19 Burst results for "Brian Stevens"

"brian stevens" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:10 min | 6 months ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on KOMO

"Loaded, and then we're gonna go deliver to our other three hospital sites Northwest, Harborview and Valley. Healthcare workers will be the first to get the vaccine in the coming weeks. People over 65, those with health conditions will start getting it as well. Hospitals around the state are getting the vaccine shipments starting this week. Next session of the state Legislature is just four weeks away and combos Charlie Harder tells us the governor is out with a set of proposals meant to eliminate racial disparity. There are more than 15 policy proposals, Governor Jay Inslee says will improve equity in the state among the proposals, creating an office that reviews police use of force, increasing the number of minority contractors on state projects. And establishing June teeth as a state holiday. The state House and Senate will consider these proposals starting in early January. Charlie Harder come on news restaurants everywhere, struggling through the pandemic, and that's inspired some in Olympia to come together to help others in the industry. Here's call most to remarry. Owners of Olympia Oyster House, put up a giving tree every holiday to help families in need. But this year, the trees for employees from other restaurants who've been laid off or had their hours cut part of the oyster House is great restaurant. Option challenge, general manager Mike Hernandez told the News Tribune. The tree is to honor their late owner Patrick Kanoute's in who died in October. It's not that were in a great position financially, but we're able to keep our doors open our lights on and Keep our employees working, and that is the best position you could be in in this economy. Some of the other restaurants with giving trees that are collecting gifts until December. 19th include Cafe Ole Espresso and Nicole's Bar in Olympia. To Romero Camo News, Seattle's pier 57 is reopened here, which includes miners landing in the great wheel had been closed after damage and demolition to nearby pier 58. Enough of the demolition has occurred. Of the southern portion of Pier 58 that the imminent threat that that pose during demolition no longer exists. Brian Stevens, with the city's Department of construction and Inspection, says Pier 57 had been closed since September as a precaution, but it can now reopened to the public. Jeff Pooja look, come on News. It's 3 34 and combo traffic.

Charlie Harder Olympia Olympia Oyster House Governor Jay Inslee Legislature oyster House Harborview Department of construction and Brian Stevens Cafe Ole Espresso News Tribune Jeff Pooja Mike Hernandez House Patrick Kanoute general manager Romero Seattle Senate
"brian stevens" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Next category we're looking at is outstanding documentary the nominees include Miles Davis birth of cool the Apollo Toni Morrison the pieces I am true justice Brian Stevens fight for equality and the black godfather directed by our next guest Reginald Hudlin it's about the music executive who helped bill withers and Janet Jackson break through he wrangled Hank Aaron sponsorship deals with coca Cola he learned NFL player Jim Brown to the silver screen he's PD called when he got in trouble he has Barack Obama and Kamel Harris in his rolodex his name is Clarence avant and in the entertainment business he's known as the black godfather Reginald Hudlin whose produced films like Django Unchained and the Academy Awards he's also directed Marshall and house party he profile of art for documentary he interviewed nearly seventy five people from Quincy Jones to Bill Clinton all of whom can claim that Yvonne had a profound impact on their careers and their personal lives and of course husband speaks with the legend himself Reggie Hudlin join us last summer to talk about it so when I when people ask you a question why is Clarence a lot important why is he well the fact that you don't know who he is but he's been responsible for most of the biggest pop cultural events in the last fifty years it is global how is that possible that this guy is so influential but I don't know who he is and that you know I'm a well read person well that should make you go well that's a very powerful person that he knows that many famous people does not want to be famous but continues to shape popular culture why doesn't he want to be famous why didn't he want to be famous I think you learn very early on from the his mentors who were well I had one of his mentors were trapped Capone and to quote the great KRS one real bad boys move in silence and I think he took that to heart and his life story is is amazing he's from a climax North Carolina like I I Google things to do in climax North Carolina like merry's goat farm came up that was it like there's nothing going on and climax North Carolina he's born nineteen thirty one dash yeah one of eight children how would you describe his upbringing as they say sure cropping is not technically slavery but slavery right so it's it's a town where his mother said well if you're walking and you hear a truck approaching just run into the woods and lay flat so they won't see you because the presumption ads at any given time you will be a target like wildlife and they will kill you mmhm so end he had a stepfather who would physically beat his mother so it didn't matter inside the house at some of the house it was he it was a hostile violent environment and at thirteen he said I am going to do something about it and put rat poison his stepfather's food his little brother told his dad I would need that which meant he had to leave now most people who look for that be a set back you're kicked out of the house instead he got a train for the first time as life all went to summit New Jersey and his life transformed he started out in the music business yes he was managing a night club than he was spotted by Joe glazier ran a company called associated booking which had seven five percent of all the black entertainment acts in America from Louie Armstrong Duke Ellington Billie Holiday everybody and is that you've got an ability and we're going to cite you some people I don't want to do that well you're going to do it and he ended up managing black white or otherwise some of the biggest acts of that era and in the big city to Los Angeles where he really flourished one of things really get about Clarence a lot in this in the documentary is his fearlessness yes his ability to walk into any room speak his mind yes and make his points what was behind that fearlessness I think the same courage that made him say I need to kill my stepfather I mean you know I'm a sense of like I don't have any resources I don't have any contacts but I'm going to figure this out and I don't see any reason why I shouldn't as for as much as I can and I is easy for me to back down from there it and he so we have a strong sense of justice he got told sort of the matrix see kind of like this is how the world really works from Joe glazier and no matter what room he ascended to as he went higher and higher up the corporate food chain he always rose to the occasion while maintaining his values which is a pretty rare combination my guest is Reggie had them we're talking about his new film the black godfather which is about Clarence gave out one of the most significant men in the music industry and Hollywood specially in in the in the black entertainment industry that people don't know about him it's amazing in a document he's so funny he some such a certain era of us what he doesn't really want to talk to you then he's gonna talk to you about about stuff and he comes back this current refrain of it's all about the numbers it's all about the numbers any sort of suggesting it's all about the money but it really isn't only about the money for him when you really at the end of the day after all of these interviews is spending so much time with them when you think about yes but the money what else is it about well I mean it is about the money in that he wants measurable growth right and he looked around and says look there's a whole bunch of people who are creating value and they're not getting what they deserve for it so I'm going to fight for people to get their fair payment for the for the for the value that they create I mean he's fine for economic parity which is still the front lines of the battlefield me as the woman's the secretary right so he fought for that for black people for anybody and the second thing is he understood that he said look added March you know because if someone hits me I'll hit back I'm not the non violent got but the fact is he had a unique battlefield which is the border and whether it was going to coca Cola and you know getting Hank Aaron the biggest endorsement deal that any athlete ever have the time at a time were Hey it was about to break Babe Ruth's record not only not getting an endorsement offers but getting death threats a by the back full every day so his okay here's unfairness and I'm going to make it right which she did and you know it was great for Hank does but great for coca Cola it was great for America and that's that's him all day every day my guess is Reggie Hudlin we're talking about his new documentary the black godfather which is all about Clarence Avon he got involved with politics and this is a great clip we have of the first time Andrew young and counter Clarence a lot and the sort of figured out what he could do for him let's take a listen all the religions known I really didn't know him so I called and we call up in these to you and the young I said yeah these are you running for Congress as India he's a in Georgia for the he's a are you crazy other well I don't know but program he said well if you crazy enough to run I'm brave enough to try to help you.

Toni Morrison Reginald Hudlin executive bill withers Miles Davis Brian Stevens Janet Jackson Hank Aaron
"brian stevens" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"From the KFI twenty four hour news from a person's been heard an officer involved shooting in south LA happen near eighty six street and Broadway Ellie piece as a school police officer was involved the roof of a casino in Gardena has collapsed hurting almost a dozen people LA county fire department says all the injuries but one are minor the building's been red tagged county fire inspector Brian Stevens says it's unknown how long it'll take to make the necessary repairs obviously there's significant damage and that needs to be addressed as well as the rest of property disobedience say before I can go ahead and operate again Stevens's roof collapse poses a special security challenge because of all the money stored at the casino I mean drove his car into a crowd of protesters in Charlottesville Virginia killing a woman has again been sentenced to life in prison he also got an additional four hundred nineteen years since on state charges for the attack almost two years ago he was since the like last month on federal hate crime charges the crowd he plowed into was protesting a white nationalist rally excavators in a rocket seriously they found three hundred thirteen bodies of men women and children who apparently died under ISIS rule mass grave was discovered last month it's still being emptied local leader says nearly five thousand bodies been dug up in the area since isis was removed from rocket in twenty seventeen and people have been protesting the scheduled start of a project to build a massive telescope on a site considered sacred by some native Hawaiians protesters have tied themselves together with rope to block a road to the top of Weiss tallest mountain with the telescope's expected to be built at a cost of one point four billion dollars check in a crash in studio city if the northbound side of the one oh one at coldwater canyon you ever saw the car spin out people side ways in the right lane C. age please on scene little bunch appears coming off a laurel canyon Boulevard south LA we have construction for you to contend with northbound one ten Vernon up to exposition it's the express lanes and left lanes of the main line shut down that's gonna go as late as five your bunch up starts coming out the fifty first street leads up to Inglewood stop on four or five just past century conquered S. U. V. in the far right lane there any fountain valley but the full freeway closures northbound side of the four oh five all lanes closed at Warner Avenue for cal trans project to get everybody off there till five you get back on at magnolia KFI in the sky helps get you there faster I'm wrong inducted clear cool out there to the morning around six degrees sunny and hot again tomorrow mid seventies at the beach is mid eighties to mid nineties inland and then also get a little cooler.

KFI four hundred nineteen years four billion dollars twenty four hour six degrees two years
"brian stevens" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Fire inspector Brian Stevens says it's unknown how long it will take to make the necessary repairs obviously there's significant damage and that needs to be addressed as well as the rest of property expedient say before can go ahead and operate again Stephen says the roof collapsed poses a special security challenge because of all the money stored at the casino more than sixty current border patrol employees are under investigation for being part of an immigrant bashing Facebook group the social media club reportedly mocked immigrants and some democratic lawmakers U. S. customs and border protection says eight former employees are also under investigation the post included doctored images of Congress woman Alexandria Ocasio Cortez in an apparent sex act messages also showed complete apathy for a teen who died in border patrol custody the agency says it's working with Facebook to get a full archive of this secret group it will decide later whether anyone will be fired or punished antrum only back KFI news the valleys last orange Grove could be squeezed out the fourteen acre property in Woodland Hills south of inter Boulevard is up for sale for fourteen million dollars neighbors say they would really miss the orange Grove it makes me feel like I'm in country a little bit and this is why we moved here I used to live in a gated community which was a cookie cutter neighbors say they're expecting the orange Grove to be turned into a new housing development a man has been arrested in grease for the murder of an American scientist ABC's Matt me Gary this is an eating was last seen on the island of Crete almost two weeks ago according to a police source who spoke to ABC news on condition of not being named the suspect confessed to the murder and claimed that he intentionally hit even with his car Eaton who was a molecular biologist was on creek to go to a conference or body was found six days after she disappeared it was in a tunnel used as a storage site during World War two the ACLU was promised a lawsuit over the trump administration's decision to and asylum protections for most migrants to arrive at the U. S. Mexican border Mexico border the new rule published the Federal Register says asylum seekers who passed through another country first will be ineligible for asylum at the U. S. southern border there are some exceptions including for people caught up in human trafficking and asylum seekers who were denied protection in a country we have a crash.

Eaton U. S. Mexican border Mexico ABC KFI Congress ACLU Brian Stevens Gary scientist murder Woodland Hills orange Grove Facebook Alexandria Ocasio Cortez Stephen fourteen million dollars
"brian stevens" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:43 min | 2 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Called true true justice brian stevens fight for equality true justice when you think about true justice what does that look like it looks radically different than what we're seeing today i don't think we have true justice when we have the world's highest rate of incarceration we have too much wealth too many resources too many possibilities for helping people in this country to be the most punitive society on the planet i think true justice means getting past this contrived view of drug addiction and drug dependency we said that people who are addicted and dependent are criminals when we should have said people with addiction independently have a health problem we need our healthcare system to respond to that problem i think true justice means that we don't put people in jails or prisons if they're not a threat to public safety and there are hundreds of thousands of people in our jails in prisons who are not a threat to public safety i think true justice means committing ourselves to rehabilitation and helping people recover it's about how we protect the health of a community how we improve public safety by doing more things for people who are victims of crime but also doing more things to help people never re-offend i think true justice means changing the way we talk about mental health in one of my new campaigns is really about what we're doing to people with severe disabilities we enforce the americans with disabilities act and the private sector and the public sector but not in the justice sector because of mandatory sentencing judges can't consider someone severe mental illness when they have to impose a punishment and i think it's unusual to care about people with disabilities in the private and public sector but not the justice sector and it's cruel to condemn someone two decades of imprisonment because they are disabled and so that needs to change that's what we're challenging the constitutionality of those kinds of sentences and i think to justice would just get us all closer to creating an environment where we are Actually reduce crime by improving health. And I don't think that's where we are in this country when you're in law school at Harvard. did they talk about these issues did you learn about these issues and ways to approach these issues not really i was in law school in the early eighties it was before the advent of clinical legal education and to be honest i was really frustrated in my first law school i went because i was concerned about racial inequality concerned about social injustice and it didn't seem like anybody was talking about that and actually left my first year and went to the school of government to pursue a degree in public policy didn't find that very affirming either just seem like we were being taught to maximize benefits and minimize costs but it didn't seem to matter who's got maximize who's caused minimize then i went back to the law school and what turned things around for me was actually taking an internship where i spent a month with a human rights organization providing legal services to people on death row that's where i met people literally dying for legal assistance and it was puck seventy two the condemn that began to radicalize my thinking about the law and i felt this desire to help condemned people get to something that felt more like justice and that's what radicalized law study for me when i got back you couldn't get me out of the law school library i needed to know everything about comedy and federalism and all of the doctrine that was going to be necessary to help condemned people and it's why i think clinical legal education the movement that is shaped education more recently where students are required to get proximate to to the poor to the excluded are required to learn about the dynamics and structures and systems that deny so many people access to justice is such a critically Important innovation in law school education. I'm wondering, because once you get out of law school, and you decide, okay, this is going to be my life's work. How and when did you decide this issue needs to be approached differently? when did you realize they're dippy a different approach because there were people who were concerned about it but necessarily weren't getting the results that they wanted or that you want yeah i it began early i worked on a case called mcklusky versus camp which was a united states court case where the court was being asked to strike down the death penalty because of racial bias and if some very powerful data in that case that established that you're eleven times more likely to get the death penalty if the victim is widen if the victim is black twenty two times more likely if the defendants black the victim is white and despite that the u._s. supreme court upheld georgia's death penalty by saying two things the first thing they said was if we deal with these racial disparities in the death penalty context we're going to have to deal with racial disparities in other areas we're gonna have to talk about this and the burglary setting the drug setting and misdemeanor setting and the courts that's too much for us to deal with and justice brennan wrote this heartbreaking descent where he ridiculed the court analysis as quote a fear of too much justice and he was right the court was essentially saying this problem is too big for us but it was the second thing the courts that started to really move me away and the court said certain amount of bias of certain level of racial inequality is quote inevitable and this doctrine of inevitability was radically at odds with what the court set in brown versus word of education it's a big truck and i realized that that was a loss of commitment to eliminating buys and discrimination and i've always been motivated by what the court has on the outside it has equal justice under law and i couldn't reconcile a commitment to equal justice onto law with this doctrine of inevitability and we kept fighting we kept fighting continued to do the work but it began to grow into this consciousness that things were going to have to change we we're going to have to talk differently about history and justice even to get the institutions of justice to do with they're supposed to do my guest is bryan stevenson the name of the documentaries true justice brian stevenson's fight for equality who came to you and said let's let's make documentaries and why did you say yes i know why you want to see us because the bigger picture but and when you said yes what were your conditions you know that's a great question i've been really reluctant to be a part of these kinds of things i really prefer just kind of being with clients doing the work but i guess i was growing increasingly frustrated that we weren't seeing the kind of storytelling that i think we need to see i worked with eva do for nay on thirteenth and was really inspired by the impact of that project it made me kind of think more openly about what we can do with film and the and the success of the book also got me thinking differently than i had thought previously and my only condition was that we i didn't want to put any of my clients at risk until we were going to have to tell the story in a way that didn't expose people in ways with they would be targets for retribution or people got angry they would be challenged and and you know we we opened up these new sites and so i did realize we're going to have to talk more broadly and and the folks were great jackie oliver who is the executive producer had made some film on slavery and that was really impressed with that and she introduced me to the coon hearts and trey alice with somebody we were working with on a short film and so i felt comfortable with the folks and that's how this that's how this happened we'll have more with bryan stevenson after quick break.

brian stevens school of government Harvard.
"brian stevens" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"Thank you for listening. And I hope you enjoy this Nick VO in Kevin Johnson. It's lovely Laura, Nick stuff. Yes. That's always good. Just lovely and Hornets joins us. Now, you wanna you wanna plug the af docs before you do reviews. You wanna do it the other way whatever you want. Gee, I don't care, I left do both. Yes. I- docs, it's on. I'm on my way down there for today and tomorrow and Sunday. It's going to be a lot of fun. Where is that? So if people wanna go, it's mostly at landmark e street, they, they are showing movies at the naval memorial and, and the American history museum. But I just people just go to ASI dot com af I dock, and then get the schedule and download the app and see what's up, but they've got some really good movies this year. So this is three days Friday, Saturday, Sunday. Well actually started Wednesday night that screening national archives. A movie about Bryan Stevenson to the lawyer and activists and it was going on yesterday. But I'm going to dive in, in, in earnest today, last lawyer and activist I knew was William kuntsler. I've never heard of Brian Stevens Bryant has an incredible man. He's, he's the person who really spearheaded the I don't know the formal name it's base. The lynching museum in Montgomery, Alabama, which is just it looks like magnificent structure. And he's been doing a lot of important work around death penalty issues and just rest of Justice and reparation. He's, he's an amazing man. I think he's got the highest rated Ted talk like the longest standing ovation and Ted talk history. Visionary, man. Wow. Ted talk. Listen to as Leonsis. He's got a Ted talk blog. Teaser walking Ted. Let's start with some movies. There's a bunch of movies. We wanna talk for movies one is, and this is not for me. I understand Toy Story, four is not for me. But if you get to four you presume that one two and three did pretty some money or you wouldn't be doing four and two kids movie. Some are kids movie animated. I'm sure how is it? You know, I went in, I don't know if you've noticed every Friday this summer, we're just getting sequels is just the summer of the sequels on that always makes me feel tired and kind of defensive because a lot of them aren't very good. And especially when you get to number four, they're not very they tend to not be very good. So I went in with this to this with managed expectations, and I just thought it was fantastic. That's yeah, it's, it's, it's, you know, for those of us, I can't say, I grew up with Toy Story, but I can relate to people who up onto a story. So it's got all those the favorite characters. Tom Hanks character Woody and Bud Light year voice by Tim Allen, they're here. So it's got that whole enough Daljit factor. That's fine. But they don't just coast on that. And they actually introduce new characters one played by Tony HALE the guy from veep. Yes. Love. Wasn't actor and he doesn't terrific voice performances crazy. Very eccentric. Little character called forty a little toy made out of a sport..

William kuntsler Ted Nick VO American history museum Hornets Bryan Stevenson Tony HALE Brian Stevens Bryant Nick stuff ASI Laura Gee Montgomery Alabama Kevin Johnson Tom Hanks Leonsis Tim Allen Woody three days
Hollywood Dream Machines exhibit explores sci-fi vehicles used on screen

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:33 min | 2 years ago

Hollywood Dream Machines exhibit explores sci-fi vehicles used on screen

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by the Michigan economic Development Corporation, John Rimini, founder and CEO at airspace. Experienced technology says in Michigan revolution is in the air. Find out what planet is doing to help businesses make that possible at planet m dot com. That's P. L. A. N. E T, M dot com. To solve the scourge of the car. Maybe we have to go back back to the future from American public media. This is marketplace. Tech demystifying the digital economy, I'm Jack Stewart info. Molly would. The future of causes always exciting and always just around the corner. Things like self driving cars have been five years away, for I'd say about forty years now, but there are times when pure imagination is exactly what's needed when vehicles have to be as out there as possible nearly incredible. 'cause or a big part of science fiction TV shows and movies. They're often characters themselves, and someone has to make them I went to see some of the creations of writers directors and designers at a new exhibition at the Petersen automotive museum in Los Angeles. It's called Hollywood dream machines. And there cause from Mad Max Bladerunner and the classic Star Wars amongst others. Brian Stevens is exhibition director at the museum, and he started by explaining how a car designer works with a filmmaker in the use of vehicles in Hollywood productions. There are a number of scenarios, one of, which is the need to design a car from scratch to fulfill the vision of the producers of the directors of the film, in many. Cases though. There are pre existing cars that do just that and there's no need to design a car from scratch, and when it came time to create back to the future just so happened, that this very exotic wild stainless steel bodied car existed. In fact, was very much in the public eye. Do some lawsuits at the time which which made it a perfect option for this particular use in this particular film. Doc. Are you telling me that you built a time machine? The way I see it if you're going to build a time machine into a car, why not do it from style now that we are up close, I can see. There are a lot of wires zip ties parts that look almost unfinished. Yes. Which is deliberate in this case, the producers and directors of the film didn't want something polished, they wanted something that looked like it was handmade in a garage. So you worked with designers of some of these actually put this exhibit together. How important, did they say it is to be accurate as opposed to just be entertaining when the coming up with these visions of the future. I think it's a combination of both if you're projecting fifty years in the future. I think accuracy is, is going to be difficult to achieve, regardless of what you what you propose, but they certainly do want some level of realism when you start getting into science fiction films as opposed to Pierce to pure fantasy films. You do want there to be an element of science basis, you want there to be something that seems even somewhat. Ause -able about what you're predicting. So you have kit here, for example, from Knight rider from what the voice of industry thousands microprocessor K IT for easy reference. A can't. If you prefer, do you think that, that was fully autonomous long before most of us had heard of even the concept of self driving, 'cause it's a 'cause like that an inspiration to real engineers and real designers, I think there's no question that when today's designers were children, watching these television shows in these movies that they are even potentially subconsciously gaining inspiration from what they see. And that's probably part of why we see some of the technologies that are shown in these vehicles. Eventually become real Brian Stevens, taking us on a semi nostalgic semi futuristic, look at the cause of Hollywood at the Petersen automotive museum in Los Angeles, fun facts. I learned from him in the early drafts of the back to the future. Script the time machine wasn't built into a cholera toll. It was built into refrigerator. I'm not sure I would have enjoyed the movie. Quite as much. And now for some related links. Check out the exhibition website if you want some inspiration for movies have been Joan this holiday. I'd forgotten how much I enjoyed some of them the Audi r s q concept from I robot made me want to watch that all over again. And I will be streaming the original Bladerunner as well as twenty four thousand nine to see that vision of Los Angeles with spinners in the dark and rainy skies in terms of making these sci-fi visions come true. The Atlantic has a great story with the headline flying cause a real and then not bad for the climate that describes the efforts to build a new type of electric flying machine that isn't a plane and isn't a helicopter but could fly building to building top skipping city traffic. And it's not just frustrated commuters who could benefit as sea levels rise coastal cities, like Miami, a going to have to go to ever greater lengths to mitigate the impacts of climate change. So we'll also link you to a court. Story about developers in that Florida city who are already designing buildings where rooftop observation decks can be converted into flying, taxi poets, if you didn't catch recent marketplace tech series on climate change at up, by the way, it's called how we survive in the podcasts are online to where we're going. Maybe we really need roads. I'm Jack Stewart. And that's today's marketplace tech. This is a PM. I'm Shepard from Lincoln Nebraska, and I listened to marketplace several times, actually every day because it's got the economic news and developments that are important to me. Donate the marketplace, so that it can be available to everyone and asked her hope. You'll join me in this effort. Thanks to join shepherd is a marketplace investor donate online. Marketplace dot org. This Mike in place podcast is brought to you by evident helping businesses create a solid foundation of trust and safety on their platforms. By seamlessly verifying workers unless time. And with more confidence evident also helps companies stay up to date on any changes to relevant information and readily adapt, if and when compliance requirements, evolve evident is bringing confidence and peace of mind, personal data interactions across the globe. Visit evident ID dot com slash tech to sign up and start running verifications immediately. That's evident ID dot com slash tech.

Los Angeles Petersen Automotive Museum Brian Stevens Jack Stewart Founder And Ceo Hollywood Michigan Economic Development Max Bladerunner Michigan P. L. A. N. E T John Rimini Molly Cholera Audi Bladerunner Shepherd Pierce Mike
"brian stevens" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on The Pulse

"Talking about climate change what it will mean to our future here on this planet, how do we adjust and survive? What are some new things we have to start thinking about? Let's take a look at climate change and our health one condition, specifically asthma, millions of people have it and warming temperatures could really affect how often they have a tax and how bad they are reporter Allen. You has been looking into this, hey, Allen my Mike. And so what do people say about climate change? So interestingly, when you off people with asthma, what affects them? Climate change is not top of mind. Then we'll concern with things that they can see in few right now. All kinds of trucks rolling through kick it up. All kinds of I mean, dirt dirt. But this thirty. The planning all the police and you gotta breathe that. It's like, sometimes you come outside a little muggy, lookin smokey Logan, and it has a smell tour all the time. That's every day not only some days just every day. So it sounds like there's a lot to worry about are ready? Yes, but climate change is on the minds of experts. People like pediatrician Tyra Brian Stevens, whether in fact, climate change is contributing to more asthma or not as hard to say, but we do know they definitely impacts asthma attacks in asthma. Hospitalizations Tyra is medical director and the founder of the community asked him prevention program.

asthma Tyra Brian Stevens Tyra Allen smokey Logan reporter medical director founder
"brian stevens" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"I don't want people to get too focused on the number of wizard ever, but you bring up a good point. So let's go back to Brian Stevenson, Brian stain. You know, I'm, I'm urging your listeners watch Brian Stevens. He's delivery is the best delivery I've ever heard. It's very natural. Why? Because like I just talked about it's it's like he's delivering a conversation over dinner. When you're having a conversation over dinner, you're speaking in a natural rate of a rate of speech. It's kinda like you and I are talking now sort of a little bit more natural. It's not a formal PowerPoint presentation and now turning to slide twenty eight where it's very slow and plotting. I analyzed Brian Stevenson's rate of speech. It was about one hundred ninety words which may. Makes sense. Because an audio book for example, is more like about, I think it's about one hundred and twenty words, but in audio book and I've, I've read audiobooks. I've had voice instructors, voice directors in the studio with me. When I read the audio book, you're supposed to slow down a little bit. You're supposed to slow down because people are only hearing it through one channel audio, right? So it's important to kind of slow down a little bit, but you don't want to slow it down so right that people lose attention. But you also can't talk this fast. If I'm talking really fast in an audio book, you're not really gonna pay attention. You're not going to capture a lot of thoughts. So that's too fast. So one hundred ninety words a minute for just a casual immoral face to face conversation, makes complete sense that that's completely sensical just makes logical sense, which is why people like Brian Stevenson speak at about one hundred ninety words a minute. Then you get people like Tony Robbins that's more like two hundred and twenty-five words, right? So again, we're not most of us are not Tony Robbins, so I can't talk like this like Tony Robbins, early jazz fest. I if I do that in a presentation, I'm going to look like a phony because I'm trying to be somebody on not. But also it's too fast for just a public for a typical type of presentation most salespeople would have or something like that. So you gotta think about how how quickly my delivering, what's my pace? How many words per minute am I delivering? So I I don't think people should get hung up on. Okay. Now I'm gonna pay spice time myself, that type of thing and see how many words. But I do think that it's a pretty good role model start looking at people like Brian Stevenson and realize that the way most of us speak when we're pitching ourselves or delivering a presentation is very stilted and slow. And plotting compared to a much more natural in authentic rate of speech. Sure. Sherm. And you know, the verbal delivery is obviously important, but there's another thing that's important or could be distracting, which is the body language and the use, or lack of use of hand movements and gestures and things like that. And you talk about one, the power fear and why you should use the power sphere. And can you talk about the importance of that, but also easy fixes for common body language mistakes? Sure, absolutely. One of the best examples of strong body language is Colin Powell, and that doesn't surprise me Colin, how as a great military guy, right? Military leader and I find military leaders are awesome speakers. There's a viral video right now. I think of a Admiral from Texas, right? Texas, right? It's great military commanders are great connected. So Colin Powell has magnificent body language. It's what I call commanding presence. It's that kind of presence that just draws you in and makes you feel like disguising control..

Brian Stevenson Brian Stevens Tony Robbins Colin Powell Brian stain Texas
"brian stevens" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

06:19 min | 3 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"And, creed These cotton fields in southern Alabama or quiet now but. In one thousand nine hundred thirty seven a brutal, murder took place here the lynching of west Johnson Last. January some of Johnson's descendants came. Here in what has become a ritual taking place at lynching sites across the. Country organized by civil rights attorney Brian Stevenson something happened here that was. Wrong something happened here that was unjust. And too few people have talked about it and so. We want to acknowledge the wrong that happened to west Johnson this is eighteen year, old west Johnson it is the only known image of him that remained he was attended farmer accused of. Assaulting a white woman before he could stand trial. A mob of one hundred men dragged him from jail shot him and left. Him hanging from a tree the blood of west Johnson is in this soil I'd like you to begin to dig this soil in. Remembrance of west Johnson the soil collection is part. Of Brian Stevens project to document and remember African-Americans links during the period of what he calls racial terror We want to call this community to repentance to acknowledgement to shame we want to tell the truth because we believe in, truth and. Reconciliation but we know that truth. Reconciliation are sequential we can't get to where we're trying to go if we. Don't tell the truth I so far Stevenson team has chronicle more than. Forty three hundred lynchings they continue to. Find more many victims like Ben Simmons and John Richards. Were accused of murder, one in four lynching victims like Joseph Richardson and Frank Embry, were accused of unlawful conduct with white women in nearly every case no evidence just an accusation was enough. There's so many crimes committed against African American why. Focus on lynching at the end of the civil war black people are supposed. To get the right to vote and the only way people who were white could maintain their political control was to intimidate black people And lynching was especially effective because it would allow the whole community to know that we did this to this person it. Was intended to send, a message. That if you try to. Vote if you try to advocate for your. Right if you insist on fair wages if you do anything, that complicates white supremacy and white dominant political power we. Will kill you anything that upsets the power structure as I want it to be that's exactly right In nineteen Ninety-three Bryan Stevenson founded, an organization he called the equal Justice initiative it's illegal advocacy group based in Montgomery Alabama focused on defending the? Poor and powerless Stevenson is best known for his legal. Victories in the United States Supreme court and for successfully overturning, the wrongful convictions of over. One hundred people on death row for ten years ago he turned the attention of his organization to also investigating crimes of the past. The lynchings of African Americans are defense attorney SIA sunny has spent hundreds, of hours searching through newspaper archives and visiting, county courthouses is there usually newspaper, evidence or documentation often there were public reports because people acted with impunity, and so there will be newspaper reports sometimes in advance saying a man will be lynched. Later this afternoon This is an, article about the lynching of a man named Jesse Washington who was accused of. A crime in Waco Texas the. Newspaper headline read burn young negro in, public square as fifteen thousand look on a mob drag Jesse Washington teenager who was convicted of murder after a one hour trial from the courtroom to the public square there's a remarkable photograph of the crowd and it's people dressed, in their Sunday with their hats on and there's clothing oil soaked his strong. To treat fire is set under him and he is, dropped into flames as fifteen thousand people look on I think it's incredibly revealing that death was not enough that? It wasn't enough to kill people people would be killed. And then shot and then set on fire and then even, after that there are cases where the body Was dragged to be heart of the black community fear of that kind of mob. Led was Johnson's relatives to bury him in this unmarked grave right. Here is where west often, is Barrett and you're right here Who is a filmmaker and west Johnson's distant cousins spent decade interviewing relatives who were alive at the time and remembered the lynching they had. A barium and heroin why because. They Lech mob they will come in they wanted. West body to take around town to drag around town to show the body off, that wasn't just west Johnson. Who was killed victimized was the entire black community everybody was feeling fear. And panic and medicine trauma the night of this lynching for the weeks and months and years after that lynching it was. A commodity crime this wasn't done by, the clan or people who had to wear masks this was done by teachers and, clergy and law enforcement officers and people you had to deal with. Every day every day Stevenson's team started their investigation in Alabama but soon uncovered accounts of mobs murdering African Americans throughout the southern states and, beyond as the case Is mounted Stevenson wanted to. Do something to commemorate the victims so, in Montgomery Alabama the heart of the, deep south which still has dozens of monuments celebrating the confederacy Stevenson's equal Justice initiative took on a. Bold project they, bought, six acres of land and started, construction on a memorial to.

Brian Stevenson west Johnson murder Jesse Washington attorney Alabama Brian Stevens Montgomery Alabama United States Supreme court SIA Texas heroin
"brian stevens" Discussed on The NBA Show

The NBA Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on The NBA Show

"Me that wonders you know if you do it every year if we pick apart these teams and say that they're not good enough and we pick apart these coaches and we say like do you really think let's throw us i brian stevens gregg popovich recoil who everything of the four five best guys right okay so the rest of the guys do you really think that the raptors outcome in this series would have been dramatically different with the different coach probably not i i think i think that also on the flip side chris is the argument you know a lot of raptors fans are like fire doing casey fire during casing it's like well sure you can poke holes at sun them some decisions when it comes to calling plays or lineups he puts the game he's deaf certainly not a perfect coach he took until this season to overhaul the system right like took long enough to start having a team shoot more threes and move the ball he certainly flawed coach but if you're toronto it's like well short but he's also had a really successful season what is the alternates i if you're toronto when you're when you're messiah cheery and your your that front office and ownership and you're making that choice you need to be sure that whoever the a potential replacement would be is actually an upgrade just to clarify i do think guys nurse there assistant coaches highly regarded across the league i think he would be you know a realistic choice if they were gonna look internally well here's what i'll say the the casey thing i think he did a good job this year but you know the playoffs is where you make your money right you are only making your adjustments for the team that you are playing against and you're seeing them it's not a one off game right you're not getting the play a tuesday night and saying tonio or they may be flying from a back to back against whatever i mean you are now this is this is the money time for players at the money time for coaches and if you have successive failures now i'm going to say if you're gonna fire him because he's.

chris raptors tonio brian stevens gregg popovich casey toronto
Elephants, tigers kill one human a day in India

The Joe Rogan Experience

01:42 min | 3 years ago

Elephants, tigers kill one human a day in India

"Yeah stomp yeah that's that's a wrap kid elephants can be they can but they're also fucked with constantly and you know there's just something to me i like elephants yeah i think they will every look awesome they're cool i'm glad they're they're real i know they're smart i know they have like tight bonds in their community and you don't have to kill one of those to eat it i mean it's like there's plenty of other animals to eat is just but fell starving to death and i was living in a place that only had elephants for short killing elephant yeah i mean if that was all i had to eat our friend brian stevens said it tasted delicious he he ate one in africa that and he said it was is one of the most delicious steaks he's ever had in his life now i was like what like how is that possible endangered elephants and tigers kill a hume one human a day in india is growing population squeezes habitat yeah but this is a crazy situation man india's fucking so overpopulated it is a very very small place what is he doing trying to get over that fence tearing apart that car human deaths since two thousand fourteen wow they kill people a thousand human deaths in four years whilst tigers have killed ninety two people in the same period elephants kill way more whoa that's nuts ended that bear selfish thing it said two other people were killed in that state in india and they're both trying to take selfies with elephants dip shits one of the kid there's too many people in india i mean india is grossly overpopulated in india i think is smaller than the united states right isn't it like what size is india i don't know.

Tigers India United States Brian Stevens Africa Four Years
"brian stevens" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Three point five on the clock boston trailing by to the limbaugh frontcourt farside i like quick hitter here i like picking about you don't have to go very fast but put it on the four seat you get a seem very quickly to the basket or looking to inbound gets it into horford right on top of the three point line guarded by maker drives by the dog and a whistle the foul called on maker prevents the two points there but horford goes to the line of chance to tie that's actually a good foul because you don't give up the dunk that quick hitter i was just speaking about driving to the basket make sure you get something and you get a pretty good free throw shooter just under eighty percent on the season or for it to get to the line the line three three so far tonight i one is away it is good and we got a one point game maker picked up his second personal maker with four blocked shots in game four the five blocked shots in three chevy ozone checks it and it's a defensive move for brian stevens horford as one more free throw it trying to tie this game twenty nine point six seconds to go free throw up and in deadlocked at one zero two five second differential to on the shot clock straight up defensive effort here by boston led so will walk it across half court now a standing dribble jason tatum about fifteen feet off yeah that's it ma it makes sense to get something going to the basket don't wait too long as they are right now though so works his way to the left wing picked up by always late seventy shoots dousing gets a maker writer the circle gives it to brogden three to shoot braga download flips it up toward the rip gets the twice two five point one on the clock boston bowl down to here in game four tip was just flat out sensational but brogden ability to get the ball up on a very difficult shot going to his left behalf running hook shot i didn't think it was gonna make the rim i didn't think it was going to get high enough to hit the backboard did and that allowed big guy to get in there and drop one down on a tip we got a.

boston jason tatum writer braga limbaugh chevy brian stevens horford one zero two five second eighty percent fifteen feet six seconds
"brian stevens" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"He says has resulted in a pattern of unequal justice today and now we live in a landscape where you see black boys and men being rounded up one in three black male babies born in this country is expected to go to jail or prison you actually think that slavery and lynchings led to african americans being disproportionately represented in the criminal justice system yes i do and i think actually it's not a hard thing to understand you know i look at i think it is a hard thing to understand for people who think people get locked up people are locked up because they commit crimes about thirteen percent of the people illegally and possession of drugs in this country are black that's about our proportion of the population you know what percentage are arrested that's about thirty five percent that is an echo of this consciousness that doesn't value the lives of these folks equal value for every life is what brian stevens in his spent his life fighting for so now soil from the place of west johnson's lynching sits on this shelf in the museum and montgomery along with hundreds of others and right now when we talk about our history we talk about our past we're not telling the truth which is not america can be a great nation even though there was slavery even though there was lynching even though there was segregation but if we don't talk about those things we did we don't acknowledge those things we're not going to get there hello car four hundred on the road for your backup call it five four forty four hundred traffic is backed up report an accident on force 6172544400 wbz phone force if you've been a regular caller reprogram your phone six months five four forty.

brian stevens west johnson montgomery america thirty five percent thirteen percent
"brian stevens" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Reckoning taking place in america over how we remember our history much of the focus has been on whether or not to take down monuments that celebrate the confederacy but this story is about a new monument going up in montgomery alabama it documents the lynchings of thousands of african american men women and children during a seventy year period following the civil war the project is being led by criminal defense attorney brian stevenson who is determined to shed light on a dark period in our past that most people would rather forget it's a shocking and disturbing reality that lynchings were not isolated murders committed only by men in white hoods in the middle of the night often they were public crimes witnessed even celebrated by thousands of people stevenson believes if we want to heal racial divisions we must educate americans of every color and creed these fields in southern alabama or quiet now but in nineteen thirty seven a brutal murder took place here the lynching of west johnson last january some of johnson's descendants came here in what has become a ritual taking place at lynching sites across the country organized by civil rights attorney brian stevenson something happened here that was wrong something happened here that was unjust and too few people have talked about it and so we want to acknowledge the wrong that happened to west johnson this is eighteen year old west johnson it is the only known image of him that remains he was attended farmer accused of assaulting a white woman before he could stand trial a mob of one hundred men dragged him from jail shot him and left him hanging from tree the blood of west johnson is in this soil i'd like you to begin to dig the soil in remembrance of west johnson the soil collection is part of brian stevens project document and remember african americans lynch during a period of what he calls racial terror we want to call this community to repentance to acknowledgement to shane we want to tell the truth because we believe in truth and reconciliation but we know that truth and reconciliation are sequential we can't get to where we're trying to go if we don't tell the truth.

america montgomery alabama brian stevenson alabama murder west johnson brian stevens attorney lynch shane eighteen year seventy year
"brian stevens" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on KOMO

"Cases of child abuse it's a forensic light that uncovers evidence that otherwise could be overlooked more from komos eric heintz the forensic light rain lee was donated to the dawson plays child advocacy center in everett it can eliminate biological matter that the human i can't see and could even show injuries long after visible bruises have faded investigators tell the everett herald those findings are vital especially when victims of crimes aren't able to explain what happened to them the forensic white can fill in gaps for detective or cooperate a victim's account more than 1200 children were serve the dawson place in 2015 eric heintz komo news komo news time 707 i know parking idea in seattle is for apartment garages where not all the stalls are taken to open their doors to the general public allowing apartment owners to make a little money in the process it's an idea brian stevens with the cia department of construction and inspection says could ease street parking crunch so this opens up a new market for parking in your community in a building that might just be across the street from where you live a recent survey found thirty five percent of all park install sit empty in residential buildings as draft legislation is up for public review through october v that will go to the city council final thought possible sometime in december there's a big changes for hundreds of students who take the state ferry to vast sean island every day a new code of conduct in sterling with the pera system says there's been trouble in the past with rowdy behaviour we are regulated by the united states coastguards so there are serious consequences if you interrupt or a disruptor safety of a ferry the solution is a designated students seating area were pushing and shoving and horse player banned in school district has put a ferry monitor on board the sailings that have a lot of students on the ferry systems dresses most students are behaving acquaint n coupled need your help finding family heirlooms that were stolen tie in murray

komos eric heintz lee dawson everett herald seattle brian stevens city council sean island murray everett cia united states thirty five percent
"brian stevens" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on KOMO

"Murray's jewelry including her engagement ring at an antique ring from her grandmother even though we know they were on the home for about six minutes you you feel thrilling exposed and violated it's a hard lesson to learn a surveillance camera in the backyard captured the image of the suspects leaving the home and they they were later seen using the couple's stolen credit card that stores in the university village and even a wearing their clothing other homeowners later told so that the same people stole from them during an open house the state supreme court says a juvenile can be charged with distributing child pornography if they send an unsolicited picture of themselves it was a sixty three ruling had down yesterday a dissenting justices minors who sent images of themselves to adults could face harsher punishment that adults who send them to minors a new parking idea in seattle is four apartment garages were not all the stalls were taken to open their doors to the general public and allow apartment orders to make a little more money in the process it's that idea that brian stevens with the seattle depart open of construction and inspection says could ease the street parking crunch and the city so this opens up a new market for parking in your community in a building that might just be across the street from where you live a recent survey found that thirty five percent of all parking stalls sit empty in residential buildings this draft legislation is up for public review through october fifth that it gets forward that the city council final vote could come sometime into some komo news time 508 there's a big changes for hundreds of students who take the ferry to vast sean island every day the new code of conduct in sterling with the ferry system says there's been trouble in the past with rowdy behaviour are regulated by the united.

Murray supreme court child pornography seattle brian stevens sean island city council komo thirty five percent six minutes
"brian stevens" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on KOMO

"The rifle first footage am that's when save stray had approached him and the gunmen grabbed his pistol and executed his classmate he then fired into the crowd hitting three students until that got jail ten the schools custodian ordered him to give up he did the suspect told detectives he was bully any wanted to teach teaches classmates a lesson that we didn't target anyone in particular the families of three girls wounded on wednesday have spoken for the first time they're released a joint statement thinking the community for the help thoughts and prayers they say that their daughters are now recovering from their wounds new parking idea in seattle is four apartment garages were not all the stalls or take it opened their doors to the general public allowing apartment owners make a little money in the process and idea that brian stevens with a seattle department of construction inspection says could ease the street parking crunch in the city so this opens up a new market for parking in your community in a building that might just be across the street from where you live recent survey found that thirty five percent of all parking store all sit emptied residential buildings those draft legislation's up for public review through october fifth then it gets forwarded to the city council the final vote possible some time in december checks will be going out in the mail to thousands of people affected by in elaborate pricefixing conspiracy by manufacturers of lcd screens state attorney general bob ferguson announced that more than forty five or forty one i should say million dollars will go to more than twenty four thousand people on average that's two hundred and three dollars each ferguson says from 1998 two thousand six the makers of lcd screens would meet and conspire to artificially increase prices this is one of the largest settlements in the history of the attorney general's antitrust.

seattle brian stevens bob ferguson attorney thirty five percent million dollars three dollars
"brian stevens" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"brian stevens" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

"Brian stevens are cto uses this great phrase he calls them recovering ct owes that is their former ct owes of companies like g e manufacturing or in on oil and gas company so so they come in with this really i understand this vertical market i mean somebody's i think of him as like a universal translator do you know what i mean like we speak and we speak containers and they speak hydrogeological analysis right they they they can translate technology speak into the language of an industry so part of the fun things about the job is i get to work with people who have all sorts of really interesting kind of crazy backgrounds and they aren't they aren't just kind of engineering people like be but there are also you know people who come from an oil and gas or a finance or a um a manufacturing background and so that means that we work with companies all over the board and worldwide so um for me that's that's the fun part of the job even as an individual engineer uh i liked the demo i liked showing off what you'd built to somebody do you know what i mean like when you build something cool and you show it to a customer user and you see them go i'll wow that's neat that to me was always the really fun part of the job to in some ways now i get nothing but the fun part you know what i mean so it's perfect for me now that that's as you interesting so i guess that means then.

Brian stevens gas company engineer