC. There was just being around BMC kind of the sense of the few writers who were who've been sort of burned by the whole the whole thing of slow death of BMC, and they lost a bit of enthusiasm lost a bit of impetus. And that might then knowing some cases reflecting on the way they felt about the rest of that career, an nNcholas rich wasn't one of them. It's gonna be interesting to see what of job he does some web. He said that he he's been pencilled in for the Toda FRANZ if everything goes, well, I mean, they can have a good team at the Toyota FRANZ someone who's going to do the tool and. Wilco kelderman. He's also down to do the toward fronts. I I understand Kelvin was originally slated to the Jiro as a leader. Then Tom doom decided that he wanted to Jerry as well. So count them now is potentially going to be a domestique in both or domestique the looks and the Jiro on the toward FRANZ which for guy. He's of of his stature where he is in his career his age might seem like well a bit of an anti-climax, maybe. Well, dial before we go at this week, we have launched our friends program for twenty nineteen. It was launched before Christmas. Several signed up a friend of the podcast, and we have launched with our audio diaries from the three grand tours on the women's tour, so Jiro tour Vuelta on the women's tour, and they're all available night of the Welte diary, just. Come out and the each each episode over an hour long. And the all the kind of all that kind of stuff that didn't make into the podcast on some stuff that did make into the podcast, but it's all there, and thanks very much to those signed up on for your feedback. So far, those episodes gets are twenty nineteen friends program up and running they'll be more episodes to follow very soon, including my special from the UB's Ma camp just before Christmas begin become a friend of the podcast this I cling podcasts dot com. This comb it costs fifteen pounds for the year. And or you can pay more if you are feeling generous if you fancy submitting an idea to be against editor of an episode this year, you can do. So if you pay a little bit more, so thank you very much. Everybody who has signed up, and we'll be by next week with a an episode focused on the world's winningest team. Can I use that term at? Declining quickstep Lionel oversee confirm the pronunciation about will becoming sweet he's almost Vince fuse from there Elsa along Patrick Fave, which will feature as a friend special as well. And some interesting stuff from there looking back on his and his life, and cycling and Donyell. You're working on a friend specials. Well, you know, trying to put pressure on me, not all. Yeah details. We ready not ready by twenty twenty four x well, there's an incentive for people to keep so many out year after year. No, I is. I think is quite a minute. Isn't it on the looking forward to hearing that one no details oversee for coming from dying woman? But we'll tease them of over the next few weeks. I'm so we've go back in the weekly the weekly rhythm to done under starts next week, doesn't it? Are you ready for some racing Daniel Naipaul favorite race? Of course. Yes. Yes. I'm ready for some racing. Yes. Rich, none of the indoor the the cross country cross country still cyclocross to come this year, the world championships will we'll have to do something on the cyclocross as well. As some point before we thought that we like cyclocross. Yeah, we did a little mini series. We'll do something from cyclocross this year. While but we're not sure what yet, but that will will come. But. Yeah, that's all for this week. We'll play with an excerpt from one of those audio diaries from the grand tours from last year, and we'll play with that. But for the moment, thank you much. Daniel. Thank you rich managed to accident park in the wrong place and lose my press accreditation. This morning, I such everywhere in the call for it and start to wonder whether I can cover the remaining three days of my wealthiest in as a rogue unofficial outside rather than both of the staff in the press office for another poss-. Fortunately, it's very low key start with a tiny crowd of people are no barriers keeping the public away from the team buses. So I'm able to do what I've normally to with. Oh, I fail somewhat naked without my official to pass and lanyard. Atiko for few people on my hit list for an episode of kilometer we making on cycling's transfer market. It's always struck me how dysfunctional democrates depending on the circumstances. Sometimes arrived is how the up a hand. But most often it's the teams in the shows every August when ROY doesn't teams are allowed to begin announcing that plans for the following year. It feels a little like a game of music jazz as we seem with the poor transfer from BMC racing to trick freighter. Sometimes teams future hinges on the destiny of one particular writer, often riders competing in the lost of the season's grand tools of Welte knowing their writing out that notice period with current teams to when Daniel and I discussed the way the transplant market works for the cost Orientale je another of my flights offensively suggesting a week of the season. When the trench so has announced one after the other with all the drama and razzmatazz of the NFL NBA draft. You've been listening to the cycling podcast. Subscribe on news at the socking podcast. Dot com to get all the latest news and special office delivered straight to your inbox. This episode was edited and produced by Tom Wally.

Jiro writer Daniel Naipaul Tom Patrick Fave Lionel Bernie ROY ROY France Toyota Nickless Roach Instagram Rafeh US Donyell Tom Milan FRANZ Spain Australia Dennis
Live from L.A. with John Legend and Patrisse Cullors

Deconstructed with Mehdi Hasan

49:40 min | 1 year ago

Live from L.A. with John Legend and Patrisse Cullors

"Good evening I'm Mandy Hassan. Welcome to a very special edition of deconstructed here in La California in front of a live audience at the Writers Guild Theatre today. We're talking about an issue of huge importance literally of life and Death. Which in the past and get that much attention but thankfully recently has been going up and up the political agenda. I'm talking of course about criminal justice. Reform mass incarceration police brutality institutional racism dealing with the prison system which locks up more people than any other country on earth that incarcerates black men at six times. The rate as white men and yes impeachment and Iowa and Iran have dominated the news headlines in recent weeks and the presidential election will undoubtedly occupy our attention for the rest of this year but we cannot afford to ignore this huge issue. This festering sore in our midst. So that's what we here in L. A. To discuss tonight with two very special guests my first guest is an artist organizer. A CO founder of the Black Lives Matter Global Network and the author of the New York Times bestseller when they call you a terrorist. A black lives matter memoir a native of La. She's currently leading. Yes on our a ballot initiative aimed at reforming the La County prison system. That will be voted on in next month's Primary Election Ladies and gentlemen please welcome and make some noise for Patrisse cullors. My next guest really needs no interruption. But I'M GONNA try. He's a world famous multi-award-winning artist and musician grammys Oscars Golden Globes emmys. Tony's he's wonderful but he's also an activist philanthropist founder of Free America Campaign to transform the US criminal justice system by trying to end mass incarceration. I'm one lasting. He was also chosen by magazine to be the sexiest man. Alive in November. Two Thousand Nine Hundred Ladies and gentlemen. Please put your hands together for the legendary John. Legend Patrice John. Thank you both for joining me on deconstructed John. Let me start with you. Your best known of course feel music a lot of high profile sexiness sexiness sexiness and museum. You'll pick you choose a lot of less sexy but high profile musicians and artists liked to throw their weight their fame their reputation name behind good causes behind campaigns charities philanthropy. Some of them tend to go for the fashionable stuff. The sexy stuff if you will. What made you get involved with? Put your wealth and fame behind this rather what some people might say unfashionable unsexy of criminal justice reform going into prisons helping ex convicts turnaround their lives. How did it all begin? Part of it was through personal connection and I think if you talked to any person of color in this country all of us have relatives who have been through either. The prisoner jail system All of us have had some level of interaction with the criminal justice system with law enforcement and so we see on a very personal level how it affects our families our communities and We've I think a lot of us and I personally was guilty of this kind of looked at it more as a personal responsibility issue. Because you know I did the right things. I think you know get caught up in the criminal justice system but I have friends in my community that did neighbors of mine that day family members of mine that did and at the time you thinking. Oh they messed up. They did something wrong and they deserved it. This is how we punish people for doing something wrong. They deserve to go to prison for whatever the A lot of time is that's been legislated by our By our lawmakers we assume that that's how things are supposed to work and There's a almost a fatalism a attached to that but when you realize that it doesn't have to be this way then you start to think. Well how did we get here? How do we get off this path and changed courses to have a more humane system so I started reading? I started reading a Michelle Alexander's book new. Jim Crow and Brian Stevens Book. Just mercy read other writers who talked about how we got to this place. I realized a after reading that we were incarcerated country in the world. I didn't know that I didn't know that as I was just going through life being pretty politically engaged and pretty politically aware. Getting involved in you. Know Senate elections and presidential elections and endorsing candidates. I was going through a lot of Americans. Don't know yeah I was going to live not knowing this and I want an Oscar for glory. We wrote this song for Selma and common and I got up on stage and I had just been reading. Michelle's book and I got up there and said in honor of Dr King and the struggle that he fought for and that so many people after him and before him and fought for. I WanNa talk about one of the critical civil rights issues of our time when it came to justice and equality and freedom in America which was the fact that we've decimated so many communities and families due to locking so many people in this country and we do it way more than everybody else. We have like three percent of the world's population but twenty five percent of the world's prison population. So I got up on stage when I accepted award for glory and said we live in the most incarcerated country in the world and we need to do something about it and folks who are marching with our song. We're with you and so I- organize my team around thinking about this issue and saying we need to do something about it. Let's engage. Let's listen let's learn. Let's talk to experts. Let's go to prisons. And Jails and talk to the folks who were there talked to folks who have come back home afterwards. talked to all kinds of stakeholders and see what we can do to make a difference. And so we've started free. America embarked on this journey of listening learning about it. And I know it's not the most fashionable cars for celebrities. It's not the safest cause for celebrities because they're our enemies that are pretty well organized enemies of reform but for me it was personal and it was worth it to get involved in this issue because we WANNA see big change. We know how impactful it is. You say. It's personal if you don't mind me mentioning this in two thousand fifteen you wrote very movingly about your mother who was imprisoned and you talked about how drug addiction tour about her life and you said and I quote. My Mother didn't need punishment. She needed. Help yeah she was. She never went to an actual prison but she went to jail and locally and in our hometown and this was all due to her Drug addiction problems at the time. This is when we were pretty young and my answer recently got divorced and she had gone into a depression after her mother died and this caused her to kind of spiral into a place where she started using drugs to self medicate and so many of us know. Stories of people like that So many of us have family members and friends at that. Descend into that same place. Some of it's because they were prescribed painkillers by the doctor and the name became addicted to opiates whatever. The reason is this is a health issue. People need help and and we don't need to put them in jail or prison. Patrice how did you end up here as this globally renowned organizer activists? What led you to this point where you're campaigning against prison. Violence against police brutality. Literally Twenty Four Seven. I am well I just WanNa say thank you so much to everybody who is here tonight thank you John. Thank you ready for this critical conversation. I think Los Angeles is the way. Selma was to voting rights act. Los Angeles is to criminal justice reform. What we do here in this county matters not just here at matters nationwide argue matters globally and so I really enter this work as a person who also grew up with family Cycling and out of the jail system and the prison system and just clarifying purpose for our audience. A jail prisoner two different things. A jail is where people go to retrial. People are usually set there and held there even if they are innocent and then at the place where they often are convicted and sent to prison where they do their sentence and so here in Los Angeles County we actually have the largest jailer in the world and our county is has the largest gel department largest police department sheriff's department and what I witnessed growing up as a child was over incarceration. What I witnessed was police. Brutality and I knew that our communities didn't deserve it. I felt it in my heart. I felt it in my spirit and I wanted to do something about it. And so as I became politicized as I became informed about the issue at the local level. I showed up and I started to try to figure out. How do I organize specifically around the issues of policing and jailing so right now? Your best known globally in your own black lives matter right now there you'll spearheading the spearheading. The yes on our campaign which is A. There's a big vote on it next month. Explain to our audience. Both here in the whole Anna home listening around the country and around the world. What is that? What does it matter so much share and John? Thank you for being an early endorser like John came on board when we are gathering signatures for a ballot measure for the audience. If you've never worked on the ballot measure. It costs a lot of money to change laws. It takes a lot of people power to change the laws and it makes sense why rich people are able to stay in power. That is one of our biggest takeaways and this boat. Yes on ours. Vote for the people. It's a vote that really is about ten years of organizing that's lifted us to this moment. So measure R is going to do two things one. It's going to hold the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department accountable for corruption and number two. It's going to create a pathway for adequate mental healthcare in Los Angeles. We have the largest mentally ill population inside our gel system making the Los Angeles Gel System the largest mental health provider. Do you all hear that our county jail is the largest mental health provider which means that most of those people are being over medicated abused they're being cycled in and out of the streets and back into prisons back into jails back into psyche ours. They're not receiving the treatment that they deserve. Patrice it's funny. You mentioned the kind of rich people staying in power and how hard it is to change the law. There's a poll done by the ACLU. Not Too long ago. Which found ninety one percent of Americans want to see the criminal? Justice system fixed seventy one percent of Americans including fifty two percent of trump's supporters. Less than say it is important to reduce the prison population in this country. Two out of three Americans agree that black people are treated unfairly by the criminal justice system. So you have all these public opinion in favor of change reform and yet it's taken so long to get to a point where we're actually having these ballot initiatives measures changing of law at the federal level absolutely. Well first of all incarceration as a failed experiment. We have to remember. This is an experiment. This has not always been the case in our country in the world. And so what we've seen over the last thirty years as a growth in the prison population growth and the GEL population. And now what you're seeing is people saying. This isn't solving crime. This isn't keeping US more safe. In fact people are coming home from jails and prisons and their families are completely up ended. There's so much chaos. And so what what people are yearning for and this country is a new way of relating to each other a new way of being together and criminal justice the current criminal justice system. Take our families apart Joan. You've been involved in some actual successful state-led efforts local efforts to turn things around. For example you're involved in Louisiana in getting amendment to pass which got rid of anti-black Jim Crow jury laws you backed amendment for in Florida which restored or tried to restore voting rights to form a fellow. Republicans trying to stop that from happening. What was your message when you were fighting those campaigns. How did you think what what's the best way to cut through the average voter when I say the average voter? I mean the white vote. Well it's amazing. It's amazing what happened in Florida's such a hopeful story because it makes you feel like we can do a lot of major things together if we come together and what happened. Is the Florida rights restoration? Coalition led by this wonderful man named Desmond me he He had been in prison for quite a long time but he came out ready to lead. He came out You know ready to go to law school all these all these other things but As he found out in as everyone finds out that comes out of prison particularly with felony convictions. Society throws all these additional barriers. To you reintegrating when you know if we were doing what was most sensible in most just and most cost effective. We would all want everybody that came out of prison to never have to go back. We would all want that to be a high priority but we do things that are backwards when it comes to that we make it harder for them to get housing. We make it harder for them to get a job and we make it harder for them to vote and so one of the issues that he decided to focus on was less restore the right to vote for all these folks who had felony convictions in Florida. Florida was one of only three states in America. Where a Lifetime? Ban was in place on on folks who had felony convictions. Being able to vote so the only way they would get to vote. Was they had to affirm affirmatively Petition the governor To relax this band so individually. They'd have to do that and it almost never happened. So you had over a million people in Florida who could not vote and the threshold to pass a ballot initiative in Florida is sixty percent so just think of how evenly divided. Florida always is always waiting. You know on election night to see who wins those electoral votes. And you know it's come down to five hundred boats allegory loss. So you've seen how evenly divided. That state is and how frustrating Florida politics can be. But they were able to in a bipartisan coalition. Go to the people of Florida and say these folks deserve redemption. They deserve a second chance. They deserve to get reintegrated back into society by voting and it pass with over sixty percent in an publicans came in and Republicans voted for it because in that same election. Republicans won the Senate and they won the gubernatorial election. So folks were voting for at that were voting for Republicans but then you have this problem where they won the gubernatorial race. The governor is now trying to has done everything he can to stop yes referendum this ballot from implement when you look at Florida. There's pushback when you look at. For example. The cash bail system in this country which is such an outrage anti-poor anti-black discriminatory two out of three people in us. County jails of pretrial any kind of courtroom conviction astonishing statistic and yet in New York. You have a bail reform which passes comes into effect is immediately attacked. That's the cause of rising crime. You're letting criminals out in California. I believe where they had the bail. It's been there's a referendum later this year because the bail bonds industry managed to get it delayed. So do you feel. Sometimes it's one step forward two steps back when it comes to criminal justice reform. I feel like I feel like we're winning right now. I feel like Even Florida if you look at how the laws being applied the courts and there are a lot of friendly courts that are are are are advocating for voters rights in the State of Florida. They're able to say you've served the body of your sentence The and some of these fines and fees are extras to your actual sentence. And so we're able to certify that you're eligible to vote so there are a lot of people that won't even be excluded Because of this new fines and fees regulation because The they can get a court to tell them That that's not part of their proper sentence because you can see how you can add all kinds of fees and things on top of things that aren't really in the body of someone sentenced and they've served their time and they should be allowed to vote. So we're we're dealing with it. We're helping to raise money to advocate on behalf of folks who are affected by the law. And I think we took several steps forward and maybe a step or two back but I think overall it's been a net positive. A lot of people will have their voting rights restored. And we'll be able to vote in this year's election in Florida and what happens in New York and what happens all around the country. There are folks who have an investment in the status quo. Sometimes police unions sometimes. It's the bail bondsman. Sometimes it's some of these prosecutor associations and they all like the status quo where we punish more. We give police all the power with very little accountability. They they want that system to be the system that rules the day. But folks are are coming out. legislators who Who are being bold and saying we need to be smarter on crime and not tougher on crime and they're not letting fear Stop them from doing. What's right Patrice? Do you agree with John Aid? You agree that we're winning and be take California for example. There's going to be this vote later this year on on on the bail issue. You're GONNA win that. I think it's a little bit more complicated than that. I think it depends on how you understand winning. I believe that we're building political power and that to me is winning. We may have moments where the right lash out on us. That's going to happen. That's their job. Their job is to try to destroy the winds and gains that. We've gotten we're prepared for that. And so part of what? It's important especially for the audience for you to understand the moment we win things that in that moment there waiting to fight back and that is not an unsuccessful that means that we are winning that means that we're pissing people off and we should be and so. I think we've already gotten a threatening message from our local sheriff measure R. He tweeted about it and I was like good. You're noticing and if we were worried about if we stayed worrying about being attacked a we would not be out of slavery would he would not be out of a lot of really disturbing places we've been at in this country and so we are. We are absolutely building. The power of the people most marginalized and that to me is success. You mentioned you mentioned slavery. And I'm reminded John. You mentioned your speech as well as the Oscars in that speech you said there are more black men under correctional control today than there were under slavery in Eighteen. Fifty which is astonishing shocking. What was the reaction to that from your fellow artist? People who you're saying you were digging into this reading about it and reading the New Jim Crow. What was the reaction when you hear somebody like that? On my manager's mother She she's an older white lady in Philadelphia and she's a liberal woman and she you know she was just astonished that I said what I said on stage and was like what is John Smoking like. She's like I can't believe he said the staff that can't be true and I think a lot of really didn't know it was true and And I I took a little bit of heat for saying it but I felt vindicated because I knew I was telling the truth and I wanted to shock people and make them say we need to make some change happen and I followed it up with action. I spent the last several years following it up with action and and really working on this issue and trying to solve it and speaking about these issues in front of crowds like this all around the country for years. Now just briefly. What kind of things. It's free America done so a lot of it. Some of it's been on the political side and that's kind separate from our proper nonprofit role so we have to separate those things when we're advocating for candidates things of that nature so. I personally do that but we have been out there creating awareness. We've been saying these are the issues that are most important. Let's inform people about the role of district attorneys for instance because we've gotten involved in I personally have endorsed district attorney candidates but also as a free America. We've been educating the public on. This is what a DA does and this is why you should care about your da election because a lot of people aren't aware of the fact that so many of the the sentencing decisions the choice of what to charge the choice of what kind of bail to pursue all these decisions are made by unaccountable prosecutors. So they're on accountable because we don't hold them accountable and we we do. We pay attention. We vote and we And we create demand for more progressive. Prosecutors we get them and we and I personally endorse people like Kim Fox in Chicago. Larry Crasner in Philadelphia. All of whom are making a real changes to change the way. The policies work in the city. So I wanNA come back and talk about this in a moment about the progressive prosecutors about the importance of elections and politics. We've got a big election coming up nationally in November. Before I do Patrice. John mentioned like you know Nice. Liberal White Ladies Statistics Compu- true racism racism. One of the words we hear before the Word Race is institutional racism twenty to explain to our audience when you say the criminal. Justice system is institutionally racist. What do we mean by the well? I mean that I mean the entire country country is racist. It's founded on racism America. The concept The way it's been produced. What it's created is an anti black racist country and so when we're talking about the criminal justice system we're talking about a system that has relied on using that anti-black racism to punish people and to use punishment as a way to talk about mass incarceration and so our system is a system that has completely decimated communities and been specifically communities of Color in Los Angeles County. Eighty percent of the population is people of Color. Fifty Percent Latino forty percent are black and thirty percent are black and so I think it's been really important. It's been important in the last few years to challenge. Us idea that this isn't a racist country or that we don't have a racist president even though one breath he'll say something racist the next breath and say. I'm not racist and so we have to keep sort of grounding down and what is racism how it impacts institutions and how impacts the people that are part of those institutions. So you mentioned the president. What do you make of president trump trying to portray himself as the champion of criminal justice reform last week? You had the Super Bowl ad where we still alice. Johnson grandmother who was serving a life sentence for selling crack freed by trump and also in a state of the Union speech. He said and I quote. Everybody said the criminal justice reform couldn't be done but I got it done referring to the first step act that he did sign. What's your response when you hear him or Republicans? Say those are the facts. I think we have to be really careful about what we're categorizing as criminal justice reform and so if we look at the immigrant rights movement and this call to abolish ice and attention seminaries. That is a huge part of criminal of the criminal justice system and so if we are only talking about one part of that system for only lifting up one individual for only talking about one single act that isn't actually progressive that that isn't actually reform and so my challenge to forty five and my challenge to people who are saying he. Is You know being the criminal. Justice Forum president is that that is untrue. He is at the very same time holding babies and detention centers. That is not criminal justice reform and I think what he's doing he's a. He's an effective Media person what he's doing as he's framing black people as his way to move us to vote for him and so he's really touting us and so black folks in the audience and listeners. Be careful That is you being used. That is not authentic engagement and just just to just tie a another Bo. Run IT and maybe move us to the prosecutor. Compensation his is his department of Justice has a whole slew of prosecutors and they make discretionary decisions about how they pursue certain crimes and and how to implement these laws that are put into place. They are even advocating for people who were freed by the first step to get back in prison so there there. Bill Bar is an extremely punitive hon. Very far right attorney general. So and so when he's implementing policy. He's he's not only not only undermining the law he's making it worse than it was prior to the status quo status quo listening to you. John Can I assume that when you say all this stuff you disagree with Kim Kardashian West who was praised Donald Trump for his passion on criminal justice reform and says it was really remarkable to see? How community is all of this guy. He has a passion for Self aggrandizement I think it has a passion for Trying to cheaply win black votes I think he has a passion for doing whatever helps. Donald Trump I think he has no passion for actual justice and he has a passion for he has a passion for undermining the FBI. They're investigating him as well. I think all of his motivations are selfish and self serving and he has no concern for the ordinary lives of ordinary folks. He also has a passion this week. You so here's especially with the death penalty so this week the week off three said he was criminal justice reform. He comes out of the White House and says he wants to bring in the death penalty drug dealers support because he he supports the Filipino. President is doing there and and other other oppressive regimes around the world are doing. He believes we should be more punitive more. More destructive cabinet colleagues on cigarette and Jordan Smith did an amazing series which urged to check out counting the condemned where they put together a basically a database of everyone who sends a distance on these seventy six and one of the interesting. This is in recent years. It's gone down. The number of people sentenced to death and this is worry now again. One step forward two steps back with this president and with this party. Are we going to see now a new age for the death penalty? Well that's why this is a critical conversation district attorneys. Are we ready to go there? Let's go to raise your hand if you know what your your district attorney does less than half the crap. That's in half but probably better than it used to be five years ago because I would swear five years ago no one would know. I didn't know what our district attorney. You only know from watching good wife. I'll be honest I'm British. That's my excuse. Then the district attorney seat is probably the most powerful seat in your county. It's the person who can tell you if you're going to spend no time in jail more time in jail the rest of your life in jail gets the death penalty and so my big thing twenty sixteen happened. I was like you know what I'm really trying to mess with forty five but what I can do is be home and change the system at home. And what I've encouraged people wherever I go is look at your local system. If we have a strong county that means we have a strong state that means we have a strong nation and for living and the resistance state supposedly then that we have to force our counties in this resistance state to also be resistance counties so the district attorney that we have Right Now da. Jackie Lacey Boo. I didn't even have to prompt you. That means we've done a good job for the last. Two years has has sent most has sent the largest number of people to death than any other county in the country. She claims that she is for people with mental illness but she has refused to create a true department. That's really helping people with mental illness. She was against prop forty seven against fifty seven all propositions that were for criminal justice reform and she's ultimately turned our back against the community. And so we're calling for a new district attorney and we're lucky in Los Angeles because we actually have two other people who are running against so so. I'm not note John. Let me bring you into this conversation your back. You held an event with him last week. I believe George GASCON WHO's running. Who's running a former San Francisco? Former police officer. What do you say to people who say isn't weird that the incumbent Jackie Lacey is a black woman? Challenger is a white guy and yet on criminal justice reform. This is the person to get behind. I think it matters what they stand for. A identity isn't going to be the sole determinant of what their policies are going to be. And Gus going has been a leader when Progressive District Attorney's progressive. Prosecutors we we had a convening of them in New York Years ago when we started started our campaign and we could fit them all a little a little table at the Soho House in a little little side. Room at the Soho House in New York when we met with them and he was one of the leaders of that group. And as we've started to help get more elected over the years we've seen those ranks grow but he's been a leader before a lot of other people were and he was doing this in San Francisco and helping lead. What happened in California as well through the work? He was doing and He's he's been at the forefront of a lot of the reforms and we wanna see and so we think he's the best person for the job that's running and so that's why we support him. Am It's interesting patrice that he's a cop and yet the police unions both in San Francisco and in La vehemently opposed to candidate sign. That's whatever honestly whatever. The police unions are four. Be against whatever their against before it almost works everytime. That's good advice on the on the DA's race that. I'm endorsing anyone but I will ask apart from the DA's race obviously very important in you. Very eloquently portrays later important as a county level resistance counties. Obviously it's equally and some argue more important less important. What happens in November at the presidential race? Is there a candidate that you fancy on criminal Justice Reform? I know the Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren both endorsed the. Yes on our campaign. Is there someone you think is going to be the president who can help turn around this supertanker on criminal justice reform lead from the top? Well I do WanNa talk about the race and the presidential race. I'm I'm going to be very New York Times. I'm actually endorsing. Both George Gusts going and Rachel Rasi. I think we need all hands on deck to get Jackie Lacey and depending on who gets into the Office. I do think we need to be training a new system inside of Los Angeles because that office is so corrupt and we need new people to come in and change it and so I'm excited about the both of them. I'm ready to really get people involved so I'll be making my. This is my official announcement tonight. But I'll be making tomorrow morning as well and relationship to the presidential candidates. I'm going back. And forth between Warren and Sanders. I've had great conversations with both of them. I think that they would both be excellent president of the United States. I think you know I. I WANNA beat trump I with my whole heart and soul. WanNa beat trump. And so I also WANNA be Biden's I just want to be really clear with I. I mean almost done which shows you which shows you where where the country is at. And so you know that. Those are the two candidates that I'm really interested in that and I'm having the most conversations with and I think it's important for us to think about this Holistically because I've I've endorsed Senator warm for the Democratic nomination. But I didn't do it on one issue. It wasn't just because of criminal justice It was a holistic judgment based on what I thought impressed. Have you been excited about? The candidates are taking this issue. And I think it's because of people like Patrice people like me all of us in this room that are pushing our candidates. Even you saw this with Hillary. Even in two thousand sixteen like black lives matter folks were pushing her and she responded and I think she responded well to allow the critique she was getting about some of the things she had said back in the tough on crime era of the Democratic Party of you know when her husband was president and I think she was getting pushed and it was a healthy push that we were giving her and so I think all of us no matter who the candidate is have to keep pushing them and telling them that they're responsible and accountable to us and they need to listen to us and they need to be afraid of pissing off so so whoever this candidate is but we also have to be smart and realized that Gascoyne is going to affect or whoever the DA is going to affect more about. What's happening in Los Angeles when it comes to criminal justice than any president ever will okay? You have to be very aware of that. So you have a multipronged strategy. You can't just be thinking about who you're presents going to be or even who's going to represent us in Washington we have to be thinking about. Who's running this city running this county and who's the State House in Sacramento? It's very good point. I'm Patricia would say prepping for this. I was thinking of asking questions about Joe Biden but I think we may not have to worry about Joe Biden for very much longer in fact when this New Hampshire will already have happened but you know who else is running in his now zooming up the polls to man named Michael Bloomberg and interestingly Michael Michael Bloomberg was the Republican Mayor of New York. And here's what's interesting when he announced his campaign he said. I'm really sorry about what I did. Stop and Frisk and maybe went too far and no one told me at the time and I was asleep or whatever it was. What's so what's so interesting on the one hand. It's kind of bad that he's so cynical. Waited all these years to run for president to say this on the other hand. It's Kinda cool that he felt. He had to say that before he could enter the Democratic Race. Absolutely there is growing movement that has been bubbling up for a decade that is challenging all of the elected officials that decided to lock up. People like my brother. People like my father the dozens of community members and family members who were children literally. And so these candidates feel accountable. And that is that is because of us that is because of our movement and for me and you know part of what happened. During the eight years of the Obama Administration as people felt like okay. We got our president. Were good and that is the worst thing for you to do. When you're part of democracy we need to be in the democracy. This is what that looks like. It's why in two thousand sixteen. When forty-five got elected. Everybody was like. Oh Shit. We got comfortable. I love the you. Don't say his name. That's kind of cool. I'm going to borrow that forty five. I can't do it. I can't do it and just before we just before we end this presidential part of this discussion. I'm just going to say a name and you can both respond people to judge. I didn't ask. The audience wants to go. I I honestly don't know that much about him. You know a mayor of a small city and I truly don't know that much about him. I I'm not. I'm not shat on any Democratic candidates that may be our nominee that I'm going to have to go out and and knock on doors for I like I am not GonNa do it so I I want all of us. As voters to push our candidates to be the best candidates they can be and whenever we have a nominee we need to keep pushing them but we also need to be clear that we need to win the White House and if the presidential nominee wins the election and rings John Legend the morning after their election. Victory or the morning after the inauguration says if I have to do one thing I only have two space to do one thing on criminals should I lead in first thing? I should do well. I don't know I'd have to come up with. I would do a lot of thinking and and say here. Here's an agenda. Here's a criminal judge in that we would really get behind but again. I really believe that so much of these decisions that are impactful are going to be the ones who are getting involved in in L. A. in Florida in New York all these states and local areas control so much in the system. Ten percent of our prison system is the federal prison system. So it's a tiny portion of what's happening in the country The first step act trump was very upset that we didn't talk about him. At that event I did with NBC Levy Cool on me onboard. Email filthy mouth. Why he was so mad he was so mad that we didn't talk about it but we didn't talk about it because it's not that big of a deal and it didn't impact that many people and then his Justice Department was undermining as it was getting implemented. So it's just it's just a drop in the bucket compared to all the other things we need to get done. The master of the insult for you is boring. John could come up with on twitter on Sunday night. My wife agrees that I'm pretty boring when the one thing we haven't talked about briefly I do want to get your take on it. Which is something the something that the Democratic Party and even progressive prosecutors haven't touched yet which is prison abolition the present abolition movement. It sounds so party radical. When you tell someone who doesn't want to get rid of prisons just briefly tell us what the cases sure yes. I am a prison abolitionist. Am I believe in and really what that means prison? Abolition yes well. It means that getting rid of policing and prisons as we know it. It's actually a call for immagination. It's a call to imagine something really radically different. Call to imagine a different way of being and relationships with each other and a different way of dealing with harm and violence in our communities. And so for me. I've been an abolitionist for almost fifteen years. It feels really natural to me. I'm so glad that it's finally giving getting some sort of like popularization but it's a call to have a true conversation about what we've invested in. We've invested in policing and people who are mostly homeless. Who are mostly drug dependent. Who mostly mentally ill who are suffering. And how can we actually attribute that to a healthy system? But what would you say to people who? I'm sure you get this all the time all the time with letting out nonviolent honestly what do you do with the serial killers on the races? So what I say is. Let's not start there. It's actually not it's actually a right wing conversation to start there because we can have that. Carl yes let's start with the eighty percent of people who are locked up in our jails and prison who actually deserve health dignity and humanity and then no abolitionist is saying. Release the one point eight million people out of jails and prisons today. That's not what's being said. What's being said is. Let's actually reinvest our dollars our resources and our spirits to something different absolutely and I I want to and we have just accept the status quo for so long. It just feels like it's it's a natural order like we just assume every thing that someone does wrong means they should go to a prisoner. Jill why is that the only solution we have to anything? Why is that? It's just like it's just our gun issue. Everyone's like oh we just need more guns because other people have guns. It's like destructive cycle. You interesting intervention can September when felicity Huffman from desperate housewives. Prison for the college admissions and a lot of people like what about all these black women who've print of along and you said I said none of them should be going to prison jail like down level down now level up and my point was we. It's a failure of imagination that we think prisons and jails are the only solutions we have these issues and most of these issues are due to poverty mental health drug addiction. All issues that can be addressed in other ways and and we can prevent these crimes from happening in the first place if we take smarter steps to do so but all we're doing is investing in punishment policing and it does not work. It's simply does not work. It does not keep us safe for before we finish. And that's a great way to round up our discussion. I JUST WANNA ask one thing more one of the reasons. I admire both of you so much. I'm delighted to have you on the show. Today is both take a very global perspective when it comes to criminal justice reform issues issues of discrimination issues of basic human rights. John you're one of the few celebrities actual allister's if you don't mind me calling you. That who is linked the fight for human rights civil liberties fight against detention. Mass incarceration here at home to what's been going on in the occupied Palestinian territories. How did you? How did you come to that condition? Where you're on Bill Maher and you say quote as Progressives. We should also speak up for the human rights of Palestinians. It's not something. We often hear from alias. Musicians is just feel like that's a baseline that's a baseline human position. There should not be a whole group of people in our country just because of their nationality or their religion being held in open air prisons and and denied freedom of movement and having their Lan and ex by settlers. And all these things that's just a human position I don't I'm not an expert in this area but one of the few kind of very very very famous people to smoke it out about it but I I think. I think it's just as someone who's observing what's going on in saying this is right or this is wrong. Clearly that's wrong what's happening to the Palestinians. It's it's so obvious anybody who's who doesn't believe that's the case or being willfully blind. I believe Patrice trees. We saw back in two thousand fourteen. Two Thousand Fifteen you so black lives matter protesters holding placards saying from Ferguson to Palestine. That was a pretty astonishing amazing unique connection to make at the time. Yeah I mean what we what was happening in Ferguson. While folks are being teargassed Palestinian community members were tweeting at them on how to heal themselves. Tear gas it was a profound moment and then many of us of the black lives matter movement actually went to Palestine in two thousand fifteen January and remember being on that trip and having conversations with folks and one of the women looked at me and said you. You look shocked. Are you okay like you've you've never really experienced anything like this hot? I said to her well the only time. I've seen anything like this as when I've been on the prison yard visit my father and so the issue around Palestine I think our generation in particular millennials have really challenged US ideas if we if we stand up for Palestine. That means we're anti Semitic I disagree with that and I think that what you've seen is a new generation of grassroots leaders and now people in Congress who are standing up for what's right. It's literally a human rights issue and lost last question both of you for me five years from now ten years from now. What does the Criminal Justice Reform Movement that you both have been working so hard and what does it look like and is there a point where you declare victory? We have to keep struggling. We honestly have to keep struggling. And we're getting wins. I like I said earlier there there. There are times when we have setbacks but I'm encouraged overall that we're making the case to the American people are making a case to our leaders and holding them accountable and we just have to keep pushing and we have to realize that fear is always going to be part of this conversation because whenever you talk about crime some people re revert to their fears. Their worst fears and there are certain politicians and police unions etc. That will plan those fears New York Post for instance. We'll do the same thing they play on people's fears and WE CAn't fear to dominate this conversation. We need to talk about community when you talk about health. We'd need to talk about taking care of each other and putting people in the kinds of safe and healthy communities where we won't even have major crime problems because of that. I think in five ten years if we look at our budgets locally state wide at the national level and if we are investing more in housing health care people having access to healthy food public education. And we're seeing a reduction in the prison and policing conversation. We're going to be and really good shape. Part of what happens every single year when we get new budgets at the local level in particular as every single budget gets slashed? Except for policing incarceration. We need to reverse that radically reverse that now not know. We'll have to end that conversation. Thank you to the right skill theater for host eons here in La. And thank you to John. Legend and Patrisse Cullors. And that's our show. Deconstructed is a production of first look media and the intercept our producer. Zach Young. The show was mixed by Brian. Pugh out theme music was composed by Bobby Warshaw. Betsy. Reid is the editor in chief and I Mary Hudson you can follow me on twitter at Maddie Hudson. If you haven't already please do subscribe to the show. You can hear it every week. Go to the dentist dot com forward slash deconstructed to subscribe from your podcast platform of choice iphone android. Whatever if you'll subscribed already please do leave a rating or review. It helps new people find the show. And if you want to give us feedback email us at podcast at the intercept comp. Thanks so much. See you next week.

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What do we stand for? - A Conversation About #BLM, Protests, Resources, + More

The Lucky Few

1:02:40 hr | 1 year ago

What do we stand for? - A Conversation About #BLM, Protests, Resources, + More

"And. Hey Friends Andy here producer of the lucky few podcast wanted to share with you about anchor I use it for all my shows that make up over two million downloads in plays date, and it couldn't recommend a better platform for your podcasting needs. If you haven't heard about anchors the easiest way to make a podcast, let me explain it's free. This is important because other hosting services come with the monthly cost, there's Chretien tools that allow you to record and edit your podcast. Right from your phone or computer and Acre will distribute your podcast for you, so it can be heard on spotify podcast more is a big deal I. I can tell you it takes quite a bit of time of your precious time to go through every platform and set up an account, but anchor does it all for you automatically? When you publish your first episode, you could also make money from your podcast with no minimum. listenership friends is truly everything you need to make a podcast in one place as long as you can get to a computer or smartphone. There's no fancy Mike necessary. No money necessary experience necessary. You could start a podcast literally what I finish this ad and start your show today download the free anchor APP and go to Anchor FM to get started. Hey Franz welcome to another episode of the Lucky Few podcast where we are shifting the narrative by shouting the worth of people with Down Syndrome. This is heather Mercedes and Mica. And today friends, we are keeping it relevant I always relevant, but we are with the Times in that according episode on a Wednesday that will come out in just a few days in less than a week, and we are going to be talking about black lives, matter and what we're seeing in our nation right now when it comes to racism in that conversation so. Buckle up and we're grateful that you here. Thanks for joining US welcome to the lucky few podcast. Ladies here we are butterflies. I see I usually do but. This okay up racist, always a hard conversation getting right any here we go. Yeah, let's it you know like if we were having a conversation about lots of things like. Don't talk politics. Religion is race part of that. I, what is what is the thing? Login and Now, I can't remember I can't remember their graces, but I feel like anybody who likes. Religion. Does it that things you're not supposed to talk about family dinners Jenner's, but this is a conversation that is important to each of us as individuals. It's important as collectively as. A podcast, and it's important to the competition the world right now so I know that we've talked. We've come back and forth. Like what are we going to release during this time and we have some really great episodes recorded coming up, but it also felt like. Let's let's talk about this because it. It deserves more than just an episode, but at least that you know. Before we hop onto back into some of the. We have coming up so here we are, I think we want to start by saying a couple of things foundation here for all of us one is as a listener, dear listeners. We Love You, we this is a space of grace, and we're excited to be listening learning alongside you and we recognize that Mica Mercedes and I have very similar ideas when it comes to racism in America in dismantling racism in America. We have different experiences, but we have a similar foundation. In our ideas a belief, so do agree without ladies yes. Oh, yes, okay I hope so so. In that regard, it is a little bit of a one-sided view. It's kind of what I'm saying in that. We have similar views again, not same experiences. This obvious I feel like that's important for you to know and our views are. We are all very much. Working towards anti-racism in our country. And we believe in white fragility. We believe that there are systems of oppression in place that have kept locked. People Oppressed. We believe that these systems need to be dismantled. These are just a few of the things. so that might make instantly. You feel really uncomfortable. We hope you stick around. anyways, we also, yes, we also know and believe that we all have a lot to learn and we none of us are the authority in this conversation, so just wanted to like. Put that out there. Yeah, there's a couple more things I would like to put out there. I think it's important for us to say that. Two out of three of us are white ladies in this circle. And in that sense, I just want to say Mercedes like if there is a moment that you feel like what heather and I are saying is not our right to say or not like not our our voice in that moment is not helpful. I, want you to feel like you can direct our conversation as the person who has experienced racism in your life in small and big ways, and I just want us to be really sensitive to how you feel in this conversation. Thinks friends. Yes, Yep Yep. Can I say I think you believe? In white fragility, I need to clarify that we believe that it exists and. Now we believe in. Wait! Just realized. From the camp that believes that exists yes and people. Anyway yes. I think. As as long as we're clarifying. I want to say one more thing that as we go into this conversation, we because we are a podcast about down syndrome, and because we are mothers of children with Down Syndrome I. Think it's GonNa. Make sense for us to make some comparisons to help our listeners Racism in a way that that lens for them in terms of their experience. So. That's the Lens. We're GONNA. Look at it through. Is kids with Down Syndrome but? I. Just want to say that. it's not our intent to set up like discrimination against children or people with disabilities as being equal in some way to racism. This is just a way for us to create a grid. From. To help us understand, help our listeners understand a little more of how racism is at work in the world. And what we mean, we talk about systems of oppression, and what it means that people are marginalized that make sense you guys. Make sense to me. And I listen to say yes. I think that people who have experienced marginalization and oppression have a lot of shared similarities, but we're not gonNA. Use One group to discount rate or to justify another I. think is another way of looking at that though. So here we are. All right, so let's start a little bit by the three of us sharing in our own in our own lives how we've been participating in essentially the movement that's happening right now in America over the last couple of weeks Mercedes start. Let's start with you, girlfriend. Okay, so in this all I guess came to a head. My hometown was having a protests by the beach sanctimony. Just GonNa name it and claim it. They were having a protest, and it was kind of like real fresh. Protests were kind of being more publicized as riots, and it was like considered dangerous to go to a protests in I kind of felt like I was so proud that saint was having because growing up in a very. Affluent White area. I don't think I wouldn't. I wouldn't have seen them doing this protests. So when I saw that it was happening for my friends posting an stories, my my gosh, I have to go even though I don't live there anymore. I still wanted to go to spot that as where I have experienced racism and small big ways, so and I knew I had friends that. That would go with me and I thought that was super special for them to represent people that are in that area, and so I went and it was, it was really great in a Lotta ways, and then also just really sat in and ways because it's not every day that you get the opportunity to see race to see possibly people who are racist in your face and. So I and I didn't think of that. When I asked my friends to go. I was actually kind of Giddy. Because A it was the first time. I've been hanging out in a crowd. Likelihood! And second I just think it's beautiful to be in the presence of people who are fighting for a really important and beautiful 'cause that directly affects my lights and my family, so in a way I was giddy like I got there, and I was moved, and like happy to be amongst people who thought like me and felt like there needed to be changed and work to be done. And there was a lot of police there which I I was kind of jarred by. It was like they were on the other side of the street and. and. It just felt. If they'll like we were at attention like if one person made one move like they were there to make sure that the state peaceful and that they were there. To I, Dunno ready to move, so it also like everybody. Keep the peace like there was attention there of. I don't know I. Don't know how to explain it, but there was attention like an US versus them. It was an s ready to battle if we. If we have to, and that was sad for me to see because I have also seen in different stories that cops have joined protesters or showed their support. You know and I Mike Oh how beautiful what of that have been? In. Such an area as southern Orange County you know that would have been be full, and on the same way of like the crowd that was there that was protesting was interesting to me, and it wasn't a lot of the people I grew up with. It wasn't there wasn't a massive amount, and it was my first time experiencing. How like we do need young people to still like? Push back on things like those were the people that were in the frontline. That's who are showing up at protests and staff, and I just have felt this wave of like Golly, how impactful would have been if it was like thirty forty fifty year old white people there? You know that actually are the population of Saney Dana Point. We're going to be each all those areas and I think at has happened since then, but it was in the beginning like there have been protests have taken over like the beach all over a grassy areas ending point San Juan and Santa many now. That is a better representation of that community. But in that first week it was two new. It was like protests were considered riots like I think there was a lot of fear of going and standing up so on that day it was a lot of people of color. More than it was white, which was abandoned because it's a primarily white area, since then it's a lot. More people have felt safe to come out, but I think in that moment it didn't feel safe or it fell almost like it wasn't for me, I think. And had an has time has gone, and people have been challenged and doing the research and. Stuff I felt like more felt affirmed in stepping up and stepping out, so that's good, but so anyways all that to say that it was a beautiful experience. I had really close friends by my side and I think it was much needed in that area yep. You by yourself with your friends like your. Kids are home and the kids stayed home, and for that reason. They're little. My voice can't even watch scary movies or totally. You've seen this heather. They can't walk cars. They can't watch. No I'm. Like, it's me, but it's like they are yes. Another little hearts and minds are various. Crowd's already. There are. Totally like the sound of lot like worship. volleying. Proud, what is Albany? We were just like all as much as I want them to be there i. don't think they would i. don't think the message resonate in a way. That felt sale. Scary, so we left them and I went by myself, and my girlfriends came and and to be honest. Some of them got fights with their husbands about going some didn't even tell their husbands because again. This is such a sensitive subject and that kind of hurt in some ways unlike buying no your husband, we all do family things together and I love them and I know they love me so i. don't get this, but. I think this topic even in that Mo- I mean we're only a week after and I feel like so much growth has happened, but also. It seemed like it wasn't for them. Then it's like who are protests for like. It's night on. This is not how we do it. That's kind of how it seems lowbrow to go and protesting what I mean. And, so it's strange and kind of heartbreaking, but also okay I'm aware and there's work to be done. I. I something you said Mercedes a couple of times that I, think is really important as we start to have. This conversation is that. That feeling. You know we I mentioned before we're GONNA compare this to down. Syndrome I remember before ace was born even like even knowing that he would have down syndrome feeling really uncomfortable participant like making a social media post about World Down Syndrome day when I was pregnant with him. And feeling like I wasn't but yet. In that world or invited into that world. And and I think one of the things that we WANNA state today as we talk about racism in this country. Is that There's not a moment where white people are going to be invited into this conversation. And tell they choose to join in the conversation. Things are not going to change in our country. And, and so it's this is a decision that are I. Really Hope our white listeners will consider that this is this is your place to step into. That That way. He. People need to start having this conversation because that's when change is going to happen and. And if you are sitting back and letting people of Color, carry this conversation it's. It's too much to. Put that burden or to even assume that things will change until. Everyone, steps into it. I think Mike. To clarify what you're saying from what I'm hearing it's. Because I heard. You say something like you're not being invited. Said but I think it's more like what I say is. You're invited. Like two hundred seventy years ago when slavery when there was a win, there are people who were who are opposed to slavery, and when slavery was abolished, Dot was the invitation. That was the image cited so? Don't wait rights for someone to say. That's what I'm trying to say, yes. Don't wait for someone to say for your Black Fran to be like. Hey, come the. The. To the condition of doing this work, so show up. Yes, Yes merced thanks for sharing that Banning else you WANNA share. Right now. Oh, let's see I mean. I have so much, but. I WANNA. Hear about your guises. Experience going to protest because that was my first time. I mean I feel like. I was bummed. No, that was my first time, but there really hasn't I. Guess I take on a protest. was also different like okay. A protest show might hippie like that's how I. Look at it with like okay. What do I have legislative like I? Don't know that's hasn't been my world. And so I can I see that as also be other people's stories. What do I think of protest is out the way to do it. Is that how I WANNA do it, but I felt like. In a time like this that there are peaceful protests in it is disruptive to demand change I. Don't like riots, of course not and I I was talking to Mike about this I. Feel Sad, and it is a terrible casualty of this war, and I feel like. The conversation I'm sad. When the conversation goes to looters, instead of the protests in the workout needs to be done. Per sure. Yes because I think the time that's brought to that conversation is shifted that way. It is to avoid the bigger conversation. You know it is to be like see. These people are doing this bad thing. Their farm justified in my feelings. I don't know. We went to protest here in redlands or we live in Mercedes has been anti came and took the most gorgeous pictures, I if we if he'll let us, we should link on our the whole album come because it was just stunning, his photography was. We did take the whole family, and our kids are a little older and they. They like the movie cars so. Stronger in. We tried to watch movies like the lark kids and the kids and it's like. Oh, they're. Your kids just don't like any of it. Hundred percent fine. They're curious are. Clifford I love it. It's not perfect but true I. my kids are older so truly star is our middle daughter. She's nine years old. She is African American Guatemalan so she prisons in this world as a young girl who is black and race has been a a part of the conversation in my life for the last twenty years. It's but then truly into our lives nine years ago in the conversation changes. And becomes. More personal it because personal so. We've been talking about it at home a lot. We've been talking we you. Know, there's a long history for the Avis family and and our. Conversations around race, and how we've made that a priority in our life and trying dismantle racism in our own hearts and in our family. So! The protest was amazing, and it was in downtown, redlands and I have never seen so many people runs the very small town and I. There were probably three thousand people there which I was I could believe people were there, and what's so interesting, different experience processes I never saw a cop. Landi said to it was wild that while I saw police cars who were situated because it got it was supposed to be in this little square area, but it got so big it took over all the streets of downtown, and so they didn't have anything officially closing off the roads, so the only place police cars were at the streets like protecting the protest. Making sure cars didn't driving drive through. And And it was the thing that was tricky. Is because I think they thought it was much smaller? They had one one blow bullhorns Yeah, oehrn! A. Speaker thing yeah goal, Horn. They had a bullhorn and they had like they designated the majority of the time together there in the square to hearing from black people in the community. But because across a big, we were too far to hear anything. So you can feel the energy from the crowd, and then everyone would cheer, and we'd all cheer and like people raise the signs of razor signs, everyone listening, but we hear anything that was a long, and that was for over an hour. That was a longtime far three kids to be like. Standing here like what's going on. But they're so committed to it and did not want to leave, and it was actually really sweet. Mason was like she wasn't GonNa. Leave and Sweet Mason had. A sign on one side set one side said everyone belongs on one side, said black lives, matter. And in hindsight I, Mike shoot is everyone belongs like a all lives matter. Message on. I didn't think about laughter and then Josh like I think it's okay because he had said black lives matter. But because they don't mean that, that's not what we meant in that messaging anyway. Other conversation for another podcast. So I just had this. I cried for most of it with soon as we got there, I started crying. And I just felt overwhelmed by being with. People with similar 'cause and it was a very diverse crowd with by age and race. And Yeah. You saw groups of Latinos. You know like holding up signs like Latinos. Latinas for black lives in you had. Just all different kinds of groups of people. They're. Like a amount of families on a ton of kids, but we weren't the only family and. And at one point, we took a knee for nine minutes to honor George Floyd and how he was murdered. And So the crowd is totally silent, and again, there's thousands of people and everyone's on me and I thought Oh shoot, this is gonNa be the moment where my girl at that point taken August to the edges of the role of the group because August was giving a little bit Wigley. After an hour. You know he's six years old, so there was an hour. Not hearing anything. Are Not being entertained I, guess the child, but Mason and truly I'm like they might. What am I gonNA? Do if they interrupt this moment, especially, Mason, she can get like real adamant about like Ma, you know. Not, wanting to move like what's going on why they're on quiet and they not appealing mason like literally for nine minutes on her knee with her. and. It was like she I almost had this moment and i. and. But. It was just like there's something about oppressed people understanding the oppression of people, the importance of that and our I could cry kids with down, Syndrome and people down syndrome don't necessarily always language to express themselves or express themselves in a way that we don't understand or quick to disregard, because it doesn't look like what we understand and I've been watching Mason through all of this and I just feel like I think she understands us on a level that I that I will never understand. It's really been an honor to water. Watch her through all of this, but. At one point, a heckler came through during this time of silence, and so like you picture. There's no police anywhere. That we can see everyone's on a knee. Thousands of people and this one man starts walking through and he's yelling. Something I couldn't hear it because it wasn't a crowd Josh said he was closer to him, and he said it was something about like. Like Jesus was black. No one's talking about or something we. He was like yelling and yelling and yelling and. From close to where we were sitting, a man yelled out. Shut the bleep up. and. A couple of people started yelling. Shut up and truly got so scared. And she liked jumped behind me, and was like Hannah King, and said we got we got a leave. We gotTA leave I. Don't WanNa. Be here we got. We got Lebron leaving. I dislike I. Take Him just held her head. And I said honey. It is okay to feel scared, but you are safe and keeping you saving you look around here. Every single person surrounding you is for you, and then as that's happening, someone in the crowd singing amazing grace. And the crowd starts. I have Chil- talking about every time. The crowd started seeing amazing grace so loud that you could no longer here the heckler. And, that's from my perspective. That's what I'm hearing. Josh for where he was sitting. In the crowd on the outskirts, he said as that was all happening a cop from where the police cars were came running down. And approach the Heckler in a very peaceful way, but like basically stopped him from heckling an escort him out of the crowd. So I don't know what it was about this particular rally or protest the, but it was like okay. Somehow, this communities managed to all be on the same page and they walked through like then we marched, and by then it's dinner time. When much longer so my I just go back to like. WE JUST GOTTA GET UTAH NOW We are matching. And so we marched in his crowd and you know it was just like. To Watch my girls be a part of that and to get to be a part of it and. At one point were marching, and we look for our right and our neighbor. People who live next to us as a young couple with the baby and they're marching, pushing the stroller and everyone's wearing masks, so you can't like. Make you know you don't really know what people are saying, but he's like made eye contact. And, just. Our fists up and then start marching side with our neighbor. And it was it was incredible, and so it was like a hopeful moment it felt hopeful I felt so grateful for it. We got home and truly psych feeling so. Proud of who she is and. I decide I. DON'T WANNA be naive. What's really happening in the whole atmosphere and I don't want to dismiss the bigger issues here but I think there are glimmers of hope in that more white people are are wanting to enter the conversation. Then maybe ever before. Is. What I'm kind of feeling in a way that is. Beneficial to progress towards racial. Reconciliation. so that's my story. that. I'll share my story. I think that I really started to wake up to kind of my complacency in racial issues. Back when how long ago was Trayvon Martin killed? That eight years ago. Six years ago. I'll look it up right now. I think yeah, both of those sounds close. I had a friend online. A writer friend Rachel held Evans. Who passed away Rudo. And she was the first. Wait Person. I ever. Noticed standing up for like I I remember after Trayvon was killed, she had a picture online of her wearing a black hoodie and she wrote a post about it. And I was like I've never seen a white person. Do something like this and I think I just. I think it was the first invitation that I had of like. There is more to this than me just. Say I'm not a racist or mead. Just telling myself I'm not a racist. And so I started to read more and try to understand a little more. And I think it's been a slow process where I sort of maybe four years ago, five years ago was like Dang. My whole library is white people. Why is that? Way Or all the books today on Britain by white people, and and then I sort of was like. Why do all the people I follow on twitter? Are White People? And so I think for me. It's been a slow process of asking myself those questions, and then trying to make changes and I say that just as an encouragement to our listeners like this is I think sometimes when we enter conversation like this, it can feel overwhelming. What is it even mean to do more than just say? Oh I'm not a racist. You know but I. I think there are small ways to start, and if you start to listen if you start to say. What does my instagram feed look like? Is it off white faces and in my listening to the experiences of other people? And the more that I've listened the more I've recognized that I was living in a different world than what a lot of my siblings, the world that my siblings of color have been living. And that is my own affluence and my own privilege that has allowed me to live in that world. And it's hard to see the reality. And the more that we allow ourselves to see it the more think. compelled. We have to be to do something. So that changes that? I have started to make over. The years have been like as I've read as learned trying to have. Real conversations with my kids about it. And and so. In all of these like I hate to say like each time there has been. Another person. Of Color, another black man killed by police. We've started to have that conversation every time and I think this time when George Floyd died. And I started to see the. The expression of rage and the intensity of protests. I. It became more clear to me like. This is not enough to just have a conversation with my kids every time. Yes, I should be having a conversation with my kids. Yes, should be talking about it online, but there's. Like, what what is it mean now for me to take steps besides just reading and changing who I'm following all of those things. So. This was the first time that I've felt. Really compelled to go to a protest. And we had a family friendly. Caravan protests that a woman in my. Neighborhood School organized. And it was supposed to be like they plan for two hundred fifty cars or something, and it was more more than thousand, and we waited in line for like an hour and a half to even be able to drive no. From the made up point, yeah! But. It was really cool. Because I. One of the big things was that I wanted the boys to make signs with me, and so we spent that afternoon making science together. And we take them all over the car and then I also I. I think I've talked about that. I lead a small group of high school. Girls at my church and we've been meeting all through quarantine over zoom. and. Them have been really moved by this moment and really wanted to participate in a protest, and their parents were like no covert nineteen that you could not go to a protest, and so when I found out about this car one. I reached out to them and said you know. Do you think your parents would be okay with writing with me and so Chris? Had Our van with the boys in it I had my friends van with three high school girls, all of us masked, and I promise their parents I would not unmask myself and And we drove together. And the most amazing part of it was because our signs were on the car. It was like a lot of like concrete block lesin that sort of thing, but as we drove because they were thousands of the cars, and we were all going through the same spaces, and we had waited an hour and a half turn like by the time we got there for these miles of driving through San Francisco. People had gathered all along the roads, and they were out with pots and pans and signs themselves and. Music playing, and so the whole ride was just so beautiful of like we had our windows Dan everywhere we are honking. People stood on corners and held up the fist us and. A at one point we had stopped, and there was a black woman standing outside of the car and she. Just you know we're all masked. She just made eye contact with me. And she held out a heart with her hands, and I held out a heart with my hands and I was like you know. I just there's been so few moments in my life. This powerful of just communicating with strangers like I am for you. And I want the best for you and it felt wake an ultimate. Of My faith what I believe that. What I believe God dreams for the world. That's my story and. Killers I was GONNA say that I think you touched on something that I've been feeling too of like. You don't get many opportunities. To Express yourself and big ways of what you believe and. I to I've felt that and. Also of like. And I think actually being honest podcasts and having some for my life in speaking. On her behalf is easier for me than speaking out. On my behalf, or even for my boys who are people of Color, it seems more sensitive. It seems it even seems taboo like didn't but more all this it seemed. In my circle kind of like. Were microaggressions are the norm it smell. Like. was there was no place for or wouldn't go right? So I do think. This is a time to get to live out. Loudly what you believe in your Heart Tolan for better for worse, I'm seeing it. Know for better for worse than seeing it. But yeah, this is in time where you can. There's been some a meam going around our post going around that. Talks about. Summer made for protests summer made for summer made for. It's like a list of things. I want to say this chart listeners because all of us are talking about how we did a protest. And not everyone's made for a protest, but you're made for some something like this is the time now is the time I was looking for me. I couldn't find it, but it's like a list of virus. Things like some are made for financial investment. You know some remain for like. Put your money into the space and. Some are made for quiet reflection, and but not cheese any as a cop out like there's. What is the thing that? Were, you will be the most impactful right, and for apprentices in it for everybody you know, and also like all the arguments about like what's the point of protestion? This is also not that podcast you can go online and and just google. What's happened because in the last two weeks because of the protests? I ton of stuff. And I would say to like maybe the point. The moment you're at in the process of of understanding your own racism. Is Maybe, you're at a point of quiet reflection, right and in a couple of months you'll be at a point where it's time for you to give some money away. Or you're at a point where it's time for you to say something. Tear racists, uncle, but there's. It doesn't have to be like you're this kind of person you. This kind of person to it could also just be like. Give yourself for him to be in a process, but but also push yourself in this process. It's. It's important to recognize that there is work to be done and everybody has a role. Yeah, yeah! There's been a lot of talk about like if this is your first time stepping into the conversation of race. The amount of whiplash you know like if you just if you're just now starting to follow some of the voices of black leaders in the space I can think of a couple on instagram that I. I honestly won't anyone who's starting this process. I actually won't recommend certain people because it's just the whiplash you can experience. It's like no. This is a long journey. That has been going on forever and it will not. It's not like tomorrow. It ends because we've done ABC in. D You know we've got. Hundreds of years. in which oppression was the norm like? All of the systems that we function also the majority. Built upon oppression, and and so the work is GonNa take a long time, so that idea like it's A. Marathon not a sprint, so yeah, like just what you're saying. Mike I think it's smart if you're if you're in this for the very first time when you're feeling whiplash and you're feeling like. Oh my gosh, this is i. don't even know what to do, and this is all confusing and too hard to hard to hard like. Don't give up m MVP. Keep going and let yourself go through the process like. In the place need to be processed through that. Then move to the next place processor that it's a process, yes. I feel like to a great example of. That, and how we are primarily talking to people and families who love Pursuant Down Syndrome. I mean think about even. The school system. And like how much parents have had to fight for inclusion in the school system and How. It is still. In a wide range poorly. Done and there has been movement and I just posted a mean that's been going around with Ruby bridges, and how she's only sixty five. She's sixty, five, sixty five and I think. I, Oh, I think I'm shocked a little bit to that. And I hope this is not offensive that. You can be white and be shocked. That racism is still existing. I, guess I I don't know why. I get shocked, but I do because. Like, there's protests. I mean Martin Luther. King these are not this is not long ago. And People's hearts. It would be foolish to think that people's hearts changed overnight like that. You, know so I feel like I've had to gain grace and compassion for non people of Color to not have compassion, and not to be and not to realize that racism still exists. In this country were not all seen the same right and. I guess I'm saying that I'm shocked that people are shocked. Totally. That's hard. I you know I, was saying to my husband last night that I in one thousand nine, maybe eight. I was eight years old. I was watching the cosby show. and. That in the story I was being told was that racism was over. You know that was kind of the that was a like rain bow story that. was, told the kids we. We don't see color anymore. That was an eighty s sort of dream. and. I was realizing like from. From sixty eight to eight when we were watching the Cosby show, that was twenty years. That's two thousand from from us. That's when we were in college. That seems like the blink of an eye and to realize that the civil rights movement in sixty eight. It had only been twenty years and already little white kids like me. We're being told that racism was done. Weird all like surpassed that moment. And yeah, it's really important for. For White people to sit with. The reality that we had we were taught something that was not true. And we were taught to look at our own affluence or our own ease, and assume that everybody else had that as well. I think that something to that I. don't really hear anyone talk about ever is. Hear people say Yeah we'll. Racism into during win, civil rights, movement or I. Mean People like well? There's racism. We have a lot president, but do you have to think of all the hundreds of thousands of people who opposed those you know like how many people were in opposition to civil rights movement. How many people were in opposition to slavery? Being abolished? How many people are on opposition to block president? All like it wasn't like all the sudden. All of America is like yes. Let's do this. It was a battle and the and it's like. That it's the same thing that's happening. You know it. Yeah agreed agreed I'm always shocked from. People are like I didn't think racism still existed. Okay but I think to like to bring it like you're saying with the systems with education system or so. I think that. What's helped me as a mom having children with down syndrome and just talking to our audience here? Is that idea of like okay I can. It might be hard for somebody to understand. This idea of like. We need to reform the entire police system. Right like that's a huge. Thing being set right now, that's a big movement happening. But when I when I have done interviews with people who have said like what do you? What do we do for education than like? What can we do so? That may send in August have an inclusive experience in our including their schools a while it wasn't it that idea that the system is not broken? It wasn't built for them so to expect the system then this, however, with the amount of years it is like the educational system is however old I. Don't know old enough that we're not gonNA expect it to change its not changing. This is our conversation in inclusion. The radical idea of we have to uproot the entire thing in order for it to work for kids with disabilities. I think that's the solution. I get that that is radical. That's not gonNA happen. So I can go the other direction, but I think that. That's. Happening to it's like okay. The systems that we are functioning and. They're not. They didn't break. They were built to oppress people of Color so. There's some operating that needs to happen and that is. I think that is terrifying to people, and that is so hard and overwhelming, and all those emotions people are feeling. Are you feel those emotions because that's what it is, you know? This is hard stuff I think they find it offensive like the also I'm what I'm reading. And what I'm seeing is the terms black lives. Matter is offensive, but terms of asking. or saying things need to change in the police. Force is offensive because it's like well, I'm not that. Or I'm not, it's it's not being seen as a collective whole. Being I'm offended because I M Y. Or I have a husband who's a police officer or am a police officer and I'm offended because I'm not like that you know. and. Yeah. That this idea that it's I mean I. think that that is the biggest. Hurdle I think for people to enter especially for white people to enter into this conversation is that you have to get over the hurdle of whether? You're whether or not using your racist because that's not the the question you're being asked like. Are you racist? Then the immediate response of like Oh, I have friends who are black or no blah blah. Sandbox right right. But that what what is being talked about in this conversation is is not the like. Do you have feelings in your heart for people of another color it's. The big systems! It's the same thing you're saying heather of what we can understand as parents of kids with down syndrome. The education system was not built for our children with disabilities. And in the same way, our country was built on slavery. With slavery ended people who had been freed as slaves were promised land. They were promised work. They were from US forty acres and a mule. And that was supposed to be how they were. They were supposed to be able to get started. You can't just get money from not having money. You can't just have a job from having no education and. Then Lincoln was assassinated. Then Johnson came to power Johnson was a racist southerner who was? WHO said no? We're not giving land to these priests slaves. And so freed slaves were not given anything to start with, and so we WANNA. Talk about racism in America. We have to go all the way back to their. Because whether or not, You are like if you're white person and you feel like you've worked really hard way you have. That is true to an extent, but your people. Your ancestors were always able to. They were allowed to have land they were. They had something to start with, and and so the systems that we're talking about. Go all the way back to their of. This these are freed slaves who were not given anything to start from with no education to start with no money to start with, and IT IS A. We are all the result of what our ancestors had and were, and it's. The fact that systems. That when we talk about systems, and we talk about how people of Color. More likely to. Die In childbirth or for. Infants to die or to not be able to home or to not have a certain level of education. It all goes back to that, and that's what we have to look at and really ask questions hard questions about. With. Yup. What she said I think to with like all of this. Okay, so with like even having sunflower as a daughter some people like you know especially in the beginning. Why would you adopt a person with down syndrome? Your life is going to be hard. And I feel that tension to within the conversation of understanding that there is racism because if you choose to think if you choose to believe that it does exist than your life is going to of be heart, 'cause you are going to constantly see. The injustice in you're GonNa have to decide whether to. Help fight against that or to kind of ignore it. and. Keep going on and so i. feel like that is also heard hurdle. That's being realized that okay if I choose to see this. How am I gonNA choose to see my family having in choose to see. The the cities that are considered poor as not like to I mean I don't know I just think then people who are choosing not to see it. It would just be hard to see like just saying all lives matter. It would be hard to see that no black lives are treated differently, yeah. And hard scary, but it's necessary, yes. And it's that idea of privilege it like having. What able bodied. Neuro, typical white people in America get. is to decide that or not to do that hard thing or not. And what our kids with down syndrome don't get. They don't get to decide to step into the world or not in be perceived by the world as valuable like they've already been told now. Let's look at the abortion rates for diagnosis. You know like you've already been told. That the world, in which you are going to have to function CEO's valuable. And so they don't get to choose to step in and out of that. I think a lot of us. Who have eleven with Down Syndrome? We no longer get that choice either for them, and it's just. It's a very similar thread for people of Color for block lives. It's you don't get to choose to step into the conversation at race. It's you are affected by it every day. And I can tomorrow I can be like. I'M NOT GONNA like we're cool I'm uncomfortable. I'm just GONNA. Turn it off and talk about what I'm wearing. That sounded condescending. People who do that, but you know what I mean like. Yeah! Yeah I think I will, I'm not saying I'm not going to because I thought we talk about this for hours. Maybe maybe, this is a good moment than to transition into resources for our listeners hugh. Maybe, you're just entering. This conversation made even never thought about systematic racism or people have said that and and you've been like what does that even mean? Or. Maybe you are like. How do I even start to? Read books about this, so let's let's give you some. We want to give you. Some ideas of books of podcasts of instagram accounts that you can be following. That might start to help you. Open up your understanding to what this might mean in your life. Yes. You've got to list. I've got a less I'M GONNA start with some books, and then you've got Bennett. There's more I. WanNa say that one of the most influential book for Me Has Been Austin. channing Brown Brown's. I'm still here. Black Dignity and a world made for Whiteness. And I I feel like her book has just gave me. Empathy gave me ice to see what her life has been like She talks about the workplace. She talks about church. She talks about What. Life is like as a black woman walking through America. So there's some other books and. Some that I haven't read I haven't read leash. The share in Harper's the very good Gospel. At I haven't I haven't read that Lisa sure heart bribe spent some time with her actually got to go on a pilgrimage. Through a lot of historical. Historically significant. Black lose experiences. Yes with her. On leading I I was into her leadership, and there were like twenty five or something Lisa Sharon Harper is an incredible voice in this conversation, so you can follow her on twitter. Follow her on instagram and you can Read her books. She's written quite a few bucks, but she's a leader. Her voice is is a trusted voice for me. I really love her. Just mercy! Brian Stevens Stevenson's even think you Stevenson! There's also a movie which one hundred percent and you should watch, and you should also read the book. The book goes into so many more details than the movies. Phenomenal it is a great movie, but it's one of those on right now. Right streaming was on its on. Not. I want Oh. No, we bought it. We rented it. I don't know where it is for free, but it might be right. Yeah, but you can also rent it for like four ninety nine on your smart tv or whatever you're doing, but the book he talks about so he is a lawyer and he talks about criminal law for people who are on death row, but he goes case by case he does a ton of cases in the book that don't show up in the movie, so it's one of those sometimes I'll watch a movie and read a book and then I'll watch the movie and I'll think if I watched. Maybe there's no reason to read the book necessarily, but this is one that I would say Jubal. I'm because there's so much in the book. What is the net flicks thirteenth? It's called thirteen. Isn't it called a just thirteen thirteen thirteen thirteen watch that now or seizure? Kids get on for nap or to bed. impactful, powerful and informative. There's a new book called. Be The bridge by Latasha Borsen. That is has been highly recommended also when I haven't read yet. So white fragility is a book that has been really powerful for some of my friends. I'd agree with that one. If you go on our instagram account, we tagged ten different from black families in the down syndrome community that you can follow right now on instagram and not that they're doing advocacy work in racism, but just to have that lens of a different perspective in view. But still with side shared commonality of Down Syndrome. Some great accounts. And there's a list of accounts I have I have a list of ten accounts that are recommended. Have I think all but one or women actually? Black people who are doing the work of within the racism conversation like this is bad because see work that they. And so. They are you can go to the lucky few official and see that list at a couple of people mentioned are on it and depending where you're starting, you can. Follow some and then process then wait to fall. Others I also want to mention the the books we mentioned. Where by Black Authors there are a few books by white. People talking about racism. To white people. And that also might be a helpful place to start particularly particularly, if you are a white person who has not really considered racism before, so I would recommend the color of life. Vest And also Amy Julia Becker who we've had on our podcast before his daughter Penny has down syndrome. Wrote a book called White Picket fences that is about the idea of white privilege, and hoping the reader kind of understand what that means in their life I would also just like to mention that are dear Heather Avis in her books? Get over some real mo, which came out almost a year ago now has. A COUPLA chapters that I think are really important, necessary one that talked about race one that talks about what needs to scoot over I. Mean well the whole book about talking about what it means to skip over for, but what it means to recognize that those of us who have privileged are the ones who need to be making space and and working to make things more just. In this world. We'll have a link to all those recommendations in our show notes. Yeah, any final thoughts. I don't know. I feel like I think we covered a lot and we also couldn't cover a lot. We don't have a lot of time. But I don't know I, just want everybody's heart to be softened that this is a real thing that racism still exists. that. There are minority groups that are being oppressed and discriminated against in. It's real and. I don't know just off in your heart to know that it's real. and. That it's hard to wrestle with and that we do have in a broken world, but we are not pro can p when you're kind of broken people, but our voices are not broken, and that you can't speak out against saying could choose to be different raised household. That's different and loving. People of Color Loving. People who are black loving people who have disabilities. People are being discriminated against. And where do you stand with that? And what are you doing to help change that? Can you do I? Don't know I love you all listeners I. Know You guys like me so I feel. But I also encourage you to the deeper into feel the need to help create a a world that is changing for the better. Not only for your family members with Down Syndrome bet for your friends around you. Who are people of Color? Good word. Good, word, girl. I would say to everyone listening that if you don't have if you're new at this work to do the work before you reach out, someone like Mercedes who might be your only connection to black lives and ask her to. Answer questions that you can find answers for you know I think we need to remember that our black brothers and sisters are exhausted, and so we can do the work do it. You can reach out to Mike and me with questions. You can reach out to Mercedes. To, of course I want. I just want people to understand like it is not are the job of white people who have already done the work to do the work on our behalf. I'm tired black people. Yeah, it's not the job of black people. To do the work for us and I I've heard from a lot of my black friends like how exhausted they are from the constant questions from white people like how do I? What about this? This brought up to disrupt? The Mercedes is available. Of course she speaks for itself I. Don't speak for her had also just. Don't put. There are already too much pressure too much. They already are holding people black people holding too much right now so. To hold fragility as well. I guess it's train. That's raised good. I. I'll say one more thing that if this makes you uncomfortable. I think that's the first step to be curious about why it makes me uncomfortable and to lean into that, and to let yourself feel that discomfort because I think our black brothers. Sisters have been feeling that discomfort forever. Recognize that when it. Starts Philly too much. So. There you go ladies. All Right Mike Mercedes thinks girls for having this conversation. Together and I love you both so much in your voices have been. Imperative in my life, and my learning so your friendship. W thank you. And to our listeners, thanks for participating in this conversation by listening, and we encourage you to keep keep on going. We're so so thankful for your so thankful for every time that you listen every time the tune in every time that you share. Maybe this is an episode that you can share. With that uncle that you're just haven't been sure what to say to or whatever the ant. It could be an aunt or anybody in your life. That you just haven't been sure what to say. Please will share this and reach out with any questions. It might bring up. As always associate thankful to our producer, Andy Lara, and our producer Bash leader. who help make these episodes happen and get them to you in your homes, and we're so thankful for all you who should like if you podcast with your friends doesn't listen faithfully and cheered us on. Please don't forget to subscribe and leave a review on Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcast, and dear dear listener remember that you supporting with with down syndrome you are shouted worth, and you are narrative shift to keep on keeping on because we are here cheering for you. We'll get together. Soon? In the next week. Okay Bye. Bye. Thanks for listening to lucky few podcasts remember to revere show on Apple PODCASTS and check us out on all social media at the lucky few pot. Lastly, send us your good news by going to the lucky podcast dot com, and sending us a message via text, voice, mail or E-mail CNN time.

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"Don't trust maybe"

The Tony Kornheiser Show

1:06:26 hr | 6 months ago

"Don't trust maybe"

"Previously on the tony kornheiser show somehow on my phone where all the communication is the texts. Adam of mandl's number was identified as mike brings. It is possible that mike breen has never talked to me in my life possibly s. I thought it was out of mandel. It's possible that mike breen it's definite mike. Green didn't send the golf balls. It's possible that mike breen who who's now undoubtedly been told that kornheiser. Thank you for. The golf balls is looking at someone. Say what are you talking about. The tony kornheiser show is on now. Michael is sitting six feet one. She's away from properly social distance and his angry. He's going to be angry all day. I want to because he had to pick up the bagels today and had an incident with a person who was not proud of my c- 'having badly. The person was intruding upon space and intruding upon the bethesda bagel store. But anyway i i just want to get to a couple of things you said that Could you repeat that thing about. Maybe on the phone. Your your cautionary tale about adam mandela. Sometimes your phone will add may be able to pull a name and add that name to the phone number that thinks it should apply to so this is the intelligence. Yes is the phones intelligence on its own yes into your life on its own under the guise of read through your email signature. Tony's phone number is we believe to be okay. Maybe this is sent to us from. Maybe tony beason in cincinnati ohio. Who as we know. Has what a piano the piano. I've tech story involving the dubious maybe messaging. I received a text one day which was labeled. Maybe linda the name of the woman whom i related by marriage. I replied with hearty. Hey sweetie as it turns out it was not. My wife would rather an important customer of mine who just so happens to be named linda's well. I quickly had visions of my career in flames and felt about as low as a starting quarterback who goes poo poo potty a national television but after profusely apologized in the customer who was not that linda graciously laughed at off. Who've never trust the maybe texts. I have a mike breen story that will get a little while. I wanted to clear up a few other things. I e mail. This comes from maria schwab and this may be the end of her husband and her brother in law and the the Toasts if you recall at tax chain over the past two years you've read emails two weeks rather over the past two weeks. You read emails from both my attractive but not so clever husband and my clever but not so attractive brother-in-law to devastating lie. They're both pretty high and mighty these days thanks to you. I figured i'd try. Look at it and right you my first email. I'll keep it brief as i don't want you to mmediately regret reading this and picking the third e mail in two weeks to share from this unruly crew. It is true that mark speech killed at our wedding. It absolutely did and it's to that. Their dad took more heat than my husband. Did for being a subaru and mazda. Miata what they failed to mention was the abuse i received from my sisters during their joint speech. It was an absolute roast. The best man speech is supposed to be insulting and inappropriate wrong. Leave it to the girls. I absolutely love sports and can keep up with sports. Talk with most men because the this love of sports and being the baby and tomboy the three of us my sisters used this against me and decided the maid of honor speech would be a bash session without getting into all the witticisms. They ultimately cautioned my husband to not be too surprised if he found out. I was a man later that night. That one hurt but the guests loved it after years of constant sports. He's a man after years of constant sports facts being thrown at me from my husband that he claims his own. I now understand where they were coming from. The tony kornheiser show. I become a huge fan of the show over the last year. And i do want to thank you for the escape. You provided my husband and me during these covert times which is a very nice email. I also have to emails. One from wayne hicken bottom and one from brian crews and they both say the same thing that they talk about the fact that i had abandoned the documentary a little bit too soon and wayne hickinbotham and said how could you talk about the documentary and not mentioned the cameo by your aloha tower partner. Charlie steiner and he's in it. I have since watched all of these speaking spanish. No he's not. he's speaking in english only to genie. Is he speaking in spanish. And and from brian stevens by abandoning the bg documentary. You missed out. On seeing charlie steiner talking about his time on ninety nine x new york and comparing the number of bg songs nineteen seventy nine two waves in the sea. Okay so i saw charlie. I wrote charlie a text about being in this. Otherwise i thought rather turgid and pointless documentary about the bg's there's not even a narrator light and how happy i was to see him and i received nothing back i so i don't know maybe it says maybe tony kornheiser i don. I received nothing back and to clarify something else. This is great. I am graham van. Hook the guys holiday card. You read on friday show and my good friend. Wow i can't believe i made a one of your show your show over. The last. Several years has gotten me through some isolating times. Three deployments and twenty twenty the connective tissue of this show is amazing. Roof is peabody. And i went to high school together. Not possible at williams and andre web. The blue angel who yellow cheese are- at the rio olympics was a company. Made a mine at the naval academy. Thank you for all the great shows especially this year. You're correct me. Although i did have the privilege of having my picture with you once. A chatter and nigel was kind enough to have a couple of my emails through over the years. Typically read holiday cards you receive and even though this was an odd year i wanted to press through and let you know that my family's thinking about your family again. Happy holidays know. That will be the first one in line when you do a live show again. Hopefully a clydes. Hope you had a wonderful hannukah old man and he'd signed at flank graham van hoop. Es i love the northwestern football talk keep it up. Keep it up. As i'm a graduate of their business school. Go cats does. Is there anybody who listens to this. Show that doesn't know everybody else who listens to this show. I mean honestly. Is there anyone. And i need to clarify. Must've been pumped about that upset. The oh who michigan state. Oh yeah we'll we'll i think watch some of it but wasn't even all that interested in it because he doesn't explain how he gets the address. That's not even your address. I don't here's another one. Here's another one. I need to say this that. I what i had wrong the other day i had it wrong. That the binghamton jim collapsed. It wasn't the binghamton jim. I called harvey sanger the president of the school and i said what the damage that jimmy says no no. It's the binghamton athletic center. We are the binghamton events center so so that all. That is is an indoor soccer complex up on the airport road. It's five ten miles from the school. So i don't care the is get more snow up there. I don't care that that went down. As long as they use a check. The event center after their weekend versus stony brook lost both who lost both to the hated line home stony brook both home games. Yeah i felt so terrible about that. Apparently the women went down to stony brook and lost both to or may have that wrong but our pictures were up. So i'm happy about that. And they were not under snow and they were visible to anyone who watched on whatever channels these were on. This is from nate cleary in johnson city. New york where. I used to live at 167 floral avenue when he rights not first time that longtime i live in johnson city which is next to binghamton invested a year. Where you used to live. We do this every time. Yada yada yada. You lived on floral well. My wife and i lived just off. Riverside drive in concede harvey's office from the top of my street. So i can speak from the front lines of gaels effect on our town. We should get forty inches in fourteen hours. There is literally nowhere to put this snow much. Like the event center my own garage four feet of snow on top of it and we are hoping it doesn't collapse not expecting the best. I'm hoping that the three inches of rain. We're expecting on christmas. Eve will help to dispose of this snow till also not expecting the best. So so i had all those things and now i guess i should get to the mike breen stuff. Michael could you get my phone in the other room. Sure so that. I can read this as michael knows. I received a text three days ago like a friday. I guess on friday. I received a text from someone claiming to be a mike. Bree okay now. I didn't know if it was my brain. You know. I really didn't know if it for the record. The phone plugged in well. I plugged the phone. And i don't know why that's terrible. Oh it's gone. I've lost it. Oh here it is this okay. Here's what i receive from. Someone claiming to be mike breen but it is not. It doesn't say mike breen on my phone. It gives a number. It gives a phone number making progress and then this message to my long lost friend. Tony i am both sad and relieved as i text you today sarah because i never thought of sending golf balls as a gift being enormous fan of yours for decades it would have been a wonderful gesture as a way of thanking you for all the years of enjoyment i experienced from your work sadly i never thought to send even a single sleeve of pinnacles great shot but i'm also relieved because i have seen you text over the years mostly complimenting you for your stellar work but i was always puzzled and quite frankly hurt when you never responded to my texts never i feel so much better knowing you didn't deliberately ignore my words of praise by the way we have met a number of times because you member said. I don't know if we've ever met even though. I admire his work. The first time was when jim o'connell better known as the ach who was my dearest friend introduced me many years ago. So there you have it. We now need to play a round of golf together and catch up all the miscommunication these last many years. Best mike in parenthesis in quotes adam. Bring so now i get this. No i don't know i don't know. Is this really mike. Breen or is this atom mandel. Playing another joke on meal. Couldn't be at a mandel 'cause he would show up on my phone. As adam mandel not even mayb- he's already in the system so i do something that i think is the wise thing to do. I text frankie nation. Who does all the booking when we actually have guests and all the you know the sort of setup work from from studios that are not downtown in washington. Dc frankie nation. Great vowels fan. And i say to frankie. Could you do me a favor. Could you get me a home number or cell number from mike breen particularly if it's a five one six number i'd like to know it and he says okay. I can't do it now. But i'll call him corrigan and tim corrigan. Tyranny corgan who works with us tyrannies dad and a great producer on his own right produces the nba games within forty eight hours. Frankie sends me a phone number and that number matches the phone number allegedly of mike breen nassau so now. Yeah well nassau. Five one six is where. I grew up although mike breen. I don't know why he's got a five one six number. i mean. He grew up in the bronx near yonkers. And i thought lived in the city but maybe he lives on long island. I don't i don't know. But so now i am convinced that this is my brain. Now i'd like to find out. Does he ever listen to the show. Mike breen i've said many times i. I became acquainted with. Mike prince work when he did the news. He did the sports actually for imus and he was right. Nigel hysterically funny brilliant. Yes stereotypes refunding. Yes just great. Just absolutely great. I then found out which i didn't know reality told me was a graduate of fordham. I didn't know that in thing about his background. And then he began to do sports. And i followed some of that and then. Espn put on their number one basketball show games with jeff van gundy and mark jackson and he does a great job. So what should i do about this i should. I haven't texted him back. I didn't wanna do it till i till havoc. We have confirmation. We were we. Were nervous you. You were passing the phone around friday evening and the first thing. Liz assume she just looks and goes. What are the chances you're getting catfish. And then they told me. I was tat fished and i even know what that was to be. Catfish found out. That's what happened to man made situation. Yeah who thought he was engaged to a girl. How could you be engaged to someone. you've never even met. What is that. Could you tech somebody for a better part of a year. But you can't be in love with them. You don't even know who they are. You've never seen them this so odd to me. i'm so old. So so liz decided i had been catfish. No but now it seems that you have you have gone through the correct channels and you have confirmation so now your relationship relationship can fully bloom again. Can we just have to see what happens to add them. Well i think it would fully bloomed for the first time since i. I'm unaware memories where you were so complimentary to mike over the last couple months to him. Yeah well i mean i'm compliment. I don't again. I don't know if he listens to the show. I don't know what happened. And the other. What is the oddest thing about this. What is the oddest thing. Because mike breen is a professional sports. Caster and adam mandel is in the money business and he works with the great jimmy done. What would be the oddest connection there. Oh yes they belong to the same golf club on long island and they know each other. How can that be right. Nigel how can everybody involved in this show on any level knows everybody else. It's the van. Hook goes to high school with rufus. Peabody right right what. It never ceases to amaze we're done here Take a break. A wilpon will join us when we return. We'll bon had has a lot a lot of northwestern stuff to talk about when we return. I'm tony kornheiser. You're listening to the tony kornheiser show. So i have a pre december twenty fifth version of this ad and a post december twenty fifth version. Today is the twenty first. so i'll read the pre this christmas. You'll have two ways to experience. The epic adventure wonder woman nineteen eighty-four in theaters on. Hbo max on the exact same day streaming at no extra cost hbo mac subscribers beginning december twenty fifth plus with hbo max stream the greatest collection of series movies. And exclusive max originals. All in one place. Discover something new to watch the undoing. The flight attendant his dark materials and so much more. I don't know any of those things to hbo. Max dot com or download the app to sign up and start streaming and wonder woman nineteen eighty. Four is the movie. And you're excited about that right nigel. By the way it's it's pg thirteen so just about anybody can watch it so that's very yes. Gowdy don't is yes. she's terrific. Yeah it's not gal godot gal. Gadot dot all right. Now gimme out. You're listening to the tony. Kornheiser show this is levi. Petri the right side nigel. Thank you for continuing to give independent artists and chance to be heard on the show like many others are banned at to put most of our goals on hold this past year did the pandemic. We were determined however to finish the songs for the holiday season. These are songs of hope and reconciliation that we feel. Your listeners may be able to identify with especially this year. This is the brothers rock and roll and it was inspired by. Levi's love for the ever feuding gallagher brothers in the rock band oasis it's a tribute to not only them but vancouver inspired us again. This is the brothers rock and roll and playing in michael wilbon. Who had a busy week. Because northwestern know was was playing in the big ten championships. Now you loss to ohio state but you were leading into the second half it seemed to me that northwestern distinguished itself but i know this was hard on you physically and emotionally Tony i think we did. I thought we played pretty damn well. I'm not ranting raving or upset. Nah i wasn't that day. Obviously i wanted to win that game Even with the odds against my team in favor of ohio state. But you know we would to. I mean before this week. We were school that before to use school. There's never been in the big ten championship game now. We've been in twice in three years. This is a monumental thing for us. Just be there and so I was here is about a nerve wracking. It was it was for me. It was up there with Being that game seven of cubs indians. It wasn't as nerve wracking but it was up there Just to see your school involved in that but also also not to be be there obviously different times. I was at the game. Two years ago. so the back and forth the vet the up all that went on to be involved in that game was pretty amazing thing for somebody At our school. So i know you hoped that they would win. But you didn't think that they would win. Was there any time during the game that you allowed yourself to think. We're going to win this game and we got down on the position where we could have gone up Seventeen three that was interception with town. Three right yeah after the picket ends all picking on. Like you know we're gonna have to. We've got to have a day where we don't turn the ball over and they do. I look look i. I thought we played just feels who. Certainly you know it's gonna be american. You'll have a quarterback He's gonna be drafted very high and we turned him into a guy. That's right that's right now. We couldn't we couldn't stop him and the running back to. I mean how many people how many people do how many teams will do that so i. I don't know what. I don't know what is going to happen in the semi final gift. Clemson obviously haven't clinton's a better team slightly. How state but you know tony. We at the weekend ended pretty well. We'd beat michigan. State and tom izzo last night undefeated and ranked four in the country. That's a huge win. That's the biggest win. Chris collins has ever had. Isn't it no no no term into tournament that are one chip center but other than that. Yeah and so you know to win that game i. It's the first time in forty one years we be a top five team. Oh wow the last time we did michigan state. Got him ervin johnson. Wow that's that's a long time in school go. That was so you get. You're getting a new year's day bowl with a citrus bowl against auburn. Yeah chuck can have some sort of public bat. So so yeah. That's you should do that now. The for whatever good. There's always a little bad. That comes with whatever good and a little bad maybe this that pats fitch pat fitzgerald. Who is your football coach. Your distinguished alumnus and a local boy from chicago is now reported to be sought at least for interviews by at least two nfl teams. What are your thoughts on that. Yeah yeah And tony look. We discussed this on this quality program. When you said to me i don't know a month ago. You said listen. You know there's gonna come they're gonna come situation here where there's a job he won't just be able to say no. No no i want to say at alma mater so you mentioned the bears at the time which we just saw we were talking about it in theory and i don't know what the bears look. If the bears offered a job. That job the i mean. That's he's a bears fan longer than he's been in northwestern guy same here by the way. is a dynamic that i don't know what would happen I so they don't wanna lose their coach. I don't think he's ready to jump at any offer. But there's not any offer when it's an nfl team so these are pretty nervous times for us right now. We just lost athletic director Who i had thought for a while the best best ad in in the country Just given you know given some of the things we've been able to do these these conversations you and i have you know on monday morning about the situation that a small the only private school by far the smallest school in the big ten which is what. We are the fact that we're in kind of big time. Athletics situation we are. That's that's a credit to the yes the president of the university and other people donors and support all that. But you start with you athletic director. We lost it to the. Acc lose him. Angelou's paths gerald in the same couple of weeks would be you know it's it's testimony but it's also huge blow if it happens. I don't let me get to the bears because the bears for the second week in a row won a game pretty good team. They played conference team. Division team. that they played in. Hindsight was foles a mistake. And do you still want to fire. Nagy fold wasn't mistake but but even bringing foles in was a mistake because they traded they. They spent the highest pick. They've had. I don't know. I i don't remember. The bears have a one in my life. They had a three and a four was butkus and sayers three and a four. Well they spent a pick that high on trubisky tune-in he doesn't want right and other picks. Yeah yeah he didn't want he didn't want to coach him. He wanted to co somebody else. He was kept looking around and so they bring in foles. Who we you know. He's he's a he's he's a bullpen guy. He can bridge you during an injury falls as that guy full should that guy and nagy want wanted throw trubisky out and so my anger. Tony has always been you. I'm sorry you you're hired as coach of the bears coach. This quarterback that quarterback was drafted before you were hired. Your job is to coach him. And so nagy spent two two plus years not wanting to coach looking everywhere. He could for someone else to coach. Now he's got the coach because his job is on the line. He's in trouble. He knows it and and and because he's got a running back because some people thought you know what they have to run back was pretty damn good. Let's see him. No the bears have liked the fewest. The third fewest rushing attempts or something like that. Go into yesterday and they got him. Put up a buck. Fifty essentially yesterday terrific young back. So that's the those are the big reason i wanted him fired. And you know what if if it's only your job. Security that motivates you to do the right thing. You can't do the right thing as a coach. I i still want him fired. I understand the bears knocking to fire him if they make the playoffs and the but they still going to beat the packers. It depends on how close it does i would. If he can't beat the packers firem- anyway. You want to fire him anyway. You turn the air against that is involved with a guy who again people who have people who know him and like him has said Yeah he didn't want to coach isky. We'll get out. I want to coach him. I'm still angry about that. But if they wanna game As you know there's a lot of domino's there's a there's a there's an enormous ripple that will affect all kinds of people so there was maybe there was a thousand grade games and a thousand great innings and you can never get to the mall and when you choose the three or four games you want to talk about on the pti show because you have a limited amount of space things get left out a game. That will definitely get left out. Is houston indianapolis but the end of that game. When that guy's going in he's going to score he's going score. He's at the end zone. He's going to score the tying touchdown and it's punched out like that was that and we'll never get to that there's no chance because the team's they'll matter but that was yesterday there was a million games that came down to the last play. Yeah it really worried. We might have been the might have been the best sunday. And then you had scraped the game that Involving you know potential super bowl matchup with the chiefs and saints yes. There were a lot of games that that came down to arizona. Game comes down to the end. You know hurts. His as throwing hail marys at the end. And there's like four games throwing hail. Marys teams are still there. Look i know people wanna crown share the city already. I'm not crying. They looked to me no but they beat everybody. Beat everybody we do. I mean you think they're gonna get upset in the playoffs right. I think if they play like this they're gonna lose like they're playing now or have played all season this spectacular. They're great they are. They're not gone. They're not beyond somebody's a not even a plus and they're not beyond somebody had put through a game with them losing. I don't think they are. I mean we've seen we saw the patriots lose twice. We didn't think they'd lose. Don't tell me the. Kansas city can't lose no they can i just i just totally reject that no. They absolutely can. What do you make of now. I now have seen on sportscenter a number of times. And i didn't realize this for some reason. I didn't know that this was the tiebreaker jacksonville. Now jacksonville is in position to draft trevor lawrence. Who is great. He had that. I that he doesn't he scrum there at the jets and just thought but i mean he must so to me. I guess about two questions. Two questions suggest themselves. He's we sorta. I don't know what his preference is. He's from georgia. Which is close to jacksonville but navy wanted new york city but the larger question is did the jets. And do you think that players want to win. It's so hard to go sixteen in sixteen and now it's so hard. Do you think they wanted to win. And do you think an ownership said oh. I hope they don't win I got players half those players are going to be there to play with. Whoever's chosen right the roster gonna turn over like you can't believe particularly if they have a new coach and they've got to and they will they will ever yeah. I don't. I don't believe you know type stuff is that's that's other people Management i mean. Sure i mean the even though they just spent a high pick on a quarterback whatever. What if this is third season. Yeah he's not that good darnold. He's not that good. Another good. And so i look at a and i don't know i don't know that that the clemson kid would turn their fortunes immediately. We've seen a lot of great players from college and be unable to turn an awful situation in the pros no matter what. No no no no no no the players pay any attention to that. I mean i forty five out of that fifty three man roster yesterday how many of those guys are gonna be gone when they tee it up again next season with whoever they pick him to drop. I mean maybe twenty or gone. Those guys can't know that they're going to be around. So i would ask you know it's too bad for the rest of us have to sorry. I know that's your team. Jet wander a promise. The kid the kid you know. If you're the league deal one. Tim in jacksonville. Come on them in new york. Of course you want him in new york sure you do. Here's a question that i have and this i ask this because it's your division and pay attention. I have watched matthew stafford. He's great he throws the ball so well they never win is am i wrong is he. Not that great. Do you feel the same way about him. No he's not great at all. He's got great. He has told him. Oh we do this. Every week with certain. Nfl players if he can only do increase week the world. He can't do it every week. Had what nine seasons. Something like that. I pay is pay quarterback in the league not anymore but he was. He's he's up there. Yeah yeah yen. So i know. He's not that great. Because they're not going to throw the. Oh my god jay cutler soul sucking takes fumble it or his teammates aren't good enough or something. No he's not great. I this is funny that you say this because yesterday it is a division. And it's something. I pay attention to look. He's better than any quarterback. The bears have had other than jim mcmahon. Oh yeah last. Forty years mentioned says to me that how come lions are better. Because you know he's really good and i go matthew. He's not really good must not that he's not he and again. I'm not blaming it. All on him. You got plenty of blatant go right in detroit but matthew stafford. He's not great and and so so many of the people that we praise we. I mean he would. I mean you today. We're going to hear about throwing soviet everytime team wins like two or three games. Eighteen wins three out of four. That guy they're pretty good. They can make a run. No no they can't. There's one quarterback in that division names rogers best. Yeah he's the best he's really good and even have a great day. The i didn't need a great day. You know you know you can say it was a post. He plays like this every week. You can say that he's the only one and it's not even You know there's there's four five guys who are like that that you would say okay. I'll cast my lot with him no matter what you know because the coaching is good. Enough to teammates are good enough. Circumstances are good enough but the number of guys that's true about is just. It's not me now to hear. The analyst proclaim exaggeration monday morning where they love them all. Good one hundred right. I'll talk to you later. Thank you michael. Wilbon boys and girls. We will take a break when we return. Chuck colpepper will join us and we will do a deep dive into the college football playoffs. I'm tony kornheiser. This is the tony kornheiser show. Hey everyone in this new world we're living in has me and my family talking lot more. You know it does. And i'm gonna miss michael michael's going you're going to guilty. No i'm not guilty. I'm just kind of salmon issue. I mean we're talking about everything. From how much greater was the greatest of all time than today's greatest sour dough bread. Which you can. I made one last night. And i was going to bring you the leftovers and i forgot it. Oh okay take it down with you to to south carolina tau excited. We are that football's back and trust me. That last one's important the washington football team for example yesterday a very credible showing drive away very credible showing except that quarterback. It's not great yet. I can't keep watching my door. Run circles in the backyard and call that a spectator sport especially now since she's reduced the backyard to total mud but despite talkative we all are the people lincoln financial want to point out the one conversation that most people still have not had your financial plans so do time to talk to your loved ones about it because the more we talked about it. We plan protect and retire. That's why lincoln financial is here to help you get the right questions to start your conversation at lincoln. Financial dot com. You're listening to the tony. Kornheiser show county gordon. And this is levi petrie again. P. e. t. r. e. e. This is called. this may be the year he says. This is about taking your lumps while keeping faith something good is right around the corner. Twenty twenty has given us our share of gut punches yet. We remain optimistic. Here's to better twenty twenty one for all you can find his music on band camp right. Everybody's got what it a band campsite. Everybody's got that right. That's very good. Michael if people like levi. Petrie want to send in their music. How do they do it. He's very good. Sending music by emailing it to jingles tony kornheiser show dot com. Wow there's a little bit of bob seger mess. Yeah this pretty pretty good and he plays chuck colpepper the washington post. Who has been busy busy busy with college basketball and college football but mostly college football so we start with the over arching question and i and i don't do this very often. I was appointment viewing yesterday at twelve noon. Bothered me so much that it took till twelve twenty for them to release the top four and then they released the top three which everybody knew was going to be the top three and then it was a question of would it be notre dame or would it be texas a and m. Are you chuck. are you okay. A lot of questions are going to be. Are you okay with x and y. Are you okay with the final four. Oh i'm okay with it. Because if i'm sitting there in the committee room and i look at those four teams. I do say they're the best. I'm i'm worried for the sport. I think the sports in trouble because it's not producing much variety and four programs have taken twenty of the twenty eight playoff berth. So far and only eleven if taken the twenty eight now only thirteen took the last twenty eight bcs births but those were spread out over fourteen years. But i think there's a there's an issue going on with these big programs I think it's bigger than the playoff. It's not the committee's fault. Any of the committees. And i think lot of it has to do with well. Now you have if you look in the nfl and just everybody in it. Did everybody play it. Alabama clemson or ohio state. It just seems like that. Sometimes and i think the recruits are seen it that way and from far and wide. They're going to those places you know. Ohio state just got a big receiver from grew up on the puget. Sound you know and And and a big quarterback who's who had committed to texas in his from austin is now going there clemson's getting californians. Something's going on there. I think threatens the sport. It's you know it's the same old teams in and i think it's going to be another alabama clemson final. Okay so i'm going to take the other side of this. And i'm going to say that essentially what this is is a television show. And so if you tell me the ratings are going down i'll tell you that the sport is in trouble but if the ratings are not going down. I don't think it's in trouble. Are the reading's going down to your knowledge. That's fair that's fair. They don't don't think you can say they've gone down. I just worry that right. It's good it's going to reach that point. I think it needs an infusion of maybe usc or or to a lesser degree oregon. But i just think those sort of cross regional battles were one of its strongpoints. We're losing those. I agree with this completely. I agree i just. I chalk this one up and maybe i'm being shortsighted chalked this one up to the corona virus and tremendously deleterious effect on the scheduling. This year. by so go ahead. I agree with that. And i and i sat around the left What has it been twenty hours or so looking at how mad people are in kind of thinking a are we being good citizens. If we're if we're spending anger on this you know in be. I mean should we just give it a one often get mad again next year. I think he should get mad again next year. I think anger. I think people that are fuelled by anger especially fans i find them attractive on a lot of levels except i don't want them near me physically but i liked their anger. I want to get to two things that happened. And i understand that you can lobby for your school. Jimbo fisher lobbied for texas and m saying they can play with everybody and took the customary shot at ohio state just saying hey we played eleven games or whatever we played. And what did they play. Which and i understand that. How is that viewed in the universe of coaches. And then i want to get to. Brian kelly's to me amazing remarks before he even played clemson absolutely amazing. But let's start with start with timbo fishe. I think that that ohio state number of games campaign. But i became a whole Fashion you know I'm only coaches Sweeney did it I don't think sabin did it as much but but anyway Yeah that became a whole a whole thing to say and it was sort of persuasive argument against them You can look at them and tell that they you know can beat most anybody but you know i think By the time fisher was saying it. I was kind of maybe a bit weary of the of hearing that school of thought you know it just it. It was getting getting worn out than at that point and then I agree that kelly's comments were absolutely stunning and would for people. That don't know this brian. Kelly said before he played clemson. I don't even know if we're going to go to a bowl game. If the parents of the kids can't be there and i thought what goal i mean if i was the president of notre dame i'd called him up and i said are you making policy for the school. Is that your job. Because we pay you a lot to be a football coach. And not to be a policymaker. I was stunned by that chuck. Stunned stunned i was i was too i just it to me. It just have this feeling that. Like i'm in favor of people having adults having voting rights. But i think it should be limited somewhat and the college football coaches could should be excluded from that because they are so oblivious. How do you sit there at this moment in american history and say that we have this huge worry because the parents aren't going to be able to watch it's an outrage that they aren't going to be able to watch their their offspring in the rose bowl. I just couldn't believe it if i was on that committee. I'd have bounced him for am. Because i think i would have justification now to be fair. I felt he wouldn't be bounced because florida only went down one spot when they lost to lsu and losing to clemson is a greater accomplishment than losing to lsu. So i thought he might still get in. But i had a bounce them. Because how dare you. How dare you make public policy like that for your universe. What are you talking about. I mean i'm. I'm happy to know yours outraged as i was on that i really yeah. And and and then it's clear from the remark that he there's entitlement laced in there too. It's clear that he thinks he's he thought his team was better than it was. Maybe and to be on saturday night and and this is the other thing he's one of the most. He's one of the more thoughtful guys out there to listen to him. After a game is often a you know you learn more than from just about any of them but that yeah that which added compounded my surprise at that yeah. Can i suggest that. Trevor lawrence is based he is. He's really really good. He if somebody else gets the heisman. I'm just gonna say you're not watching. You're not really watching are you. Am i wrong on lawrence. He's really good. It's like watching something that you've it's a level that's a notch above what you've ever seen. Maybe you know it's it's just it's evolution it's all those things it's You know how sometimes they give an oscar for. It's not really for the film that That that that they're giving it for. But it's of a lifetime nod to paul newman. Paul newman got one. I got one of those yeah And or maybe it's one. They were great last year. But we couldn't give it to him last year. So we're we're we're gonna do it this year who've had to give it to joe burrow last year we had to had to had to had to. But i say this. This is a lifetime. Achievement oscar heisman time. And you should. he should. Yeah two games this year. 'cause corona virus. So that's gonna. I think it's gonna cost him the award. Probably but this is the time where you said just meryl streep iron lady the whole thing and give him a lot of we are on. Espn two this week while we're on because espn of course has all these bowl games. My favorite being if it still exists the bad boy more bowl. I really liked that to get a bad boy. Though myself for free somebody would give it to me. But there are all these bowls. But there's a lot of schools opting out of bowls will. How does that affect the money. That's been allocated i mean. Is that a story. The it seems to me. The sort of large number of teams opting out of bowls so some of them have opted out because the players vote that way and some of the team's vote unanimously in some don't but they they end up voting that way majority and then some of them opt out like kansas state wanted to play one but couldn't because they had positive tests. What's going to. They didn't want to renege at the last moment so they had to had to go ahead and get out. You know It's i think the most interesting thing about it is that to me. It really gives you a sense of what this toll must have been on these players. It's almost you know they play for the reward of a bowl of tourists. And i've always been amazed. You know how they'll go to you know they'll go to say that you know at bowling phoenix has had seven. Different names was copper. It was inside. It was cheese it. It was packed it. It's astonishing now. It's up to guaranteed rate ball now. It's been canceled yesterday. It got but players will go these bowls and you know we belittle them and we think they're nutty and but they it just matters to them. It really does when you see them there. It's kind of like okay. okay. I get it so to have them. Vote their way out. Say as boston. College did really tells you you know what this has been for them and and how they're kind of isolation we've all had isolation but they're kind of isolation was a strange one. You know not being able to socialize on campus and so on and And they're they're so young. I think it just really tells me how much it has worn on them. By the way feel free to disagree with me but spare me the agony over the rosebowl not being played. Stop it. it's not even the rose bowl. It's part of this playoff. at this point. It is the rose bowl in name. Only and california you know has a severe corona virus up and down again so that the rosebowl won't be played. So what or my my reacting badly to this know that is the single worst thing that has happened this year in the No you're exactly. That should be way way. Way down our list of laments. At this point i mean. They're not they're not gonna have the rose bowl parade which is far more important than the rose bowl game and watched by far more people would seem to me over the course of three or four hours speaking of which the pac twelve you were saying you were saying before maybe a good oregon team the pac twelve basketball and football. This guy larry scott. Maybe it's not his fault but they've gone into the ground since he's the commissioner into the ground. My wrong on that they do seem to do that. Just seem to have a clunky air about them. You know for for They seem to get so many things wrong. or so. many missteps Just yeah they've and and some of it is i think some of it is especially with the football. I mean i know the california high school football numbers or supposedly a little bit up in recent years but you know It just means more is the sec's slogan. And i think there's some truth to it and and you know you'll notice that the the pac twelve was the last one to start playing with. You could have been just completely a responsible posture responsible posture. You know and But yeah so. I wonder if some of it is but it did tell us how you know the sec playing football with more urgent for the sec that it was for the pac twelve and i wonder if that kind of feeds into how far it's dropped as well well at least the pac twelve is in pious like the big ten which will under the cover of darkness change every single rule that they have made when they make the rules saying all we care about a science and safety but and we can make a little more money. If we do it this way right. I mean the big ten. Stop it stop. They had a tough time chuck. It's a pleasure. Thank you so much. We'll talk before the championship game. I hope okay. I hope so too. Thank you tony so much. Chuck colpepper boys and girls will take a break. We will be back with email in jingles. I'm tony kornheiser. You're listening to the tony kornheiser shaath. Hey football fans you an amazon prime member. This holiday weekend amazon. Prime video is the place to watch the. Nfl live with back to back games on friday. Christmas day the vikings take on the saints in. Nfl christmas special an nfl. Christmas special will. Charlie brown introduced the team. That would be so much fun. All over kicking the football. Yeah then on saturday. Yeah that's right. As soon as the first guy goes to kick off the. Footballs taken away by lucy. Or whoever that works on saturday the forty nine faced the cardinals a divisional showdown only on prime video only on prime video. Ooh i don't have that not an amazon prime member. You're reading my mind. Don't worry sign up for a thirty day. Free trial and get games. Were good idea. Yeah and you can catch all the action on any device except pots and pans almost anywhere in the world so this holiday weekend relax tune in and enjoy the nfl on prime video. Friday vikings saints. Saturday forty niners cartoons coverage begins at four. Pm eastern for both games with kickoff at four thirty both on prime video and of course it's presented by bud light platinum. You're listening to the tony kornheiser. Show ya time number tony time baggage with at knows only to thank the big read. All those smartphones females time. Time album is the Show is ad mark schaeffer. That is here for me. It is bill got okay. Bill got very very nice. Guess it's very very nice. I appreciate that. Why don't you do as the vaguely. I i got to do what they re today. Yes but there's the bagel the one forty eight nineteen bethesda avenue out. Today was a big day for us bagel sandwich day. I'd like to apologize for my behavior. In the line there is some confusion. I also got some bonus bagels for the road as an apology. So yes but that's the bagels. By the way it could be levi. Petrie that is banned is called the radio publica. There was a second page here. That i didn't see i'm mike petrie and the radio public radio public okay. Music is very very good just about do it for us today. Let me just say this before the mail bag. If you knew peggy sue i feel blue without peggy. My peggy sue a lovey galley. I love you peggy sue. That was the late great buddy holly of course thanks to our guest today. Michael wilbon and chuck colpepper thanks to our sponsors wonder woman nineteen eighty-four and hbo max christmas day. That's friday amazon. Prime with nfl games on christmas day and then the day after and lincoln financial remember you can listen on apple podcasts. Spotify google play radio dot com. If you get to the tunes please leave us a review. Michael you're gonna play some golf. I hope i'm hoping every day so yeah so at chessy oldfield. Yes oh well that'd be that'd be great. The weather's supposed to be good in. South carolina is supposed to be beautiful. Oh that's wonderful. You know every once in a while koi dad. He'll miss again three to six months ago every single day i saw you dead. Maybe you should try and plan safe way to enjoy your winter. Just just want you to be. I'm trying to be responsible. I just felt. I felt overwhelmed by you. Know by the virus. I'm just gonna say. Just stay here often tim and new jersey wife. What would you like for christmas me. I'd like tony read my email and exclaim. It is a brilliant email wife. Isn't this the guy who talks to a monkey and a half hour on his gas. Bill me yeah. Why doesn't that simmons guy do emails as always any mentioned in my wife. Scorn is brought to you by lifetime. Bend disturbed one gazebo. At sign jamie edwards. You mentioned the death of john carey and how british spy novel genre seems to have died with the end of the cold war. Couple of years ago. I read an economist article. Which unfortunately i'm not able to locate that talked about the history of british spies who became british spy novels. If i recall the article correctly turn cold war. British spies were masters of human psychology and behavior. They had to read people build relationships. Decide who to trust and so forth studying literature was good preparation to this line of work. So many british spies where english majors and thus good writers today. Most of those experts in english and humanities have been replaced again. If i remember this correctly people with quantitative backgrounds mathematicians computer engineers the sort of people who can electronially hack into an enemy's information system while sipping tea in the basement in london necessary financial security though. This transition may be the switch from literature. Folks to math geeks means we may never again get the sorta great spy novels. We once it. Isn't that a great email and from nick. Mielke montgomery alabama for your discussion earlier this week about john career. I was reminded of a series to recommend you to watch during the winter. While you're being snowed into kevin's perfect forecast. You need to watch the night manager. Which is a six episode. Bbc miniseries starring. Tom huddleston i. I watched three of them. And then for some reason i stopped. It's fantastic and you can get it on amazon prime which means you can watch look array on your look who set while you eat ice cream and drink wine over the kitchen sink. Do it now. Grandpa thank me. Later from steve the sycophant. I'm sorry to so slightly very slightly disagree with your comments about the late. Great john currie he did not serve with the. Uk's version the secret service he served first with 'em fifteen which is or it is m. I five maybe somewhat at mit five. Which is he's telling me to our fbi later served with 'em i six like our cia as for the best film versions of his novels. Look up the nineteen seventy-nine tv version of tinker tailor. Soldier spy starring alec guinness and the two thousand one movie the tailor of panama with pierce brosnan playing a womanizing slimeball agent one hundred eighty degrees away from his swab 007 roles From pat telfort in martinsville saskatchewan. This past week. I was listening to the show when i had my second. David aldridge moment. You read an email from lance morrison from dinsmore saskatchewan. And i thought. I know that guy i worked with lance and we've kept in touch through high school athletics in the province we've known each other for more than five years but didn't know the other person was a little. The first was. When i heard you read a letter from sean bellamy of saskatoon earlier in the year and i said the same thing i know that guy i have known each other for about twenty years but we also didn't know we were little's i don't know how many other little in this province but maybe there are a few more out there. I'd like to meet them. But i'll be honest. I don't wanna meet people and it's not just the kobe thing that's funny that's very funny. Did anybody out there and go to school with rufus. Peabody from william bennett. The director of the official choir. The tony kornheiser show. That's came bay. High school in south carolina while hanging out with my kids tonight. They watch minecraft gameplay video. Don't ask the game users. Said i have my iron farm working without missing a beat replies. Everyone i replied everyone knows the best. Steel has grown in sweden. My daughter named what and the woman whom related by marriage is shook her head and said poor. Mr tony priceless one. More time here rocky radovic. And he's been with us for a long time from jersey city. You're jumping on the jimmy resin anecdotes. I was lucky enough to spend some time with them. When i was young editor to magazine. Do you remember magazines in the same way that he was handy with a bic pen. Jimmy really knew how to work in expense account out of the blue. He would call me up and tell me when and where we were going to lunch. Always a diner though he always went to diners. Jimmy would order tuna melt and then talk at me for the next forty. Five minutes hitting me with ink-filled stories. None of it for public consumption of writing about the mob shrapnel of his have to tuna salad it was was one time we were walking up. Lexington avenue jimmy stopped to lecture in front of a stroller and yelled into it. You're lazy. I pulled him back instead. Jesus jimmy that's just a toddler he answered. When i was his age. I had to walk everywhere. Nobody puts jimmy resin around. Got on your bike. Everyone is always do wear white. Don't you know where you come from. You leave it all be. There's no fool or the to us bird. I'd still give you mine counter all the things that we've been through soon your own whispered allies when you speed. There's no guy you walk. All our he was on your wall bear on have to say still there fact. There's no man you seen you for some time. Mother says you away and for me. We'll do fine. i guess there's nothing and merge too loudly you round on christmas day. Don't expect the brain. Get talk and south. Show god A mile then in new york four while looking for way so good do it changed in the years only about his choice. He said i'm a man. These people are to get to know my family or to wool albo. You will lie these days like him. I feel there's unchain man. My flames died all these things. Bernau defiance better off alone. Thank and with how har- much long thing in this may but city strand fine way soldier first time in years. I just over the thrill the far man. I guess it's time sino found what's important to you. Maybe that'll Hey misule fran. I'll put mind as a dream still out there for Looking for start. Maybe there's a girl maybe we'll stop jews out of air. A megan call. This made this may.

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Global Warning

The Pulse

49:10 min | 2 years ago

Global Warning

"This is shy. Ben Yaacov here to tell you about a new show co host and called the y. premiering October twenty. Third in each episode, we'll take the deep dive with one of our reporters into an issue that matters in your community and offer insight into why it's happening. You can download the white every Monday through Thursday wherever you get your podcast major funding for the pulse is provided by a leadership gift from the Sutherland family charitable fund, the Sutherland support WHYY and its commitment to the production of programs that improve our quality of life and by the coryell institute for medical research. This is the pulse stories about the people and places at the heart of health and science. I, Mike and Scott when I was five, I got a little yellow parakeet. That was me Bailey. Morrell has a different story. My grandpa bought me my first half off the Reno stage. I was five years old. That's right. She was in kindergarten and on her way to becoming a cattle rancher Bailey just turned eighteen. She lives on her family's one hundred sixty acre ranch. It's about an hour north of Sacramento. They raise Hereford's so Hereford's are those awesome cattle with the red bodies in white faces. But in recent years, one of the worst droughts in the region's history threatened her family's way of life. Our water district had no water to sell to us. There was no opportunity to irrigate our crops or our pastures. Our land had to go fallow. So the land just sat there, dried up and useless. They had to sell a lot of their herds. It was a lot of hard night's deciding which we are going to send with auction yard for not the prices that we would have liked because even the cattle market dropped, they started looking for water on their land. We drilled four test holes for wells and all of. Them came up dry. We did everything we could to save the water that we had because we didn't have enough, and I was huge for my family. They wondered about the future, what we could do if it was even worse that anymore. Scientists, warn that devastating droughts could become more frequent and intense with climate change and warming temperatures. But Bailey says her family decided they'll do whatever it takes to adapt. Our hearts are still in agriculture a no matter what the world throws at us. We're going to have that relation to agriculture. They invested in a new era Gatien system that conserves water. They moved the herds around war to allow the pastures to recover and do what I could on my end to prepare. On this episode as temperatures rise and crazy weather becomes the new normal droughts, hurricanes heatwaves. What are we going to do to adjust to adapt and to survive? Hope is not a passive emotion. There's a lot that we need to do facing right now is really a race against time. Taking carbon dioxide that's captured putting it someplace where can be stored over very long time periods. It is about us having to live in a world that we create. The new United Nations report on climate change moves the target in terms of global warming. Scientists used to think that limiting warming to two degrees celsius would be enough. Now, they are saying, we have to limit warming to one point five degrees or face dire consequences, extreme weather and conditions that will destroy lives infrastructure and endanger our food supplies the report, her just sweeping changes in all aspects of economy and society. That means changing our lives, our habits. Let's get started with an example of changing habits related to trash mountains of it end up in landfills every year as that waste decomposes. It releases methane, one of the most potent greenhouse gases, incinerating trash also pumps a lot of carbon emissions into the air. There's one small town that's creating a blueprint of swords for doing. Trash differently. Reporters on your neurons used to live in Japan, and she takes us to a rural community known as a Sierra waste town. It's not yet eight AM and the recycling center in cots who is already bustling with activity, a steady stream of residents arrive and unload trunks, full of bottles, cans, and paper items. They separate recyclables into dozens of clearly labeled bins lined up in neat rows. Comic cots who is a small town of about two thousand people in the forested mountains of Japan. The waste collection center here runs a tight ship and everything is carefully sorted and arranged with the help of staff their Wapping forty, five different categories of recyclables and the town recycles eighty percent of its trash. A curious Ikano heads up the town's zero waste academy. That's a nonprofit organization that manages the recycling program. Every resident gets a thick booklet, a recycling guidelines to learn as they go. We have, let's say, newspapers, cardboard scrub papers, Australia did peepers paper containers, paper container with aluminum packaging. On the back, they have nine subcategories just for paper, even paper with aluminum on it, a cure walks me through the waste recycling center. So what are you doing? So this is a manga NASO weekend sometime check using among to segregate aluminium or metal. She pokes the magnet around in the been to see foot catches any metal cans mixed in with the aluminum before kamikadzedead opted zero waste policy. In two thousand three. The town used to burn all its trash and incinerators officials realized how that impacts the environment and people's health recycling also has an economic benefit. It cost six times this for recycling or how we initially right now compared to incinerating everything. Trash pickup is not a thing here. There are no garbage trucks in this town. Almost everyone has to bring their waste in themselves. For the older residents who can't drive themselves to the recycling center. The town does send a pickup truck. I hitch a ride with the driver Kazuyuki Kiyohara. Kazuyuki is really concerned about using the earth's resources wisely and he's super gung ho in his personal life about the whole recycling thing. He's got more than a dozen separate bins at home keened. Okay. Food put us in jail. I have middle bottle caps, plastic bottle caps, milk containers, soft plastic from laundry detergent. Trays plastic wrappings and containers, and he keeps going paper paper, cardboard and garbage to be incinerated. That's about it. Sorte. He's so intense. He even inspects his family's trash. Vocal gives him a final check. I give my family members instructions on how to wash recyclables properly at home. And after they wash an item, I check it and I go, it's still dirty. Then they go. And I asked them to wash it again. That's right. You have to wash and dry all your food packaging. Many locals say that's the most annoying thing. Back at the recycling center. I catch Daichi yucca no, as he unloads bags of juice, cans, plastics, and dirty diapers. He moved here from Osaka few years ago. We'll. I confused the categorization, so detailed. It was easier. No saw Khan. It's all ahead to do separate the trash into Burnham, booze and non here. All the categorization is so much more detailed. So there was a lot I didn't understand it was. So it's a lot of work as a single father of two small kids. He says, he's too busy to sort out and wash and dry juice cartons. He's not a big fan of all this. I wonder why we have to do this much. As it coming resident, I have no choice, but to separate my recycling. I will continue to do so. Fifteen years ago when I lived in Japan, I remember I had to write my name in big black letters on the're trash bags. It made me feel so conscious about what I threw away. If I left even one bottle in there, the town wouldn't pick up the trash and everyone would see my bad left out there on the curb. The curious Ikano from zero waste academy says it takes time to get people to buy in. But once they learn, there is no going back. Japan has of course good that this kind of social pressure if everyone's doing it and then maybe you need to do it. That's a social pressure. So people got used to it. So it's how they changed customs. And once the customer has changed, aids become habit. That's the team finished. You come cuts who is gaining international attention. Now, outsiders are flooding here to take workshops at the academy on the day. I visit folks from Japanese branch of the clothing company. Patagonia are here to learn. Yes, exactly. And well, beyond the small town, people are recognizing that reducing how much he threw out could be a big step in the global battle against climate change for the pulse. I'm Sonia Narin. We're talking about climate change, and on the one hand, we have this new u. n. report that says, we have to limit global warming to one point, five degrees celsius or face really terrible consequences. Extreme weather and conditions that would threaten our lives destroy our infrastructure endanger our food supplies. And then on the other hand, we have our habits, our comforts so many conveniences we've become used to. We just heard that guy who lives in this era waste town, talking about how much of a pain it is to sort and wash all of his trash. So we really have to ask ourselves, are we ready to make big changes, for example, to quickly move away from all fossil fuels. No matter what I talked about the costume benefits with Benjamin Preston. He is an environmental policy researcher at the RAND Corporation. Any type of action in doing. Nothing about climate change or taking very aggressive actions to combat climate change. All these decisions come with significant trade offs. It would require mobilising absolutely massive amounts of investment. And certainly this comes with with consequences investing so much wealth and resources into combating climate change means there would not be resources to achieve other societal goals and objectives. What about my wallet? I mean, we've all benefited from cheap gas prices from low prices of electricity and so on and so forth. So how would things change in that regard? Yeah, absolutely. So obviously, a big concern, a potential barrier to making these kinds of changes, what what are the costs associated with that? And perhaps more importantly who bears those costs. So as soon as you approach hill consumers and say, look, we have to come back climate change, but inside doing it remains, you're. Going to have to pay more for energy like trysofi. You're gonna have to pay more for food and water because of changes being made in in those sectors. That certainly gets the attention of the general public against the attention of consumers and can can lead to push back in terms of some of the policies and actions that are being promoted to to fight climate change. You know, when we talk about climate change, we're talking about it at the global level. We talk about international agreements and federal policy, but these things do trickle down to hit people in the wallet. We often look for a bad guy or somebody to blame and in all of this. So energy companies are a target and people blame them in a lot of ways for our continued reliance on fossil fuels. Is that fair and our energy companies doing things to change what they are doing? Yeah. Well, I think there's there's no question that the energy sector is, you know. A major contributor to climate change. If you start getting into the blame game, though there, I think you have to start looking at number of directions. So you know they might be burning fossil fuels to produce electricity but guesses on the other end of the wire, turning the lights on in their house, turning their conditioner on in their house. That's that's consuming that electricity electrical utilities. Most of them are businesses, and therefore, you know, they're responding to markets and and we're the ones who are creating those markets that said, I think it's also important to recognize that energy companies have lots of incentives to get out in front and play a leadership role in developing new technologies and moving away from fossil energy to renewable energy when in solar in particular. But let me ask you when people sometimes it seems like people are demanding an all or nothing type of approach like renewables now and. Get rid of all the other stuff. So is that realistic? I mean, what would happen if we tried to do that? Well, personally, I do not think that is realistic. I mean, I think achieving these kinds of changes over short time scale is invariably disruptive and with disruption comes opposition and we can say, well, there's political opposition from conservatives who are uninterested in climate change. But I think once you start talking about, you know the cost of some of these changes again, hitting people at home in their wallets, the potential disruption to companies, you know, that level of disruption is going to create a large amount of opposition, which is gonna make it very difficult to do anything politically and socially, even if it were technically feasible. So what's our? What are our options then if you think we can't really make the deadlines than what's. Next for us here on this planet. Yeah, great question. Well, I mean point though, is we have to recognize we're probably not going to keep climate change below one and a half degrees, and their consequences are going to be experienced as a result or consequences are already being experienced in recognizing that means we actually have started investing in the adaptation side of climate change and really investing in managing the risks so that the consequences to human beings in society in the natural environment, we're actually making progress on that front as well. Benjamin Preston is a climate change policy researcher at the RAND Corporation. That's a think tank headquartered in Santa Monica, California. Leaders and activists from all over the world came together at the global climate action summit in San Francisco in September. The motto of the conference was take ambition to the next level. Here's one of the participants, Muslims leeann Ainhoa I am the Queensland minister for environment and the Great Barrier Reef I'm also a condom yuko woman. So new knuckle nudie woman of quantum connection. The first aboriginal woman ever elected to the Queensland parliament. And of course Queensland is the second largest state in a strike. So comet changes impacted Queensland in many ways. Actually, we've seen the impact of persistent drought for many years in some parts of the state. And of course, we've also seen back to back consecutive mass bleaching episodes of the Great Barrier Reef one of the strongest messages that I've been giving to delegates that up being meeting the last few days is to seek to pursue thriving balance. So first nations, people know all about thriving balance how much you should take how much she leave behind. How do you ensure that you've got a thriving balance in the environment. We need to find what thriving Bellas means for us. Now with the economy can still thrive with the environment contrived where communities can thrive. And of course we're future can thrive. I stand here with three thousand generations behind me understanding that we are, but a speck in time, but aspic in time is absolutely critical for the three thousand generations ahead of us that was leeann Enoch. She is minister for environment for the state of Queensland in Australia. She was speaking at the global climate action summit in San Francisco. Talking about climate change what it will mean to our future here on this planet, how do we adjust and survive? What are some new things we have to start thinking about? Let's take a look at climate change and our health one condition, specifically asthma, millions of people have it and warming temperatures could really affect how often they have a tax and how bad they are reporter Allen. You has been looking into this, hey, Allen my Mike. And so what do people say about climate change? So interestingly, when you off people with asthma, what affects them? Climate change is not top of mind. Then we'll concern with things that they can see in few right now. All kinds of trucks rolling through kick it up. All kinds of I mean, dirt dirt. But this thirty. The planning all the police and you gotta breathe that. It's like, sometimes you come outside a little muggy, lookin smokey Logan, and it has a smell tour all the time. That's every day not only some days just every day. So it sounds like there's a lot to worry about are ready? Yes, but climate change is on the minds of experts. People like pediatrician Tyra Brian Stevens, whether in fact, climate change is contributing to more asthma or not as hard to say, but we do know they definitely impacts asthma attacks in asthma. Hospitalizations Tyra is medical director and the founder of the community asked him prevention program at the children's hospital offer the FIA, anything that increases airway inflammation is gonna increase asthma symptoms and asthma attacks. So what is the exact connection here? How is climate change going to make as much worse than it already is. Okay. Climate change at one on one burning fossil fuels like coal and gas puts more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that changes the climate in common oxide is one of the raw materials in photosynthesis. That's the process that plants used to make food. More common thi- oxide means plants grow foster, and research shows that plants like ragweed and pine trees could release Paulin sooner and release more of it leading to a longer pollen season and more pollen is of course, bat and use for people with asthma or allergies. And when I think about asthma as a condition Allen, there are already a bunch of factors that are really out of the control of individual people, right? It gets worse in terms of where you live or what you're exposed to. Right. So let's zoom in on that and look at factors environments or in people's neighborhoods. Let's look in particular at one. Family. I met Angeles, Sultan. She has two sons. Both of them have asked them Angeles has she won those if the Asmus thought that because of where they live in the Philadelphia neighborhood called Germantown. So when you will come out with sometimes you walk in a puff of marijuana or you know, the neighbors was always cigarette butts everywhere. The boy's father and grandmother will both heavy smokers. Their apartment wasn't a mice infested building. Unfortunately, nobody's holding these landlords a cannibal so they able to just went out anything. Everybody had breathing problems. Everybody like everybody had a pump. Like if one of your kids was outside at the playground, you could borrow somebody else's pumped just to make sure they get some beautiful. I had to lend my pump out plea times when I was at her house. I also met Angeles, oldest son, Josey Sutton is seventeen. I like to dates consider myself a dancer on the play video games. I'd always movies, typical teenagers though. About ten years ago. He had a really scary incident now cannot be at all. So we had called the ambulance stroke, and it had put oxygen take on me, but it still wasn't working. So they rushed me to the hospital and had to combine the steroid mixture for some other medicines noted open mile long, just wasn't getting the oxygen. Eventually, Angela move a family to a different neighborhood, but that was Hoffer her financially that move parental almost double with off the woods. And that was a cost she had to shoulder on her own my console, these other kinds of challenges that some public health people are looking at when they take care of people with asthma. These are not just personal problems as Mozelle really about atmosphere. You know, it's not just about what's happening in the individual body, but it's about what we are breathing and are breathing spaces. Our collective that's alley Kenna, a professor of politics at Drexel University. She's been studying the experiences of people with asthma since two thousand nine and recently wrote a book cold. Ref taking asthma care in the time of climate change. Climate change is really pushing the issue here. Historically, you know, at least since the nineteen eighties when the asthma epidemic emerged here in the US you know, public health researchers, caregivers doctors have talked about addressing asthma in terms of triggers. These are singular things, mold pollen dander air pollution, cold air exercise. So these are just singular things. But those aren't really how we live. We don't live through singular things and Alan, it sounds like Allie Kenner is thinking about all of these factors coming together. And I was thinking about the mom just mad Angela and how she moved her family from one part of Philadelphia to another. To lessen the triggers they were experiencing. But now I'm thinking about a future where maybe we can't get away from these triggers because they'll be everywhere, right? So unfortunately, Elliott Kenna's picture of what the future will look like backed by the research is that it could just be getting worse for people like Angeles, Sutton's, two sons and other people with asthma. So for example, climate change means more air pollution from things like ground level ozone, and again, a longer Paul and season and more extreme weather events and weather is another big trigger right when you have asthma. Yes, that's something I heard a lot about from Jeffrey Coulter. He was like nosed with asthma when he was eleven. Every time the season does change. I normally have a bad asthma attack where to get rushed to the emergency room because I'm gasping for air. My ads Apponator times not working and on the issue that could change with changing weather is mold because more flooding could mean more mold. Wrote in houses. Jeffrey actually helps people retrofit their homes to help them save money in running into mold is a risk at his job. He was doing work at a client's house, and I went into the basement and I could not breathe it all. And Elise was wrong. I say you have mould down here because it's killing my loans right now. So mold could be getting worse because of climate change more pollen air pollution could get worse, crazier weather patterns. That's sounds like a lot. What do public health people say they wanna do about this? Or are they just sort of shooting off a warning flare at this moment? Right. Anti Kenna says, one thing we could be pushing full awestruck to regulations around air quality and air pollution, and we will kind of outside on a busy street. At this point, is it politically feasible? We need to make it politically feasible. I mean, we're, we're talking about public health, and if you look at the research on the public health impacts of air pollution, if far exceeds asthma alone, and she says, hopefully the work from her and other asthma researchers will get the policy makers to pay. Attention. Thanks Allen for Mike in. You're listening to the pulse. I, Mike and Scott and the researcher, we just heard from an Allen story, basically, said, people need to push for stricter regulations. They need to make their voices heard. That's something a lot of Americans are already doing. They are out there, demanding action on climate change in protests and marches and some protesters think it's time for another step. They're sitting down and getting arrested, audio producer and climate activists Claire shown is considering that next step herself. She has a podcast called stepping up and she asked to women who've been invested what that's like. It's scary to put yourself on the line and risk arrest. And I have to think about that every time whether I am ready to get spread by tear gas or water or. Be left in the rain or have my handcuffs too tight or have my arm dislocated from being pulled. But that is the reason why civil disobedience as powerful because it's it's not easy. That's Sarah shore. She's an organizer with three fifty dot org. It's an international climate action group mobilizing people around the world. I've attended a lot of protests and rallies. I've done a lot on social media. I've called a lot of people to get them involved. I've organized coalition leathers I've, I've made banners, yeah, lots of things, and I've gotten arrested three times now. That's fine for a twenty three year old. But what about someone who's inner sixties like me. Should I get arrested. Claire, that is just so stupid. That's my good friend eve since kinda dumb. If you ask me, I mean, what? What do you want to get arrested for? You know, it sounds like you wanna do something good in the world, but I just I, I don't think I don't think it's a good idea. She had some pretty good points. First of all, I don't think that most people in the establishment have much respect for people who are out there protesting in a way that they want actually wanna get arrested. The people who are gonna make the laws are, you know they're not radical people. They are much more more more centrist. They may think that these hippy dippy people were outliers. Actually, there are some older women in the climate movement who are engaging in civil disobedience. No longer hippies their grandmothers. Now I'm Nancy Feinstein. Nancy is a grandmother and helped found a. Group of climate change activists called a thousand grandmothers. The group took their name from an anti war song from the nineteen eighty s. Grandma of the will. The song provides inspiration for them in today's fight against the climate crisis. I think a thousand grandmothers was a catalyst for a number of elder women to get off our butts and do what ever we could in community with each other, getting off their butts and getting arrested. This sounds of protestors could be heard from blocks away as they demonstrated against the keystone excel oil pipeline. The first time I got arrested was with my mom. I should mention that this point that Sarah shore is Nancy Feinstein's daughter over twelve hundred people gather rested men. My mom were two of those people. They fastened their wrists to the fence and waited to be arrested. It was really nice to do it with my mom, and I think part of it was her wanting to do something with me. I didn't know. I am always looking for opportunities to hang out with my daughter, but I can't get my friend Eve's voice out of my head. Why would you want to put yourself in that situation? You know, voluntarily to get yourself in a place as dangerous where you could get hurt and then not be able to do the work that you want to do afterwards. I, there's just no way there's no way I'd want to do anything like that. I asked Sarah, why not simply right my congresswoman. When you see people putting their bodies on the line, it makes people pay attention. For example, in the civil rights movement, people breaking unjust laws like sitting at the lunch counters or riding at the front of the bus, and seeing African Americans get beat up by police and police dogs made the public realized this is not fair, and it completely changed the American perception of. Segregation in this country, but still, why can't I leave this arrest business to the millennials? Then I caught a speech that Bill mckibben gave after the keystone, excel arrest action that Nancy and Sarah were both part of bills. The founder of Sarah's organization, three fifty dot org. Young people have led vis white, which is appropriate. But one of the few unmixed blessings of growing older is has to certain point what the hell are they going to do to, you know, and and. And so it was to go to Washington and she that there were a lot of people with hairline like mind, showing up the point I'm trying to make for young people is just that your elders are starting to act like elders. Okay. And I think they will be with you as fight goes forward. Thank y'all. That was a bit of a revelation for me. So I signed up and became one of the thousand grandmothers. I don't actually have grandkids, but the group uses the native American definition of grandmother, an elderly woman who cares about the next seven generations and is Nancy says, grandmothers can afford to do this. Older women can actually step up in ways that maybe when we were first trying to establish ourselves, we couldn't or when we were raising children, we couldn't. Of course, the downside is we're old and a little creaky. All of us have had conversations about this because many of us had physical disabilities that has made me more worried when I get arrested with my mom because she's less, you know, physically able and she's more stressed out about being in the back of a police wagon or being made to sit in a position. That is painful. So I, I worry more for her in terms of physical discomfort. Then myself, I feel more willing to take some risks. Because I can't think of anything more important. You have to identify with a grandmother. If the public sees a grandmother getting arrested for a cause that they believe in, it makes you think twice. And so I'm really excited about the prospect of thousand grandmothers rising up organizing grandmothers all over the place. I think that that's incredibly powerful. You know, people always say you would put yourself on a train track if it protected your children. That's kind of how I feel about this climate struggle. I don't think myself a particularly courageous person, but if I ever needed to be courageous, it's now. And for me, I'll continue to March and right my congresswoman and signed petitions to support climate action. And while the idea of getting arrested is scary, I am ready to take that step to. That's audio producer Claire shown to hear the full story and other surprising stories of climate activists checkout her podcast stepping up. We heard some music in this piece from blue dot sessions and Holly near. We're talking about climate change. The new u. n. report states that Uman's have to take serious action to reduce warming over the next ten years or face some dire consequences. In the meantime, many researchers are looking into adaptive strategies ways to mitigate the impact of warming temperatures to protect ourselves, our cities, our infrastructure, here's a candidate that could help form a barrier against rising seas mangroves so there there are those trees that look kind of like jungle gyms. That's biologists, Samantha Chapman. She studies wetland ecosystems including mangroves. She does most of her work at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Mangroves like it there, but they grow in tropical and sub-tropical waters all over the world. Climate change could mean more storms rising sea levels and big destructive waves and Samantha. Says mangroves with their jungle. Gym shape could help lessen that damage. These big roots and things called pneumatic doors which are like little snorkels that stick up that allow them to breathe in the water. And all of that structure actually breaks up the energy as of a wave as it kind of comes in. So you are looking at mangroves as a barrier. That is one of the ways in which we're looking at them. We're also looking at them and perhaps most importantly as sort of a builder of land. So mangoes are very good at building land like salt Marsh grasses are. So in order to keep up with rising sea levels that have been rising since the last ice age, they've had to sort of build up soil and they do this in two ways. They both catch the dirt that's running down rivers and coming in on coastal events. So they catch that sediment and they trap it and they build up the land that way. But they also do that by growing roots and sort of pushing the soil up. And so in doing so they can form their own. Land, which is pretty amazing, especially when we're thinking about losing so much land to seek things sea-level rise and with temperatures warming could we see mangroves in areas worse so far they haven't been able to survive. So thus far mangroves in Florida where I'm working, have reached kind of the limits of where they were in the past. But this is like the long ago past, but they've been steadily since the eighties moving up the coast. The one thing mangoes can't deal with our freeze events and it hasn't been freezing as much anymore in Florida. And so they're sort of marching up the coast in Florida, and they're doing the same thing and Texas and Hannah and other places in the United States, as well as other places in the world. I just spent a sabbatical Newseum the same thing happening there, changing their extent there as well. So if we're talking mangroves, what would we do what we plant them in all kinds of places, it is not that hard to create new coastal wetlands. China is doing an amazing job of it. Right. So they are planting vast areas of new mangroves. I've traveled there recently a couple of times to see some of the work that they're doing writing coming back from ecological disasters in many cases in our planting, lots of mangroves and lots of other types of wetlands to sort of clean up thirty go systems right and entrap carbon. One of the things that's tricky with mangroves as you have to get the the water flow. Right? And so you have to know kind of how much of that darts going to be delivered into the systems to allow them to build that land. But in terms of the planting itself, it's these, they have these seeds that float, right? You can get a bunch of them. They make lots of them and you sort of stick them in the ground. And if you have the conditions, right, you can build vast mangrove for us really quickly. How do you think about nature's ability to adapt with warming temperatures how the earth might adapt and change? Yeah. And this is definitely. Personal opinion that's not shared by everyone, but I tend to think that nature is resilient when we either leave it alone or give it a little bit of help to do it at needs to do an example of that is the fact that these plants and animals are moving around with climate change, not all plants can move mega are good at that because they have things that float. But there are, you know, Maples that are becoming more bundled in northern areas right that are changing with this climate, but I think that we need to provide the room for nature to adjust to climate change, you know, and it's gonna just with or without us. That's the that's the way I think about it right nature is going to be here. The earth will be here. It's just whether it's a a sustainable place for us to live or not. Is the real question. Samantha Chapman is a biology professor at Villanova university near Philadelphia. She studies wetland ecosystems. Another strategy to adapt and to prevent the worst is to try to get rid of some of the carbon dioxide. We pump into the atmosphere, thirty six billion tonnes globally every year. What if we could capture that greenhouse gas and store it somewhere safely to introduce us to a technology called carbon sequestration reporter, shayla FARs n. went to one of the sources of the problem. Okay, kind of sitting on the side of the road here maybe about our quarter of a mile from the Miramax powerplant which is mostly coal, fired powerplant about half hour, south of Saint Louis. One, two, three, four, big smokestacks over there are releasing greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide is changing the climate. So how do we keep all. Carbon dioxide from going into the atmosphere will one way is we can trap it at the source where it's being released like this powerplant here. But the question is are tracked it, what are you going to do with it? And that's where this technology cold carbon sequestration comes in. Involves taking carbon dioxide that's captured putting it someplace where can be stored over very long time periods hundreds to thousands of years. That's Dan Jomar. He's a professor of environmental engineering at Washington University, and he's also an expert in geochemistry. The process of carbon sequestration is pretty straightforward. You inject carbon dioxide underground where it reacts with the surrounding rock and water than slowly that gas becomes rock itself. The way Dan describes it, it sounds a little like science fiction, but it's not a new technology. Research scientists have actually been injecting carbon dioxide into sandstone deposits for decades when you're looking for a good place to put CO two sandstone comes to mind for one big reason. It's full of holes, and that's a good thing. It means the carbon dioxide can seep into all of its little cracks and crevices. But the problem is once it's there that gas can take. Thousands of years to turn into rock. The carbon dioxide stored. There remains as essentially this CO two bubble that's trapped beneath the roof. You can see why this would be an issue if there's a crack in the overlying rock. All that carbon dioxide can escape. And because carbon dioxide is acidic, if it gets into the ground water, it can cause lead and other heavy metals to Leach out of the rock. Then you have contaminated potentially shallow groundwater which we might use for drinking water with carbon dioxide, and also quite importantly that CO tiff it makes it back to the surface and goes back to the atmosphere. There was no point trying to stored in the first place. So sandstone might not be an ideal rock for storing CO. Two, Dan says a better candidate might be a type of volcanic rock. That's actually one of the most common rock types on earth. It's called basaltic basaltic reacts with carbon dioxide and turns the gas into limestone. What Dan studies is, how fast that process happens under different. Conditions we met up at his lobbying Louis, so I could see this process in person. And the first thing you notice when you walk into his lab is this row of metal chambers sitting on the counter. They're about the size of soda can and inside each one, Dan simulates the conditions that you'd find underground each chamber is a different mix of variables like temperature and pressure, and then sitting down in the water. We have a core of assault, and so we have a rock that has these natural pours in it. It's sitting down in water. There's a lot of carbon dioxide dissolving into that water. And then there would be carbonate, minerals forming inside this piece of rock. Remember Dan's trying to figure out how fast carbon dioxide turns into rock inside these little soda can size pressure cookers and it turns out it's actually pretty fast. A lot of people had said, well, maybe the carbonate minerals would form over decades. We had thought from our understanding chemical reactions that would have. Happen much faster in. Indeed it did. So we start to see carbonate minerals forming as early as six weeks, some of our experiments. So that sounds promising in less than two months. Carbon dioxide starts to turn into rock. But the question is, how feasible would it be to try to do this on a large scale, the kind of scale that we'd need to start to address climate change to figure that out. I got in touch with David Goldberg. He's a geology, geophysics professor at Columbia University, and he says, location plays a really big role. Every assault will react at a little bit different rate. It depends on the the pressure constraints, how deep it is depends on how to is injected, how dry the too is. In other words, you might have a ba- salt deposit under your house. But that doesn't mean it's a good candidate for carbon sequestration. David also says the technology for injecting carbon dioxide underground is basically the same technology that's used. In willin gas exploration. The obvious difference here is that someone's paying those companies to drill for oil and gas. And right now, David says, there's not really a financial incentive for companies to do carbon sequestration, won't be doing it with an altruistic motive only. It may start that way, but I think in the long run to make tain this there needs to be a financial structure that makes the incentive for commercial sector to do this. We're still aways off from being able to do carbon sequestration commercially, but scientists like Danan David's say they're doing the research now in the hopes that those financial incentives will be there some day for the pulse. I'm Shay LaFarge on. we've been talking about climate change and let's finish with a young woman who says her generation is ready to tackle these issues. My name is Daphne criminal. I am the United Nations. Secretary genders on ROY on youth, and she says, global policy conversations about climate change, half to involve young people. If peace about us having to live in a world or us having to be leaders of a world that we did not create and I have not met a single young person who does not believe in climate change or who does not take seriously. I have seen young people, questioning the clothes, they're questioning the products that they eat. So in that sense, I think there is a strong accretions in young people that we shouldn't leave the world in the way that we found it. We should make it a better place for our children. Now for the future generations live and on the other side, we have no other option. If this generation does not reverse these implications, then we are going downhill. So that is my call to action. Let's the envoy on youth of the United Nations. Secretary general. She attended climate summit in San Francisco. All of our postcards from the summit were produced by Caroline dealer. She's the environment reporter for PR is the world that's our show for this week, the pulses a production of WHYY in Philadelphia. Thanks to the producers at. Imagine if that's a podcast about climate resiliency from the North American association for environmental education. You can hear the whole story about Bailey teenage Cattle-farmer on their website. Our health and science reporters are Alan. You and Liz tonne. Our intern is Julian Harris. Charlie Kyler is our engineer and this week. We had help from Mike Villers. Alex stone is our associate producer, tiny English. Our editorial director, I'm liking Scott. Thank you for listening. Behavioral health reporting on the pulse is supported by the Thomas scattered good behavioral health foundation, an organization that is committed to thinking doing and supporting innovative approaches in integrated healthcare. WHYY's health and science reporting is supported by generous grant from public health management corporations, public health fund ph MC gladly supports WHYY and its commitment to the production of services that improve quality of life supporting the post the coryell institute for medical research, enabling scientific discovery around the world through its renowned collections of cell lines and DNA from the National Institute on aging and National Institute for general Medical Sciences, learn more at coryell dot or.

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Dr. Roz Show: How to Legally Protect yourself in this Racial Pandemic with Attorney Shimane Smith, JD.

Dr. Roz Show: The Relationship with Yourself

1:03:35 hr | 1 year ago

Dr. Roz Show: How to Legally Protect yourself in this Racial Pandemic with Attorney Shimane Smith, JD.

"Hi Friends. If you haven't heard about anchor is the easiest way to make podcast. Let me explain first off, guys. It's free. Tools that allow you to record and edit your podcast right from your phone or computer. Anchor will distributor podcast for you, so it can be hard on spotify apple podcast and many more. You can even make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast in one place, so go ahead right now. Download the free. Ankara APP or go to DOT FM to get started. I can't wait to see you here. Hi Guys Hi. Guys welcome to the Dr. ash show the PODCAST, that. is taken over. The Airways about all means lowered life relationships, but today we have a very very very important conversation. With some money Smith. Who Should Money Smith is? We is one of my favorite people. I met him in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety six. As a freshman at Chris University and I met this. Heat smart. He's a smart guy and I'm always just had admirations for him. Every sense in so I really am excited about what he went with us today so that we can feel powerful. When we are out street and were accosted or in a situation where we where we may legal help in these racer times. It's been extremely. Difficult to see some of the things that we've seen things that have taken place. Decided to do this era episode. Today's so that we can ensure that you know we. We have something under about so money. Tell the people who you are as they can get to know you like I know you. I thank you me on. Doctor is really appreciated at civic eight. You're absolutely MAC abor eagles. Also one of the smartest people I know I really enjoy a hearing. Your your podcast. Listening to the vice that to offer people have done a great job. Helping people maintain healthy relationships, hey. That's a tremendous tremendous asset to our community. Thank you. As that raw says I'm said I'm an attorney. Practice Law for Broccoli nineteen years. warned meeting, different ads throughout my career spend a great portion of my career as a criminal defense attorney. Also done some civil rights work. I've transitioned over to more corporate lately, but Achmed spiriting trying civil and criminal cases in state veteran courts, and I'm also a background in teaching law school as well. Some of these will probably be discussions podcast. Oh, that's awesome I didn't I didn't realize you Lori Teaching Twelve but I'm sure you're. Being your class. I've got great feet. Great feedback, yeah! Yeah, so you keep your real world for them? So I see that we have some people logging on, so go ahead and feel free to let us know if you're here. You have any question cast. Put them in the comments and we'll get your questions as they. Show Up. You know, but we're going to go ahead and get started with the interviews money. I know that you wanted to give a little background and so I'M GONNA. Let you take the poor, and then we'll come back with questions. Thinking I while we're here to discuss. Your rights, you have interactive law, enforcement or police officers any different level, but I thought it was very important to give a little bit of background people who may not be familiar with the plight. Of Black and Brown people in this country's the why this conversation is very important. If you! Look at some statistics that come out. It shows at the likelihood of chains itself around be blaby contact with law enforcement are tremendously higher than that of of of non black around people. Right now we don't have a full grasp on all the statistics that we should. There's effort by a University of Stanford. To compile data through open, outspoken policing project. Where they are in the process of gathering information from law enforcement departments throughout the country for the one that collapsed Wednesday collect data on the interaction, a law enforcement with the citizens and the demographics of those who have stop with we're seeing. Is that the a tremendous? Discrepancy between a number of black people and Latinos or staff as opposed to white people. Although we don't rake up large portion of this cap for this population, African Americans were thirteen sixteen percent of the population, but yet some agent listening that they account for over eighty percent of the police contacts through stops whether it be through driving or whether it'd be through interaction of being frisked through walking down the street. And what is very telling because contrary to would allow the stereotypes might say about us this. Show that black people are more likely to commit. Crime than any other people as a matter of fact, the majority of crime committed in this country committed by white men. I know a lot of people heart bronze statistic is like Oh. What about glad people counterfeit senator murderers? You know if you break down those facts, statistics really doesn't testify the aggressive nature of law enforcement projects tools made you look at believe in two thousand eighteen. There were approximately I wanted. My memory serves around sixty thousand murders at eight six thousand of those were believed to been committed by black people, and if you look in relation to forty one percent of. This forty one million people in this country are both black. If you break down and you're looking at approximately point zero zero zero zero. Zero one five percent of the population that may have perpetrated some form of this crime, but people often use as the justified aggressive nature that. Takes place against us. Also when it comes to drug use, we find that there's the him with a project that believe I don't. Kramer at Chicago. Bears. Is some beacon look it up online the statistics for it. It shows that when it comes to drugs. Use. White population used drugs at a much higher number in that black and brown people in this country. And also the statistics of WHO's likely to sell drugs dating even. So. There were no more likely to sell drugs. Then why people but yet we have six point five percent. Higher Likelihood of being arrested for drug related offense, Stockton Chris and search for those particular instance and more likely to be car serrated for greater period of time. For those instances as well now. Why do I bring those particular things up? Bring those up because when you talk about, please contact. With. A lot of times. searches and seizures are taking place. One. They're looking for weapons, or they're looking for drugs mainly, and you look at the data's. The number of black people and Brown people are being stopped him being frisked or a arrested for these particular crimes. It doesn't justify the disparity in those particular numbers. So. This is important because likelihood of. US having contact with police officer are much greater. Than White Citizens in a lot of man that have the contact, and no, even with. That looks like I. think that people who have a tendency to add this TV you would have a frisk looks like as someone just patting down the exterior of your clothing, and then you're done. Of, the Supreme Court decisions that talked about stop and Frisk dotted minor truce. But what we know is that these are carried out in much aggressive way, a lot of neighborhoods and base against a lot of people that look like me. In New York where we found out through to due to their recipe staffing, his policies was that high numbers of of sexual Inappropriate sexual, touching and sexual harassment. There were young men who. Were stopped. Chris can have their jim to tell us. Basically, erupted impressed. They can't have children U.. More. What's? Absolutely absolutely, these aren't minor little. Intrusions and and and I think if you have contact are talk to some people about it. It's not uncommon for them to grab your genitalia or to put gloves on. It was bid between your behind looking for some form of contraband. Drugs was very true six. Because Trauma and A LOT OF PEOPLE WITH A great affects unharmed from it up. Some people will lose their jobs. Obviously but just imagine in. Walking out of your home, anointing to give give their time that some might grab you in and basically violates you in the golfing. Thanks abuse that yeah. I mean as a woman that is scary like the scariest thing that that could probably happen to. A woman, so to speak is for her to be sexually assaulted so to hear that. Law enforcement just like doing this and getting away with it. That is terrifying I can't. I can't imagine in a worse violation. It's very difficult. Nephew projects online that chronicled in in in detail, a lot of the stories that we don't hear about an media and interviewed a lot of the people who were subject to these type of violations in their community and Think about it. We'll talk a little bit more about. Some of the justifications for these stops that police officers us one of the factors that they use determine if a police officer has a right to stop is if you're considered to be in a high crime area. Right there, sex set abides and creates an equal treatment. of You from anyone else who? Are highly policed. Alley police like our neighbors are. Highly Police, so you're law-abiding citizen, but just because area living you are deemed to be true. You're allowed to be treated differently based on your socio economic status me areas. When I think about that and lead that is. Because here's the truth, people who live in high crime areas. They want to be saved. Not everyone that lives in that population Likes the crime that happens mountain into not that I can just be stopped because I'm in the area that that to me is. In no way does not. signify. Protecting sir? Absolutely. Yeah we felt like I'm being Husky. Absolutely in imagine the trauma of if you're in situation where you been stabbed. Repeatedly, been violated. And maybe make it very clear. In New York late studies nine out of ten people who were stopped at risk where this had committed a crime, and we're not talking about small number of people we're talking about. They were conducting hundreds of thousands of stops risk insert neighbor. Let's. Ask hundreds of thousands. I think in two thousand. Fourteen the two thousand thirteen. It was round, two hundred thousand, but it was increasing because of the lawsuits that. Moment, but imagine how many people that will be the concentrate neighbor that because over eighty percent, black and brown people. You know how that looked in plate out, and they were targeting increase neighborhoods and these particularly. In, imagine having to undergo that in violated, but yet if you do need someone to help, you have to try to call on those people who violates you for assistance to try to help you. Yeah, term scenario in dynamic, does that create with community exactly as great when we are having to make a choice of weather three call the police when dangerous happening, because we don't know what's going to happen. You know after this just that's terrifying that that we don't have the same. Of calling police when there's an emergency it. Bewilders me. Is Incompatible. Is the the craziness about it is that when we discuss these themed gun places typically Goeman her and he's A. Tragedy a tour to. Some people to wake up. Oh, this was this was horrible and it was a horrible situation to watch. This is something we've seen in our community for years i. Wake. Up and you saw sterling being show if you didn't wake up. Will you saw? Mr Garner view. Choke to death. What has to be your psyche. Stay with sappy. Is this something that's serious and we need to pay attention to. Say Guy. Literally made the growth tap for people realize electrical matters. You, know because I I think because we were home. And you couldn't run away from it. You know you had witness. I think that's why it became such a thing during this time, but you're right. It's been happening since the big I mean from its beginning I'm taking from Africa here I mean it's just been happening. From the beginning of Time in this country, where black, glad been under siege. Even from I. Mean maybe a small Linda arguably. Breath at right after. Emancipation during the reconstruction made me a small window, where, but there was forces that since we integrated the confederacy back into this society in they got put their foot right there to door in. They begin to make policies and get elected that in. Much once again we were. You know they've the thirteenth amendment. People think that was the that's read Africans from their their their hostage near bondage from the captors. Treated, deception because this, unless duly convicted of a felony. So that's led to mass incarceration and even after. Reconstruction era we saw that there was a Polish. encarcerated black people and get them charged and convicted of any type of crime. So that they can get free labor from them again. and this is the culture that police officers police departments of modern least arms were bill. And people say without such a long time ago ended a change when. It had of course can. Check. It has not changed ourselves personality. It add hurting changed. There have been tremendous movements to try to protect us from. Violence. Another black into. The, To the black grant. Was a formed to protect people enough California from open area believe. Police brutality where they actually controlled the area to ensure that. If someone's getting arrested, they wouldn't be violin and we look would happen through. That organization in how members of the organization although most of them were were. Government just Lisa's will force on them to the point where it was very hard for them to even. Go on a daily lies from due to the trauma. It out because they obviously certain members of Fred Hampton was assassinated street to be sleep by police, and if anything, it's crazy, it's crazy. You think about it and. You know right now. We have this situation where people are asking. How can I be an ally? In? At the end of the day is not my job to educate you on their presidential keyboard, doing you need to figure it out Scanio people to stop like at the end of the day to. What it boils down to. Now. Yo people to stop like. Late let it go a WanNa read, got a couple of comments that came in on several says Hale. Thanks for this story. Thanks for this. This is a great topic. Are we're able to say? Does you with areas as well as the lining? That still happens today, so we are usually collected together very true. She's like poor. People have a right to be safe to at. That's true. We we absolutely have a right but Migra this. When you think about that. We were own considered three fifths of a person we've never. Like. And? I don't see how people can like do that fact to think that there that we over that. We didn't even consider US human. In. In you know you considered human so actually we'd be over pitcher hunting down in the street likely about Aubrey situation. I mean I couldn't watch that. Much. It was, too. Because, at the end of the I would be fighting for my life to someone. Coronary me with the shotgun and I have no idea what. And I'd say as. Just the idea of the end. From Georgia. Just kinda hit home. Skewed things really haven't changed. In my hometown have KKK marches. In you know in just you know WanNa. Definitely So recipes soldier. No because. When I saw in I saw him fighting for his life. Remind me of that Michael McKay. If we must die, let it not be like dogs under the off some independent glory spots. and. We must that we gotta fight. The fight back when Akron. Let them just take out more. And I would say this. There is something that you can do to try to help. Protect yourself if you have these types of encounters with law enforcement, and I do want to talk a little bit about some of the things that we can do. Let me, be the first say, obviously what I say here is not turning advice not meant to be. Legal advice inside just more of educational purposes, but it's important for us understand. What we have to be confronted with, we deal with these types of situations, and I also want to point out that when you have an accountable law enforcement, there is no expectation or requirement that you as an individual our privacy. Snap that deescalate situation. That duty is on the police officers however. It's very important that You exercise calm. You be very relaxed as possible to make sure that they don't get round up because at the end of the day. More than certain rights is important for Ekamol. Right right. And that's scary part. I want to have this conversation because. Even though I am African American. My experience. With. Law Enforcement is difficult. Her husband, who is also African American. And I didn't realize that into. Like, an issue. We've been pulled where he'd been over whatever. And I have never seen him like so call. You know and trying to you know, be proper, whatever and here I am like. Why did you pull over light just carrying over? Cared unreal. This I moved to the DC area and So in my hometown. I really brought the law enforcement was. There to protect them from a small on from a very small town and Most of them were can't or Even the community that I knew. It was so small, and so my husband looks at me. and. He tells me like the red. He's like shut. And I was like. I'm getting upset with him at this. Sitting here trying to you and you're telling me to the, so we make it home. Or do home he was like. Don't you ever in life do that again? He was like somebody has solicited. Tell the story rise and he was taken anything. They could have skid anything he was like you. You don't do anything and that was my. Very first experiences. Just really realizing et. Even as a black woman. I don't even understand. What the person is law enforcement for black men. You, know I had another friend when our first material to the D. C. Area And It was Halloween and they were looking for someone who killed a cop. Is So He had ever talking he was economic. Take the metro today. Which is our subway? And I was like why you. Hit US. I was like no. Drive the same cars dude! That Killed The cop by our Nino unnecessary. was like Gosh I wouldn't even. Like, they wouldn't even cross my mind. That I'm two thousand. Across my more on into God's. But it's so traveling in is so real that I. It just made me realize even as a black woman. My experience is different than likely. It's crazy. It's crazy. Into let me move meek counter regnery. I WANNA. Definitely highlight the fact that a lot of this fight that we're seeing. Take place streets for the lives of black people are led by women. and. Constantly think about the dynamic said of as opposed to a man men leading those dynamics in those fights. What the response reaction may be. I believe to be truly believe women saving our lives more ways than one. And one of the things I applaud each and every one of them for what they're doing and the strength that they're showing in this community. Is just amazing. That you know, thank you for saying that. Because as black women often say that we know of his really realize. So I appreciate you saying that because. You Know I. Mean if you get there. You see women on the front line he's. Out there on the front line. And you know they are fighting farmers, not to say that are out the too, but I think there's a certain level of protection that a woman. Hand shelter a black man from because. You know hopefully they will be as aggressive. With women, you would think. Yeah, you would think we have have. Someone commented the hat. My son was twelve. Download the I being pulled over APP excuses. As the location. I need to download that I didn't even know. I has ability a setting that they can that you can go in, and you can set it. Set it up to. If you are being called, overeating can immediately notify whomever we select your contacts automatically. Start to record. Front Cam way or back camera on the back Camry whatever your preference is, it'll dimmed of up the on the screen. So. The offers can't see that the they're being recorded. And automatically sin the video to cloud as well as email or text messages to whomever you choose to be text McCain. Sure that won't be deleted is a very powerful but bear Perry powerful tool to use absolutely over and I think you can program into to say I'm that police officer Syria? By police, officer, or something like that and and trigger ahead and start according. An, Android to come up with something like that to be had I'm an iphone guy so. I got investigate that. But I do I have it on my phone. I have said up and I. my contacts Reset Just in case, pulled over, or whatever the situation or encounter. Maybe a my do pink is very important for us to document are counters and just. For the sake me also for the sake of your protection, but I am very big data, so we can really have assistant accountability. And there is. There's a movement to keep officers from having body counts. There was looming. Keep people from recording police, and beyond so in understand this that police officers do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy while they're conducting their public duties. Would that means is hey. You ever rights film. Them what may staff. From filming a lot of different things are is there's privacy rights attached to? They don't have that. Police Oxford tells you. You're not allowed to them. There hasn't been for a case. You have to determine that. Haven't reached my expectation of privacy however now. So. You say turning Panera off. You can't fill me. In police officers allowed. To tell you things that aren't true. they they are protected in a lot of aspects by some the things they say are new to this. United States pretty record as Issue several stay out cases that have backed up data. That proposition, but look if you are recording a police officer. Conducting it believes you should probably be a very safe distance away. To where you're not interfering with the duty of the police officers. That's is that could be a problem. If you're too close. Say The obstructing the performance of their duties, and I've seen people or and he tried to get right up on. That's not. Understand police officers elise and they do have a right to exercise performance. Oh, their jobs in such a way which not the hindered by necessarily have reason as well for the safety food safety at the public. Should be aware of the laws in your individual state, because there are some wiretapping law states that would require you to announce to the person who is being. Arrested or investigated or any other people in June Two are recording. Okay trying to hide the fact that you are recording something. Don't try to cover that rating like that, and you can probably make make I am recording this and the laws of the state and reason why I say that because one of our classmates all said this is. This check! This is this eight. Checklist chess. The air is in that state that law a lot of times I'll have a misdemeanor offense attached to. The recording in that area, you don't make now than they. Have Grounds to arrest you on a violation of that misdemeanor statute and seize your phone as evidence argued. Hey, but if you do have. If. You are recording and police. OP reports are approaches. You try to get as you do not have obligation to turn that footage over to argue that. They need a warrant to get that information. so you're allowed to lie. Politely refused them of that talk. Right the NAFTA. Turn it over. But, it's very course we're seeing. In this at at these videos come you. Very important to our fight for equality to be treated like human beings miscarriage. Because that was going to be one of my questions. We sane where there's video footage. But, yet these cop still go free and I. It just didn't even dawn on me the whole. You. Know seeing that you. You are least stating saying that you were filming the show that. Video can hold up. Because I'm assuming it will be able to hold up in court if that law is there the miss them all. Is there. Right because we talked about systemic racism racism in this country. We talk about a lot about white supremacy. We talk about the the the attitudes towards. Black people in this country and that's I think. Naming that movement lack lives matters very very smart, because reveals BAKSI! You get me. We learned that from King. First major video that is seen my lifetime of. This. Brutality where personally just imprudently beaten? The perception of black people, a lot of people stereotypes that even when you're be beaten to a pulp that still thank your dangerous. And That's a problem, but that's part of what we have to deal with this not on us. The changing is never did anything to deserve that treatment justified treatment. Afrikaans, that's part of the evolution that this country has the bill though as a whole, they have to evolve as you beans in this country. To where we are able to have humanity and CD humanity in others and treat each other. Like people with compassion empathy. Awesome I think this is from reese known. He says I've Been Brunswick. The neighborhood is a few miles from my head. I'm not surprised that it went down like that amount Aubrey. To this day and would be cautious about navigating that neighborhood. I mean that's unfortunate light and and the from Georgia. You know. There's some places where it's like you know not. You know, don't don't go here their. Job It's not here. Yeah from! CLEVELAND. From outside Cleveland that was very neighborhoods we didn't go to. If we went to the neighborhood. We knew that there was going to be a problem. We're going to stop by the police are there was going to be citizens charter? Run this out in his growing up in eighties and nineties. You know magic when I bought my. First House abutted the city of Lakewood which was supposed to be very progressive in right off the lake in the. NEXT TO CLEVELAND AND I. Was walking down the street to come up and get some ice spring having a great day. Right and car. US. Now Racial Epithets Collina's naps in a very threatening manner. Now you know the lawyer need to stand up. It was the hood hamsters streak. But it was just the say here I am on the home owner. What was considered a very nice neighborhood in. Taxes the taxes were high. But at the same time, being subjected to this type of Treatment Is Not about what we US said. This about evolution of the people have got to do better. Absolutely I just saw. Dislike Marsha proctor and gamble with it was a very smart commercial, but it really showed the microaggressions that black people face is the man was walking down the street with his child and the. People in the car rolled up the window and then he was getting on the elevator and The elevate ner. They let him in and then towards the egg. This shows that he is a judge. Don't I mean? A very Amazing commercial, but it just shows it that as a black man, you could be I would think a judge has the highest of high race that you can be at the highest highest in in a professors and still be treated with these microaggressions. I Just think that it's at. Seven. I have this question because we hear this a lot. And we don't really I'll be on I. Don't know what it means. When they were over for probable cause. Still, that's a million dollar question in. Will basically under the fourth amendment of the Constitution. That word is used at No should be issued without probable cause so probably cause of legal standard that police officers have to happen to search you or to get a warrant for either your arrest or search your house for your home. There is no set standard legal definition other than it's based on reasonable articulate acts known to a police officer at that time that there is or has been a crimes committed, and it could be any number of facts factors that the equal arise up to level, probable cause and the ultimate determination of if they're probably causes this. For, a search or seizure at the time is determined by the judge. So it's. In in some courts Mike there was the word versus Illinois. Factors a probable cause Liz running in a high crime area. From the police officer Flight high-crime Mary Police Officer. From police officer when there no other. Reason for police officer suspect crime committed obviously person so the court found that was probable oss. So you look at when police officer you have police police officer counters are searching seat of. Two different things well. They're different level of of. Intrusions, the day can. Have with on your person, your property on based on the facts circumstances, so there is under terry versus Ohio Korean Ah Sach to the proper calls required. where the courts say, it's NAP, practical police officers to have probable cause for a to conduct an investigation of a person on the street and of live on moment, but if they have reasonable, articulate That crime is afoot. It can't be based on a hunch. can't be based on fishing expedition but if they can articulate facts, the suggests that criminal activity is or has been committed or about to be committed than they can do a search if they leave your armed and dangerous arm endings. Patchy down into a protective Pat Down This using Colin now. Call the stop and Frisk of your person. There's reasonable suspicion for that particular interaction that they have with the a just for the pat down. for weapons leaving to commit a crime at army dangerous. That has evolved now. Police officers are used in the lead. They don't have the right to do so. But a lot of quartz loud to do for them to search for drugs. Patchy down and they feel you may have a barge in your pocket. That might seem by. It's so format narcotics go into your pockets and pull those things APP to sync with they are. Are At some time or some type of weapon now probable cause for criminal it be or crime. Is Little bit higher standard than reasonable suspicion doesn't go as far as what would be necessary to convict the person a beyond reasonable doubt in court. But it has probable cause that you have committed a crime. If they have that, then they can go, and it can do a search your person a now. If a lot of times, they don't have to have probable cause. You consent to a search And, now back up a little bit, but if you give a police officer consenting search whatever they wanted can live with. Hey, you can search a glove compartment of my car. Search stack that. Come them as the scope. They know have probably caused search anything else. They shouldn't go on searching F particular area of the scope that you give them, but you have to be very clear about it. Means you're? A search. So you can in this, you can refuse a search. When I say refused you have to be cleared. Deplete demand. is vulnerable the guns do do. Magic. Which should do very clearly articulate that you do not consent to a search. At the hey, you don't have to fight. Get all upset. And I would I would add. I will say hey. It's best for you to remain calm specialties being recorded as documented in his record of to say I do not consent to the search. More lot of officers won't care if they don't have proper causing fights way to to try to get to the search. Weather's bringing. In MY OPINION UNRELIABLE DOC! Canine units out or A lot of different deans. Will just go ahead and violated. And tried to search your car that take place you. You know you don't try to interfere with what they're doing. You just as very crumley that you that consent to that search and leave it at that. But you can't. issue. We can refuse. My policy is I've got asked to. This is my personal preference to search my car. Even though I don't have contraband I, don't do anything wrong or anything I would say no. I do not. Because I've seen with cars. Look like after they did search. Big. Side of the road. You know they don't find anything. They're gonNa go have nice day or anything like that and slam you sort of. Take yourself back put in car and some type of manner whether there's late at night or early in the morning, still at inconvenienced unless deal. Yeah, no absolutely It's horrible. We have a user this of his todd and lost that. You can't really drive. Block without somebody Latian true crime is driving were glad. In. It says I was taught law school that you can't really drive a lot without violation when the true crime is driving while black. mcchord say any type of Arctic. Valuation, the allowed police officers to justify that stop. You pulling over off of Masada road in on that signal, and if you're park or anything like that, so I've seen a lot of people staffer that did. Have a license plates tag. Karsli struck it from license plate cover. Again stock for this. You know they'll ask. You bill are the reason and what the Supreme Court paintings given them a license to racially profile people because we know who's. Living adversely affected by this. Yeah I got pulled over one time because. Light, I guess stands cleared, PAG was out. At of know, how was supposed criminal that you know what I mean rat? I'm about the HAMMOCK. I think probably the only thing that saved me in. That bubble is with a dog. Dog Whitney late at night and It was really it was terrified. It was terrifying You put the on this like right out of things in the world. Going on, this is what we heard about. Right. You care to pull me over for this. So, I guess you know you Kinda talked about it with the probable pause, but win pulled over by the cops. You talked about a little bit to win You, said to remain calm, and so we can say if they are so if they'd be Kim the search, ready in your car, or whatever because they don't listen to me, saying I don't consent to the search in UTSA. I consent. Search him a luck apartment nothing. And if you have that reloaded limited scope, you can limit the scope of your consent. Yeah, I personally wouldn't consider anything. That's just my policy. I personally wouldn't if I were advising clients panicking money I would say don't consented if you have the ability, call me in record was known. You know right away. Don't get me wrong client to call me three or four o'clock in the morning among the side of the road. So and so may lose off. Is put him. Phone you. Officers I knew you know. He's representing exercising his right to remain silent. If you have any questions or anything nature come through me. Can you issue a citation whatever in? Or. Give a warning pleased, but you know. If that's not the case, you know there have been situations where give the client. Taken speech. You're going to be taken right now, you know. Goodwill that they're going to be arrested resumed. They're going to take right now when they take you. Mama told me never to the shut up. Please be quiet. You know and this is what you do in that particular moment I'll meet you at the police station here. But in this important understand to look. In we hear all the time, the Miranda rights. Let's say you have a right to remain silent. Back, probably the most important. Right that you have when you have an account with a police, ost. Now the courts say do identify yourself. You're the. I'll give your name. As far as that's concerned, but if they're their questions beyond that, you don't want to answer. You don't have to me. You have that right, be styled and not say anything. You also have a right to determine any any state have access to, or they can't deny that access to attorney. If you have any questions or doubt as call your lawyer. If you don't have a lawyer, they can appointed lawyer for you. If you city defender's office, oftentimes they have these were on call amid trust me. Public fins get a bad rap. A lot of people always Chris is something. The best lawyers I've seen in my life have been public defenders, travelers and we watch that. Just mercy. With Brian Stevens? He essentially was a type of a public defender even though he worked exclusively. For a program to help get people wrongfully CARSO rate on death row off, but basically he was a public interest lawyer with Lonzo cases and Making millions of dollars from it. But one of the most brilliant lawyers that I've seen in my lifetime, and I wanna be by Kim, when I grow up and that movie a novelty deliver amazing. At Saint Just mercy I can out in his fantastic. Listen to his Ted Talk. You! He's Gibson, great Ted talks and some great speeches and done some things pet. Listen to I'm like man I wish I had. A motion one of course that is black juvenile to be treated like Weiqian. Mostly. Known. He's highlight spirit, tease, adjust treatment that. Were Black. Kids receive within the justice system and I've seen that first hand. You know my my white clients to did better, the black ones and it was the same. Same Judd and I will fight like hail, but it was just the matter the what they were treated differently. Yeah, and it was this origin. And that's the reasons why transition the name to do more corporate, because it was very hard for me to stomach a Lotta things vaccine arguably leap at night from Dillon with did now it was just whole lot in motion -ly taxing on you, you care. Out there I saw that. but if you geared some mostly taxing on you, it's constant battles constant fight. It could be detrimental to your physical health just fighting are fighting field like you're in it by yourself, sometimes But what you can do to help your attorney. You get less situation as we'll be quiet like I, said I'm not gonNA. Tell you up. Please be quiet. Now there's been evolution of the Miranda Rights. It used to be very strictly to lease tailgate to donuts allegation to get the Reeker underwriting statements. You make against Gambia miserable in court. The courts critique with Ben Tinkered with that. Hey, they've said. Hey, you know you have to be the sick declaration of I need an attorney I wanted maturing right now. Let me speak to my attorney. If you say I think I, need a lawyer. The courts have said. Hey, it's not really certain your legal rights to attorney off. Someone told me I should ask for. Asserting your rights to. To attorney and they continue to a question you. You don't shut up. You engage a some courts would say hey. That's the way review Maranda rights than in there. If you searcher police officer leaves, but he comes back a little bit later breaks tax questions starting answering. Hey, they said it reengaged different circumstances different situation, so you would have research a right to counsel at the particular time. Never mind they. Meantime, they didn't give you your journey. You know so. They wanted down that particular standard. Doesn't preclude you from being prosecuted like some people say in remote rant rights. I get three. That's not true. It only protect statements. You're in the process of being detained custodial detention by police officer, being interrogated so keep statements out emissions kilter. That's great to know because you know I. Wouldn't have thought of that. I would have thought it. said it one time dead. That would have been a nut. Right I to say. Someone says hey is David. You have to give you license. When stopped walking down the street? Okay. There are different laws for different states in different jurisdictions. Some cities, some states that do have a law that says if police officer is conducting lawful traffic stopping. You have to provide some type of traffic that you provide them with your identification that NFL yourself, so you have to look at laws that your particular dangers. However? If you're not. A police announced street police stops talk to you. He's allowed to talk to you. They're allowed to hang inter gates at. Ask questions whatever you don't have the answer especially if they don't suspect you permitting cry, you again, Michael Tell you showed up. Please be quiet. I'll say anything. And you can go on about your business. I've seen this play out the way supposed to be play out in real life, which means police officers violated the rights of citizens. Sometimes judges overlook that. Lets Woods the United States Supreme Court has repeatedly stated that say hey, a police officer may approach. They have a right to ask you questions if you choose to consensual encounter. you choose to engage you can't but if you choose not to. You're allowed to go about your business. Your refusal any in advocating station with a police officer does not give them rights further detained or create some type of reasonable spatial problem offs, but again there's a difference between practice. Gary. What plays out in practice does not mean that what it is going to be starting with plays. Agit doesn't comply with the theory. Allies with the actual says. So yet to be very careful. With that I always going to be lights, you always Wanna be called. About things so depends on the jurisdiction that year you're in. As those things now a lot of things to law, so if you're a passenger in a car. And the police conduct a traffic stop of that car. Technically you haven't just sit in carpet. This done anything wrong. Grass with police officer. Hey, the I league. In at the police officers you free to go I'll go get out the car. On Your Business. Because if you don't know who's in driving a at the hassle contributed to find that car. Sometimes it. Let's take ownership of that canceled ban. Can rest everyone or they can pick and choose. Who's going to get it I mean. He's going to take that particular. A charge not seen that play out. A lot of its work sto-. You do have a right to do so. Police Officer Says No. You can't leave it at that particular point in time when they say you're not free to go. That's can be to be some form of detention. The seizure in particular I, if there are no articulate reasonable justifiable facts that you have crime or has been committed or about to be committed particularly when you search of quarter writes. A as a passenger in the problem with this is because of contraband. Fine on a car that you're just riding in this way, always be careful. What which told you was true? Much if they do get in a car, which is anyone because if something is found in that car vehicle, you get charged. According to a legal different costs in you don't have the rights with. The fourth amendment rights illegal search of that particular vehic. You can't challenge that after bands in a vehicle because the courts have is from a cost. A say you don't have standing in challenge. The constitutes no search of that vehicle his natural vehicle. You don't have any reasonable expectation of privacy in vehicle does natural. you can simply have to go through the legal system in that be able to foul. We call a motion to suppress evidence to challenge. The lawfulness of the Stop in the seizure because you don't have standing. As a passenger. Well That is, that's terrified. I. Mean You know that your clients? Rights have been violated in an obviously a there in. Say you go in you WanNa fight everything you can, but you don't have the ability to challenge the constitutionality of staff or of search at equal because your client apps standing at the time. They do is going to be real they have. A you're only avenue is to try to get. You're not trying to work out. All the. Prosecutor WHO's willing to? Go if the. Person WHO's doesn't stand up and have ownership is being their stuff, too. How. and. This is GonNa be our last question tonight because we're all still trying to figure out. How is this possible? HOUSE HASSLE THAT There hasn't been any charges. Taylor. Like how is that possible? There's there's a lot of reasons why not possible I mean well. So what they? That dictates really weighs on me having heavily. Yes, so they use at no knock warrant. Get into the House and obviously the person that they were looking for did not live there. And that was already in custody. So, there was tremendous level incompetence that was involved at least department that time. We've seized cases like this for. Decades. Case. Was Georgia. I'm not sure. Where there was elderly. The police. Yes, that was Georgia. She was like eighty years old. And they use a no knock. Warn came in the House and ended up shooting and killing her ran out. I've curse not that the actor warrants three eight any safety police officers faith. They're useless at it creates a heightened sense of danger one. In in what they're really looking forward towards. A lot of times in some cases, they may be looking for marijuana and their. Their Lisa Mail marijuana record store now. Certain states yeah. A. Quarter stores, but I'm calling the dispensaries things that. Matt? Through that? So reason why the charges in my opinion estimate brought one beside the politics that courts have provided officers will protect of for carrying out. Their duties and Lila duty. They have qualified immunity standards and statutes. If there are operating in what they believe is being good faith under the circumstances in a go into someone's house and they ended up shooting and killing them. There's protections for. and. That's what I'm. That's important about this. Woven rain now is because I mean we're talking about drugs here. Let's be honest. East the stereotype of this whole drug cartel in the inner city where they're carrying tons of gun to shoot up equals. A lot of the houses that they come into the down drug dealers. These guys are shooting times. They made me looking at some former probation. You know they're not going. Try to shoot a police officer with me back on the street in a few hours. Bonds I mean this whole militarization of the police. Words in my opinion is unnecessary. And it's dangerous. People lost their lives for so in that situation I definitely meet. Someone should be held accountable for. That was a violation of. Not only their rights, but it was reckless. At a late last night. Off! To. Reduce those charges. For this amazing how their incompetence can create a situation where they are allowed to kill someone, and then also wrestling for that demerge back, yeah. That's situations near me. Unlike Gosh, she was in her sleep. A young girl WHO's laying on the SOFA sleet. They came in her house. They shot and killed her when she was six years old. you know it was? It deserved me in these situations. Don't happen in other neighborhoods. We don't hear. I heard one situation. Recently simply where there was a couple who had a shootout with the police officers knew to know Nag. Maury combat a white couple. Did. Repercussions for the officers involved in. We want to say you treat. we warned three like eighty one else in this country by anyone else in this country. We don't let crime. We WanNA. Feel safe. Still protect. We don't feel like protection for those who sworn. To protect us. Absolutely. You are the best. Thank you so much for this hour with us. Just really educating. To protect ourselves and how to ensure that we are We are legal rights because. You know it feels very hopeless times. I'll be honest. It feels very hopeless. But to know that we do that. We can't say I do not consent to this or to know that You know that you cannot take my phone. Let's have a war. You know to know that we can use that. That type of language won't. We'll help some of US affability that we have to go through. If we do at least we know. Some language that we can use before we go. I want to tell people. Reach on. Where you're practicing ads, and you're also a budding entrepreneur. Is Wales everyone about what has gone on down in Charlotte Right? Ashley. Comes tune where actually wants this pandemic to is over will be opening up our private number. Cigar Lounge. That's the store near Cigar League. Upscale high. classing, you know, have A. Lot of manatees. At the that facility, but also the website I am at as case law DOT com. Or linked in I'm Smith again. In or me up on Facebook as Any talk. Always, love adding engage in conversations with people, a healthy debate amity banter. So. Obviously as we have, we have a lot of that here in marriage expose. Absolutely absolutely, but thank you very much for having me on into this conversation. I do hope that some information that we share today will help some people I told my daughters that I was doing this podcast asking it was about. And what am I say? We have two quite that say something potentially saved millions of people's lives. and. I don't think it's out that series MVP, but it was. This is very important, very important conversation for us. Ask please the. Conversation. Yeah absolutely in You know, thank you, thank you for sharing all. I wanted to say that we have a fiscal. Fiscal, Say, you know we're whenever fist fight. In the place, you know some excellence is about to happen hey. Yeah, but thank you guys. Thank you guys for tune into another episode of the doctor Rod Show. I hope this was great for you i. hope that you learned something and I. Love You with the grace of God. We near this would somewhere because just section money starters. We'd rather pretensions as nude lies. Thank you and have a blessed and wonderful day CA. Congratulations, this is really nice. I'm proud of you. Clearly, this is Toby's act back.

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18 - Terry Karges and The Petersen Automotive Museum

Cars That Matter

41:18 min | 1 year ago

18 - Terry Karges and The Petersen Automotive Museum

"From commedia! This is horst that matter. Well this is Robert Ross with Kirk cars that matter and I'm here with Terry cargoes virtually with Terry Cargoes Executive Director of the Petersen Automotive Museum at the dame. We've certainly heard for a long time, but this'll be an opportunity to learn more about the. About what Terry's doing their leader, welcome Terri Hi. Thanks for the opportunity here. Well. I think it's a great conversation and I wish I could be there at the museum with you, but as we're all presently working from our homes or abandoned offices as it were, it's a different kind of conversation, but I think we can get just as close as intimate with the cars as we might do. If we were actually face to face, and had some of those great machines in front of US Terry. You've been with the museum since two thousand twelve, and you've obviously seen a lot of really interesting things happen. You led the charge for complete re envisioning and reopening that happened in two thousand. Thousand Fifteen, but let's go back to the beginning kind of the origin of the museum when its founder Bob and his wife Margie Petersen, but actually envisioned this institution Bob Peterson was on the board of the natural history, museum here in town, and so as Bruce Meyer in Bruce and Bob were also neighbors the Natural History Museum had I think something like sixty cars and were thinking that they would open an automotive museum with their cars, and Bruce really was instrumental in convincing Peterson to make the Peterson Bob wrote a very big check I think it was about fifteen million dollars initially to get the museum funded and get it started. He also owned a building. He was a great entrepreneur. Entrepreneur you own the building here which had been a department store, so they opened it. It was a Seibu department store for two years, the Japanese high end luxury store that didn't work, and then it closed, and some years later Oshkosh came in and I think they operated for about eight years Mr. Peterson had purchased this building on the idea that could move his headquarters here, but then he found there were no windows in, and it wouldn't be good for writers and journalists in general, so he ended up moving down the street that they opened in ninety four June eleventh of ninety four to much fanfare and natural history. Museum believed that this was going to be an enormous cash cow. Cow that they envisioned I. Don't Know How many hundred thousand people in attendance, but that didn't happen in so museum was operated by natural history for about seven years and finally Mr. Peterson and the board didn't get along. Mr Peterson actually spent another twenty. Five million dollars took over the bonds to the museum so that he could own it outright then he set up the Peterson Museum. Foundation and we became sole, enterprise or nonprofit to the year two thousand. Well, that's quite an arc for the institution for what ultimately became probably the most important automotive museum, certainly in America. Maybe the World Baba's a real visionary. I mean for those who are not old enough to know. I mean He. Started magazine Publishing Empire. That was all about cars It is hot rod magazine started at all and I think if it weren't for Bob and his vision, the whole evolution of automobile and automobile enthusiast in America probably would not be what it is today. He really was instrumental in helping the culture grow. He was an entrepreneur's entrepreneur. He had been a press guy in media guy for the studios, and as a guys were returning from World War Two. His job was. was taken back by somebody who had gone to war in Bob was looking for things to do Felony Madman. Months Hired Bob Months was the first guy on television here. In Los Angeles to sell appliances by screaming and yelling at the camera. That's right, but he had an idea to do. A car show even had an idea for a car. Think they made a handful of those crazies ex act. We have one in restoration right now. Why am I not surprised? Bob To go promote. The Joe went to manufacturers of components, knowing that they would benefit from participating in the show by talking and selling their products to all the folks who came what happened was that he put a booklet together, and then he discovered that the people that he was talking to. They didn't have the ability to take pictures of their products. They didn't know how to write copy, so he started doing it for them and essentially. The major pioneers in the world of high-riding became advertisers. Bob Had the show completed. He said wait. I have an idea here, so he went back and thus was the beginning of magazine. That's right. Isn't that an amazing story? And of course some of those names are still around today. That'll brock manifold crater rims. As they say history at it's great stuff you know. Terry talked about how Bob and Bruce Meyer sort of envisioned the initial collection at the Natural History Museum. Bruce was on our show recently with his friend, Bill. Harland, we had a great conversation, and of course just about everybody in town and across the country, and really around the world. WHO's into cars knows the name of Bruce. Meyer but. But apart from Bruce or in addition to Bruce, I know you've got a number of other real. I call it notable figures who are part of Your Museum board members. Do you WanNa? Talk about some of the friends and Fellas on that the chairman of the museum for the years that we were developing the new museum was heater, Mullen as highly successful collector of French cars and has. has his own museum up the road in Oxnard the mullen. That's right in the Exodus Chandler space, incredible pavement David said Doric David was on the board when the museum opened in ninety, four David is vice chairman along with Bruce and Peter now, but David was the inspiration for the exterior, a lot of the remodel. What Bruce had turned seventy. This is what Bruce shared with me. I turned. Turned seventy and I decided things needed to change. He mentioned and talk to David about it. WHO's good? Friend and David met an architect over in Italy that he spoke to a show brought him out here to the museum. They walked museum and challenge the architect to come up with a design for the exterior, saying that we can't build a new building. That wouldn't happen in our lifetimes. Change, the exterior, though and it should represent speed and motion. In Gene Cone Cohn Pederson Fox came back quickly really with the design. That line for line is what you see in the exterior of the building today. Well, it is a remarkable solution for an architectural challenge that as you say, would not allowed the reconstruction of an entire building. Heaven knows the La County. Museum is turmoil because of their proposed plans, but this was not only quick and effective, but it it. It allowed the museum to continue doing what it did best, and that's be a showcase for cars, so the exterior looks like race track speed. It's an incredible vision, and inside you got an equally new and reimagined space to carry forth your program, and of course, a lot of great machines reside in the Peterson, and maybe we should talk about your Collection Holdings I. Guess the most obvious question. Terry how. How many cars and bikes have you got the right? In the neighborhood of about three hundred, there are the crown jewels of course that we have and really starting with the round door rolls. It's right at a really are icon card, eight thousand pound behemoth, but and that car really does have a round passenger and driver door to door car. They're round like China, portholes. Yeah the was built to be. Be a show winner was it was a nineteen twenty five roles that the owner at the time a Belgian industrialist decided I need to win concourse of course back in concord elegance, where for brand new designs, so it was a little bit of a different kind of game. It was like a fashion show almost de the car ended up in a forgive the term of Bone Yard in New Jersey and Painted at gold and toured it saying get your picture taken for a dollar was the Duke of Windsor's Racecar. Imagine. And drove it around anything for a buck, but the Shaba Gotti is one of the prettiest cars I've ever seen. That was a gift from the French government to the of Persia on his wedding day, and then the Rita Hayworth owned Cadillac IAEA is is a real thing of beauty, and then of course in terms of the car that most people are in love with his the X. Chaos. Chaos s formerly owned twice in fact buys the McQueen that's right that beautiful green predecessor exit e e type, and what a remarkable road car that was when they make like twenty or something I think this is one of sixteen surviving cars. They were D- jags that when Jag pulled out of racing decided well. We've got the car. Let's build them as road cars, so they were built without. In back, but on this particular car. Von Dutch did the dashboard on it. It's an all star car. He owned it twice originally white, but he sold it to Bill Harra, because he was afraid of getting too many tickets, and he was driving it fast on Mulholland. Every time he offered unity in there was actually a scanning offer from the sheriff at the time. Anybody who can nail McQueen in that Jag, it gets steak dinner. You can't make this stuff up now, but what from what we understand? Nobody got the steak so. That's that's great. We'll the car sure ended up in the right place because I know, it's been one of my favorites for many many years so many substantial cars including lot of wonderful ones fly a little more under the radar rimmer bribes up in pebble last year PININFARINA was showing their new creation, new electric, hyper car, and Lo and behold Peterson's little. Chiesa Talia was there may be one of the most beautiful turn for entered science and History Nineteen. Forty seven is. In fact I'm sure you're aware that was. The first car ever displayed in a museum. It was at Guggenheim as a work of art in it was definitely a game changer in the post were automotive styling in again wonderful than it resides at the Peterson now they're so incredibly rare and Jew alike, but then you've got a lot of jewels in your treasure chests. They're you know one of the questions that I think a lot of our audience would have is whether or not a lot of these cars are owned, but I presume. Presume a lot. Cars are on loan as well so that you can really get a mix of exhibits happening. It's a good observation. Downstairs in the vault we have over two hundred and fifty cars on display in. We give guided tours through the vault daily or you know that volt has been the that's been kind of a legendary place like King Tut's tomb archaeologist Howard. Carter discovered his assistant says. What are you see? And he turned around and he said I. See things wonderful thing well. Nobody used to be able to get. Get into the vault now all of a sudden it's open to your guests and certainly wouldn't were through this current of lockdown scenario. It'll be open again. Can you tell us what's their terri? I'll help you with the story on the origins of that when I. came here vault was closed, and I came from the theme park entertainment business in the racing business, and spent a career in racing in manufacturing automotive manufacturing, but I was given a tour of the museum at the time. We had two floors of cars. The first floor was. was, a Diorama and nothing had changed for twenty years I remember that floor had two major galleries, and those would change once a year and the third floor was our offices and a kids playground area, because we didn't have the ability to get cars up there. So when I came the second day I was here I was given a tour by our marketing guy of the vault and tell me about these cars, so he started talking through the cars. This is Elvis Presley's to Moscow Pantera the one that he famously shot this. This is this car? This is so and so's Rolls Royce. This is so this is the SHAG mobile from the spy who shagged me little? Miss Sunshine was here in on and on and on and I'm thinking to myself. This is crazy. No one ever sees cars in a conversation with my predecessor, said GonNa. Get a lot of requests to see the vault. Not Worth your time. I kept thinking to myself. This is such a hidden treasure. It doesn't make any sense, so I thought. Let's try over the Christmas holiday to see if people would actually pay extra, take a tour, and so we announced that we were going to open the vault for the Christmas holidays. And I went up and stayed in the admissions desk for two weeks there we had people flying in from Chicago from San Francisco from all. Over the country arriving almost breathlessly saying I understand, the fault is open I got see the I've heard about the vault and it became an instant hit, and obviously we said No. We're GONNA continue the Senate the most important. Important part of the museum today that's fantastic. What a great place to see hidden treasures, and the to really get a glimpse of what makes the Peterson tick the cars that we own were probably in the collection about three hundred fifty order cycles upstairs in the galleries, galleries are curated to tell a specific story in each of our eleven galleries because of our. Our reach and because of our fans in the members that we have, we can borrow any cars that we need that. Allow us to tell a story a specific story. Almost all the cars upstairs are always on loan to us. That's fantastic and a lot of them presume local as well which makes things especially convenient when it comes to the logistics involved target rich. Rich, environment, yes, indeed it is I guess southern California is that if it's anything about this place, it's cars and film, and what a great place for a car to be. You mentioned film and I'm not sure if you've had a chance to see current exhibit the Hollywood. Dream Cars, but there are fifty cars here in the museum from films from Star Wars. Wars to mad, Max you name it the original back to the future cars here at the laureate well, yeah, that's the cars that made their makers famous just by virtue of the fact that they appeared in these blockbusters. That's incredible. Well. That is one of your great Kurt exhibits. I know the museum under your Aegis and with the fusion of considerable investment remodel that. That was well over one hundred million dollars I understand that reopened in December of two thousand fifteen, I was there I was fortunate to actually be involved in designing an exhibit for one of your sponsors Maserati at the time, and it was quite a Gal. Occasion and I would never have imagined that the museum could have been transformed into something so fresh and. And vital with all the new exhibit spaces and the new exhibits interactivities for the kids can kind kinda give us an overview of some of the breadth and scope of the new programming to open the new museum, and to reimagined the museum. We undertook a tour of thirty three museums around the world to look at best practices ideas, showcasing ideas interactive's. What kind of. Of video examples might work. What kind of a theater presentation would work and I guess the first thing that we decided was that cars need to be presented as art so you'll seat and a large number of the cars throughout the museum presented on podiums as Sculpture Rolling, sculpture. If you will, but what we decided was I four would be a theme on. In the second floor would be the industry in the third floor would be history dividing up the galleries that way allowed us to go in until niche stories that then also change every year as an example right now in the Mullen Gallery, our largest gallery downstairs is Hollywood dream. Machines exhibit in next to it is disruptors which has to artists that are not necessarily automotive people, but have designed various modes of transportation in their own art form. In their own Andrea, upstairs on the industrial floor is a motorcycle gallery, which is actually the Richard. Barner gallery the. The Bobby Ray Hall Driving Simulator, room as ten driving simulators next to it, the Charlie near Berg, motorsports gallery right now has an exhibit on the thirty year history of Chip Ganassi racing in Bruce Meyer, gallery across from those is a collection that a guitarist from metallica James Hatfield gave us ten of his custom cars that he gets right, and just gave to us next to that as hot Rod Gallery, and we've got a couple of low riders up there I. Remember your low rider show from about a year and a half ago. That really quite something. Some ground. The opening of that exhibit was the largest month attendance in our history phenomenal success, and what's amazing is the whole low rider. Culture is something that a foreign to most people, but again if you were guys are H, you know. We grew up with those cars around us and in high school and our friends older brothers had them, and they were really form of artistic expression that you had to see it to believe it will terry. Let's hold that thought and come back in a moment after a break and pick it up talking about the Petersen Automotive Museum some of its future programs goals, and all the good stuff about becoming a member. Stay tuned will be accent. If. You're like us. You're looking for a way to make stay at home a little more special. We're GONNA. Let you in on our secret. Join Rob Vices to get luxury cocktail kits, toys, tools, tech, and other incredible items delivered straight to your home on a monthly basis. The value is incredible. Your first box is going to be a four hundred dollar to kill a curation, and you can sign up for as little as ninety nine bucks a month. Use The code podcast, and you'll save an extra fifty bucks. Sign up so head to ROB VICES DOT COM to bring exciting experiences safely to your door. Remember use the code podcast and go to our ob bb V. I C E S Dot Com. Blood back with Harry Carcass. Executive Director of the Petersen Automotive Museum Afar and soon enough I hope I'll be back stopping the galleries of the Peterson. Personally, it's a great place to hang out. There's an awful lot to see. Thank, you can't wait. We're on lockdown right now. There's an awful lot going on behind the scenes, though keep things moving and actually were enjoying success with that well, that's great. Give you an opportunity to do a little housekeeping. As well I know that certainly the role of curator and your support team for the Museum of cut an awful lot of work that the public never even knows about. Maybe now's a good time. Tell us a little. Little bit about your curatorial team. What does it take to get these jobs? What's involved? Actually it's first and foremost. You want to be passionate about cars and or eight museum studies museum activities be want WanNa be a great writer and you want to be a great researcher. Those are two fundamentals, no matter where you come from, and we happen to be blessed with several of those folks. That we've had good luck in finding a couple of folks right out of college, and we just brought someone in from New, York who was there is a part of the city museum there. We just had a fellow join us. That was at the Academy Museum across the street as our project director, coordinator and Brian Stevens. Who's our head of the exhibition? Department has been with now I think it's almost. Almost fourteen years as a wonderful guy and a great planner, and so there's a collective I think it's a passion for excellence is the other part. We've been awarded the world's best. Automotive Museum, not because there aren't any other good museums, but because we tell a whole story about the automobile, we're not a brand or a singular type automobile. That's right. There are so many museums especially in Europe and. America, to that focus on brand, specific exhibits, obviously Porsche Mercedes BMW every mark has its own place to exhibit their. You know their brand history re one of the most amazing museums I ever visited was in Wolfsburg, where they had one dedicated to folks walken vans, which was an incredible experience, but the great thing about the Peterson is that there is such a breadth of material in all the moving pieces that requires to put those exhibits together, obviously bear fruit with such an incredible variety of cars and bikes. You showcase a lot of other, talented the museum, two and one that really intrigued me was. Was a remote studio that Art Center College of Design in Pasadena had opened at the Peterson. Can you talk about that? Terry Sure Peter Mullen? Is On the board at the art center as Charlie near Berg huge advocates, and of course, that's where the cars begin. You know it's interesting. Toyota was the first company to open an advanced design studio here in southern California now, virtually every major automotive manufacturer has a studio here in southern California that's right and most of the folks running. Those studios are arts center graduates. I think it's no exaggeration to say that art centers turned out more luminaries in the. Design field in industrial design across the board, but specifically automotive decide than any other school in the world. Obviously we all know Stuart, read ear to get him on the show. He's been the charing that department for quite some time now and you know under his aegis. Number of stars of come out of that institution Peter, Mullen when he's speaking, says that eighty percent of the cars on the road today have been designed. Designed by art center graduates, but our center was a natural in terms of the industry floor, the second floor of the museum. It was an opportunity for us to stay. Here is how cars are designed, and so we provided art center at two large spaces for them to have a classroom if you will an workroom with computers with students in actually designing cars or motorcycles or automotive projects that they have signed or Or signed on to do for the school. Then we do a number of other art, classes or meetings in there for kids younger kids now to that we run so so explain how or exterior does a visitor get to come to the museum and actually see these art sitter center students cut a look through the glass and watch them doing their thing. They get to interact with them, and it sounds like to younger. Younger, kids can actually get some hands on experience. It's not a hands on experience unless we're doing something for the smaller children, and then we'll do objects like help them designer draw, but on the actual design of cars there'll be a couple of students. They'll beat students in there that can walk into the studio and see what they're doing on their computers. It's intricate in. It's fine work, but it's exposure to here's. Here's at least some of the information on what goes into beginning of designing car. I think those people have no idea where it starts, you know used to be. It was big, drafting boards, and or cocktail Napkins with ink, and now, of course it's a much broader toolkit you know everything from cad designed to virtual reality. Amazing amazing stuff you know. Everybody now talks about how the car collector hobby is fizzling out because. Because, young people don't care about cars only care about video games, and of course we know that's not true. Thankfully, what are you guys doing it? The Peterson to sort of engage the kids who actually we spent about three million dollars building where we call Discovery Center for kids in. It's a room that has a mix of activities. There's a track where you can build your own car with your own axles and. And gravity track, and there's actually two of them, so the kids who has these large buckets of Lego parts? The kids build their own car and racing against their buddies is a map where the kids can for the little ones can actually put something around and subtract fiberglass track. That's run these soft cars on. There's a go cart that the kids for a photo and it's really cute. Kids Walk in look at this. This thing and plop down in an immediately. They know it's for them. Honda gave us a couple of motorcycles for the kids to sit on for a photo op. Here's a work table where the kids can actually take pencil to paper and colored pencils. There's a tracing table with all of the Pixar cars that the kids can trace out. Any of their favorite characters does a coloring table where you take your finger. Finger painting you can drag various colors across the cars that are presented on the screen, so it's a whole mix of different activities that has been important to us, but that's only part of it. That's a room. Get into. We actually also fund at least ten thousand kids a year. We pay for the buses and bring them in for guided tours, but a total of twenty five thousand students that we brought in last year and guided tours by Dawson and it's all scheduled based on their age bracket. Different curriculums for the different ages in the different classes. Actually our education department is the largest department and the museum right now. This is fantastic I mean. Why would anybody go to Disneyland when they can go to the Peterson? Dan Kids there have more fun and learn something into the bargain. The second day I was here I had so many different experiences I mentioned earlier about my experience downstairs in the vault, but I was in front of what was then the Arts Center exhibit. And there was a school tour with little toddlers, but what hit me was the kids were silent? They were straight as an arrow. Nobody was fidgeting. As this fellow was designed, he was talking about. This is how you design a car, and I thought what a marvelous experience! These kids are enraptured with this story. You look everywhere, and all you see is cars upside and yet these kids are paying enough attention so that it's a very special moment indeed and i. I thought. Wow, what a great opportunity! So we've gone from. Say Eight to ten thousand kids a year over the past several years. We're now at the twenty five thousand mark in obviously WanNa grow. What an incredible public service, and obviously a little bit of an ulterior motive to it's a great service our hobby because you gotta get fresh recruits, and there's nothing better than getting them interested young I think every truecar not got interested when they were very very young. Speaking of hands on experiences I guess for older kids. You'd mentioned some driving simulators and things to how do your visitors use? Those those are free. We have ten driving simulators sponsored by. They've been wonderful to work with. We've had some great experiences you can go in. You choose eight different tracks to race on from eight different cars, and it's open all day long as part of your mission, this is unbelievable. I mean there's supposed to be no such thing as a free lunch, but obviously in this case there is not part of our job is to look beyond sixty sixty Wilshire Boulevard. Twenty five years old now we've had our twenty fifth anniversary and one of the questions is what do we do? Where do we go next? What are the opportunities? What are the responsibilities certainly currently were looking and collecting the work that's being done by manufacturers right now on autonomous cars electric cars, so we're working hard on that, but the other part is that we think also there's a potential in the future for virtual museums, so gathering that information. We've been hard at work building. Our Collection Factory acquired the original Petersen publishing archives, ten million photos and. And with the help of Sima, and through a grant, we were able to digitize about a million, two hundred and fifty thousand of them heavens were putting them up on the web at no cost at no charge to have them available, and it really is that automotive culture from the forties through the seventies and word proud of that. What an incredible resource! So you're doing! What the British Museum or the National Gallery in Washington. DC are doing with their fine arts. I mean making this accessible to scholars, and just the general public around the world did. And, did you know you talk about a virtual museum? Though I mean now obviously with our current situation, where people aren't leaving their homes, and certainly no museums on the planet open, it really forces proof of concept to sort of explore the whole virtual accessibility. Anything you're doing immediately. That would pertain to that. We do ironically if we've wanted to build a channel really where we're putting up interesting videos creating content that is enjoyable, but it's also educational, informative and something that people would want. Want to see share at three weeks before the shutdown, the board approved US going ahead and starting to staff up so that we could build a channel, and in fact we want to use the original Petersen publishing grand to put this out. What a great tribute that would be the the could not be more fortuitous bit of timing there, and hopefully that will soon be just one more piece of the Pie and not the only piece of Pie with all relegated to at present. One of the important parts about this Robert is that we have an audience that and our visitors about. Let's say eighty percent of our visitors come from within a forty mile radius. Forty miles is our reach so in looking at how do we become more successful? I? Do we continue to grow if you're not growing your slowing down, how do we do that and online and video and content? We believe it will allow us to do that. Another funds statistic out of all of this is it fifty percent of the viewers of all of our live streaming in the video content that we're producing is coming from outside the country. ECHO, so it's up forty miles. It's four thousand or eight thousand miles away, watching the high from Belgium high from Russia I for. All of that is really promising. We're quite pleased well. That's what that is truly fascinating just as a as a little shoutout to the organization. How does someone become a member of the museum? You know just on the Bruce Meyer and the membership. We have a group called the chequered flag, which is our cream checkered flag, two hundred chequered flag, two hundred Bruce carded a day one with guys like Phil Hill Dan Gurney Parnelli Jones and has grown in the. It was the chequered flag two hundred because he thought one day we might have as many as two hundred members. Earn fifty now and the fun part of that, too. Is that probably largest collection of the premier collectors in the world are chequered flag members. Now we have a checkered flag lifetime level that we've got over fifty. We just started about a year and a half ago. There are individual memberships in there a family memberships. It's a number of ways that are affordable, economical, and then the chequered flag. Flag is an opportunity monthly to get together, and we go tour with our members private collections that you would otherwise never see and it's breathtaking minutes. It's really a wonderful experience. Well, that's great and privileged entree to the museum, and I presume folks who aren't quite ready to step. That plate can also become. Supporters can certainly joined in some way. Indeed, stay tuned. We'll be back in a minute. A moment of your time. A new podcast from Kirk, media Currently twenty one years, old and today like magic extended from her fingertips down to the. Yourself, because the world needs you and you. Do that asked about me was ready to spit on my drink. Fingers were facing. Feel like your purpose in your worth is really being stopped me from playing the piano. She buys walkie-talkies wanders to whom she should give the second. Humans, we never did we never well, we just find. Rock climbing is that you can only focus on what's right? And so our American life begins. We may need to stay apart, but let's create together available on all podcast platforms. Submit your piece that Kirk. Oh Dot com slash moment of your time. Back with Terry cargill Executive Director the Petersen Automotive Museum Terry. Obviously, you didn't get into this because you wanted to run a business. He got into it because you know how to entertain people, and especially, because you're a car person to. Can we talk a little bit about what your personal interests are cars in your garage? Some of your car stories your first car. What gets you up in the morning? WHO's in the theme? Park Entertainment Business for twelve. Twelve years I was at Disney for years seaworld for years and marine world up in San Francisco for four years, and at the end of the twelve years. I, was burned out and I didn't WANNA. Do it anymore at all, but I couldn't figure out what I wanted to do. I was sitting on my front porch. Saying Terry you've got to come up with an idea. You gotTa have a plan. You're wasting your life something that you're not enjoying. And I couldn't come up with the idea. What is it? What is it? And then it dawned on me that the only pictures I had ever had in my offices for all those years was race cars. And I thought Oh my God. It's right there I started to think about it and I remember being moved to the point where in nineteen, fifty five. We had just moved from Joliet. Illinois to Newport Beach, and in the summer my dad took us to the Torrey Pines road races. Right and I saw my I D. Jags I smelled my first Castro. Our I saw exotic cars and people having fund in the on the bluff above the Pacific Ocean it's summertime and I'm thinking boy. You're not in Kansas anymore here, but I remember leaving the track hounding on my dad's back. Back from the backseat, Dad, we've gotta do this. We've got to do this and then going to the opening of Riverside in watching the races. They're all varieties of cars racing all over southern California. Nothing ever got me as excited about anything as cars and growing up in southern California in the late fifties and sixties. You've got drag racing in the streets. You got drag racing a number of different tracks. All of my pals were car guys. We went to every kind of a range. If there was a race, we were there and if there wasn't, we were racing ourselves. So, that became the passion. Once I decided that that's what I wanted to do. The Path wasn't clear, but let's say kissed a lot. Frogs on the way I did a lot of things in the automotive business that I didn't enjoy that I found well. This isn't what I want to be doing. This is an hour WANNA contribute. It's like I bought a race car and and found out quickly. I'm not as fast as I want to be or I should be. I'm not as wealthy as I need to be race. That's right and I. Don't WanNa be racing in amateur racing I WANNA be with Mario and Alan and all the guys, so I figured out what I know how to do that. I might be able to pursue. My dream in is raise money so I started introducing myself to teams, and I'll go find sponsors for you and remember when Gallus Creko was with Bobby Rahal and Al Right I was able to help. Help, Dan, Gurney, put the Toyota Program together I had the pleasure working with Chris Cord when he had the Chevy Monza's and we put Budweiser on the car Jim Busby. We grew up with buzz. I put coors on his BMW. We brought that in, and that was coors I, ever racing sponsorship and fellow who is a friend of mine, and of course at the time, said so worst deal I ever made. Say that at you had great exposure. He said carried the moment. Coors announced it was going to have a racing sponsorship. I had three thousand proposals from racers from all over the world on my desk I had Richard Petty flying into see I'd Roger Penske come to see me I? Had the whole world arriving in my were step I couldn't get rid of you. Guys The rest is history in my history with cars I grew up as a Volkswagen guy in southern California. My first car was a fifty three window and then. I had to sixty four convertibles. They had four buses. Two of the more campers had a square back had a rabbit Oh man, you're serious. You're really a member of the VW religion. That's awesome. The air cooled boys there. But my dream car was in became the first time. I saw Porsche speedster I thought. Okay, it's over I. Know What Love Is. My Dad had a fifty nine or showed that I was seventeen at the time, and he let me drive it every Friday night I had either Friday. Night or Saturday night, and I put a Polish on every Saturday literally I was possessed. We had the car for two days and drove up to Pasadena and had Roger. Burst put one of his exhaust on. Right including the Stinger, but Porsche was the car for me and my brother. Own Beverly Porsche Audi at the time and I bought a black speedster. speedster and we went up and we turned it into one hundred point car. After I got the car to the garage was driving home on the Santa Ana freeway had the car twenty minutes in some guy. Rear ended all. I don't want to hear. The story Oh everybody's worst nightmare. I crashed. My Dad's fifty nine on there was an offramp from these free way to what was then Harbor Boulevard. There was an s curve and I was in the rain, and I thought I got this. Lost the car crashed. The car was. L. Do that. At chick iverson, Volkswagen a genius Phil, Emery and his dad were there, and they had tross Aucoin of trash it or fix it. He put a front clip on that car. You couldn't tell it didn't come out of this. Brand new. Those guys artists the day the car was done. I picked the car up and crash it again. Ernie was that the guy in the tow truck came to give me was the same guy who picked me up the first time ended before business cards, and he said kidney hold onto these. You're going to need a talk about groundhog day. Will I hope you didn't need them again now? It sounds like the love affair with Porsche didn't end then not at all. We've been blessed I've had some great cars and I'm still Volkswagen. Guy I have two of them now and I bought a sixty two. My grandsons I learned to drive in a sixty two and I wanted them to learn how to drive a stick that great, and then we bought a built a hot Rod, a sixty seven hot rod with one hundred fifty horsepower man. That's a powerful little Volkswagen considering they wave only a little more than I. do right about now, not much of a collection but fun. That's fantastic. I love it and I can't disagree. A real air cooled, Fan. Myself Imagine! You're walking along the beach in Santa. Monica Malibu bottle and you pick it up and well. You know what's inside. There's genie I love to ask our guests. This question kind of gives a little insight into the origination. Jimmy pops out, says he can have any three cars terry. What do you think they'd be? I'll never forget this. I was at the Hyatt new quarter at the time in the Newport auto show I had a car that I was prepping I. my first job I own a little detail. Shopping is to detail most of the Ferraris in orange. County and I had a car they're in. It was quite early in the morning there was not a sound anywhere and I heard way off in the distance car going through the years. Happily are angrily if you will. Was a GTO to fifty GTO. And I'll never forget that. We just had kept conner's GTO here in the museum and an exhibit called seeing read. That's right. That was a great exhibit I. Don't know such a beautiful car, so probably a GTO. The to fifty GTO probably have to have a test to Rosa in the mix. Is there a prettier car? Probably, not those pontoon. It really was an expression of beauty and speed, and there's nothing looks like right and third car. You know I'm still old school. Air Cooled I'm probably pretty happy with a poor speedster. SPEEDSTER IS ICONIC. There's nothing more pure and elemental, and one of those little bathtubs turned upside down with that top down, or even with the top up. It looks mighty wicked special. Terry this has been a great conversation, I sure appreciate the insight, not only into your own personal journey, but the vision and the direction behind Petersen automotive. Museum it's a great institution, not just for Los Angeles, but for the entire world of the automobile and can't wait to get back there. We've been blessed with a magnificent board. I think the management team over here in the staff or the best it's ever been. Been It truly is a team sport and I get a lot of credit for things that an awful lot of other people are doing, and we're so lucky that we have so many dedicated folks I think we've got something very special to offer, and if you like cars, this is the place to be well. I'm raising my hand. I'll be done with. The doors are open. I can't wait to see in person. Thanks to my guest Harry Cargo Executive Director of the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los. Angeles catch us for the next episode of cars that matter where we talk about the passions that drives us. Drive. This episode of cars. The matter was hosted by Robert Ross. Produced by Chris Porter edited by H H Moseley sound engineering by Michael Kennedy. Theme Song by Celestin Dick Additional, music and sound by Chris Porter. Please Leica, subscribe and share this podcast I'm Robert Ross. Thanks for listening. Media! Media for your mind.

Bob Peterson Bruce Meyer Terry Petersen Automotive Museum California Automotive Museum Executive Director Bob Porsche Robert Ross Peterson Museum Natural History Museum Kirk Los Angeles America museum studies museum Volkswagen Terri Hi Peter Mullen
Heather Sips Some Rotten Tomatoes

Heather Dubrow's World

1:07:03 hr | 1 year ago

Heather Sips Some Rotten Tomatoes

"Thank you for listening to this podcast. One production now available on Apple podcasts podcast one spotify and anywhere else you get your podcast. All we've been doing his wash hands. Wash their hands and wash your hands and guess what. Where I and I'm so sick of the smell of him, so I can't even tell you so what I discovered was this new brand called Cal Raya? Who talked about it last week on Calgary AC- a L. D. R. E., A. Caldera consciously craft in home body, care brand that combines thought ingredients, delectable sense making caring for herself and our homes a beautiful experience. We're talking about him. Soaps moisturizing lotions are awfully formulated incredibly effectively smell divine, and these information of essential oils and flowers, and hurts and other thought fleet chosen ingredients. We also have. Home Sprays and countertop sprays the it's absolutely divine average the junior panel you are going to love it. Get Free Shipping on orders of fifty dollars or more. When you buy online at CAL, DRE DOT COM C., A. L. D. R. E. A. Dot Com visit killed tray, dot, com, and at one. Did you watch it? This is heather dubrow world, and now you can live in a two times a week right here on podcast. One welcome back everyone. I am so excited if my dear friend, Justin Silvester back on the show today so much to talk about you look amazing. I've so many questions. How are how are you? You is interesting I. Am good I better than I was two weeks ago I am more hopeful than it was two weeks ago and I'm just happy to see everybody rally around this movement. I have to say you have been. From all the coverage I've watched. I mean to me. You've been such. An incredible voice were really. Calm understanding voice because I think. For a lot of people they need a very solid basic understanding of what's going on, yes. And sometimes when we listen, and even myself not for this movement, but in general. If I try to listen to politicians, let's say on a certain matter. Some you know not understand things, or you know not really get it, but you really like driven to the heart of everything that's made it in such a such a great way for everyone to understand. Thank you, you know when I was in school, and even as an adult I normally turn things off that I can't understand our. I feel like it's a task to figure it out. I also tuned things out. Don't get involved in things where the message does not. Easily come to me. so what I wanted to do for black lives matter really is two things one make people feel comfortable with getting involved in something like this, and the other thing is I just wanted to show people that it's not the scary dangerous thing that you see on TV. There are children they're. They're a mothers there. There are people there at the protests at the protests. Yes, at the protests from the age of five fifty five. I thought seventy five year old couple came out with their lawn chairs to sit in. Listen to everyone. Sneak in I think. A lot of people are just afraid to speak out because there are scared to say the wrong thing, but. Honestly as a black person. It's Ok to say the wrong thing. Because part of your education is getting it wrong. The first time I think there's some little celebrities being fired. That would disagree with you. I. I hate. Tell our at bad, but that was you by the way you can. Because that was in say, let's be honest. That wasn't saying the wrong thing that in the wrong thing, there's a difference there is a difference there is a difference Yeah, the fastening is happening honey. They're leading everybody. Go right meal at you. Know what, but it's time for people to be accountable. You know I, said on yesterday's show we had recruited recorded it. You know a few weeks ago and I actually went dark for a couple of weeks. I haven't. Haven't posted on social media and I didn't do a podcast last week, not because they didn't want to say the wrong, not because of that because I really felt like you're smart. People like yourself and so many people out there that are saying the right things in the right way, and I chose to listen and allow those voices to be heard rather than under percents rather than being heard of conversation that I really. Don't you know there's better people for it? And more appropriate people for it. But if four eighty you know what I was saying before was say before the show I did a little opening for and what I said. Was You know even if you don't think you're part of the problem, you have to be part of the solution, because if we're not the solution, there is no solution. Amen, Amen, but the one thing I don't WanNa. Do because I know in the in the world. We do this often where? We find somebody who has done bad things in their pass, or who have said things. That have been a little dicey. Little ratio are insensitive towards women are whatever that moment is at that time, and then all of a sudden just fired him right? Let me get rid of them But my whole thing is, let's educate people on what the problem is so sometimes like people are always fire Mama June. She is back, you know house races derided Mike First of all when you get those type of people on reality TV. You already know that they are coming in because they're controversial. World didn't kick five amazing friends. They put a cause races in there with a closet gay guy in another black woman in there, so those people could probably go after they knew what they were doing making. Those types of television shows in a lot of times. You get these divisive people on your shows, because it's good for the audience because it's good for ratings. What I want to see is I want to see these reality. Stars come back. Back to the show with their tail between their legs, and I want them to talk about the reality of what happened to them whenever they did get called out for being racist. Tell me about the wine that you loss. Tell me lot. The hundreds of thousands dollars that you've got. You've lost Tommy about the sensitivity training that you had to go to tell me how you lost friends how your family reacted to it i. think we're missing. We're listening. We're missing the opportunity to teach people what happens when well and then the question is. Did they learn or did they get caught because? That's the thing to. The. That's the thing, too, but if I was running a studio I would. I would fake it out I would say hey. We're GONNA. Send you to sensitivity training, and you're going to sit with this man for five weeks twice a week. Ignore GonNa Learn about your mistakes. And then when you're done, we will then make a decision on whether you will be fired are not fired. And in that person goes insensitive. Timothy Training thinking if I. Get a in this class. If I can get into this, this guy gives me a good report back then I will be able to keep my job in my income, and then when you get back there five weeks later. Be As an Edward will say you're gone stale. We just wanted to educate you on why. You're getting out of here. Everyone. Educate you to be a better person before we let you out of here. I don't know tough call. It's a tough call. It's a tough call I truly believe that 'cause a lot of times. People learn things from reality. TV It's crazy. I now it's crazy. How many times I do I like this because I saw it on. Our I heard about this guy because this person was talking about it a Michaud. I just think as a community as a profession. We could really teach people. It's like when it's on teen mom, when the one guy shot the dog and we have to come back and we honestly unpacked. What happened to her life? Once this all happened and we got to see it firsthand. I want those teachable moments well. That's a good show to pitch by the way. It's like celebrity Rehab. Life after life after scandal. Yeah, that's that you know what you're right. That would be interesting. I would hope though that these people really you know at my word for twenty twenty, and it's an old word, and I'm sure my kids would cringe, but woke I. Mean Areas under. Is Not the perfect word for twenty twenty. It's a there is no other word. I mean. That's it, but I hope that that these people get well. Because you're right, you know people say stupid things people. Do you know racially insensitive things? They actually insensitive things. And don't really mean anything by maybe because they were taught that my dad used to say like such a joke and I can't even repeat it because he didn't mean it to beat it if he didn't know any better, he because he was not, he was not originally insensitive person at all. But he didn't know any better, so there's definitely learned beverage, but I think for me. One of the big things that I've learned is not to be complacent. Because are alright, so we're Jewish right. Being Jewish does. Look. We are not Hasidic. We don't walk around with you. Know yarmulke girls yet. No one knows that we're Jewish. Right? I I've never been the victim of racial profiling because I have no idea what a black person goes through it at all, but what I have been complained about and I know it's a it's. Affected me the zero zero zero point. One percent I've had people say to me like people have worked with on sets like like Oh. That's sweaters so Jewish. You. Let it slide, I remember saying once like well. What does that mean like tacky? or I I mean I have friends now that will make every once in a while. We'll slip something about the Jews into the conversation and we let it go, because we know they don't mean it. We know that they're old school. We know that this is what they were talking, but that's not okay. It's not okay. It's not okay and what's going to happen this the the basic thing that's going to be. Late into law after this year has gone by, is you no longer can say. I didn't know better. You know better you better now. Because by the way you had nowhere to go when everybody was learning it. Kobe hit Barney's closed and right after there were more murder Hornets. Shore were in your damn. House when the Lord was teaching this lesson. Oh Yeah, you couldn't go anywhere, so you can't say for the longest time. When the Women's movement started in me to hit, there were a lot of men that said Oh. I didn't know any better you know that's just you know how I was brought up in the game now no one can say I didn't know because we had to learn it. We had to be and we had to put it into our lives. Same thing with this black lives matter movements. Those little side jokes about people's hair the. Saying that, you want to be diverse, but not being diverse, making little Rachel comments at work. Those things are no longer going to happen, because we unless you were in a coma for six months our retreat for two years. You know. This is heather. Do World. Every plate is now open, hellofresh a leading meal kit company every late and hellofresh along with their subsidiary range of come together to form one company with a wide array of offerings. All price points for you to enjoy. Okay sell this is a really new and exciting way to work rid hellofresh 'cause you could smeared full plates and fuller with America's best value meal kit. The recipes come in about thirty minutes, and it's definitely badger than a trip. Berge store and starting a meal from scratch. Everything offers contact lists delivered to your doorstep. Easy home cooking on budget. So there's less time deciding what to at means more sense than enjoy good mood with your family. Every plate now offers a hundred percent author emissions, and everybody is constantly expanding their shipping zone, so make sure include British ship at checkout. Now you know chef. Heather has been cooking up a storm. I gotTA. Tell you I'm over it when there's an amazing service like every play I do half the work sin twice the time with my family and the way it's going to matter where kids my cooking. So that's what we're talking about here now listen neat. You want to try every plate. You can enjoy your first of every plate meals only three dollars ninety nine cents per meal by going to every late dot, com, and using your code heather one. That's every plate dot com and use the code neither one. You'RE GONNA love. This is heather. Do Rose World. Here's heather. By the way. Have you seen, there were a couple of people that came from silent retreats for the I've been God for two months. Genetic thing happened. How insane is that? It's so crazy you. Know and what I've been really proud of is All these incredible men and women like yourself coming out educating speaking and you know white celebrities is well posting, and and and trying to get the message through I posted a couple of things I can't tell you the amount of hate. Yet on my stream from it, which sickened me. I saw also an Bethany. Franko She's got this incredible. Be Strong that she's donated I think like forty million dollar. She's been all over the world chips really really impressive what she's been able to do with her platform and she had posted something saying. We're going to donate to black owned businesses. And that yeah, and then I saw her tweet later. She's never gotten so much hate. No, it's crazy but I. think the problem is and I say this in the nicest way possible. You automatically get defensive when you think someone is calling you out for something that you might be guilty up you what I mean. Like if you feel like you're being accused of something. Today's reality TV if somebody said something in a very light will somebody at this table, said X. Y. only a minute. No idea what I was saying was that white people were going after her. You'll know that's what I'm saying. That's what I'm saying. If. You go back in your mind it any friendship group are whether when you when you are in reality, TV. If somebody said something that you might have been maybe a little guilty of our accomplice to you automatically get defensive automatically. Think somebody is pointing the finger at you. So when you have a celebrity, are you have someone saying black lives matter? You cannot be complacent unique to stand up because you have. Let this go on for too long, although we're talking about the world and every race and every person ever. People take it personal because they aren't doing enough, so their initial reaction is to get defensive like why are you saying that? When is it a problem like? Is it really an issue? Maybe alive should matter, and it's I. Hope it's not like that we're not pointing the finger at you, but if you feel a little guilty, maybe it's time to self reflect. Yeah, that's a really good point. People. There's been a lot of means that have been perfect. Really sum up. Why because? When I post. Black lives matter people say all lives matter all matter which is true and in the past if someone had. tweeted that or said that you would say yes, of course, but we're talking right now is black lives matter in this the movement and one of the one of the examples that someone gave which I thought was so smart was look. If you go to a fundraiser for breast cancer, yes, and you're sitting there and you're talking about breast. Cancer and someone ran in the middle of the fundraiser and said wait a minute. All cancer matters. Yes, yes, all cancer matters, but at this moment what we are highlighting is breast cancer. It does the other cancers aren't important. One hundred percent or the one I like to use I. Just broke down on. Just said this week on my podcast is. Because Jimmy Johnson the NASCAR driver spearheaded so proud of Jimmy it was unbelievable. EFFORT SPEARHEADED NASCAR, taking a stand for black lives matter. He got twenty three out of forty drivers to participate. It was unbelievable and I was going back and forth with this woman on Jimmy's aides. who had some really valuable points? Because there was a white guy named Tony who had been killed by the police, and he was innocent and. I was like I feel for you. And she was like. Why aren't you guys saying his name and I'm saying and I kept on saying why aren't you? Why didn't you rally? People around this when this happened four years ago. Why didn't you guys get together and she was like? That's why all live should matter and I said you know Webcam me. Break this down for you because. I knew white ladies like a wedding. You know white women level wedding, so if you and your asset if you and your husband planned a wedding for two years, the day finally came you put on that white dress. You'll walk your ass on that aisle. And you said I do in right before you're about to turn around and do that March. Your brother got up. Out of his seat instead I love my girlfriend. Melissa who I've been dating for eight months and I'm going to get married today to so everybody. Sit down. We're going to celebrate to weddings. How would you be that? Your brother tried to hijack your day. And Yeah! Love is love. I'm not saying that they aren't in love. And their love is an important, not the moment just not at the moment. So eat that. Yeah. But, did she get that? She DMV and she goes. Wow I actually get it. And I said Yeah. I had to turn it into a open bar wedding for you and. Well you just turned it into open bar. That takes it to another level. You had said cash bar. That really would have ruined. That would have just you know wouldn't allow one hundred. The other one which I think is very good to chip pink about is there's an it's funny, but there's a gallon I'm forgive me I can't remember who was, but she had a picture of a house, did you? A picture her house behind her. That was very pretty house, and then in the next slide. It like is if she was talking to herself, there was a house that was on fire. And she was like. Hi, I need help. My house is on fire, and so it was like yeah, but all houses are important. She's like Yup minds on fire. I need someone to come. Put out the fire on fire and then this other person. Yes, but all houses are important, but mine is on fire. That's the that's that's. That's how you have to break things down. Especially, if you have been told year after year decade after decade generation after generation that this is just how life is, and this is just what happens. We treat women this way because they wear short skirts. They have a reputation that this happens to them and. Their skin is dark like this. So this is just normal life and it's better for them now than it wasn't a big sixties seventies. That's how we have been conditioned. We have been programmed and it also starts with. Kids. It starts with bullying. It starts with your kids, not knowing that it's wrong to say certain things to people, and then they continue that they continue that behavior, and then they become adults, and it may have kids, and then they don't correct their kids on that behavior, so that's why it's a grass roots effort in. That's why we're starting from the ground floor. Floor and that's why we say we just need you to listen. Because if you can't come to a protest it, you can donate money we get it. If you can't don't go save posted on instagram. What can do is talk about it in the privacy of your own the narrative of your family I so agree with that. It's important it the most important thing. Where can people donate? What what would you recommend is the place because the people are going gosh know. Okay I can't go to a protest or don't feel comfortable or but I. Really do want to do something. Where do I put money? The ACP has always been a safe space for you to put money. That is my first one black lives. Matter is also a great organization to put your money into the bailout fund in your state. There's a different bailout fund for each state. They're run by lawyers and a bail out. People who lead protests are who have been arrested for curfew are violations, but not diluted in the rioting. So if you look at each state, you can find bailout fund but I always say go with the N. double ACP black lives matter. You can't really go wrong on that. Yeah, I'd say another thing that I that I learned from the last couple of weeks after reading and listening. Is You know I always taught my kids? Not taught my kids have always been colorblind like. They just have they. They just have so if if there is a child WHO's. Chinese or Indian or Persian or black, or whatever it is like? If I say Oh, who is so and so they'll say oh. He likes soccer like that's always. There's like there's never a description. But one thing that I've heard repeatedly which I thought was so interesting was. Don't be colorblind. See my color and. Color. Which I thought was so beautiful because I always think. Wouldn't it be nice if we were just all humans? But you know what we are all humans, but how nice to honor each other's histories and backgrounds, and see it and appreciate it rather than not seeing and to now that I think about being colorblind. It's actually just being blind one hundred percent, but we can't honor and say NC and appreciate people's colors. If we can't even say, people are so afraid to say black. Will I think you're right. Thing it set. You could say black, but I think people were people have been historically worried like joy. Say African American do I say black. What? What is politically correct here? What do you say I mean? You don't know you don't know, but you save black now. It added Twenty Twenty Sabe Black. It's OK black. People don't even want to say black lives matter because they are afraid to say the word black, which is the craziest thing to me, so you can't appreciate and teach and educate someone about the good of my color, because you can't even say it without going lower without saying well, that guy is blah. Right, the cancer voice the cancer voice because they get afraid to say it in. Beyond me and I think we have created this politically correct environment that we live in this bubble where people are afraid to savings and it's because. People are afraid to get fired. Our people aren't afraid to get canceled. When it comes to this, just say it. No one is going to. By the way if you stood up at a Klan, meeting instead black, you wouldn't get fired at club. Right now. It's hard. It is hard to stand behind these people and when I say these people I. Mean My people today and not find support in any aspect of your life. I also think it's really important to be supporting. Black business especially family owned small black businesses. Been Reading I was just reading yesterday that black businesses have been hit the hardest by covert. Yeah they've been hit the hardest by Cova, but also black businesses are never highlighted. In any way shape or form if you look at post, mates commercials. If you look at Uber eats commercials if you look at any type of Any type of ordering situation. There never highlighted. You know good, never highlight it and we have to really keep that in mind. So, how do we move? Because clearly you know there's no there shouldn't be any quote getting back to normal because that is the past. Yes, and so here we are today and moving forward and being woken having these conversations having this incredible movement. It's got to keep going so. So. How do how do you? How do we together move forward? I'm doing on justice I'm doing phases. Just like the covert reopening. I am doing phases of what you can do, and the first phase of this is listening. In learning and a lot of people, you guys have passed phase one. Thank you so much. I've seen the post that saw the black box back. We're all here for you. We're all in it together. Based to is having convert stations with your families with your kids with coworkers with friends who don't completely understand and hadn't gotten through phase one yet. So starting those uncomfortable conversations, especially with your children is super duper important. Third, phase for people who want to be allies in the situation is look at the doctrines that we are trying to pass. We are trying to get certain bills. Put into place the no not Arden Arden instead means that cops can come into your home without knocking without telling you that they're coming in. That's how Brianna Taylor. What was unfortunately murdered in her own home. There's another ordinance that is to defend the police, which doesn't mean taking all of their money, but if you live in Los Angeles no matter who you are. They're seven bullets with your name on it, and that costs the city sixty million dollars. Do we really need sixty million dollars worth of AMMO for Los Angeles, probably not so they're gonNA. Take this money and they are going to put it in the community. So that saint it again, because that's a really important thing, because even myself when I saw like Minneapolis is going to de-fund the police department I thought my literally my first reaction was. What are they? GonNa, pay anyone. What do you mean? They're GONNA have no no law enforcement at all. If you look at your city in UC how much money they are giving to the police, it's astronomical. It's unbelievable. Okay, and when you look at the budget, you're like Whoa is this where my tax money is going? Do we really need this much swat year? Do we really need this many bullets? This year would defend the police means is taking a look at that spreadsheet and cleaning it up, and taking some goes billions of dollars that they spend every year not in salaries, not in training, not in reasonable equipment. It's all the excessive at that. We Really WANNA see clean up and go somewhere else so when you see de-fund the police. It doesn't mean defunding it. It means taking a look at the budgets and taking some of that money from them and putting it back in their community because. If you put it back in the community, if you teach kids from a young age and give them educational programs in, give them the resources, they won't turn to crime. A lot for a lot of kids, a lot of kids were even grew up. Selling drugs crime was the only way they knew how to survive because they weren't giving the college preparatory that white kids were given across town. They weren't told that you have to go to college. And this is how we're GONNA. Do it. Let us figure this out. You know because they grew up in homes. Where other people did the same thing so that is only. Only type of of hope, that's the only way they know how to get out of the hood, so let's put some of that money back into those kids so back when the new generation comes up prime down because people have hope. I love that I think that was such an important message that people understand they're not talking about taking away all of the polices equipment. They're not going out with a flyswatter you, but but look if they used ten million bullets in the in the world in the country last year. Why do they have fifty million bullets storage rack, right? centric percent, cutting the fat and putting it back in the community to make the world safe place and give everyone the same advantages to Joe hopefully make crime lore, one hundred and thirty percent by the way. I tell this to my friends all the time and they're like you know I. Don't get it on my. You send your kids to private school, and you pay forty thousand dollars a year. Per Kid. You took seven of those families from your private school. You only took seven and you could say you part. You paid about two hundred and fifty thousand dollars a year between those seven families. If I told you that, not this one school. That doesn't even get that amount of money every year. As a whole and you're telling me only seven families from your. Your private school is giving that school that money. You have to really think about the advantages. Education gives two kids one hundred percent. I mean I was just so so people are now because the school year is over. Pretty much for everyone they're saying. The reports are in on home schooling, and it's a fail right, and so I've been reading a lot because obviously education so important to us, and and exactly to your point. EXA- agree a hundred percent with what you're saying. My kids do go to private school. I'm a public school kid. But my kids go to private school and I was thinking by first initial thought was. Well, you know my kids home. Schooling was really good. Because I? Pay a fortune and it had to be good right. And of course I've heard stories went up, but I really took a deep dive into what's been going on and thinking about all these poor children who I mean they most of them didn't have equipment at home to be able to log in or Internet, access or wildfire anything and beyond that. If they don't show up who there's no truancy officer, you know what I mean. There's one hundred percent. No one knows where they are what they're doing. It was a failures can be such a huge gap and education and the truth is. This happens daily in many communities anyway. One, hundred, twenty five percent and It's really sad to me that there are children who don't realize it who don't get the type of attention to realize that you know I went to college for free. You know and I didn't I. Switch Schools when I was in seventh grade and I went to a Catholic school because the school that I was so stupid. GonNa turn into dangerous minds with Michele Pfeifer movie. Yup We. So? My mom was I kinda freight for me to go to that school which I was do. But it's funny. I was at a public school with thirty five kids per classroom. was packed thirty five kids for classroom, and then I switched over to a school that had less than twenty per class. and. It's that difference of fifteen kids that can really make or break someone's future because a teacher has time to pay attention to one of the fifteen, but not one of the thirty five. And this school had mindset had switched. It was unique play basketball. Are you know play football in order to go to college? When I went to the public school, because that's how most kids go to college, Stapley us. Where did they get a scholarship? At this other school it was a you don't have a choice but to go to college, so let's figure out how we're going to do this and. Figuring out in finding a and having somebody me in the direction of you could do this for free list is how you do it. These are the steps you take. A lot of kids don't have that person you right I. Think Mentoring, we talk about mentoring, and all ages is so incredibly important, but I think now more than ever especially for the black community for kids to have important mentors. It's unbelievably important. Yeah, 'cause, there's a lot of information out there. That's not getting to them because the resources aren't getting to them. You now. There's one guidance counselor for two thousand kids at a school. What He. Oh it's great, but one teacher can't handle thirty five kids. I don't care how brilliant the teachers you just can't and you have to also realize even in a classroom of thirty five kids. There's going to be children on the spectrum in this class. There's going to be difficult. And so what happens is the teacher ends up spending all their time on on helping these difficult children and stopping fights, and all this stuff and not teach it. One hundred percent. One hundred percent, and it's just one of those things that I feel like. The generation before me. Didn't have that hope in their lives. Their lives. The hope was they would go to get associate's degree are get get some kind of trade and from there they would get a good job being a secretary or being a paralegal legal or doing X. Y. and Z. in the generation. Right up, just right right right above me my sister's age. Started, the college womb, and now we're talking about college, but there's a whole generation who doesn't know anything else, but college in startups and going and figuring out how to start a small business. But we can't forget about those kids whose parents never went to college because their parents, everyone's a college with their parents never went to college, and that's not even the conversation because they think it's too expensive. Our kids like mine. Don't get into college. To change the narrative, you gotta change the narrative and the only way to change. The narrative is in a classroom. So, you were talking before about how your phasing back in just like Cova did how does Hollywood do the same? Hollywood they pass phase one, thank you. Hollywood from passing things one. But I think it's GonNa. Take the black community in the allies who work in that workspace to hold their hands to the fire. Because if you put out with your company, put out a memo saying that they support black lives matter. You need to hold their hand to the fire. Make sure they're supporting it in August in their supporting in January that they keep on supporting in that they put measures into place that will continue to show their support for years and decades to come. And I think a lot of people are GONNA lose their. I think a lot of people are gonNA. Lose their jobs or waiting their works, because a lot of people are going to speak up about people being performed live. Protesters putting it out because they think it's what's right. And Not Continue in that conversation. No one's going to be scared because we saw what happened with the me too movement we saw when we held people's answer. The Fire Shit changed and shelter. The college changed. Yeah, it was a culture switch. And now that you have the NFL, saying you know what we were wrong, common caffeinate would have never gotten fired in twenty twenty. We're going to see more sports, stars and more role models take a stand that's going to cause more people to take a stand in. If they can take the stand, the nine can take San to at my workplace. Good for you I think that's amazing I. Just I'm so glad you came here today. And you talked and educated and again. I'm just so proud to be your friend and everyone knew you're doing I. Love You, too, and I just I mean honestly I'm just I been amazing to watch you. Thank you. I appreciate that and I. Honestly like between my instagram and just said I've really tried my hardest to make this as easy for people as possible. And make this conversation as comfortable as it can be because. I know that this conversation is uncomfortable, but try living it. But! That's the whole thing you know when you hear someone say like. I'm tired of this. When will descend because I've seen people posting like that? Really try being black. Yeah. Aren't you tired of this? Aren't you tired of this? Don't you want this to end right? Come on and I. Just want to get it right and I tell this all the time. Let's get this right today, so your kids don't have to do it tomorrow, so my kids don't have to do this shit tomorrow. Let's just do it. Get it right. Let's we have allies. We have social media and you know. Let's keep it going. If Martin Luther, King Junior can get a million mother buckets to DC with no call waiting with no deums with no, you know. Right off facebook without even a a mail system work properly. Okay, if in okay can do that, think about the power you have in the world if you have forty followers, sixty dollars, thousand dollars, two thousand followers. Just because you're not instagram official are just because you know you don't have a platform like you think you should. That doesn't mean that you can't influence. Somebody it, you one person. That's awesome. That's all you need. I really it's been incredible to watch. It is incredible to watch and. I hope that. Twenty thirty years from now we look back and go. Wow! Twenty twenty started off as such a shit show, but look at what it created. It's the best year of my life. I always say. I. Love You so much. Tell people how to find you and social media. You guys me at the lady sitter on Instagram and on twitter, and just the same. It's on every podcast platform. You can find up live on Wednesdays it's phenomenal were teaching people about what's going on in the world and you can find me everyday starting next week on daily pop twelve thirty on E.. You're listening to heather. Do Rose World. All we've been doing is wider hands and watching her hands and wash your hands. Guess what millions of. And I'm so sick of the smell of him, so I can't even tell you so what I discovered. Was this new brand called? Raya talked about it last week on tell Dressy A. L. D. R. E. A. Caldera is consciously craft in home in body care brand that combines thought. delectable sense making hearing I helps ender homes a beautiful experience. We're talking about hand soaps, moisturizing lotions that are thoughtfully formulated incredibly effectively smell divine and these. Of essential oils and flowers and herbs, and other thoughtfully chosen ingredients we also have. Home Sprays and countertops as the it's absolutely divine. My favorites, the ginger panel. You are going to love it. Get Free Shipping on orders of fifty dollars or more when you buy online at. Raya DOT COM at CA. L. D. R. E. A. Dot Com visit killed tray, dot, com, and at one due to your washing. Now back that heather dubrow swirled. cleese, please please welcome back Jacqueline Coli Hi. It's good to talk to. You again feels like it was eight years ago by the beginning. It does and I'm just going to make my first comment which it looks like you've hung pictures. Yes I've gotten pictures though. I'm learning. That I've lived in for two years. That's what happens when you stand still for more than five minutes. Amazing. I'll tell you you know. At the beginning of the lockdown. I was like I had all these lofty aspirations like I'm going to learn a language and I'm GonNa, play loot and I'm going to purge my own house. I don't know why the Luke we don't own and I'm GONNA purge the house from top to bottom and all my children are going to be perfect great. What a shit show, but. I will tell you that for some reason as the as the country's starts going back outside I'm becoming a Gora phobic and now i. really like in a whirlwind have purged my whole house almost done with it. You know it's good I. really like I don't know why I usually Game Day player I guess it was just like Game Day was here. It's time and I think I've gotten to John. C. I think I'm the opposite. At the very beginning was so disciplined. I was like I was letting on my apps, doing leg the lingo in stuff, and then as we've like sunk into it more I'm like it's a good week. Bye Shower! I was the kid I got good grades at the beginning. Then just like as we get closer to graduation, I'm just going further and further down. Friday well I. Think I had a dip, and then I came back up. I think that's where. I'm hoping I can come back up. Time. We have plenty of time all right with this. Will you look fabulous as always and so you're still working from home. What how is that? And when do you think rotten tomatoes open is? Are they going to open the offices again? I mean honestly I have no idea like I'll be really honest with you like for me. It's slightly different. Because I do a lot of this stuff. So like your podcast. I could do at home I'm just kind of playing by ear, but if I'm being really honest, other meeting this morning i just said this someone. Two Thousand Twenty I've just kind of written off like if I get to do anything before the end of this year I will look at it as a win, but I am no longer expecting that I will, because every time that you like kind of expected than like something will happen, and so right now looking at like okay tenants be. July that's like a thing and so that's something to maybe say okay. This is a marker I think I will when when they let me get a pedicure. That's maybe I'll start to believe that the world is back man the poor nail salons. I gotTA. Tell you they've been targeted so hard. I just awful. I feel like there, and this is I love my nail technician like like that's my girl i. see her more than anyone else i. kind of do my own hair so actually. She's more of like a person for me than. Hair stylists type deal, but yeah I feel like that is the one that's GonNa. Take the longest or like when I can go to like a concert with people like so now it's like a different measure, right? It's like there's there's very different. Things are going to tell you when things back. Yeah, it'll be interesting to see. Justin Sylvester, he was just on the show and he we were talking about like. You know in the period of time since all the protests have been going on and testing time for covid seeing if there's a because one is soon, there's going to be a surge. But I really I. Mean I pray that? There's not because that will wait. Yeah, BE HORRIFIC! I don't especially the people they wouldn't want negatively affected obviously, but I mean look at this I will tell everyone I've sacrificed this to you before. Call pandemic like whatever you need to do to get through this time. Do it if it means eating vinegar cream at four in the morning like I did maybe the past weekend. I'm. Like sixteen hours on Netflix or maybe just switching to the good bits on three sixty five days on Netflix by the way. I just want to tell your audience that if they are women quarantining alone, you can find solace in that movie on Net looks right now. That is all I was. Really. Yes, it is I mean I'll go and say like it makes fifty shades of grey little pg thirteen. Wait it called. Three, hundred sixty five days, it is based off of a dark erotic romance novel, and it is literally something that I have just like ridiculously fascinated with because of the comedy around it so people when they watch it, they're making take. Talks and people are talking about on the Internet, because like the movie. If not winning any Oscars. I'll put it that way, nor does it need to, nor does it need to. And the sole purpose of it is to have very beautiful. People do very sexy things on yachts, and in very beautiful luxury places. It's like luxury porn slash. Actual Corpora Oh my God. I'm totally watching I. Woods right now is the number one. It's like hey. I've become I've. Romance Novel Becomes Strangely Fascinated with it, and watching people slowly lose their minds as they watch it. It's become my new thing. I just lot of. Like watch this and then I wait for the messages afterwards. They're like Oh. Are you going to be getting messages for me now? I used to be a huge romance novel Fan, and then me and my sister read the whole out outlandish out landers. Series Yeah! Of course now I think there's like thirty bucks, but at the time there maybe fifteen or something, and then by like books for we found, he was ginger, which I'm not putting down gingers, but it's not my. Jam so I had to. I had to like pretend dark hair every time I read the book, and then they came out with the TV show and that I couldn't watch it because he was ginger. Oh Wow. It's okay when you. Someone in your mind. That's why like some of these books adaptations get in such trouble I don't mind the ginger necessarily I can't I I will not judge anyone on their preferences. Though, because if you look at my kindle, you would be surprised. By, the way that doesn't mean I don't like ginger like on billions, I like the guy on billions. He's a ginger I think he's. What you had in your mom. I know what you have in. Your mind is what you have in your mind, and once that's there, and then they put up something. That's completely different. No, it's not a ginger. Judgment is more like is not what I was thinking about when I was loving. This book you know exactly I, mean sometimes you can go with like when I saw the hunger games, and I loved that series the books, and when I saw the hunger games like he wasn't exactly the PD picture, but I could go there. I. Don't think he was the pita than anyone pictured girl, but yeah, it was a little more great actor, but he's just. Reminded me a little of Barney rubble, a little bit like Sweden and cute, and you want to hug him, but not like you want to do him and I felt like. How is there even a choice between the two is because I hot out the other guy is. I am not going to lie to you. There is a whole thing I remember on like. Twitter one of the message boards actually, Hunger Games probably. Doing tumblers, where like isn't it really a question of pita in gale? Gale really bad towards the end. I know give so hot. You almost don't care. Exactly I agree. Okay, so I I need movie recommendations on many different fronts here, but have to tell you. I I'm glad you got three sixty five, because I've had some alone time because dairies now back to work, and the kids are kind of like out with friends abet like with certain friends that have been quarantined like we're opening circle. On main pod. That's the thing. Yeah Yeah we're doing pods, and so it's which is nice because they really need friends, but. It's giving me some time. Really Mike. What am I going to watch? What is I'm going to do that? I showed cocoa. My nine year old. I had her watched. She never saw enchanted. Oh. It's a great one. Did she like it? She loved it and she's totally not girly at all, but she loved it. I have to say amy. Adams is so good in that movie. She's done a lot of great things I really like her filmography. If you look at it as a whole. She's been very varied in the stuff that she's done. I think maybe the reason why she likes enchanted. It's just as tongue in cheek about that stuff as it is wrapped in it like it's satirical, but it also like is authentic within that sort of like fantasy genre, so I appreciate that about it i. do yeah, absolutely all right so obviously. With everything that's going on the world today. People want to educate they WANNA expand horizons they WanNa see I'm curious what's going on as far as rotten tomatoes goes and are you highlighting? Black documentaries that are really important to watch. How how what is rotten tomatoes doing to help us educate ourselves? One. Really lucky again. I've worked for rotten tomatoes for three years, and they have always been so supportive of putting. Black Brown faces at the forefront both publicly, and then also behind the scenes, obviously a very public person that speaks on behalf of the brand so I appreciate the fact that we didn't have to scramble to find you know that voice. We already had it within their. We just turned it up and one of the things that we did. which is we partnered with actually the critics association that I'm a part of the African American film. Critics and we created a list of one hundred ten essential films to understand the black experience and. And there are so many films within that that I love, but I'm just GONNA highlight a few of them. One of the first one being one of newly available in free for votes to see right now, thanks to Warner. Brothers at just mercy. This is Brian Stevenson's film adaptation, which stars Michael B, Jordan and Jamie Fox. It was in the Oscar conversation last year, and it highlights the actual man Brian Stevens his quest to sort of battle. Racial injustice is far as involved with the death penalty. He set up a a injustice organization in Alabama and one of his most famous clients was waltz McMillan, who is slated to be executed and And there was literally no case for him. Jamie delays that character also based off of a book, which is currently at the top of the Amazon List because as folks seek to find things to read educate themselves. It's just a perfect parent, so I would say grabs book. downloaded. You also list great. Black owned bookstore is that you can get stuff sent to you and then also go to warner brothers and check out the actual film, so that's a first one on the lighter side, but also I think one that that I think folks should watch maybe sort of appreciate I. think Maybe bromance within the African American experience in that's love. Love and basketball! This one is a gravy. Yeah Gina Prints by the would i. think is the great one for you to sort of appreciate it, because it does talk a lot about not only women but African American women in the differences as far as what they are essentially allowed to do within the world. This woman who wanted to be both a mother in basketball player a woman in end, the wife in a basketball player, and struggles for her to do I absolutely loved that one in highly recommend that one anything by Gene Burns violent. Honestly, she's only done a few films. Each one of them are simply simply amazing. She also did. Beyond the lights, which is a film that stars a Luma in Boston rock. The other one and this one is documentary is also streaming on Netflix and I. Believe Netflix's just made it past their pay paywall as well, and that's the thirteenth by able do rene that film really talks about? The the criminal justice system, and how it affects folks and it was nominated for an Oscar and eva recently was just elected to the Board of Governors Often Academy Awards, and she just been such I think of vocal I would say champion for African. American cinema I particularly love the work that she has done and I'm GonNa. Give you two quick Moore's in then we'll talk about some other, but one is hate you give. This is Amanda Steinberg from few years ago. It really encompasses what's going on today because this was A. Novel, that was actually a a graduate program project is in Graduate School for writing. Program drill riding. The Beginnings of the hang in there in her professor to resign was like you need to do this. This is incredible. That eventually became a book bestselling book. And then it was also adapted into films, two thousand Eighteen Mandala Steinberg East Array. Regina Hall. Russell Hornsby and she witnesses her childhood. Friends killed at the hands of police in like it's one of those. Pulling someone over. An instantly things changed, and it was really incredible also has K J APPA from Riverdale in that one playing her love interest. It's really really interesting depiction of someone finding their voice at a very young age as we see, young people really take to the streets it'd be. The forefront of this movement is young. People have been in the history of protests in history of people asking for change with their political. Political Voice I think this is an excellent representation. Especially, if you have like younger children, but yet kids between that thirteen to eighteen rain, and you wanNA maybe sit down and show them something that says here is something that you can look at and find both education and inspiration. Hey, give is incredible and the very the last one of course we just GonNa talk about slightly. Do the right thing. Anything go see do the right thing. It is still to this day so topical. There is the same conversations we are having to this day are had during that the hottest day in bed Stuy in Brooklyn. And it's incredible to think that the film is now forty years. Off Thirty years old like it is absolutely incredible about that evidence. That is an incredible movie and it's it is amazing to think that it's still relevant, and also it's sad to think that it's still relevant, and is that the store element wanting I do love about that and I was GonNa this little tidbit. If folks don't know, that was actually the first date that brock took Michelle Obama to. when they went on their very for state went to do the right thing and I just I love that story because I think it really embodies them as the couple in it also sort of has a legacy that attached to that film so great. That is great. That's what an amazing list! Yeah, and this is. The great thing I just gave a few of you. Guys can head over. It's rotten tomatoes, and we have literally a list of one hundred ten films. It was created by the African American Film Critics Association and I really think it will give you a great place to jump off. You're looking for a film or documentary. That can really sort of again. Educate and also entertain. The. Thank you so much for giving us that list. That's amazing and I'm going to check out a couple of those movies that I haven't seen I haven't seen the hate you give I want to see that. Yet. Again if you have like it's a, it's a really great one. A Mandala is amazing in it and I feel bad because I have named like fifty films. I now I know I know. But that's what's great about the website you can. You can see the ones that I didn't say and you know. Hit me up twitter and you'd be like. This went on me like girl. I I wanted to A. That is awesome. What do you hope that? Having this whole black lives, having the whole black lives matter movement. Would you hope is going to happen for black filmmakers in the coming years? It's really interesting I think. This is what I will say. There's been a lot of progress with African American cinema I think there's been a lot of progress with black so makers and female filmmakers. I think my hope is. Is that in every aspect of filmmaking because there are certain places where we do a good job, but there's certain places where I feel. The conversation doesn't happen. I want people to remember this moment when they're sitting in a room and someone puts forth idea and they immediately go to there. I thought about it. If it involves race African American viewpoint in cinema. Take the moment to to check your privilege big for second. Am I allowing biases to? My decision on what I'm about to do, and I hope that if nothing else when we talk about everything, but especially in cinema, because so many things get shot down in a board room with five people who may be aren't the people that necessarily have the experiences to give an accurate representation of what they're doing, and so in roomful of five very well meaning. They would think non-bias. People make a decision about a film or filmmaker or story line or hiring a certain actor or using a certain cinematographer or hiring the same guy that they always used for the crew there so many small everyday decisions that go into filmmaking that when you add them up, can give us this sort of viewpoints. silencing marginalized choices, and so if nothing else, I hope that every single person within inch of power takes the moment to remember this moment, and to use it and apply it every day. Because I think there was a study where talks about the average African, American, person experiences an aspect of racism anywhere between twenty to forty times a day. So, If you're not thinking about this at least a few times a day. You were probably contributing to that so back. What I would say like just remember that to stick that. This is a constant, and it's very small things. Sometimes sometimes, it's very big things, but they all add to the map out that we are currently trying to scale, and it is mountain, so is going to take a lot of time, and so you can. You can't move a mountain in one day. You can only move it with a brick each day and just try to be a brick each day. Try to like every decision. You make clause and rethink. That was beautifully, said beautifully said. Yeah because I'm like I don't make movies, I. Have No it. We're going to do this, but I do know. Everyone takes a moment. I do I take a moment and pause of where. Now! Envisioning how I interact when we talk about, this is also pride month, and and there's an entire different dialogue about we're POC. People an indigenous. The there's just there's so much where we all have to lie. Just take a moment to pause, and so even myself even though I'm black woman I'm still trying to take a moment to pause in the other aspects and check my own biases. Love that you're amazing I love having you on the show. You're absolutely refreshing and bright and incredible. So will you come back of course, girl? This is literally when they have like. I was so much fun, and then like I've got a new subscriber to. I've been listening because I'm. I'm all about the PODCAST. Walk my dog. He gets exhausted. Including If you just like laid out on the walk was like we're done with this walk and I was like okay. I've been in cycads log. I gotta go back. You're like. Listen, find out. She's not done with her story. Sit Out! That was like we'll also that really hot here in La. My dog is like a Berry California dog. It's about eighty. He's not about. It's funny now. Everyone had to find you on social media how to find rotten tomatoes. Well. I'll as please headed over to rotten. Tomatoes Dot Com. You can also find this at rotten tomatoes on every social platforms, twitter, instagram facebook, and you can of course find me every Social Platform at that Jack Ledge even tick tock where I have been deep industry sixty five means. I'm telling you. It's a thing to checkout Oh my God I'm going to put it on my watch list right now. Swear to God. Thank you so much. I adore you and I will see you soon. Be used known watching. The kids are in bed. I will. You're listening to heather, dubrow world. What a great show! Wow! I feel incredibly inspired and I'm definitely going to check out that three sixty five movie. How about you? It's GonNa be a long weekend anyway. Thank. You guys so much for support. If you have an extra minute, please go to. Apple and I tunes and leave a five Star Review and say what you love about Heather rose world. Thank you again for the incredible messages It's really inspiring to hear from everyone and I will see you guys next week. Have a fabulous weekend. Thank you so much for listening to rose world, download new episodes, every Thursday and Friday on podcast one the podcast, one APP or apple podcasts, employees nature to subscribe to the show and leave a lovely five star Rating Kodak, Apple, podcasts and CEO. Much, you love. How did you browse world see next week? Thanks for listening to today's not gas made possible by our friends at wires ice cream. You probably know Briars as America's number, one ice cream brand, they are known for their natural vanilla ice cream. I have always been obsessed obsessed obsessed with wires. I mean they can make the ice cream four hundred fifty years now. So you know they're the real deal. 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"Stop the hammering!"

The Tony Kornheiser Show

1:14:37 hr | 2 years ago

"Stop the hammering!"

"Previously on the Tony Kornheiser show. Actually said and this is all I said, hey, calm both ways. Right. And he said he wants red card near. Yup. Through and I, I went I went because I just felt that the attendant publicity. And he was a foreign man, and his orientation to soccer was far more reverential in mind. Just call them both ways pitch. Longtime might have been all you said. But I'm sure that's not how. Previously on the Tony Kornheiser shovels zero what happened there, instead of saying you turning corners on just one previously. Yes. Don't worry about it. We are live at chatter at the corner of Wisconsin avenue northwest. Jennifer streets northwest. We have jingle side people with us today. Enormous crab. Thank you off. Very grateful for that. I'll get to that in a second, gene, mcmanus's here. Kevin Sheehan Michael Kornheiser was here. Niger will produce the show sometimes badly. He will run the board. He'll do the new book let me get to some of these notes that we have this Bill, the Hata who I've said all week, I've said his la- here, lack is here today. And he writes this, he writes, I took a bit of a break listening to the show for a few years, because of reasons like work short commute because I didn't have time when I met my girlfriend, Casey, she lives several miles away, and that led me to tap into your podcast again, since I was behind a whole bunch of episodes to catch up on one of the older episodes of the podcast. You were lamenting, the closure of neck, oh, than England confectionary companies you'll as they made your favorite candy bar. The sky bar, you would despondent that they may never exist again. Well recently, I heard another company bought the neck, oh assets and we'll be putting their favorites back into production including the sky bar later this year. But for now we've been about a year without sky bars. So it hit me. Fine sky bars for Tony being in the northeast near the neck. Oh, plant in, and this is no joke. Rivera, I figured there might be a stray Skybow still on the shelves. My search was fruitless until one day I was giving EBay and found an online candy. Shop in Pittsburgh, selling a lot of six sky bars. They were manufactured in July twenty and according to Netco sky, bars, have an eighteen months shelf. Life is trying to get me to eat these things die. And then he takes over the show, I bought them outright and had them, Pat carefully for transit, so they didn't melt bringing them here to chatter involve locking them down in a cooler. So the elements couldn't get at them for the roughly success, our drive down, so this morning, I present you the gift of the currently auto production sky bar six, in fact, manufactured in revere. I hope you enjoy these. I mean they'll be making more just not soon enough and he says, please don't read my name on the air as suspect. People are sick of me. There's something to that. I have another note here. Eric from Gaithersburg, who writes, longtime first time by way of paying it forward or backward, for years of entertainment and laughs. I have for you and the gang personalized golf bag themed canned beverage accessories. It's my new endeavor called the canned catty. They're great for tipping, your hands from getting wet and clammy while enjoying a beverage near the sink. It also works as a holster to hold your drink are playing frisbee games with the dog named Jesse. Or if you need both hands free for any reason, like pushing away small toddlers is humans trying to hug, you please hold them up for the folks watching on news channel. They're out there for people to get we have some in here. Everybody can have one of these. I'm very grateful to Eric from gang. Yes, you did it did about later about you. Have you wanna plug something? Oh, yes. I have an upcoming art show with another artist. Serra Matic's, it opens July fifth at the Parkview Gowrie and Glen echo. It's up July fifth to July twenty seventh opening reception is July fifth. Great, great time to have the greatest time tonight, one of the two people down. Sketching today on the podcast. That's great to know. But you can listen to it. The Kevin Sheehan showed you just on the phone with Goldie just on the air. No, no, no, no, no. I do thing with Richmond, every Friday morning, not local. Oh Richmond, Goldie. No, that's big Al down in Richmond. Golden big AL's morning show. You remember big Al actually does big out your radio pound. Yeah. Let me that is often. Let's put that so restaurant. I mean, make sure lost among all the jingle side, people as Paul Twining, who was wondering why am I here I'm doing business here? I'm among eight hundred people here what am I doing here? All right. So let me give credit where credit is due and all craze in predator, Jerry praising credit to Jerry growly for organizing this thing year after year after year. Naming it this year. Naming it because year jingle side. For the retirement community musicians. There is tomorrow here at chatter a lunch at eleven thirty. There is a Calvert Woodley lati-, Serie tore, and reception at two o'clock, Nigel. I believe you will be there. I will be the big event itself as a jam Java tomorrow at seven Jerry is here. If you don't have a ticket, and you want to buy a ticket, or you wanna just threaten, Jerry. Is there a tour bus that takes him by bagel city news channel eight used to do that the Rockville studios? I don't know if that's still existent because I thought you should jump on it for one. Right. But I'm going away. Oh, I have to go away today, which are kissing. If not convenient if you listen to the show that really going away just saying you're going away now. He's going. And this is six months in the making. So I have to do. And it's nice it's an honor you notice this sort of increased and his tone because he's going away. Our schedule next week is Wednesday Thursday, Friday we in North Carolina, Monday and Tuesday for this particular event. And we will be here, Wednesday Thursday and Friday and let us get to the lead story, which is the NBA draft and of the top thirty players drafted, I would say, I didn't know twenty of them, I would say that after number three, I was pretty unfamiliar with their Hoover. I think that I think the three top picks make a lot of sense. I on Williamson who looked great and who cried in the presence of his mother who mean so much to him, he cried. And if you didn't like him before you like them now and if you don't like him now there's something wrong with you. Authentic. I don't know how great a player is going to be a fine for his suit was drip, wouldn't it? I just. Dribbling? When did you learn that phrase, I learned last night? I heard it seventeen times on the draft coverage and I'd never heard it before. Apparently it's swagger. Looks really good. You're not allowed to say good. You have to say, not drip, dry trip. So there's I n Williamson goes one Jaama rant who Memphis cleared out space by getting rid of Mike. Conley goes number two and r j Barrett, I believe will be a great NBA player goes number three three do keys in the top diner tan three Duke. He's in the top ten which makes you wonder why they didn't win the national championship. I mean, we'll says, oh you can't say that. And I go just said that I just said that why didn't they got three in the top ten? That's right. Why didn't they win the national championship? What I would say and I'll lean on Kevin on this. You know these nineteen year old kids in the main, they're nineteen twenty they're going to play against men. Eight ten twelve years older than them who are. Seasoned professional basketball players, and most most of these guys are going to get their lunch handed to them, most of the time out, well for a while, or if that discourages them forever, the wizards took a guy last year, that nobody had heard of that rave, reviews some kit from Oregon. No from slasher Troy crunching. Yeah. Did he play ten minutes this year barely? And he was going to be great as ready right away. He's ready right now. He's not ready. Wasn't ready? They took sat around the year before he plays. He's a pretty good player is going to be a star is never going to be a star. They say the kid they took now Ryuhachi Moore's gonna start. Right. Or he's gonna play right away. He's healthy is going to play right away because they have nobody under contract. So he's going to play. And maybe he's going to be real good. But however good is next year. He's not going to be nearly as good as he will be down the road. If he is confident. Kid willing to work. What are your, what the NBA draft is not like the NFL draft eighty percent of these players are never going to have an impact on the league. I mean eighty percent just play seventy percent of the top ten we'll never have a significant impact on the league. So the NFL draft is totally different. You're drafting players in the fifth round that are going to help your team sometimes right away. Zayn Williamson is probably the biggest number one, pick in terms of marquee star value since LeBrun. Yeah. I mean, he actually himself, Tony with that team this year. Even though they lost in the regional finals Michigan state here. They I mean college basketball was suffering coming into this year, the popularity for ratings by himself. No doubt. I'm self. And he looks the part to me, Jaama rant really looks like a player looks with the vision of magic and is alien Steph curry thin, but you don't really know. You're, you're, you're never sure, but the wizards got this guy. Hot murah. Brandon Clark was on that Gonzaga team. He looked like a better player to some. But again, that I just thought that the GM for the wizards did a great job last night. He's, he's the acting GM. They don't have guys just on the squad. They point they made a consensus pick list. So the gr-. Thing that Marie Taylor does a very good good cheese really quite good. And I've never met her. He's really quite good. She finally asked I n Williamson is crying. She talks to the mom a little bit talks a little bit. There's not much there because he's crying. And so what you wanna do in that situation just let the camera work because you fall in love with the kid says, anything you wanna tell people in the world that he said, let's dance. This crowded New Orleans, great now, I don't think the world is going to be any good. They got five starters under the age of twelve young teams don't win. But I thought if off to New Orleans I'd be excited about what was about to happen, the problem. Yes. The problem with New Orleans. It's a fold problem. It's football city to begin with understandable. And to this is this is forty one games a year at the smallest population in the entire league at an area that more than king Katrina smaller than Salt Lake in a Hurricane Katrina took away so much money and population that never came back. So can they support as much as they may like this kid? Can they support a team and we'll see we'll say at a completely superficial thought here if I had been in a cave for twenty years and came out last night, and you present me with a picture of one hundred different people men, women, children and said, which one of these is the Commissioner of the NBA. Peak that him silver. He seems most unlikely Commissioner, I would love Adam silver had one of those suits that the kids warm. Yeah. Him drip in past years. I have thought that much of the clothing, look terrible, and nobody would wear it last night. I thought it looked really good. I thought most of those suits looked really terrific. I can't wear them. But I thought they looked really the hat. So big, I'm not talking about the hang. The hang caps, it gives them, although hang Callen those hats, the, the NBA taps is stupid, looking and not only that they all look exactly the same. So you didn't know what team they were for until you got real close to the to the print and a third of them were traded. Well, this is. Well, this is. Even though you got on your team, why can't they figure that out? Why can't they make these trades fficials so that they don't put on the hat of a team that they're never gonna play for? The other thing about Adam silver, he does not do what Roger Goodell does, which is bro hug. That comes up. There's, there's a good firm handshake. He did hugs. I on, I think, and that was it sees the savior. I think they probably know each other the ratings went down the ratings were down this Michael wilpon wanna talk about that, only if the ratings are up, he says he the NFL ratings are down. The time but the NFL ratings this year were up and the NBA ratings this year were down, and Zion Williamson like LeBron James is I, I want to see him don't you do? See him so here. A really good. He's going to be I want to pelicans game. Well, if they put it on, on, they should be on. You shouldn't be be an after wizards shouldn't, and they won't. Yeah badger. No say no. Bob cats wherever they are this year. That's shouldn't be. Well, that's your favorite thing. You can't wait for the Christmas day games to be announced. We'll. Get out of five straight games. I want today I love will. But stop. He's going to do the show. I'm not doing PTI today. So he's doing it with Frank is Sola, and he will be ankle deep into this draft. And you think they'll talk about the draft. I think so. Well, Frank is also Frank does his own radio show about the NBA Frank. I solo. That's actually knows stuff. I mean if you wanna know stuff you talk to Frank. We'll take a break when we come back and horn a we'll do some movies for us. I am Tony Kornheiser. This is the Tony Kornheiser show. This is the net. Sweet add, we've done this all week. Yes. Again, I just read this, it says, please feel free to add live the introduction with a personalized story. I don't have any because I don't want it says that I tell you at the time I played golf with Larry. Ellison because I never did that. I never did. He's got his own private golf course of course, his ole. Yes, is in Monterey, California. Northern california. I don't know exactly where it is his own private course. He's somebody liked to get to know. So I'll just read the copy, if you don't know your numbers, you don't know your business, but the problem growing businesses have that keeps them from knowing their numbers as their hodgepodge of business systems. They've one system for accounting another for sales, another for inventory, and so on. It's just a big ineffective inefficient mess much, like, Naito running the board, taking too much times, and too many resources and that hurts the bottom line. So we are introducing nets, we oracle the business management software, the handles every aspect of your business in an easy to use cloud platform, giving you the visibility and control that you need to grow sweet. You save time, money and unneeded headaches, as if there are needed headaches by managing sales, finance, and accounting orders and HR instantly right from your desktop or phone. And that's why net. Sweet is the world's number one cloud business system. And after this show, you asked me for a definition of the cloud business system. You'll be standing. Right now net. Suite is offering valuable insights with a free guide. This is something you want to get because it's free seven key strategies to grow your profits at nets week dot com slash Tony. That is net. Sweet dot com slash Tony to download your free guide. Seven key strategies to grow your profits. Let me spell net sweet for you any. T. S U, I, T, nets week dot com slash Tony. You're listening to the Tony Kornheiser show. This is Kevin Johnson that not that Kevin Johnson, Nick Bowen. And they right. You just want to send you our new single called. How can you love now available wherever you get your music digitally says the first single off an upcoming album untitled deluge out on July twelfth. Thank you for listening. And I hope you enjoy this Nick VO in Kevin Johnson. It's lovely Laura, Nick stuff. Yes. That's always good. Just lovely and Hornets joins us. Now, you wanna you wanna plug the af docs before you do reviews. You wanna do it the other way whatever you want. Gee, I don't care, I left do both. Yes. I- docs, it's on. I'm on my way down there for today and tomorrow and Sunday. It's going to be a lot of fun. Where is that? So if people wanna go, it's mostly at landmark e street, they, they are showing movies at the naval memorial and, and the American history museum. But I just people just go to ASI dot com af I dock, and then get the schedule and download the app and see what's up, but they've got some really good movies this year. So this is three days Friday, Saturday, Sunday. Well actually started Wednesday night that screening national archives. A movie about Bryan Stevenson to the lawyer and activists and it was going on yesterday. But I'm going to dive in, in, in earnest today, last lawyer and activist I knew was William kuntsler. I've never heard of Brian Stevens Bryant has an incredible man. He's, he's the person who really spearheaded the I don't know the formal name it's base. The lynching museum in Montgomery, Alabama, which is just it looks like magnificent structure. And he's been doing a lot of important work around death penalty issues and just rest of Justice and reparation. He's, he's an amazing man. I think he's got the highest rated Ted talk like the longest standing ovation and Ted talk history. Visionary, man. Wow. Ted talk. Listen to as Leonsis. He's got a Ted talk blog. Teaser walking Ted. Let's start with some movies. There's a bunch of movies. We wanna talk for movies one is, and this is not for me. I understand Toy Story, four is not for me. But if you get to four you presume that one two and three did pretty some money or you wouldn't be doing four and two kids movie. Some are kids movie animated. I'm sure how is it? You know, I went in, I don't know if you've noticed every Friday this summer, we're just getting sequels is just the summer of the sequels on that always makes me feel tired and kind of defensive because a lot of them aren't very good. And especially when you get to number four, they're not very they tend to not be very good. So I went in with this to this with managed expectations, and I just thought it was fantastic. That's yeah, it's, it's, it's, you know, for those of us, I can't say, I grew up with Toy Story, but I can relate to people who up onto a story. So it's got all those the favorite characters. Tom Hanks character Woody and Bud Light year voice by Tim Allen, they're here. So it's got that whole enough Daljit factor. That's fine. But they don't just coast on that. And they actually introduce new characters one played by Tony HALE the guy from veep. Yes. Love. Wasn't actor and he doesn't terrific voice performances crazy. Very eccentric. Little character called forty a little toy made out of a sport. Understood a single word to this. None of this not as I I'm digging myself into a hole. But what impressed me the most about this movie is that? Not only that balance that style JR. And the novelty, which I think, is a tough balance. But it's visually absolutely stunning. It's so beautiful to look at. I mean it's a real treat to watch because those people at picks are first. They worked so hard on the script make sure it's smart and funny and it moves and it ties up all the ends, and it takes you on an emotional journey which it does. But then they add on this visual artistry. That is just baffling. And in this case, it's, it's it mostly takes place in teak shop and a carnival, midway in both those environments are just so loaded with potential and potential for light and color and movement and interest, and they've just completely nailed it too in my view. I thought it was a really a pleasure to watch. That's I love those movies. I don't watch just. Just every every it's like God. So I'm just going to interrupt to say that the DC construction crew is gathering outside chatter right now. So within the next hour of the show, we're going to hear bulldoze hounding beyond. Oh, this is exciting. Me, this is me because what they'd note that they're just like it's some psychic mind meld. I have with them that when I'm, you know, in any way involved. They're getting ready to last another movie. And I have heard of this movie. This is called late night. I believe it is written by Mindy Kaeling. I'm not the biggest mini Kaeling fan in the world. It centers on Emma Thompson as talk show host Emma Thompson got very, very good reviews. I think but I ll ask for your review of this movie. Well, Amitai kinda like the picks her, what I just said, Emma Thompson is the neon light of this movie. I mean she is the light in the color in the movement, and all of that. She is so radiant in this film that it's just breathtaking. She plays this late night, talk show host, who's in danger of being replaced by younger Hibbard oud. And Mindy Kaelin plays the kind of scrappy, young Nayef, who comes in the show. It's not okay. Is it a hundred percent believable? No. But that's not why we go to movies. It's it contains such pearls, you know, of wit and wisdom, and especially about women in the workplace and kind of resentment of the men, you know who who feel like they're being replaced, and so I enjoy it a lot. I mean I you know, I'm always kind of catching myself when I met one of these comedies. It's like it's almost keeping a balloon in the air, where you're just chuckling all the way through, you know. And this winter's had me, laughing all the way really laughing all the way through, which I is a win, and, again, Emma Thompson. All my God is she's just a treasure. I mean, she's I, I don't even know how to describe the persona, she's kind of like that Miranda priestly character in devil wears Prada. You know, the Meryl Streep down devil wears Prada, because I thought I quickly when you said women in the workplace, I just thought, I guess, Delaware's product is the one movie that I would say that, not only did I like, but I loved, and I want it and watch it and watch it, and it's got nothing for me. And I watch it all the time because it's, it's just fabulous. Is this that good, I would say this might be a little notch? Maybe it's not as smooth you know what I mean? Like this might have it might be a little clunky. But maybe it's not quite as seamless, but it does have that same vibe, and it does have that same seem the young woman older woman him mentoring. Each other. You know about, like, okay, here's what you're getting right and wrong. And here's what I'm getting right and wrong. And it does have that delicious female role. You know, who's, she's not exactly the villain of the piece she has her reasons on MP not for nothing. She just has this fabulous wardrobe and for this kind of movie that piece of production value, really counts because it, it adds to the pleasure of watching it killing right this, yes, she had. Right. She's been, she's talented. Usually out there. And, and God bless and Reed. Scott another actor from veep. He plays the, the kind of chief macho writers guy and I thought he was lovely and his characters really, you know, a lot of fun and has some of the best line. I don't enjoy it there. Movie, didn't joy it. They're movies that I would say are aimed at women more so than men that involve, and I always think of like Alec Baldwin's in all of them. I guess, and I always think they revolve around marriages, I don't particularly care for those movies. He's like this workplace movies about aggressiveness, and how you how you have to you have to take care of your own life, and it's just not about the furniture and it's not about versus all the time movies. So why the Nancy Meyers move? But I the devil wears Prada was great. And if this, I would watch this movie, too, but let's see. Okay. There is a Bob Dylan documentary. If I have this correct. Is this the rolling thunder documentary get rolling thunder review? Okay. So I saw trailer for this one of the most tedious trailers I'd ever seen in my life. Wheelhouse. I looked at it, and I went, you know, one I've seen this a thousand. I thought for sure you would have seen it and we talk about it. Don't tell me tell me did you? So you liked it. Okay. Yes. With with a big with big Astro? Okay. This is score says he did it. And you know there was all this from that tour. Do you remember that? Did you did you did not see it? I do remember it the entire notion of making documentary. Now about fifty years later makes me feel so old that I want side. I don't wanna see it. It. So it was so well documented, like they had, you know, they just got a lot of footage of the actual tour the performances in the backstage, and all of that. So there's this trove of footage and so- score says he that's what he had to work with which is which is very rich. And then he has in, then he has Dylan and we have present day interviews with Dylan. You know, which is always interesting. And the van he does this thing he's kind of inserted which people do because doing the trickster and you never know what he's, you know, there's this kind of theme that he's developed around of south, which, you know, okay, I accept that but he like Sharon Stone is in the movie playing. You know pretending that she knew him back then, and she that she joined the tour. This is not true. She's inserted if she's one of the talking heads. And then they kind of insert her in the vintage footage and Michael Murphy, if you remember Tanner, eight HBO series or he plays Jack he's. Like Jack Tanner politician. And so I just found it to be. Documentary. It's a it's just it's just it's too, it's not going to be as good a spinal tap. They didn't need it. And but I didn't I was not a fan of that conceit but I will tell you, I will tell you watching those performances again. And watching him at that time is absolutely electrifying. I mean it just it's so good. It's so good. And the songs are so good and what he was doing with them with so good. There are there's a scene with Joni Mitchell. They, they kind of convenient people joined and left along the tour and she joins up and they're at Gordon Lightfoot house in Toronto playing just playing and she plays Coyote. And I think it might she had just written it and it just makes the hair on the back of your head stand up and it's just absolutely the most beautiful thing. So I really do urge. I mean, if you're a fan of that music, it's absolutely glorious to hear these songs and just in that band. I mean. Rate band after you watch it. Don't look in the mirror. Don't know. That's why. No kidding. The picture when my license is so frightful. Cannot. Only Tony not only a number. So the other day, we wish Marv Albert happy, seventy eighth birthday on and Marvis. Great and more doing it. Right, right. Yeah. And Marv wrote me, a note saying, just remember seventy eight is the new seventy seven. Anyway. Thank you. Tux goat. See, thank you. I in one day boys and girls, we will take a break. We'll come back with news. Right. That's handle that I'm Tony coin. This these the Tony Kornheiser show. This is the underpants read. So we do these do these everyday. Some, some for some reason. It's a little different than we have a full atrium. Bring underpants. Yeah. This is you're, you're underpaying just be in a small studio by yourself. It's even weirder. Because Paul Twining is here. Paul Easter jeaner Interclub. So, I feel like he's just looking at this fourteen year old kid being like what happened and what happened there are two types of dudes in the world, those who go through the gate and those who go over the fence will after years of research and countless experiments with seasoned underwear, scientists undies. Yeah. So if you were the editor, would you would you remove seizing Origo? These now has an option for both with their new boxer briefs with a fly. It took a while. But now men from both sides of the aisle can enjoy the world softest undies and look drip, that I use that good Ramu Terrell done. Thank you. Don't, don't trip. If you're doing, apparently it'll soak it right up. So it's good. Use the gate. He's undies are so soft and make voice sound like Gilbert, Godfrey me on these uses that coveted micro fabric, which is a full three times softer than cotton. And now Robert Burg and Jamie can experience. That's that Mike Romo Delphi fabric for themselves. Not only will you feel like you're being hugged by -joyed self, but miandi gives you multiple style options for both men and women. Men can now try the new boxer brief with flights the same great cut his boxer briefs just with the whole. Now for number one, there we go. Here we go for timing. Get a great offer for Tony's listeners for any first time purchasers when you purchase any me undies you get fifteen percent off and free shipping. Get fifteen percent off of the most comfortable undies, you'll ever put on this is going to continue for the rest of the show. Yes, it floor. We have a jackass can go out there. We can still do the show mid to stop to get your fifty Edison. I bear pounds. Sand their actual work crew. Now this section is mad at. To get your fifteen percent off your first pair free shipping and one hundred one hundred percent satisfied, guaranteed Goto Gundy's dot com slash Tony Kaye. That's me, undies dot com slash Tony gay and don't worry that when you actually order the underpants that it's not coming with a jackhammer. Don't worry about. You're listening to the Tony Kornheiser show. Here's the accompanying letter to the song. My name is Billy's survey. I'm a Presbyterian pastor in Nashville before I found my true calling actually lived in Washington for number of years and was a big fan of your columns back when your fingers still typed, believe it or not. I was also roommates with Nigel. Yes, it was bizarre. As you might imagine it to be to have it as a house maid, although he did make a great fishing ships and kidney pie. When asked I'm also musician, I reported three outcomes. The song, I'm sending to twelve harmony from my first album horse named cried which was released in two thousand and we all had more hair actually wrote that song, Nigel. Unfortunately, hooliganism, did not affect the song, much anyway. I hope you Little's like if thanks for playing, thanks for everything you've done to keep us lapping over the years if you are as talented as Billy survey, or if you're not as talented, you wanna send your original music. We're happy to have your regional music, Michael tell the people, how to do it this beautiful, isn't it? I remember being in he lived, just Nick, how across the whole, and you would hear play this anybody, like, hey, listen to this, you'd think and you just heard him create the whole thing. And it was just this is the final version of it, and it's just magnificant. How does your music by emailing jingles at Tony Kornheiser show dot com? And aren't we selling things to putting years to stop listening to jackhammers o'clock in the morning. What was that? Yeah. Right. I mean, come on. I think Garrett Morris doubt me do the news today, the haunt of hearing now think we need to see a permit. DC stuff, something stealing not stealing shaking the tree to get plums, eating them. Stick nuts. Did they not get runs money here? Eating being should not be eating plums off a tree. Come into chattering plums better. Here. We have news. If we might we do indeed Missa. Tony. We will start off with you'll watching to nationals you're back into a routine the last two. How about that? But no. I turned away. I turned away from this. Let me tell you something. Okay. I turned away from the set last night, when Feddie couldn't even get out of the third whatever whatever fourth, couldn't get out of the fourth, and Matt gray. And I hate mad grace i-it's terrible. I hate wonder swear. Oh, I think I hate everybody pretty much in the bullpen. But I, I just said, I'm not watching anymore. I wrote Chuck Todd. That's it. I'm I can't I come going over the draft. I cannot watch us because I know it's going to end badly a three nothing lead to went to three three to make some great defensive plays. Adam eaten throughout Bryce Harper play and they won the game. Because later returned a great throat. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Later in the game robots had a home run. When don't have a home run. See turn back to it. No. I did not look at it until this morning did not get to see that it was raining at the ballpark. Not at my house again for the third straight night. No rain in my house whatsoever. No, Chuck Todd took. Here's his last. Text, you missed a grace special, gene. Sa- Gora broke a one for twenty with a home run. And then you know I don't I don't trust the bullpen at all. But this is this is three in a row over a team that they're chasing. Huge Syria, rice Harper did not hurt the not hurt them. He led off last night. One oh five with three strikeouts. So we got one hit in the entire series and got thrown out at the play thrown out by Adam, even at the plate is, I would say this. That's a big deal. This series is a big deal. And now they get the Braves or the best team so far in the division. Get to see what Lanta race fans here. Can I just tell you MAC, Scherzer's statistics over the last four starts outstanding to want you wanna take shadow with man might have him but he doesn't go? I do not like. Innings thirteen hits three runs and Oneida three ERA and forty four strikeouts in twenty nine innings. So he asked Sears. Her worth the money is his ERA now in the twos or it's in the twos. It is tentative, and, and some of those stats compiled with a shiner as you said, it looked like from Muhammed lead got any broken nose. Yeah. No, he's you. You have as I knew at night. Just great. Just in just believe I had that you did did have you remember what she say. Yeah. Looks like arm fatty amount. Honestly, offend. No, no. You stick to a three nothing lead. You can't get out of the fourth month get outta here. Actually get out of here, and I would say that grace and actually please get this leave just leeann. So frustrated you broke your routine last night. I went to draft and went to the draft. But that was that you did that. Game perfetti. So you they were able to get the win around. That's exactly right to this year. And Strasbourg is tonight. I believe that he's drip now. He's, he's going to start tonight, Dallas kaikal starting tonight. I don't think so. Ready to go? He's supposed to be backed by this series right? Yeah. Maybe he has them. I wouldn't start them tonight. But Montreal has been without baseball, since the, the nationals came here for the two thousand five great stories in history, this story, but the Tempa they raise have received permission from major league baseball executive council to explore plan in which they would play home games in both Tampa Bay and Montreal. This is this is an acknowledgement of two things by baseball one that they would like to repatriate to Montreal. They've seen what happened with the Toronto. Raptors they will always feel we could we could droughts in Montreal. We've got one Canadian team Toronto. We get another Canadian team. And the second recognition is that, that Tampa Bay is a rat hole. Okay. Florida is a rat hole for. Baseball absolutism fleet miscalculation on every level that people who live there are going to go see baseball games. They don't they made a ethnishity decision in Miami that Cubans who lived in Miami because they love baseball would go to the games, and they don't, and they made a decision that Tampa that all these retirees would go to the games because they went to games elsewhere, and they don't they are. They're the two worst attended teams in baseball, and they wanna leave baseball auto tap spring training. But when Montreal had a teen nobody going, so that's right. What are they thinking? How long before teams in Las Vegas. Do you think it's so hot? Will they have to build a great doing that for football had a great dome stadium pulsating built, but it's going to be a nice eighty his Tampa's attendance, Tony just awful because they have a good team today. Very smart. People running the team, they get about thirteen thousand a game. The owners don't want to leave, but. You can't do this. You can't ask people to live in two cities and to country. Never let that happen. Very strange, these sort of close to get expenses. Where do you work? Well, I work in pampa for twenty games. And then I work in Montreal for sixty games. You can't it's Canadians. Go to the west coast of Florida where they traveled east coast. Mostly the west coast. I was under the impression was most Canadians. Go mostly the west under the plan to the razor play. They don't go to Phoenix. 'cause only people from Chicago only only mid western the raise replay, early home season games in Tampa and roars and one, they want the new outdoor stadium Tampa for the ten games remain of the few at Tampa, season-ticket you like silk road. I can watch them in April in May June June, not even. Yeah. And then they go off to children. If is exciting games in the playoff race outside reverse. Snowbird 'isms. To montreal. Congratulations to your US, women's soccer team. They win them to know of its we watch some of it take ninety nine we're here doing something else on K J pocket. Yes. Jason few speaking of tangents wasn't. It was great. Fun. Yeah. So we were watching that because it had to be our lead story yesterday. We knew that it would so Kelleher sesame. It's going to end by five o'clock. We'll be done taping. Jay Bilas, you go right into the game. And I said to him, wait a second. What about extra time? What about overtime, and he then said to me, no in this stage in the first round there is no overtime the rhino shootouts. It just ends in a tie. So I read the cyber leaf about that the United States women did what you're supposed to do. They scored early in each half and they were dominant. Right. Did you watch? No, I didn't push any of it. But I heard they scored three minutes into the game. Second. Was this. A revenge game of sorts. Swing swing knocked him out of the Olympics and leave them in the Olympics and tied him in the World Cup last time in the only tie. They had something like, didn't you tell us the other day that now they have a worse draw because they they go play Spain in the next. Well. I'm telling you, that because someone told me that evaluate the women's World Cup soccer or the men's World Cup soccer or the s I can't do that. But the word was that, yes, this was a harder draw. But if you're the best team, they'll through, that's what they're doing them through. It now get Kevin. I know you will cover this on your podcast day. And what's, what's the name of that show? Again. That would be the gut per second. Kevin Sheehan show podcast bit of a scare for US team is Alex Morgan, one of the stars of the team are. Yeah. Had little bang on her knee and had to leave in the second half met sure's out. There were the broken nose in a black suck it up. Alex, come on. As for the next game ship don't word be out there. This is the story is very confusing and very interesting at the same time cleared up now this terrifying store. This, this is actually terrifying. New research in bio mechanics. And I know you've got some great personal stories about bio mechanics, Tony personal. Just the young people. Developing horn-like spikes, at the back of this skulls bone Spurs calls, but an reading directly from the from the copy here in Washington Post, but the full tilt of the head, which ships weight from the spine to the muscles, at the back of the head, causing bone growth in the connecting tendons, ligaments, the weight transfer that causes the build up can be compared to the way that skin thickens into Callus, as response to pressure or brazen, and the result is growing horns, they're growing horns because of constant cell phone use. It's not about anything else. It's not about eating the plums in front of chattering dying. It's about old phone and looking at your phone, and they're growing. They deserves. Yeah. They deserve antelope. Specially pay attention to their parents. Because their in their phone walking down the street looking at their phone and crashing into everything. What, what is the key racier on your phone? Once on the back of your head. We on your phone rested. That get to be like some contest, there want to have Bighorn. No, no. It'll be in your. Ooh, look. Yes. That's quite fast thing, you get tattooed, or Scrimshaw or something like that. It'll be fascinating turnaround. Let me see your horns, knocked our Winnie. This is environmental. Very this is awful so off twenty years from now. I don't want the baby Buzi that one's on its head hanging. Kicking a hat. I think a baby aspirin Dale. Take care of it. Oh, it's just it's terrible. This is preventable one would yada. Yeah. All right. Did you hear about hundred? There's a love child apparently with another woman, not the one. He just marry the woman he's a woman, an Arkansas twenty eight woman by the in London, Alexis rub its he needs a bodyguard he needs somebody that travel. He said something something Jimmy Carter's brother. She filed the petition for. Beer in the in the findings of the parties were in relationship and a child by the name of and you love this baby DOE was born as a result of that relationship. The child has no name, you know that Jayme baby. Doe. Now that can't be her name. That's what it says. Can be Jane Doe. This is that's not Rene. There's a story of marijuana, Pepsi, something or other. Leila name that rod are tests Sheild. And now it's marijuana pet. See Van Dyke, that's the name. So doctor sees Dr. Marijuana event. I was watching a hot bench the other day. And it was a case about somebody suing tattoo artists for not completing that tattoo in the way that it had been promised and the tattoo artists name was Susan tattoos in. Susan tattoos. Ms, I watched hot bench and take notes. All right. Three judges one opinion. Hotheaded. We're done, and we will have old guy when we return. I'm Tony corners. You're listening to the Tony Kornheiser show. County. Oh guy radio for the day. This is Bruce Springsteen. This is the title song of the album, the response to nine eleven the rising, and we are playing this in honor of mills Lafayette's, who is sixty eight years, old today, and has a major part in this particular song in the middle. Of course, we love knows we, we love knows says local for us. We love those bullets fever. All-time great. I love Springsteen as well. And played he played with Neil young. Did you early on? I had big part of southern men. Yeah. He said out of high school. I mean you know, he's got a brother who's a lawyer, and another brother was or something like that. And those his untitled except he's worth billion dollars. Yeah. And he dropped out of high school what he wanted to do where hear. The Chevy Chase high school for most. I don't know. Wasn't to Johnson? It may been WJ. I don't think you're right. But how did he do? Did he have a good career? Thank he's done. Pretty often and incredibly nice guy went to see a show. He was on this years ago. I went to see show and chat with them and just the nicest blow Kevin can I mention just one thing before we go into, and I don't really have anything to talk about with Ovalles, all that more soccer no street, construction. Brunson Bruno leading the travelers wasn't gonna mention that, we're, we're we. We're not sure if we're happy petty, no winning Rieger. Regan. Yesterday, just about to say when Rieger was so Michael, what did you think? Rica, electrified just, you know you don't want not not every week every month. Johnson Johnson once or twice a year comes on the shelf. And she's fabulous beyond always. Right. So there's a special section in the Washington Post today called the candidates to familiarize you with democratic candidates because the debate starts tonight. No next week next week. Is that one okay Wednesday? In the democrat their people, I've heard of them. But there was so might actually never heard of I made a list, Michael Bennett. I'd heard because Chuck Todd talk matching, but I would not have known Michael Bennet from Colorado. Steve Bullock, the Montana governor, I would not have known if you said who's the governor of Montana, I might have said Jon tester because I knew he was elected to something in Montana, or Maury Povich, because he has a healthy one didn't make the cut for the debatable can John Delaney has been running for president for three or four years out of an office in your, he's a one term congress. He was my congress. Former one term congressman running for president around the we know him but around the country, nobody has any idea who he is. Tolsey gabar. Oh, sure. Yeah. She's, she's I can't. Doesn't so much media congresswoman from Hawaii moderate. We have former military, okay? John Hickenlooper tractive to John Hickenlooper, yet from out, west Colorado, Colorado, governor. Did you? You knew that. Yeah. Wow. Jay inslee. I. You didn't make the debate know him that's is the governor is not the is league brother president to see ends Ensley brothers did a different person. He picked last night, by the timber wolves washing opener, Wayne mess him, Wayne mess him know him the mayor of Miramar, Florida. Did you know he was running no way Asom? Now Tim Ryan. Yes. I knew he's still CBS great broadcaster, the congressman from Ohio. Eric swale. Well, the guy that's been all over Trump. Yeah, yeah, the congress. Congress. No. He's a big talking from California and two young. We know about only because we had said at one point, Andrew Yang. So we know about him Marianne Williamson not idea, Marianne Williamson, kind of new age, Jan Age. Yeah. She's an awesome. Yeah. How how to man after after she gets the politics and prose primary well how years, enter right now. You have more name recognition than any of those people, then many, it's just a win is one of these debates, I think next Wednesday six pm. Don't have any of it. Some. You wanna talk about me. Yeah. Yeah, a lot of things, but they're not going to interest, you know, I'm fascinated by the group. You have out here. This is an incredible. That's that's grown. I know Terry credit. I just think it's very interesting that you're not gonna be around for all the festivities this weekend. And I think that's happened before, hasn't it. Yes. But it but it also happened that I had been around and I've gone. So I so Nigel will be out there with everybody tomorrow, right? Oh, yes. Not to go to Calvin Woodley. And then I'll be jingle Inc. Any Jerry integral asked if I drive the tour bus next year, and I said, I would. Commercial driver's. I can do that quite won't have handle air brakes, as a commercial driver's wide had one. Yeah. I was gonna say that valid to drive the toaster buses for the prep school. My drove a good humor truck when I was fourteen years old. Did you rip just talk my way? Anyway, wait when you were fourteen. Yeah. Had a car and drove a good humor Trump. How did you do? Might explain the call while the car we purchased for ten dollars. It was seventy two Pontiac Catalina, those good car, and in a battery, so we had to borrow fifty bucks from Colin Gillespie to go by the batteries. You have to six dollars at Sears put the battery and we had it for the entire summer went to memorial stadium a couple of times went down to the. No. Of course, fourteen years old license everywhere this was a much better time easier time. You didn't get trouble ladies at someone we had to park it in little falls mall, every night, which is actually over where I live now. And, and my friend, Mike would drop it off there. And late in the summer, he dropped us all off at our houses. And my father and mother would say, who is that we just got hit hitchhike back then hitchhiking everywhere. Safe it was safe now. And he got he got pulled over after dropping off one night late summer was he doing anything wrong? Well the actual. Of the poor. We would have to hold up from caving in. And I think a police officer one of Montgomery county's finest saw this pulled him over and he didn't get his driver's license until he was eighteen we did. And we drove him around from sixteen eighty. Affair that you were driving. They know all the stories now back, then they didn't really know what was going actually drive an ice cream truck, I did for about a week until they found out that I wasn't eligible that I wasn't old enough to be driving. Did you scream? Actually, I think we ate, most of the Brompton throve it around the neighborhoods, friends lived, and we all scream. You have to get the ice cream stocked, every morning, didn't they have to stop that there was one stocking Tony, and then it was like a week later, and I had to give the truck, I was asked to give up the truck after they've found out ransom, sort of checker. Whatever that point, your parents, get invading their son. They didn't they didn't now the Gulf cart that we had that we stole from Kenwood country. That was. Three fires that when we got caught on and gotten a little bit of trouble for, but my friend driving, my friend, Mike. And I used it to, to deliver our papers. I had a post route and I had a Washington star around simultaneous have been easy, and we know the Gulf carpets much easier in, we had the glitter charge. It overnight, you know what Tony we had that one for about three or four days. And then the charge ran out at Talbert s- on ripple. Here. We partnered, we had gotten there early in the morning after delivering papers to go in and get some candy breakfast or whatever. And what did you? So that conveniently that's only three blocks from Kennewick. Well, that's why we got in trouble. So somebody came somebody said, and it was kids that pulled in with the did, it have ten would in simple of our parents friends drove bias like as we are on the Gulf. But on river road, driving the Carter. This highway two three lanes. All of it. Now, if your children had John this found out about it. What would you think it would be different today? I would get legitimate Trump and they wouldn't get into any college. That would say. Anyway. So, yeah, Harvey would rescind your acceptance bay. They might. So could they know? They all know him now. Yeah. But they need my father, I think pretty much knew what was going on. But he's just, you know, so I was I was driving. This is. I'm gonna ask you advice on this. I was driving to work yesterday. I was making a left onto n street in that I'm driving down. Eighteenth street on making a left onto an I'm gonna make a right onto seventeenth. I'm gonna go to an and make a right on 'em. And go into my garage at the ABC news. Bill. The end streets circumstance most of the time there is no traffic going north because the north goes on. Connecticut avenue doesn't take this small little Spurs straight up doesn't most of the time. But yesterday, and I wait patiently I'm making a left most people make rights and get onto Connecticut avenue. I'm making a left the light is green. My signal is on. I'm halfway into the intersection, I have to pay attention because for reasons, unknown to me the walkway signal is always you can walk all his ways. Have always one hundred percent of the time. To the Tabart in block. Yes. Okay. To the timbre in block, there's like, you know, gyro stands on by corners and pedestrians always have the right away and pedestrians by the way, pay. No attention. And they're on their phones torn. So so because I'm in a car, I don't want to kill anyone. I don't wanna hit anyone. Yes. Sometimes I do, but purposes of this had Wadi podcast. I don't pedestrians. Your bikers. Pedestrian. Well, we're going to get to that part of the coming north. I am halfway in, I am negotiating this turn. I am only waiting a little bit so that the pedestrian traffic and clears and I'm going, by the way when I make the turn. I'm going to go five miles an hour came street. If I'm going, five miles, narrow street with construction, and some guy in a scooter who thinks he owns the world comes flying up paying, no attention headphones. Yes, Anisa suit a suit and headphones at his truce's me, purses me out, because because I was making the left turn, and I did not I'm halfway in, and I did not give him in his scooter going twelve miles an hour, the right away the street and the sidewalk on the street. He's on the street. And, and I, I don't actually react. But I I'm. Learning about this, 'cause I'm come on. I'm not like you get it was. I I don't know that I had the right away because he's coming north. And I'm turning say community. Yes, he seeming he's seen me for three hundred feet, right? He's going twelve miles an hour. I'm pretty sure he had the right away probably did. But in just a little bit aggressive in gotten in front of them, and they don't like I, I, I did I turned in front of. So you did turn. I thought your way in its. Turn. I was just waiting for the last pedestrian Hannah magin that you would that it was your fault in that particular nothing happened, except except he was how far away was he like, was it possible. He was gonna T-Bone you on that scooter hurt him a lot. He but he was being he was being Jesse. Sesa Bley, aggressive are extremely chesty. They, they like to sort of like show boat on the scooter, get after scooter nation, I will tell you off signs that nothing on stop at any and it does tickle me when they fall off. It does. Because they end up being stick it out of the road. They tried to get onto the sidewalk and they fall off dress not be on the side. I've had them comparing. Yes. Yes. You're either in the road or you're not in the role in the intersection. You know where edible arrangements is on where the tiny jewel box is we're books. So there's like at that point on 'em streak. Hamlin going right Camelot's down the nightspot just want to know. That particular intersection, there's a sort of complicated. It is sidewalk in the middle of the road. They hit the bump, and they fly over all time and you don't wear helmets. What can I tell you? Sorry. I'm very sorry. And they are scattered. I mean they fly off the off the scooter, those scooters owned. Are they rented? I think you rent the rent yet. Yeah. A few of them catch fire in the last couple of day this store. Like, made Santa's vaping on them and a catch. That they're pulling them off the street temporarily because fires because they're catching fires. While they're charge retro great. If this guy in his suit just went up in flames. Joe's Nebi peeps. No, it's one thing. It's one thing to worry about people walking to worry about people on bicycle that you just, just Ed to all the things you have to worry about constantly as they avenged, invent new forms of transplant. Derive anymore. No scooter. That's why that's why New York City metro ups to enter New York City. They want your cars then want, you know, sad day. It's it is hashtag sad. We'll take a break, we'll come back with tingles E mail. I'm Tony Kornheiser. You'll listening to the Tony Kornheiser show. Pesto tries to. License without. He is. That he's healthy. Then. Stay in seven this. Bye. Great spot. Want to break the rules, go back to those. Nine he knows. Lyrics and the vocals by kill great. Oh. Version of somewhere over the wings. Yes. Let me thank in haunted for coming on the show today. Let me thank today. Sponsors me on these nets. Sweet. Remember to listen and subscribe to an archived episodes, Tony Kornheiser show wherever you listen to podcasts, including apple podcast, Spotify, Google play radio dot com. If you listen to show tunes, please leave us a review. Listen to Kevin's podcast, as well which is available on, Kevin. She and as you get your podcast and come to my art challenge, I v to twenty seven from Sheffield and want to on New York home of Jones beach. And yes, you already knew that doing conversation if you can call it that about the women's World Cup and sock of general. You actually have me thinking, whereas solicit, when you need him. Congratulations universe. You win from Greg 'em in Dallas in the open Thursday show when I heard Mr Tony utter the unfortunate phrase, and now my fingers are going wild with Todd. I had to double check which if my podcast I was listening to phrasing, Dr Hoff phrasing from Steve, the sycophant after listening to Wendy story of disaster date. I can only say even though I. Do not have a helicopter. I will be ecstatically happy to take her out and not ask her to do anything for me, including rubbing my belly. I however will provide with all the fried broccoli. She wants and gladly rub with. She wants or not it's hard. From John Virginia Ghazni. This is joyful tale. About a man me who is blessed by the woman, he is related to by marriage on this day thirty second anniversary. If you're here, John Virginia say Hello. She was willing to drive four and a half hours from our home to a breakfast date, and watch a ball Ange man recorded podcast. So we will be here chatter on Friday as a way to celebrate the day we commemorate our nuptials let Michael no. We're coming from williamsport Pennsylvania, where it's raining. It's always raining these days. Thank you for years of entertainment, laughter, and happiness. Enjoy the beach in your summer break from Steve Sigourney, Big Sky, Montana, I'm guessing the nets will lead on the reluctant Friday show. But shortly after that, I think is important to mention Bronson goon leading the travelers Bronson goon that we did not see in the open, and we did not see in a masters, and we did not see in the PGA all in this week, Bronson goon is in Hartford, or Cromwell, Connecticut. I think it is officially and is leading matches. He was briefly are most scorn golfer, then briefly our favorite golfer now. Now where do we stand on Brunson? Brazil, our favorite golfer and walkers now practicing his to hand grip. So he's ready to take from Joe. Lean won't chicken Nebraska, thank you so much for having the fabulous Wendy Rieger on yesterday. She's the light. And I knew we had some things in common. I two on the Kito diet and actually crave fried Brussels'spouts sprouts, and just like Wendy there's no belly rubbing at our house. I'm so sad to miss jingle fest weakened, and the chance to join you chatter. I did call the full service for profit, shattered yesterday morning, reach an extremely nice gallon phone, I told her I wanted to buy the two newlyweds in the house couple of free drinks to toast their nuptials. And that's Robin, Jamie and fulfilled. My request immediately. So thank you for the great customer service weddings chatter. This could become a thing from build key Stor or Kaiser in Kensington. I have not always understood what was what was about when Rieger that made you and the other men of your generation like my late father, drooling, stammered, her mere mention, but after listening to her on your show during his last few years, I'm starting to understand. She has tornado wrapped in a hurricane surrounded by title. One moment, she is sitting silently, I imagined buffing her nails while you Joan on about the NBA draft in the nets are only contribution being Jay Bilas, Ana then a segment starting was about that. What is your favorite appetizer? And do you like super segment topic that I was pulled directly out of an English side brochure? We somehow get to a date ending in a grown man asking for belly rub. It was hard to think she could match the kicking out of a windshield story, but she brought it. She's the Robert ory of this show. She doesn't need to ball much, but give a couple of shots in the last two minutes, and floods big. That is a great upgrade Email nails the Sean in Saint John's. I guess, Newfoundland this is from Newfoundland before the women. I'm related to by marriage moved us to New England. Yes. I was a frequent user of the bay bridge, this Friday, will, I will once again be crossing said bridges, I will be visiting my in laws on the shore. I need to know if there are any new billboards, I have to check out along route fifty no but there's, there's a there's certainly a build up of commerce. Once you cross the bridge, a large buildup of commerce, Mike from Berkeley. Virginia not that we needed more reasons to adore America's sweetheart Wendy, kick out the windshield rigor. But now she's a bourbon drinker, women who drink bourbon are the best from Ryan sweetening Columbus. Ohio Wendy, so many, great, Wendy Rianne when you're says, if she would be hired as an assassin to just shoot everyone at the table. And go that's great. And from Q low in Atlanta now in Arlington. I don't have a Subaru, but might Prius hit a Pailin drama, eighty nine thousand nine hundred ninety eight miles as I celebrated one year in the DC area. It's been surreal to experience things that hitherto only heard about like the traffic on Connecticut avenue, inexplicable redlined delays in my own personal David Aldridge moments will be on Harrison Wendy Rieger. I'd like to thank you, mentally, preparing me to live here and hope you continue to share your wisdom, and outrage for many years to come. That's great. If you're out on your bike time, everyone is always do wear white. Whereas, where's the hammer is go up on the floor? Somebody go stock the hammering stop the hammering. Sandstone. Into sweaty. Squid. Turns. Let us thinking. Can you? So. Via busted. How? How? How can you? Okay. How? Pre. Kiss me the morning, wake me saw. Dress me, then your autumn he. Genoa whisper shake Smith. Dream. Would it seems when you. Heels away. Singing. Armony. Bye. Named my. Word tell you. No tomorrow. Rang and sorrow would use spe. She will born blessing. On a Dan. Dan fan the night searching down back then. Zone. On on. So. They run in. Woke up this morning fell down on my knee sin. Please cement. Semen legs. They to Rome, weary head it to rose tired this, my hands up to the sky and see. Although. Arm. Running my. A ni. Ooh running through my so.

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