17 Burst results for "Brian Stephenson"

"brian stephenson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of Dexter Court in commerce. There's a telegraph office where in 18 61 general P G T Bone regard was authorized to attack for something and launch the civil war. Across from that is the bus stop where Rosa Parks boarded her bus and took the fateful seat. He refused to surrender. In 1955. At the intersections. Heart is the Artesian Basin fountain, site of a slave market marked with a sign Slaves of all ages were auction along with land and livestock standing in line to be inspected. Public posters, advertised cells and included gender Approximate age first names. Slaves didn't have last names, skill price complexion on owner's name. In the 18 fifties, Able field hands brought $1500 skilled artisans 3000 That's Lee Street over there. Of course, our ultimate destination is equal Justice Initiatives. Legacy Museum from enslavement to mass incarceration on the way we need another museumgoers. Yeah. Where you from? From Georgia. My husband is airforce and he's teaching at the Air Force Base right now, so just Fooling around. I was going to this. Rosa Parks Museum this morning, walked around the corner and the security guard there just looking at the building. And she said, Did you see the poem on the side of the building? History, despite its wrenching pain cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, not need be lived again. Maya Angelo. So then she took my picture in front of the legacy museum that someone you're talking about. I want to go to that. I got to do that. At least. Because it said something about the injustice and the lynchings that happened after the abolition of slavery and I'm like what? Up until 1950. I'm a skeptical person. That Feels I can't believe everything that I Reed Sea here. But you know you can hear it. At least I mean, you can take it. The history lessons, you know, and that's where each person has to weigh the evidence that they see and And it's not like I'm looking to be persuaded or not be persuaded. Injustice happened for sure. That's why I took a picture of that poem for sure, we don't need to relive it. I was surprised by her skepticism about the persistence of lynching since photographs are easily found in the one of Emmett Till's body in 1955 is historic. Having galvanized the civil rights movement, But Brian Stephenson wasn't surprised. That's not an uncommon perspective. Most people can't tell you Anything about slavery because they don't know that there were four million enslaved people living in this country When the civil war began. They certainly don't understand that the great evil of American slavery wasn't Involuntary servitude in forced labor. It was this ideology of white supremacy, this narrative of racial difference, and for me, that's the narrative that we haven't actually come. To grips with this notion that black people aren't fully human. That was the true toxin. That poisoned our nation. He wants the Legacy Museum to connect the dots to show how the evolution of the slave market made slaves even more vulnerable and emboldened the owner who depended on them to treat them less and less as human beings. Hand to convey the humanity of the slave. The anguish you think anyone could imagine. Why would we really, We banned the international slave trade in 18 08 which is actually before Alabama was a state before Mississippi was a state before Louisiana was a state before the deep South had actually formed. A 1,000,000 enslave. People were moved from the north to the south. When sleep, people were losing their value with increasing calls for abolition. Slave owners didn't want to be caught. Owning property that they could not get a return on. And so they wanted to trade that to a region where there were people still willing to buy, and that created the domestic slave trading that became so especially brutal. That's what separated Children from For mothers and families were broken up, etcetera, and it was harder labor. Once in the museum. Alana and I were struck immediately by holographic images of people and sells slaves glowing with their own light, Speaking of lost Children. Seems like him my daughter calling out for me, and we want them to have a first person narrative. Long.

Legacy Museum Brian Stephenson Rosa Parks Rosa Parks Museum Mississippi Dexter Court Emmett Till Artesian Basin Maya Angelo Air Force Base Alana Reed Sea Georgia
"brian stephenson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The intersection of Dexter Court in commerce. There's a telegraph office where in 18 61 general P G T Bone regard was authorized to attack Fort Sumpter and launch the Civil war. Across from that is the bus stop where Rosa Parks boarded her bus and took the fateful seat. He refused to surrender in 1955. At the intersections. Heart is the Artesian Basin fountain, site of a slave market. Marked with a sign Slaves of all ages were auction along with land and livestock standing in line to be inspected. Public posters, advertised cells and included gender Approximate age first names. Slaves didn't have last names. Skill price complexion on owner's name. In the 18 fifties, Able field hands brought $1500. Skilled artisans 3000 It's Lee Street over there. Of course, our ultimate destination is equal Justice Initiatives Legacy Museum from enslavement to mass incarceration on the way we need another museum goers. Yeah. Where you from? Right now I'm from Georgia. My husband is airforce, and he's teaching at the Air Force base right now. So just Fooling around. I was going to this Rosa Parks Museum this morning, walked around the corner and the security guard there. You know, I was just looking at the building. And she said, Did you see the poem on the side of a building? History, despite its wrenching pain cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, not need be lived again. Strip. Maya Angelo. So then she took my picture in front of the legacy museum that someone you're talking about, But I want to go to that. I got to do that, at least because it said something about the In justice and the lynchings that happened after the abolition of slavery and I'm like what? Up until 1950. I'm a skeptical person. That Tails. I can't believe everything that I Reed Sea here. But you know you can hear it. At least I mean, you can take in The history lessons. You know, And that's where each person has to weigh the evidence that they see and And it's not like I'm looking to be persuaded or not be persuaded. Injustice happened for sure. That's why I took a picture of that poem for sure, we don't need to relive it. I was surprised by her skepticism about the persistence of lynching since photographs are easily found in the one of Emmett Till's body in 1955 is historic. Having galvanized the civil rights movement. But Brian Stephenson wasn't surprised. That's not an uncommon perspective. Most people can't tell you Anything about slavery because they don't know that there were four million enslaved people living in this country When the civil war began. They certainly don't understand that the great evil of American slavery wasn't Involuntary servitude in forced labor. It was this ideology of white supremacy, this narrative of racial difference, and for me, that's the narrative that we haven't actually come. To grips with this notion that black people aren't fully human. That was the true toxin. That poisoned our nation. He wants the Legacy Museum to connect the dots to show how the evolution of the slave market made slaves even more vulnerable and emboldened the owner who depended on them to treat them less and less as human beings. Hand to convey the humanity of the slave. The anguish you'd think anyone could imagine. Why would we really, we banned the international slave trade in 18 08 which was actually before Alabama was a state before Mississippi was a state before Louisiana was a state before the deep South had actually formed. A 1,000,000 enslave. People were moved from the north to the south, where enslaved people were losing their value with increasing calls for abolition. Slave owners didn't want to be caught. Owning property that they could not get a return on. And so they wanted to trade that to a region where there were people still willing to buy, and that created the domestic slave trading that became so especially brutal. That's what separated Children from From mothers and families were broken up, etcetera, and it was harder labor. Once in the museum. Alana and I were struck immediately by holographic images of people and sells slaves. Glowing with their own light, Speaking of lost Children. Same mother, my daughter calling out for me, and we want them to have a first person narrative. You fail any speed along to his name in.

Justice Initiatives Legacy Mus Brian Stephenson Rosa Parks Rosa Parks Museum Mississippi Artesian Basin Fort Sumpter Air Force Emmett Till Maya Angelo Alana Reed Sea Georgia
"brian stephenson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Take the intersection of Dexter Court in commerce. There's a telegraph office, where in 18 61 general P G T Bone regard was authorized to attack Fort Sumpter and launched the Civil War. Across from that is the bus stop where Rosa Parks boarded her bus and took the fateful seat. She refused to surrender in 1955. At the intersections. Heart is the Artesian Basin fountain, site of a slave market marked with a sign Slaves of all ages were auction along with land and livestock standing in line to be inspected. Public posters, advertised cells and included gender Approximate age first names. Slaves didn't have last names, scale price complexion and owner's name. In the 18 fifties, Able field hands brought $1500. Skilled artisans 3000 It's Lee Street over there. Of course, our ultimate destination is equal Justice Initiatives Legacy Museum from enslavement to mass incarceration on the way we need another museum goers. Yeah. Where you from? Right now I'm from Georgia. My husband is airforce, and he's teaching at the Air Force base right now. Fooling around. I was going to this Rosa Parks Museum this morning walked around the corner and the security guard there. You know, I was just looking at the building. And she said, Did you see the poem on the side of the building? Um, history, despite its wrenching pain cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, not need be lived again. Strip. Maya Angelo. So then she took my picture in front of the legacy museum that someone you're talking about, But I want to go to that. I got to do that, at least because it said something about the In justice and the lynchings that happened after the abolition of slavery and I'm like what? Up until 1950. I'm a skeptical person. That Feels I can't believe everything that I Reed Sea here. But you know you can hear it. At least I mean, you can take in The history lessons. You know, And that's where each person has to weigh the evidence that they see and And it's not like I'm looking to be persuaded or not be persuaded. Injustice happened for sure. That's why I took a picture of that poem for sure, we don't need to relive it. I was surprised by her skepticism about the persistence of lynching since photographs are easily found in the one of Emmett Till's body in 1955 is historic. Having galvanized the civil rights movement. But Brian Stephenson wasn't surprised. That's not an uncommon perspective. Most people can't tell you Anything about slavery because they don't know that there were four million enslaved people living in this country When the civil war began. They certainly don't understand that the great evil of American slavery wasn't Involuntary servitude in forced labor. It was this ideology of white supremacy, this narrative of racial difference, and for me, that's the narrative that we haven't actually come. To grips with this notion that black people aren't fully human. That was the true toxin. That poisoned our nation. He wants the Legacy Museum to connect the dots to show how the evolution of the slave market made slaves even more vulnerable and emboldened the owner who depended on them to treat them less and less as human beings. And to convey the humanity of the slave. The anguish you'd think anyone could imagine. Why would we really, We banned the international slave trade in 18 08 which is actually before Alabama was a state before Mississippi was a state before Louisiana was a state before the deep South had actually formed. A 1,000,000 enslave. People were moved from the north to the south. When sleep, people were losing their value with increasing calls for abolition. Slave owners didn't want to be caught. Owning property that they could not get a return on. And so they wanted to trade that to a region where there were people still willing to buy, and that created the domestic slave trading that became so especially brutal. That's what separated Children from For mothers and families were broken up, etcetera, and it was harder labor. Once in the museum. Alana and I were struck immediately by holographic images of people and sells slaves glowing with their own light, Speaking of lost Children. Seems like him my daughter calling out for me, and we want them to have a first person narrative. Bility Street belong to his interesting.

Justice Initiatives Legacy Mus Brian Stephenson Rosa Parks Rosa Parks Museum Mississippi Artesian Basin Fort Sumpter Air Force Emmett Till Maya Angelo Alana Reed Sea Georgia
"brian stephenson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Court in commerce. There's a telegraph office where in 18 61 general P G T Bone regard was authorized to attack Fort Sumpter and launch the Civil war. Across from that is the bus stop where Rosa Parks boarded her bus and took the fateful seat. He refused to surrender in 1955. At the intersections. Heart is the Artesian Basin fountain, site of a slave market marked with a sign Slaves of all ages were auction along with land and livestock standing in line to be inspected. Public posters, advertised cells and included gender Approximate age first names. Slaves didn't have last names, scale price complexion and owner's name. In the 18 fifties, Able field hands brought $1500. Skilled artisans 3000 It's Lee Street over there. Of course, our ultimate destination is equal Justice Initiatives Legacy Museum from enslavement to mass incarceration on the way we need another museum goers. Yeah. Where you from? Right now I'm from Georgia. My husband is airforce and he's teaching at the Air Force Base right now, so just Fooling around. I was going to this Rosa Parks Museum this morning walked around the corner and the security guard there. You know, I was just looking at the building. And she said, Did you see the poem on the side of the building? History, despite its wrenching pain cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, not need be lived again. Strip. Maya Angelo. So then she took my picture in front of the legacy museum that someone you're talking about, But I want to go to that. I got to do that, at least because it said something about the In justice and the lynchings that happened after the abolition of slavery and I'm like What Up until 1950. I'm a skeptical person. That Feels I can't believe everything that I Reed Sea here. But you know you can hear it. At least I mean, you can take in The history lessons. You know, And that's where each person has to weigh the evidence that they see and And it's not like I'm looking to be persuaded or not be persuaded. Injustice happened for sure. That's why I took a picture of that poem for sure, we don't need to relive it. I was surprised by her skepticism about the persistence of lynching since photographs are easily found in the one of Emmett Till's body in 1955 is historic. Having galvanized the civil rights movement. But Brian Stephenson wasn't surprised. That's not an uncommon perspective. Most people can't tell you Anything about slavery because they don't know that there were four million enslaved people living in this country When the civil war began. They certainly don't understand that the great evil of American slavery wasn't involuntary servitude enforced labor. It was this ideology of white supremacy, this narrative of racial difference. And for me, that's the narrative that we haven't actually come to grips with this notion that black people aren't fully human. That was the true toxin. That poisoned our nation. He wants the Legacy Museum to connect the dots to show how the evolution of the slave market made slaves even more vulnerable and emboldened the owner who depended on them to treat them less and less as human beings. Hand to convey the humanity of the slave. The anguish you'd think anyone could imagine. Why would we really, we banned the international slave trade in 18 08 which was actually before Alabama was a state before Mississippi was a state before Louisiana was a state before the deep South had actually formed. A 1,000,000 enslave. People were moved from the north to the south, where sleep people were losing their value. With increasing calls for abolition. Slave owners didn't want to be caught. Owning property that they could not get a return on. And so they wanted to trade that to a region where there were people still willing to buy, and that created the domestic slave trading that became so especially brutal. That's what separated Children from For mothers and families were broken up, etcetera, and it was harder labor. Once in the museum. Alana and I were struck immediately by holographic images of people and sells slaves glowing with their own light, Speaking of lost Children. In the same time him I dont calling out for me and we want them to have a first.

Justice Initiatives Legacy Mus Brian Stephenson Rosa Parks Rosa Parks Museum Mississippi Artesian Basin Fort Sumpter Emmett Till Alana Air Force Base Maya Angelo Reed Sea Georgia
"brian stephenson" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Four point six eight is great you know saying if whatever that's great just in the role right now it's the low is when it comes to overall while you check in your all right to know what the exact got a five point no we got a four point eight six four eight the four point eight I day has a four point six eight and ani has a four point nine nine I didn't even think no those show free for ninety two exclusively to ninety two for you all righty if you were to for range in the name would you please give us some of this traffic that these great who were drivers may be in right now it looks like some bad seven south Philly but first everybody is talking about just merge all this makes me so happy because this movie is so good it opened over the weekend you know we talked about it before but this is the true story a Brian Stephenson his here whole row wake fight to save this Mans life Michael B. Jordan is in it Jamie boxes in every Larson who's from Marvel as well but like having Michael B. Jordan and a TV box in the neighborhood to talk about the movie just it's it's such a droid film it says needs to be her and if you didn't see it open and we can see the movie and it's really a good movie great job and I love the roller coaster is what definitely but like you said if you don't get a chance to see this weekend go see it now Jeff it is out in theaters everyone is loving he will not that you know you won't be mad that you went to go see an S. coming from the girl with the four point all right now what or Vermont Avenue.

"brian stephenson" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on WDRC

"PCH dot com before it's too late thanks PCH dot com better hurry if you want the next big winner to be you enter at PCH dot com now entries do to twenty five no purchase necessary void where prohibited this is fox on justice on new year's day nineteen ninety one a deadly fire roared through a wooden Holman Murphy's California Christina Carlson was trapped in the bathroom there was a window but it didn't boarded up her husband Carl and their three children managed to escape investigators called it a tragic accident no one seemed to take notice that shortly before the fire Carl Carlson had taken out a two hundred thousand dollar life insurance policy on Christina the family moved to upstate New York seventeen years later the Carlson's son Levi was doing work underneath the truck when the Jack gave way crushing him Carl Carlson had taken out a seven hundred thousand dollar life policy on Levi he was found guilty of the murder of his son for the insurance money and now back in California Carlson is about to stand trial for the murder of his wife Christina in nineteen ninety one with fox on justice and wind loom fox news I'm sad when it comes to driverless cars there are some new rules for the road from the White House sort of the guidelines from the White House will let the industry police and regulate itself transportation secretary Elaine Chao talked about the U. S. leading the way in driverless and other transportation technology at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas at the US department of transportation we are preparing for the transportation system of the future the new guidelines will unify self driving car work across almost forty federal agency but the government will quote promote voluntary consensus standards and enforce existing laws to ensure companies don't make deceptive claims about driverless car technology under the new recommendations the national highway transportation safety administration will require carmakers to submit safety reports and ensure human safety drivers pay attention to the road ahead the box on tech I'm Brett Larson fox news on on the shelf the general Sam Mendes is World War one epic nineteen seventeen expands nationwide the film grab the best drama award at the golden globes it tells a tale of two young British soldiers given an impossible task deliver a message deep in enemy territory will stop sixteen hundred men from walking into a trap not the role in just mercy Michael B. Jordan stars as a world renowned civil rights defense attorney Brian Stephenson who works to free wrongly condemned death row prisoner played by Jamie Farr in the mood for comedy too pretty had assurance rose Byrne as two friends with two very different ideals started beauty company in like a box but their ideals clash with the new boss with lots of cash under water crew of aquatic researchers work to get to safety after an earthquake devastates the lab but there is something deep within the C. that's now out think of aliens underwater that's fox on film on five Hey it's Lars Larsen great to be with you right here on the talk of Connecticut.

"brian stephenson" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on WDRC

"Upstate New York seventeen years later the Carlson's son Levi was doing work underneath the truck when the Jack gave way crushing him Carl Carlson it taken out as seven hundred thousand dollar life policy on Levi he was found guilty of the murder of his son for the insurance money and now back in California Carlson is about to stand trial for the murder of his wife Christina in nineteen ninety one with fox on justice and wind loom fox news I'm sad when it comes to driverless cars there are some new rules for the road from the White House sort of the guidelines from the White House will let the industry police and regulate itself transportation secretary Elaine Chao talked about the U. S. leading the way in driverless and other transportation technology at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas at the US department of transportation we are preparing for the transportation system of the future the new guidelines will unify self driving car work across almost forty federal agency but the government will quote promote voluntary consensus standards and enforce existing laws to ensure companies don't make deceptive claims about driverless car technology under the new recommendations the national highway transportation safety administration will require carmakers to submit safety reports and ensure human safety drivers pay attention to the road ahead the box on tech I'm Brett Larson fox news on on the shelf the general Sam Mendes is World War one epic nineteen seventeen expands nationwide the film grab the best drama award at the golden globes it tells a tale of two young British soldiers given an impossible task deliver a message deep in enemy territory will stop sixteen hundred men from walking into a trend not the role in just mercy Michael B. Jordan stars as a world renowned civil rights defense attorney Brian Stephenson who works to free wrongly condemned death row prisoner played by Jamie Farr in the mood for comedy.

Brian Stephenson attorney Brett Larson US California Jamie Farr Michael B. Jordan Sam Mendes Las Vegas New York Elaine Chao secretary White House fox Christina murder
"brian stephenson" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on WTOP

"Check out the courtroom dramas and clemency and just mercy this still meaningful do everything possible you will know what to into down in Alabama now earlier we talked about both movies with Washington Post film critic and Hornaday and we started with just mercy it's really impressive this is based on the real life story of Walter McMillian who was inaccurately accused are imprisoned and convicted of of a heinous murder down in Alabama and a young Harvard trained attorney named Brian Stephenson who a lot of people will know his name now he's become an enormously influential and important leader in the criminal justice reform movement but this chronicles one of his earliest cases which was meeting Mr McMillian taking on this case and I'm sort of overcoming just obstacle over obstacles in securing justice for his client and this is just a straight ahead story it's not spectacular visuals it's not whiz bang of facts or anything it just tells the story straight and true especially through gripping performance is Michael B. Jordan plays Bryan Stevenson and an astonishing Jamie Foxx plays Mister meant million I mean this is the twenty nineteen was really a great year for comeback performances from people like Eddie Murphy and Jennifer Lopez and I would put Jimmy fox in that same category this is it's just a slow burn of a performance and it just takes your breath away it's very very impressive and it's a really absorbing and ultimately and lightning movie all right from just mercy to clemency one bad guys thank not easy some in respect and this focuses on a prison warden and a botched execution does it work for you yeah this is you know it's so interesting as you said that we have these two films coming out literally on the same day but this is told from a completely different perspective and you're right it's the prison warden there played by Alfre Woodard in another breathtaking performance I think both these movies are driven by the performances and I think the import and the meaning of this film it's you know for me it was dramatically and nurse at times it's so very quiet it's so very interior in terms of her emotional journey but I think it gets to the moral injury that can be sustained not just by the people who are subject to capital punishment and the death penalty but those who are are obligated to deliberate but I just I think it really gets to the psychological and emotional ramifications for everyone to the entire community and for especially for the print the professionals who are asked to do this deed so I I think it's worthy if only for that but also for this afterward performance just I will say spectacular and that is Washington post film critic Ann Hornaday who joined us via Skype still ahead was a down day on Wall Street today nine twenty four.

Jennifer Lopez Ann Hornaday Washington Harvard Washington Post Skype Alfre Woodard Jimmy fox Alabama Eddie Murphy Jamie Foxx Michael B. Jordan Brian Stephenson attorney murder Walter McMillian
"brian stephenson" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on WTOP

"Just mercy still meaningful do everything possible with two into down in Alabama well let's talk about both of these films with Washington Post film critic and Hornaday who joins us live on sky great to have you back and thank you so much thank you son so let's start with just mercy it's based on a true story it stars Jamie Foxx and Michael B. Jordan you say it's spectacular tells about it's really impressive this is based on the real life story of Walter McMillian who was inaccurately accused imprisoned and convicted of of a heinous murder down in Alabama and a young Harvard trained attorney named Brian Stephenson who a lot of people will know his name now he's become an enormously influential and important leader in the criminal justice reform movement but this chronicles one of his earliest cases which was meeting Mr McMillian taking on this case and sort of overcoming just obstacle over obstacles in securing justice for his client and this is just a straight ahead story it's not spectacular visuals it's not whiz bang of facts or anything it just tells the story straight and true especially through gripping performance is Michael B. Jordan plays Bryan Stevenson and an astonishing Jamie Foxx plays Mister meant million I mean this is the twenty nineteen was really a great year for comeback performances from people like Eddie Murphy and Jennifer Lopez and I would put Jimmy fox in that same category this is it's just a slow burn of a performance and it just takes your breath away it's very very impressive and it's a really absorbing and ultimately and lightning movie all right from just mercy to clemency learning please bad guys bad kind many of these men respect and this focuses on a prison warden and a botched execution does it work for you yeah this is you know it's so interesting as you said that we have these two films coming out literally on the same day but this is told from a completely different perspective and you're right it's the prison warden there played by Alfre Woodard in another breathtaking performance I think both these movies are driven by the performances and I think the import and the meaning of this film it's you know for me it was dramatically inert at times it's so very quiet it's so very interior in terms of her emotional juror journey but I think it gets to the moral injury that can be sustained not just by the people who are subject to capital punishment and the death penalty but those who are are obligated to deliver it and I just I think it really gets to the psychological and emotional ramifications for everyone to the entire community and for especially for the print the professionals who are asked to do this deed so I I think it's worthy if only for that but also for the south you would performance just I will say spectacular right quite the choice we have this weekend thanks so much and thanks and thanks thanks to both of you that's and wanted a film critic for The Washington Post it's two fourteen get your business off to a fast start in the new year it's go time switch.

Alabama
"brian stephenson" Discussed on X96

X96

11:15 min | 1 year ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on X96

"The Amazon Amazon amazing Amazon and her adventures through the ages what I see what they were doing the amazing animals this is Gina didn't pre read the Amazons amazing Amazon now it's just the amazing she didn't yeah yeah I got it okay give me a break you confused me Wonder Woman look who's here is to settle the whole thing Sean means from the Salt Lake Tribune he is a culture writer and film reviewer a you can read his stuff that SL trip dot com or at movie cricket dot net hi Sean hello yeah Shannon dean hello wrote one of the stars for that Wonder Woman seven fifty yeah yeah pretty cool all right so we we do the arts sees in the forties we start from the worst and go to the first in each category you didn't see there's a quite a few are a far exceeds BM release but you didn't see most of them I thought I'd I missed two of them there are that there's there's one on the list there that actually has an opening this week okay yeah there's not there's nothing really in the arts these this week so two parties quickly if man for the future which is a continuation of a Chinese martial arts series starring Donnie yen who most people know from rogue one I didn't see that and then three Christ's which is a based on a true story about a psychiatrist who is treating people in a than a mental ward in Michigan and discovers that he has three patients all of whom think they're Jesus well one of the must be wrong well at least and so he decides to what a way to maybe break through is to get them all in the same room together well yeah matter and anti matter exactly the the the trick here is played by Richard Gere the three are played by will hunt Walton Goggins Bradley Whitford and Peter Dinklage this sounds fascinating I I I hear not so much but this way it premiered at the Toronto Film Festival in twenty seventeen getting out in theaters now okay yeah that's been on the show it's a great premise and January and January is sort of you know certain movies movies movies that they were on the shelf on time we had several here Mister like a boss we'll start with this is this is a comedy ostensibly tech Tiffany had issue and rose Byrne are friends since middle school who run their own cosmetics business together okay great online sales but the but their brick and mortar stores is is sucking them dry and they get they got an offer to be bought out by a by a a cosmetics mogul played by some high tech okay she turns out to be awful and and it's impossible to work with cars on so tension ensues I think they had a they had an idea here that Hey you know if we get all these funny people in the same same sat funny stuff will happen now we don't actually ever write anything for them wrong there and there are some funny bits here Jennifer Coolidge is one of the one of the always late when she shows are running Billy Porter steals the show as the savvy as the sassy gameplay in a gay guy the school I'm not shock of shocks and house on Sony crime a crown Sony for who you know from Ghostbusters in that pool you know people like that but yeah I just doesn't hold together SO two stars all right to star so that now I'm just mercy out start under water fall under water and Kay see that father last night that is this is this is a down the Marianas trench nearly seven miles below the the Pacific service a drill a near future ishe I guess drilling rig that there's an earthquake and and mostly gets destroyed in their six survivors under water drilling under water going operation yes and so six survivors trying to serve traverse the ocean floor to get this to get to someplace safe no I like movies like this if they're well done well yeah and that's that's the cabbie out isn't it and as they get as they as they are awesome they realize there's something else down there with them cool so you know I like that said that that that you know when they when they started telling they release something they shouldn't have released I can't breathe in these movies yeah like in these under water movies I I really do have time so there's not only the the the perils of being trapped underwater there's a monster or something down the sub and T. J. Miller yeah and you know I would just you know and and the problem with this movie is that it's not crazy enough until the end when it's too crazy okay and yet you eat there's a sweet spot and they like you know don't get there and then they were shooting you don't get there quick enough now all right and the store is the lead here and is fine you know so yeah yet and you know this is a two year old movie because you know her characters straight so Hey is Billy Porter in and out of the corner but yeah TJ Miller gets to have all the wisecracks and that's what it's two years old that's why he's it that's what I'm working using our exactly SO two and a half stars two and a half four under water all right just mercy just mercy this is this this should have been off like an Oscar bait type movie again it is an Oscar big type movie but it it's sort of like what Oscar bait would've been ten years ago true story based based on the true story to life of Brian Stephenson who is is you know one of America's true heroes yeah he he runs a the equal justice initiative which is a organization that tries to get lawyers for death row inmates and try to overturn cases and and and you know get representation that they never got originally and so on this this fall this follows one of his earliest cases in nineteen ninety two of a guy who was basically framed for murder and was on death row the seems that here is played by J. by a Michael B. Jordan it's really good the the condemned prisoner he's working with is played by Jamie Foxx who is also really good and brie Larson is in here as well and it's a lot of a lot of good performances really well acted but it is you know it's so earnest and so sincere that that it it basically sort of telegraphs all of it so you know so can't marble hill longer and electro can't save this movie now it's it's it's it's all its mission statement the movie basically at it but I mean it you know yeah it's all it's good it's just a great it's three stars so nineteen seventy now I see what you've given this and I won't tell it till the end you can say it but I've seen this on everybody's top ten best movie of the year best this best and you will love it won the golden globe yeah by signing in it's going to be a big Oscar content so what does every here's the thing this okay let's let's talk about what it is first this is this is Sam Mendes who directed sky fallen man and American beauty in seven of nineteen seventeen and it is about it is it is inspired by stories that meant his grandfather used to tell of serving in World War one okay so it is ninety seventeen you have to lance corporal's who are are assigned a mission they have to cross through dangerous territory part of what no man's land and other other areas to get to a battalion to tell them to call off an impending attack all right that if they if they are walking into an ambush there if they go into this attack there's going to be a massacre sixteen hundred metal be killed including one of the guys is brother to added added incentive there that that one of the two corporals his brother is up at the front of that front Poston and they have to get there to save to save him and everybody else all right so it and so and so they start marching then if they go through trenches they go through they go over you know where they're shelling and shooting there's you know through the countryside it's on the the notion here is that is that man days and his crew it particularly Roger do you consent to talk for great you know Clio legendary cinematographer hi this is on vision is a single take this is all happening in real time you're watching it as it goes and nothing it doesn't stop now obviously it's not a single take yes is way too much happening all at once and so that they crafted to make you they crafted to make it look that way they feel I at its are supposed to be invisible it's on it's on this is where the problem this is where the problem is for me and why I'm not as hype for this movie is some people are you spend the in that is a that is a long you know that that's again that that is a trick a a a cinematic trick that is can be really technically well done and they delivered ma'am they do it the bird man bird mandated Hitchcock did it and rope back in the forties yeah that's right you know it it it is really cool add and the added these guys do it really expertly and it's that and technically it's a it's it's a brilliant achievement however if the story isn't there the story isn't there to carry you through all you spent you spend too much time looking for the cuts you some you look for the invisible at at your looking for they just passed over bass past behind a tree that's where the dom okay break that kind of thing I and that's where I what that's where I was with this the story you know some people some people have have warm to the story and and are fascinated by it and and you know god love him for it and and I'm glad they found something movie that I did not your board I I wasn't bored but I was but but the the single take think takes you out of the story and of the story is not strong enough to hold you in that's what's going to happen what happened with me so do you think if you didn't know that it was supposed to be that way going in the United I don't I don't know if I I don't know how much I knew when I thought I saw this thing like three weeks ago when the hype really got under way I mean I'd heard something about it's supposed to be all done in one take but you know it's it's it is not as compelling a story to take to keep that that cinematic trickery from from his tracking all right three stars three stars for that alright let's run these down if man for not screen three Christ's not screener John didn't see these under water two and a half like a boss two stars just mercy three stars in nineteen seventeen three stars old look we got next week what do little to well Robert Downey junior doctor Doolittle doing doctor Doolittle yes that's sort of them up dated to not very it's still a period piece is it yeah we can have animals talk for reals now that area Gee the CG is better and I hope he doesn't throw that seal in the ocean at the end we also have bad boys for life the so this is the third most I think fourth fourth fourth Will Smith and Martin Lawrence yes okay yeah all right well don't go home and watch about can remove it yes yeah do that watch heaven can wait or the graduate or to die for or what's up doc hello its mould Saturday Night Live sketches all right all right thank you show me thank you Sean a movie critic dot net is where you can find all of this stuff sure SO trip dot com.

Amazon Gina Sean Salt Lake Tribune writer Shannon dean
"brian stephenson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

39:19 min | 1 year ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on KCRW

"Seasons greetings from all of us at KCRW music this is he collected twenty four the the this yeah yeah where this and one yeah yes yeah see yeah please see that in in fact while see the let us for for for those from for the the the so and from from from from from the KCRW sponsors include universal pictures presenting written and directed by Jordan Peele starring the P. ten young though now nominated for a SAG award for female actor in the world watch yourself support KCRW taking public media strong and free because you believe in news music and engagement for everyone the season of giving back is the best cure your dollars five thirty KCRW dot com slash join I thank you KCRW sponsors included U. S. blinks proudly manufacturing fashion basics including T. shirts sweatshirts and tanks U. S. blinks also offers ecosystem double fashion options and are designed to meet right here in Los Angeles this is U. S. blinks dot net he's these he is this the so this is the the happy holidays from eclectic twenty four the a not to me the full I can't the he cool to on and KCRW's sponsors include Warner brothers resenting just mercy based on the true story of Brian Stephenson Amanda save one hundred and forty lives starring Michael B. Jordan Jamie Foxx's brie Larson in select theaters tomorrow everywhere January can this is a collective twenty four you here for hand picked music and we've got more subscribe to Caserta these five songs to hear news letter and discover five fresh tunes every Friday to KCRW dot com slash newsletters.

"brian stephenson" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"B. I. now looking at the last minute pardons issued by former governor Matt Bevin sports in a little courage journal today say agents are trying to determine if any of those pardons were tied to political donations or made Evans Bevins campaign democratic leader in the Kentucky sentences clear to him there was political favoritism involved because now they have to find out if the pardon power was abused many states are abolishing the death penalty new movie tells the story of a man who's made it his mission to save people on death row Michael B. Jordan plays a role of attorney Brian Stephenson who founded the equal justice initiative the movie's called just Mersing the pure statistics of mass incarceration the mount of of black and brown people people of color that are targeted and incarcerated are just mind blowing and also the amount of people that Bryan Stevenson has gotten exonerated you know I think the amount of work that he's put in over the past thirty years is incredible he's making an impact he just needs help you know this movie hopefully allows people to get closer to these people closer to these issues and allow our voice to ring true in the arms are making a difference and demanding some answers from his broken systems man who inspired the film was a guest speaker at the lecture series series put on by that since I have okay public libraries near enough center back in October that event sold out radio seven hundred W. L. W. sports here's a bangles update bangles do better with the brown Sunday in the season finale of Paul Brown stadium the actual be right here on seven hundred WLW college basketball last night if he wanted to scoring thirty points eighteenth rated date knocks off Grambling eighty one to fifty three Kentucky coach John Calipari has been named the college basketball coach of the decade by the Sporting News NHL hockey last night Columbus blue jackets win over the New York Islanders three to to build Addison seven hundred WLW sports one in three adults in America have pre diabetes but most don't know it to let people know it can be reversed before it becomes type two diabetes professional basketball player Julius Randle is doing everything in reverse I'm only done.

diabetes Addison Columbus NHL attorney Kentucky Evans Matt Bevin Julius Randle Michael B. Jordan America New York Islanders John Calipari Grambling basketball Paul Brown stadium Brian Stephenson
"brian stephenson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:28 min | 2 years ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So I can't help but ask you because I feel like this is. so much on the minds of criminal justice reformers what you think about this recent spate of elections I mean if I think it really took off with with Larry Krasner winning in Philadelphia but there were a couple before can fox Kim Wesley bell Scott column and we're talking about these people who are running for district attorney in these very populous cities all over the country and they're winning they're running on platforms of D. Kerr serration running on platforms of decriminalization and when you see them all gathered as a group you see this real diversity in terms of race gender ethnicity geography age and experience and do you think that this is a. just a ripple or trend that's going to fade out you think it's a wave and do you think they're going to be able to deliver on the promises that they campaigned on. so I guess I have. maybe a couple different actions the first let me say is is complete. excitement and enthusiasm I mean for the last fifty years the only way you ever got elected district attorney and we should say just to be clear that of. one of my arguments in the book is that that this system is all these is it doesn't deserve the name system I doesn't. I don't see this in the book but I now think about how it doesn't even deserve an injustice in many cases by. but it's not really a system because it all these this we actors having said that them the most powerful single actor is the local prosecutor the city the county prosecutor those are the people that make the decisions right the in the the Tasha Willis conversation and every other decision that maze gets made in the case. so it's thrilling right because you only got elected for fifty years on platforms of on the lock up more people than my opponent and I'm gonna keep them in a harsher conditions and I'm gonna keep them there for longer. and then starting really in November two thousand sixteen. some good news from that election one one six is this whole slate of prosecutors in in Florida Alabama Georgia Denver Chicago taxes I mean a career defense attorney in Texas with the words not guilty tattooed on his chest ran for local prosecutor and one. and then Philadelphia Boston. St Louis so. what is it tell me what's so exciting about that is what it signals in the electorate. because it shows that people. are starting to wake up to the unfairness to the Reagan justice that that. dominates our system today and that there's an open this and even a hunger that's fueled by activism in many of those folks got elected because people not doors and people talk to their neighbors and and people encourage people to vote in off year off cycle elections right this is hard grass roots work. so it's exciting though that folks can win on those kind of platforms I mean Rachel Rollins of Boston she announced her platform in all these cases that she was gonna prosecuted decriminalization and I'm thinking like. a black woman in Boston is gonna win like county D. eighty on that really and she did like by a huge margin. so that is thrilling. I do have I guess some cautions one is all their platforms are not the same and there could be a way I fear that we're about to enter into a moment where you get to say I'm a progressive prosecutor and you can have like one thing that you do this for aggressive like I'm not going to prosecute you know marijuana possession in a place that still criminalizes it and you keep doing everything else just as terrible as you did it but you get to run under that mantle and I worry that we need to have some much clearer kind of metrics and benchmarks for what is going to count as actually progressive verse is what's going to be just the same old brutality with a little kind of tweak here or there so that's the one kind of big fear that I have about this and the other is that I want to say I don't want public defenders to get lost in this conversation at all because I think that. any effort to actually make our system. deserve the tie title justice in it any effort to bring fairness to bring a measure of of of decency is going to require a real investment in. criminal defense lawyers and public defenders because again think about even these progressive prosecutors what they're saying like somebody like Larry cries in or any of these folks they're saying listen when you. I'm Willie I'm not just going to go for the Max and are willing to offer probation in certain cases. I'm willing to hear the whole story about somebody's life I willing to look at them as more than just the charge sheet right is a revolutionary statements in many cases for prosecutors if they really act on them. but who's gonna bring that story to them. who's going to tell them. who Tasha Willis is who Dante is right I mean you know our Brian Stephenson talks about right how none of us should be judged by our worst act right we all have to be thought of in the context of our whole life but who's going to tell the story about the whole life. that's going to be the defense lawyer that's going to be the public defender and that person in that job in that office needs resources it needs independence all it needs are it needs high quality staffing needs pay equity public defenders in most places in the country still make one half to one third with the prosecutors make in the same courthouse. and until we start to address of that. I think there's going to be a limit to what this that this prosecutor movement can do so I'm thrilled I'm thrilled but I'm cautious see you talked about you know the differences between being a prosecutor and being a public defender you obviously were a public defender never prosecute the case and you talk about who's going to bring the stories and you know in this case of somebody like for example so tentative very or Larry Krasner they've never prosecuted a case and now they are the head of the prosecutor office course that's unusual but there's this need to sort of inculcate I gas talent and energy and sell since on both sides so what I wanted to ask you is this Barry Scheck who co founded the innocence project recently said that he thinks that law schools should give loan forgiveness to public interest students who do two years in a public defender's office and two years in a prosecutor office that they would have to do equal time in but well I'm all for the loan forgiveness. one loan forgiveness it better I mean that that that the crushing debt loads that we impose on students right now is is is is immoral and unconscionable I think so I went to school I went I was fortunate to go to a school that had a very well funded loan forgiveness program so I was able to become a public defender and and and you know I do it and and pay off my loans with the assistance of a loan forgiveness program but the most law schools don't have that so so I endorses that part do you are you at what do you want your students some of your students to grow up and be prosecutors is that something that you want for them and you feel like you'll have contributed in some way because as you say that the most powerful actors in the criminal justice system. yes so I I do. I would do I want I mean my students are going to become who they're going to calm I'm I'm I'm realistic about my impact my ability impacts somebody's career trajectory but what I want them to do is if they go if they do go on become a prosecutor I want them. to become the kind of prosecutor that is. that is willing to listen to conversations like this and is willing to you know read you know books like yours and is really and is willing to Merse themselves in the lives of people who have been the most directly affected and brutalized by some of the harshest of the system. what and I think that if you're going to become that kind of prosecutor I think it's very hard to do a. in an office that has an entrenched culture. that is counter to those things so the one thing that it doesn't work I think does it work for young lawyers and won't work if it's the shack model is I don't think. they you can go into an office and I see this all the time students come to me and they say you know I took your criminal law class I took a class in the prison I did the clinic the criminal justice clinic I'm really passionate about these issues but I want to go into place so I'm gonna have more power and influence and I want to go into a prosecutor's office and you know what do you think and what I tell them is they think that they are going to change the culture of that office but that office culture is more powerful than them and it is going to change them. and. now. what to me the only six sold so historically I have caution people against doing it. what changes that for me is this new generation of folks that we're talking about if somebody really is. a. truth transformative progressive leader at the top. then they're going to need the young people who and mid career people who come into that office to support that vision because the problem that somebody like Larry Krasner has or that any of these folks is going to have is they come in and they inherit a whole bunch of folks who don't share that vision they didn't get hard with that vision they're they're afraid of that new vision. because think about it right. I think we don't really take seriously think about what it means to come in. with this new orientation and this new model in essence you are telling people on your staff that for five years ten years fifteen years twenty years you've been putting people in prison for too long. you've been putting too many people in the prison. to hear that about themselves this is the hard thing it is hard for judges to I went off to all the DC Superior Court judges all the people that gave me hell they give our colleagues hell for years invited me to speak at their professional development there were a hundred of them in the room the judge I just told you about wasn't there because he moved on to another court but but a lot of people like you were there. and I couldn't believe it they were willing to listen to me and I told them the stories the cases and I gave the new fender perspective. and then at the end I told them that they had to and I said up front listen if a judge came into the Yale Law School faculty and told us how to write articles there'd be a lot of defensiveness so I get right now I'm coming in here and telling us something about your job and I I respect your right to be defensive. but I told them the only thing they could do is start giving shorter sentences I would I told them well how about this is an experiment. look at what you did last year because you know judges have keep books and guidelines and I try to be arbitrary look at what you did last year. this year for the next year whatever censuring Klein to give cut it by ten percent. and then let's look and see at the end of the year of crime continue to go down in the city which is. mo most probably would given the trends. and then if it's if it hasn't gone up how about next year you do another ten percent and they all looked at me like I was totally nuts because I was and one of them said wait if I did that that's a good mission that I'd be giving sentences for too long that I took somebody's liberty for too long last year and for the fifteen years before that I've been a judge and I was like I know that's what I'm saying. so it's hard to get people to change their entrance practices and their habits but that's actually what some of the justice reform work that inside the system right which is only a piece of it but some of the work that's inside the system is that's going to have to be a piece of it. thank you so much James Forman junior for your beautiful book and spending the evening with us thank you everyone. you can listen to James Forman Gina this program was recorded at the Sydney Goldstine theater in San Francisco on December thirteenth two thousand eighteen..

prosecutor Larry Krasner Tasha Willis Boston Philadelphia D. Kerr Texas Kim Wesley bell Scott St Louis attorney Brian Stephenson Florida Barry Scheck marijuana Rachel Rollins Reagan Georgia Alabama
"brian stephenson" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

11:45 min | 2 years ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And I'm not here to say that that all of the doctors and all the scientists that mark the horrible and I'm not here to even say that the five what I call bad apples are horrible people they're not. the people who in their job in in their capacity deviated I believe what they should have done. and then as they did they kinda. Darden say in some things to help cover their tracks. but the further they went down that road the further they got from the truth. find out what TV show has that it came from me. desperate housewives. but we have to make a change this is desperate executives exactly so these great trial lawyers don't just rest on their laurels I learned that they have a passion and each time to be even more creative because there's always a new challenge and so when you jerseys change the theme from CSI to desperate housewives in the Merck executives were now he said placing generally jury this case is about kinda like desperate housewives but it's really about desperate executives he had a face of all the desperate housewives on the show in replace those faces with the officials of Merck and then proceeded to say why they were desperate because they sold a bad drug. you know what the deal so this isn't about lawyers this is about persuasion and everything we do in life that's really what it's what it's all about. in the the stuff you said about Turley the importance of connecting with the jurors. you know the jurors are going to decide this case and they've Dino. so much. so many of these cases now the jurors really don't decide fax they decide philosophies a lot of times the fractured medic ana on biox a heart attack hi he was a sixty eight pounds overweight yeah high cholesterol he didn't work out. the plants because the heart attack or the other parts of his so what's going to decide that case is really the philosophical bent of the jury to a large extent because the facts are admitted we can go over a lot of the cases that are have been tried in in more and more of them the facts are admitted and it's just how the jury's going to perceive those facts Tom looks so take that a step further and let's use you as the example and the Bryan stow case in your closing argument it seems to me that as I watched and listened to your closing argument. you were able to adjust for the jury. after they had heard from the defendant's attorney you were able to adjust their perception of the playing field you were able to adjust their perspective of the information that had been presented to them no question the Dino and if you're married to Erica you understand how to do that if you can adjust the playing field with the Erica you're toast so I think that she's done more for my legal career then even you even you wrote the script cook okay let's move over to Bob Shane you know I got a compliment you because this book is really important it's not only important to young individuals who are attending law school and have the opportunity to attend a trial at class but it's important to the public to understand what lawyers really DO and held in passion lawyers really are to make things right so I got to commend you for that thank you and then I got to ask you a little about that we made an individual last year Bryan Stevenson who truly is an extraordinary lawyer an individual and he's one of these guys who's out there telling the world that justice has to be available for all of us and and that's really what you're doing here with this book you're empowering more lawyers to bring justice to everyone. yeah one of the great houses meeting Brian Stephenson who started just an Alabama hung up the shingle to defend clients on death row in at that time Alabama you were entitled to a lawyer to Q. your Deathrow assonance is from now to the equal justice initiative and he's now has when the most popular Ted talks ever over three hundred three million if you use what is a Ted talk to Ted talk is the technology education and design. foreign that started out in California we have a similar are each year when they bring the best movers and shakers in the country Brian Stevens was asked to speak on the criminal justice system and his views on how a mass incarceration she's changed our society and what's amazing about Brian Easter very quick story one of the cases in the book involves a guy name and David Nelson who committed three murders they were brutal he shot a cab driver and rob them of twenty dollars. so now he's being executed in three days before he's about to be executed he goes before the Supreme Court to follow motion to stay the execution. because the lethal injection procedure he feels is cruel and unusual so magic going forty nice a Supreme Court and you couldn't have a more reprehensible disgusting person who did some despicable lacks. and now you're up there saying time out you're saying time out save this guy and what's amazing about Bryan Stevenson is he'll he'll tell you in going to everyone's point early about persuasion you have to be candid and he admitted to the Supreme Court how bad his client was but he said. really he shifted the persuasion to society and says we can't carry out this execution unless we have integrity we must do it the right way so that we don't go fishing around in his arm without a doctor looking for vain without some sort of protocol in place and justice Scalia said or did you mean to tell me that this crime was committed thirty years ago and your client is argue about how we're going to find his family Brian Stevens said said yes it's about us as a society and what we pulled ourselves with regard to our integrity anyone that case at nine zero friends one for home let me read to you just a small portion of the introduction to give you a better perspective of this fascinating book. the author Shane rights in my previous three text books I have taken the lead to explain litigation skills here like a good commentator at a championship game I have let the great trial lawyers I interviewed takes stage as I wrote this book I had one goal I wanted this book to give readers access to specific trial strategies they could use that could not be found anywhere else to that end I did not want my subjects just to tell a bunch of war stories that were exciting but of no help to lawyers with more ordinary cases as a result I required each of my interviewees to provide me with a transcript of a particular trial skill where there was a turning point that affected the trial's outcome so that is what we are talking about today Keith. shame in following up on what Dave Dino was just saying trial lawyer skills. I remember reading a passage in your book about Windle Turley. who was talking about opening statements and you know a lot of young lawyers again try a case start to finish and then start their opening statement by talking about we'll hear the facts and this is what you're gonna you're gonna learn over the course of the trial Turley says don't do it that way he says get in touch with the person that you're representing and tell their story right from the get go is that is that would you would have learned from talking to yes I think one of the great this is that. wells warning closing argument and what this book shares is the obvious point that people who were jurors are making up their minds as quickly as possible if you don't grab their attention in the opening statement and be as persuasive as you can in the opening statement they've already made their decision by the time they get to closing argument it's too late to change to change those viewpoints so he's a big believer in starting strong and so my mind I know Thomas is well because jurors studies show making up their minds within seven seconds of meeting someone whether they're going like that person so if you wait to the end to get your facts and your ideas out there they're already rooting for the other team how much does the jury's opinion of the Attorney. matter. in their decision whether they like the attorney or dislike the attorney. time I like to hear your views on that but from what I've learned from these attorney I guess it depends you have overwhelmingly good fax. there may be some discounts somebody attorneys personality than the typical case it is everything because your credibility is your client's credibility Lisa Blatt one of the. I interviewed she has the most. oral arguments before the Supreme Court if any one ninety nine six thirty three oral arguments and although it's not a trial she says her goal is to channel her client because they're they're one and the same in very channel that to whoever you're trying to persuade you know Dave denotes interesting we have them. we had a couple of trials hello which we had a very friendly lawyer on the other side very friendly judge. and I said you know I'd like to conduct an experiment. I would like for the jurors to secretly check a box. then it would say aha I will not make any decision until all the cases over and the judges instructed me on the other hand if I had to book at this minute I would favor the plaintiff or the defendant and the jurors would do this after opening statement they were doing at the close of the plaintiff's case close to the defense case and then we know how they how they voted at the end and lo and behold we found out that all but three of the jurors had the same view at the end of the case is that he did right after opening statements. now obviously you need a very friendly opposition on the other side because the whole idea's jurors you can't make up your mind until Bob walks and all that stuff but the judge thought it was an interesting experiment so we did that on two cases and indeed with those twenty four jurors and although they waffle back and forth sometimes during the course of things they ended up voting the same way but they were both right after opening statement which in it was pretty interesting how important you tell the story in opening statement. I agree completely and I think on the flip side if you ever put up a witness who the jury finds is being untruthful they're going to hold that against you and change their opinion because you've lost their trust and so to be persuasive as we all know you've got to be a truth teller in if someone thinks you're not a truce television stop listening to you immediately and start listen to the other side Bob what is this.

Bob Supreme Court attorney Darden Attorney. Turley Windle Turley. Lisa Blatt Dave Thomas sixty eight pounds twenty dollars seven seconds thirty years three days
"brian stephenson" Discussed on Katie Couric

Katie Couric

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on Katie Couric

"Was donald trump is an idiot if you go for donald trump you're an idiot and that i can't they're loud and clear to a lot of people we've got a lot of still searching on that i think that was on helpful to say the least i think it's your god given right as an american citizen to say whatever the hell you want about and you're like that official and in the language that you feel it is most appropriate that said i don't think we're going to persuade people and last were be a little more thoughtful about how we talk him i think this is true for liberals i think it's true for politicians to it's never a good idea to plays sociologist when you're talking about voters straight because when you talk about like people feeling this divide are feeling that they're like put upon by you know clings supporters are the elite service up i got its people we often talk about people like there this like where like anthropologists studying an agent culture whatever like what are the white working class voters think we're going to go with a pair binoculars and like look and and holders in the for like obama has done on a few times we did the gun than wouldn't comment like hillary clinton that with the por both like it is never going to idea to talk about voters is that part of the problem you guys why interview doors currents goodwin after the election and on this podcast and she basically said it and i think brian stephenson talks about this a lot as well being proximity and part of it is geographical i mean and get we have these these girl and eggs are and voters often times and people in these big cities coastal cities have very little interaction with people i was having dinner with my has spent on friday night and we are sitting next to a very nice couple from memphis and they recognize me despite the fact i had no makeup on and it looked really scary and so they started chad and this guy we were talking.

donald trump obama hillary clinton memphis official brian stephenson
"brian stephenson" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on Pod Save America

"Was donald trump is an idiot if you go for donald trump you're an idiot and that i can't they're loud and clear to a lot of people i we've got a lot of so searching on that i think that was on helpful to say the least i think it's your god given right as an american citizen to say whatever the hell you want about any elected official and in the language that you feel is most appropriate that said i don't think we're going to persuade people unless we're being a little more thoughtful about how we talk known him i think this is true for liberals i think it's true for politicians to it's never a good idea to play a sociologist when you're talking about voters right because when you talk about like people feeling this divide are feeling that they're like put upon by you know clings supporters are the elite service up i got its people we often talk about people like there this like word like anthropologists studying and agent culture whatever like what are the white working class voters think we're going to go that with a pair binoculars and like look and and holders into the for like obama has done that a few times we needed begun than wouldn't comment like hillary clinton that with the por both like it is never going to idea to talk about voters was about part of the problem you guys why interview doors currents goodwin after the election and on this podcast and she basically said it and i think brian stephenson talks about this a lot as well being proximity and part of it is geographical i mean and get we have these these girl and eggs are an voters often times and people in these big cities coastal cities have very little interaction with people i was having dinner with my has spent on friday night and we are sitting next to a very nice couple from memphis and they recognize me despite that the had no makeup on and it looked really scary and started chatting and this guy we were talking about trump of course because you can't go anywhere without.

donald trump obama hillary clinton memphis official brian stephenson
"brian stephenson" Discussed on RadioLab

RadioLab

01:46 min | 5 years ago

"brian stephenson" Discussed on RadioLab

"I was actually where you know the case this is lawyer brian stephenson again my office the at the time was caught the southern persist offense criticism i was in atlanta georgia before moved had to alabama and the most of his was nineteen eighty six and we were defending someone down and suedes world georgia guy by the name of gamble and the bats in decision came down and objection to him aybar the prosecutor used his preppies strikes exclude all of the african americans and we so wait a minute you're on a there's a new decision bats and vs kentucky which means with prosecutor can't do this and the cord so well i've read bats and what this raises of the prosecutor has to give race between reasons and so the prospers i've got my race neutral reasons it was struck this woman because she looks just like that defended that i was an african american was a wait a minute when is that no she doesn't the jets oh i see that his first up judge that i see as he did what a prosecutor said i struck this may because he lives in south's waynes bro and that's where the defended lives and we were course were say look all the black people live in south waynes pero all the way to that's not a race to to resume jets had no that is a raced into recent he said i stop one person because this man was in the military and he was discharged after five years of the military and in my experience your honor you know to get discharged honorably after an even a number of years or the durant was put back on the stanley so where you discharge from military honorably yes i was i was actually decorated i got this match no i got this award i've got these things well i still except the prosecutor's reading for excluding that per all know my favorite was the positive those are your fellow noah gets better a gets veterans that's your so i struck this man because he testified.

brian stephenson georgia prosecutor african americans durant noah atlanta alabama aybar kentucky five years