19 Burst results for "Brian McCullough"

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

06:08 min | 3 weeks ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"That can be divvied out to the players as well. The question would be how much. How much would if. I'm young twenty two year old female. I'm coming up. And i want to be the next lionel messi. I want to be considered the greatest player of my generation. If i spend the the best years of my career essentially only playing you know. Thirteen other teams over and over again and not trying myself against the whole breadth and width of of the football world. Will i feel like that that. That's a real career. That's what i think this will depend on is if the players can be sold on. Well this is. This is the future football. This is the way things are going to be going forward versus if they're convinced that this is some bastardisation of football that would essentially render their achievements less valid. You know i. He's the lionel messi of the twenty thirties but with an asterix because unlike lido messi who had to play against all of european lee played against the same fifteen teams over and over again that remains to be seen at it. You're right it is moving fast. So i don't know yeah. I think we'll just have to watch for a lot of it but thank you for sort of you know demystifying and you've brought in just how it touches on so many other spheres Sectors of the world. One question for you as an arsenal fan will this change. You know if they if they stay in the super league can go forward with that. Will you still be an arsenal fan. I thought about that this morning on the one. I think every fan whose whose team was on this list was like breathe a sigh of relief because like we haven't even spoken on like this is not based on merit at all arsenal has not won the league in Fifteen years they've won. Fa cups or whatever but there's no reason our arsenals may be finished ninth in the table this year. So there's no reason on merit arsenal tottenham. Who is i should note. our arsenals. Biggest rival has not won a trophy of any sort since the early sixties not a single trolley. Not cup not you know our slows at least one cups in the last five years but so this is not based on anything. Other than these are the biggest brands i used. The liverpool versus everton analogy like everton was one of the best teams in england consistently for in the nineteen eighties. They just haven't been for the last thirty years right. So if you're talking biggest teams big teams. You have to have an everton in there. You'd have to have a new castle in there. It's not based on that. It's a hundred percent based on what these global brands represent. And so one. The things that i think everyone else. That's not a part of these superstar. Brand teams is is suddenly feeling like why is my.

england ninth lionel messi Fifteen years arsenal liverpool early sixties this year fifteen teams everton One question one Thirteen other teams hundred percent twenty two year old this morning lido messi nineteen eighties at least one cups last thirty years
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And socially that runs counter to everything culturally and socially that we've been acculturated to expect. I don't think obviously that it's going to turn out that way. But you know, I totally understand that that that because that is something that it was hard wired into us to see a snake and be fearful of it. Right. I think that it is hard wired into us to be fearful of people looking in my window. Right. And so that's applicable even to things like like technology like like when I turn turn off my lightbulb at night. Right. What have you learned about conducting unintelligent podcast interview that you can share with me? The pre either either in this interview or in your previous podcasts experiences. Well, that presumes that I conduct intelligent, podcast interviews. Okay. Real quick though. Because I have super simple answers for this one A B overprepared every time I do an interview I end up using maybe thirty percent of the questions that I come up with because you have to know what you what you want to talk about. But then don't be married to the things that you want to talk about over prepare have more questions than you'll ever use. So that when you start talking if you actually listen, good interviews, go in the direction that they're meant to go in and that they should organically go in. And so if you're over prepared, then when the when the interview goes in the direction that's this thirty percent of questions and instead of that thirty percent of questions like he thought it would you can go to so over prepare listen. And then listen, I I've listened to Howard Stern my entire life and his. Precept is is you know, don't stand in the way of good radio. So if if the conversation goes somewhere that you don't expect, but it's interesting like trust it be willing to throw your notes out and go where the good radio is which is good interesting conversations. Why is Joe Rogan successful? Despite the fact that he doesn't seem to prepare joh- because he's curious. You know, what I mean because he's intellectually never as like he's always wanting to learn new things. So that's a superpower. Because it means that he can sit down as long as you're interesting. I if Joe brought on a boring person. And by the way, I have heard boring interviews on that show. And guess what? I haven't heard those people again. But if Joe can find someone interesting to talk to again, he's willing to listen because if someone takes him down in interesting road, he's willing to go there too. He's he's dying to go down that interesting road with whoever that person might be what will your next book be? We are currently shopping a history of nerds and nerd culture. And I'm not going to elaborate any more than that. But it's gonna be. A history of nerd culture. Okay, Brian McCullough. Thank you for coming on the show and for producing so much useful. And high quality media about technology..

Joe Rogan Howard Stern Brian McCullough joh thirty percent
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And so a lot of what was lost. There was more of the detail which on the winning end. That's great because all of that details still there if you listened to the podcast. But essentially what I had to lose with sort of the nitty gritty beat by beat. You know, year-by-year details as in the book, it became more of telling the the overall arc and how each company contributed to how slowly technology in the web went mainstream and all of our lives. But then at the same time. That's what I learned the interesting process of doing the book because I I've never written a book before I'm not a journalist. I'm not technically a professional historian. I would find the actual narrative that I needed in the doing of it. Right. So it wasn't that. Well, I came Netscape and then came Yahoo. And then after Yahoo came EBay, so I gotta do EBay next. I would discover in the process of doing it what the real story was what was the contribution that some of these big names actually made to to mainstreaming technology. So the story of EBay I realized in the in the telling of it is EBay trained us to trust strangers for the first time EBay did things like create the first online reputation system. That you know, where would we have? Where would Uber and Airbnb beat today without that? And then like, you know, I knew I was going to do a stuff on Napster and file sharing. So you think oh, well that I know that story that's all about a piracy and things like that. Will no Napster was the first blow in the the first the first brick laid to the modern foundation of you know, we live in in society. Today, we expect unlimited selection in instant gratification. If you tell me about a book or a movie, I expect that I failed to like start watching the thirty seconds. So it was more that I discovered the narratives that each company and each technology advanced to get us to the modern day. How does Microsoft factor into the history of the internet way more than I thought it would the startups that I founded were mostly tail end of the dot com. Bubble into the dot com. Bursting aftermath so mostly in the two thousands and in that decade. Microsoft's infamous now lost decade where they sort of lost their relevance in the tech industry..

EBay Yahoo Microsoft Airbnb Netscape thirty seconds
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"I think it's within ten months, and that's Facebook opens open re registration as we said. I couldn't figure out what why everyone loved Facebook. Because I couldn't get on it because I didn't have a dot EDU address in two thousand seven Facebook opens open registration and everybody gets on and in if you were alive at the time you remember this. There was no one on it. And then seemingly overnight everyone. You knew it was on it and people you didn't you had lost touch of was on it. And then your grandmother was on it. And then everyone was on it. I think that the reason that the iphone took off a side from the great design aside from Steve Jobs being the greatest showman of our era. Is that at the exact same moment social took off? And so the the iphone or the smartphone? Generally is simultaneously the perfect consumption device for. Social media. But also crucially the greatest production device for social media. So a year later when the app store, launches what are the thirty key flagship apps that at that launch on the app store. Facebook was one of them. And so how would I question in the book would Facebook with social networking have taken off had? Smartphones, not taking off at the same time would smartphones have taken off if social media wasn't there to be the perfect thing for people to do with them. So again, a theme of this book is timing is everything and simultaneously. The iphone comes Facebook is open to everybody. And here we go. We're in the modern world. Brian. Thank you so much this. You gotta read this book how the internet happened. If you lived through it, if you I mean, a lot of this. I missed just from having three kids almost at the same time. So it's going to relive the two thousand three to two thousand five years is in here. And if you're definitely if you wanna get into the business of the internet, and you are twenty years old, I highly recommend this book just to have a basis and just to read the stories because they are interesting, and they're not they're not the made up stories. They're not the EBay. What was the the thing has has? So thank you so much Brian McCullough also host of the internet history podcast and the Techni ride home. He's at Brian MCC on Twitter any other place, obviously, the book can be bought or downloaded or Leo. Yes. E book audiobook version. Yes. So wherever fine books are sold as they tell me to say the audiobook not me, by the way, because I have to do a daily podcast that I was afraid that if I lost my voice, either the book would be screwed or the daily pug has would be screwed. So I can't remember his name. But I actually he's a very talented of narrator and voice guy. So one last question sitting down to podcast or sitting down to write which do you prefer? I'm not sure that I'll do another book, and I'm really enjoying podcasting right now. I. I think. Here's my question. It's interesting that one was intended to support the other now. Yeah. Yeah. They support each other. Exactly. Well, I have a degree in writing. And I prefer sitting down and talking to people. Down by myself fine. Thank you so much for joining us frying McCullough. Check out the book read the book and listen to all of his podcast. Thanks so much for joining us there you million and thank you for joining us on triangulation triangulation records every Friday at three PM Pacific. You can download any of the episodes. Any of the interviews. We've done twit dot TV slash try. If you wanna watch live. Go to twit dot TV slash live, hang out in the chat room, and listen and comment and just download our podcast subscribe. And it's really important. If you like these interviews Tele friend because that is a good way for us to for the word to get around that we do these long-form interviews that are fun. I think Tilson to hosted by me, and of course, LaPorte Jason L and thank you so much. We'll see you next time on triangulation.

EBay Facebook Brian McCullough Leo Steve Jobs Brian Techni Twitter Tilson Brian MCC Jason L PM Pacific two thousand five years twenty years
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"Your home to to market, more and more and more. Right. And then there's something about I don't know. There's something about like, let's say the Amazon just came up with a they just applied for a patent for some kind of technology that where you would call if you're coughing than your smart device might regain recommend cough medicine, which sounds a little black mirror ish. But when you really think about it, it's not as bad as what Facebook is accused of doing like, I'm posting a bunch of pictures of something that like I have sending all these Cigna. Sales by my family pictures, or my friend pictures that are going to convince them that I might like have anxiety disorder or something that then they're going like that's what they're accused of. It's just more nefarious. Let's under the guise of like, we're just all sharing connecting everyone. But then they're taking all these psychological signals. And then telling me stuff like that. I feel much more comfortable with like I cough. Do you want cough medicine? I'll sell you some I agree with you. I agree with you. Because and again, and I believe this Jeff betas and Amazon says we just wanna be more convenient for you. You're sick. Don't even have to think about it. We're going to have a drone deliver you the medicine before you even have to ask for it. Right. However, think of it this way, there's nothing to stop them from then selling that information to your insurance company. That's true. And so I'm you know, Amazon doesn't feel mostly like a company that would do that Facebook Moorefield like a company that would do that. But there's nothing to stop them. So I don't know, where's the slippery slope and all that they might be the insurance. Company. Oh, that's right. I forgot about. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. They're. Yeah. Phone. So this all leads to the the term Netscape to the iphone. I don't want you to give away your whole. There's so much more that we didn't talk about you still need to read it. But what what why end at the iphone? I guess is my question. Well, again, because I I don't think you can understand the modern era. If you don't understand how social got here, and how mobile got here. But the reason that Mobile's important is that the. Let's see I think it wasn't until two thousand that home PC penetration in the United States past fifty percent for the first time. So the fact that now what the what the mobile revolution really is is the ultimate culmination of the computing revolution until smartphones. Got ubiquitous we did not have the majority and again, caveat caveat of first world developed countries of but also in developing countries, increasingly you did not have the majority of people computing using computers on a daily basis. And again, I she actually hates that. I tried her out to do these things. But my mom used has used computers for twenty years, but she used them sparingly. She sent emails she looked up things when she needed them. She, you know, did work for her work when she, but but she now uses a computer like everyone else. What eighty nine thousand times a day because she has a computer in her pocket, and the the the reason that I end with the iphone and the point that I make in that last chapter is that as we said there was a whole bunch of pioneers trying to make mobile computing, happened, palm blackberry. The the Newton Simon all these things and the for the technical reasons that we talked about that that broadband over networks and three G and things like that came. And then the fact that the the batteries in the screen size, and all these things that that that that people have explained about why it happened at the same time. The I posit in the book that it's possible that the iphone could have been like, a blackberry where it would have been a super successful. But it still would have been just for business people in busy people and things like that. But the th the iphone comes out in two thousand seven there's something else that happened in two thousand seven within months..

Amazon Facebook cough Newton Simon Mobile United States Netscape Jeff fifty percent twenty years three G
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"And we thank Todo for their support of triangulation. All right. So Facebook did we skip anything? Are we read of obviously, we skipped webcam a fast buck friendster and six degrees, which I've ached. In your book. So how did that all what I mean? I just I suddenly just remember friendster happening. I remember why. Or maybe it was like Lee after AOL instant messenger. Was that something that may be right to it? Yeah. And I talked about that about how AOL really could have had a social network. There's even we're skipping over this. But there's there's chapters about like the ALL Time Warner merger tied in with the bubble. Bursting and the the Microsoft at trial and things like that. But yeah, I do point out that that AOL could have survived because it actually had the social network that everyone was on as the bubble was bursting and like to the tune of hundreds of millions of people. They just didn't know what they had funny thing about six degrees, which most people consider to be the the first social network as we would recognize today again. This was a too soon thing for a very simple technical reason, which was um. That digital cameras were a thing yet. So there's a quote in the book where they're they're having these these feverish discussions about how we can convince people to to get pictures and scan them in Email them to us because you can't do profile pictures. So what good is social networking? If you can't like take a picture of the party, you're at last night, or the, you know, the sunset or your or your dog or your baby or whatever. So too soon digital cameras only go consumer mainstream round two thousand two thousand one but they're not on things like smartphones yet, or there are no smartphones that are on cellphones. And then so nap friendster comes next and friendster simply runs into the technological challenge of they just don't know how to scale things like that yet. Because the the it's a it's an engineering challenge to for a social network because each and every user has to see some. Something different. And something has to be propagated. That's different every time you log in. And I had a Jonathan Abrahams on the on the podcast, and he will straight up tell you. He's been on many places been interviewed many times. He's like we just we didn't have the chops. We didn't we didn't have the engineering, right? We were too soon. My space does this better. My space also was super successful at a time for not both six degrees and friendster wanted you to be your authentic, self and the way that Mark Zuckerberg eventually wanted you to be on Facebook as one of the reasons my space took off is because you could be whoever you want. You could be a fake Stor on my space. You could beat Teela, tequila and share whatever you wanted on on my space. And so I I'm sure you can remember too. There was this whole period into two thousand four two thousand five two thousand six when when Rupert Murdoch buys my space where it seemed like my space was the winner. But you kept hearing about this college, mice base clone and. I I was out of college at this point. So I couldn't I couldn't see why people thought that this was superior. And so everyone, I think has a general idea of the Facebook story, the, you know, the movie story, and the movie story is not necessarily inaccurate. They took a lot of artistic liberties and things like that. But they also focused on a part of the story that was more dramatic. So what I wanted to do in. This book was to tell you more of the story about the the founding, and like what were the problems? Why did they win? Why did they almost fail? What were the problems that they overcame, and what I ended up focusing on a lot was how much it seems that Mark Zuckerberg was not convinced that he was onto this great idea that Sean Parker has said many times and various interviews and stuff that Zuckerberg was obsessed with doing wire hog, which was Napster. Clone that he was he was happy that this social networking thing. This Facebook had taken off. But he he really thought the thing was sharing an different way sharing media sharing your files sharing things like this and..

Facebook Mark Zuckerberg AOL friendster Jonathan Abrahams Time Warner Rupert Murdoch Microsoft Lee Sean Parker Napster Teela six degrees
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"And then when the experiment is wildly successful than they're like, all right, fine, and they renegotiate the, and they make windows, and then and then and then Steve Jobs has his arm twisted. And apple people at apple convince them, oh, we need to make these for windows machines as well. And so then apple and I tunes and and the ipod and the gadget era. Yeah. Yes. The the stuff that that I guess it was the time we needed stuff in our hands. And that's the the palm era as well. Or is that did we skip ahead. Too far. Oh, no, no, no. We can talk about this. But then we should come back to social before. Oh, yeah. Yeah. The the the the the mobile era is another example of it was just too soon. I can remember my brother coming to me in two thousand two and had had a phone where he could get Florida gator football scores and basketball scores on his phone. And I was like, well why why would ever want to do that? If I want to find out what the Gators did last night. I'll go on my computer and turn it on and find out. So I feel like my entire the first half of my career mobile was always something that almost like VR today or other things I was I was told forever is the next thing the next thing. And and it really wasn't next thing. Forever. Going back to the Newton in one thousand nine hundred nineteen Ninety-three that apple created and IBM had a my Simon. And and then the palm pilots which. I had and and people tech people had and business people had and then the blackberries, but again until the iphone it was it was still a niche product where you know, blackberry was hugely successful as late as ninety as two thousand five two thousand six and their install base is only twenty million or thirty million. And those numbers are off the top of my head. But they're in the ballpark of what they actually had not a billion two billion or whatever. So again, it was just a case of it was too soon. We didn't WI fi didn't go mainstream until two thousand to two thousand three we we didn't have three G till after the iphone anyway. So it was just it was you gotta give apple credit for conceptually getting the smartphone. Right. From the very first try the point. I make in the book is that the automobile it took forty years to get the configuration the way that we experienced today. There's no longer a crank on the friend that sort of thing. It's amazing. That the iphone? They got that conceptual design right from the very good go. But they also were fortunate to come out at the exact right time when the technology was there, but then also and this can lead us into social. There was something to do with these devices that came out at the exact same time. Right. Exactly. Okay. We'll get to that. And I love that that that is some of the the I think what's so key about your book, and as you were talking before about being portent for younger people who didn't, you know, necessarily live through all of this as adults. They that the iphone, you know, when I first read that sentence in your book was it was conceptually perfect. I was like there was it wasn't perfect. Like there was no cars. No, outsource agstar. And so of course, but then to think about that. You're exactly right. The concept was perfect, and they get where as you know, that and maybe that wasn't true for any other company. But yeah, I wanna talk about social and the iphone and all the rest, but I. I want to talk about something that people might think is crazy right now. But I don't it's a it's a toilet with technology built into it. I'm talking about the TOTO wash. Let you've heard Leo talk about this. I've used it as his house and is very nice to use a toilet. That is very warm in the seat opens for you. When you come in and closes for you. And it's also a day. I have not usually as day, but he raves about it. So it's it he says, it's great and you should trust him. You've trusted him a lot of things..

apple Steve Jobs Gators Leo Florida TOTO WI blackberry Simon IBM forty years three G
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"Bubbles back the ninety s are back the bubbles back. But it was a really unique time that I don't think can really ever be replicated for other outside reasons. Wall Street reasons baby boomers have bringing a ton of money to that needed to be invested somewhere all sorts of other structural reasons that I I don't think we'll see again in our lifetime. And so what I mean, how does the dot? Com. Burst compared to like the two thousand eight like the real estate like what were the? Like the dot com. I felt so important to me. And I definitely knew people who had got in on Alcan's of IPO's in their company. And then all of a sudden, you know, they had no everyone I knew was out of work everyone. I knew is out of work so job, no money. Even though they handle this money on paper just before and they had maybe bought a house and gotten a crazy mortgage. And then I mean, how did the to connect in your mind between two thousand eight in the bubble. Well on the one hand, I do make the point in the book that the dot com. Bubble was the first time that mainstream main street Americans. Learn what a bubble meant. It was also I have statistics in the book that like, you know, the people that started investing in the nineties something like seventy percent of them got started after nineteen ninety-five. So there was a lot of people that this was the first time that they're saving for retirement and that goes away. Unfortunately, I think that then the the housing bubble was worse because it was just like well that was a fad that didn't work out. We learned our lesson and the just a few years later when people are pumping up this other thing people are like, okay. Okay. Okay. I missed out. I didn't I I try to outline sort of the last month of the bubble. And and everyone knows it's a bubble. But if I just hold on maybe my company while I appeal if I just hold on. Maybe my EBay stock will double again, and then I'll get then I'll get out. It's waiting for the greater fool sort of thing. So I think that a lot of the housing bubble was people like all right? I got burn. And on that one. This this time, I'm going to be smart. And the problem is is that housing is such a greater percentage of the overall economy of the country in the world and is tied into so many other industries that even though a ton of money was evacuated in the dot com. Bubble and it did lead to a recession, and there was also touched off by nine eleven and things like that. But it was still sort of isolated from the larger world and US economy and then the housing the housing market and the housing industry was just more integrative. And so it were it was worse. So then you move on to to Google like mostly the Google peo- and Google ad words and Napster sort of like Phoenix's rising from the ashes tongue live. The point that I make on the in the book, and I'll just make this point. And then move on real quick is that so Google solves search, which is genius. The second thing that Google does that his genius is create the greatest advertising engine ever devised by humanity. But they did not invent that they they adapted that or stole depending on your definition from another dot com company called Goto dot com that became overture. They did it in a way that was googly overture was basically just a pure pay for play auction. If you're willing to pay fifty.

Bubble Google Alcan US Goto Phoenix seventy percent one hand
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"It's recur sive it gets better and better and better. And so I think that maybe the problem that we have today is that once they prove they could do that. And they did the same thing with Edwards and add sense. Because remember Tim Armstrong is here in New York in two thousand two thousand one with like five hundred an army of actual ads sales people, and then add add words, and at sense is completely automated, and you can do it by yourself. And so they fire all the sales people, and and it's a self serve advertising model. I think that the problem is is that so Facebook comes along in the wake of this. And and a lot of ways I think that Facebook really cribbed a lot of things from the way Google did business, and and they're like, well, there's no need for human curation. There's no need for an actual human have their thumb on any of these skills because the math all works. And I think. We're learning right now, or I hope that people are learning is that. Yeah. I know that the algorithms and the math are still the most efficient way to do things, especially at scale. But I really think we need to bring humans back and put their thumbs on the scales. For a lot of things especially involving humanity. Great. I mean, I think comparing to like I use the site called posh Mark wages sort of like EBay. You know, like you just said on your old stuff, and I'm not so much like, I don't necessarily look at people's reviews anymore. It's just like I use it. Because like you give a percentage too posh, Mark. Like, there's a there's a middle man in there, probably women, but. That are like if somebody doesn't like they don't release the money until I get the thing. And you know, I don't like an if it's not what I what I ordered. Then they're in between, you know, they there's a middle like, I don't I don't trust. I don't like I I'm not, you know, I I don't have the same sort of trust. I used to have an EBay or Craigslist. So it is it is a human there. But yeah, I mean, that's we're talking about advertising versus delivering breads, which is a different. Let's let's move onto dot com era. Let's let's go to the headshot com. Puppet. The time the wonderful time to be alive that amazing time where everyone knew it wouldn't last. And yet we were still buying it, all and are not buying it. But still like I remember I got married in two thousand and when it was when I was working at tech TV, and they gave me as a wedding president my husband, and I they gave us a DVD player and it came from Cosmo dot com. So like, they they just it wasn't that. I think they hadn't thought about getting gift, but it was like. They ordered from Cosmo dot com and Kuzma dot com. Gave us our first DVD player and it came in thirty minutes. So, but that was just ridiculous. They were never going to make money, but talk about that time. So right. You know, the the Cosmo was famous for like if you ordered Ben and Jerry's you could have just gone down from your apartment in New York City because they were mostly in New York City at first, and they would they would deliver it to your door for less than you would pay. If you had just got across the street to the Bodega, and yet they still had to pay that delivery drivers. They still had to have the refrigeration in the warehousing and things like that. But again that was like that whole again Jeff Bezos taught everyone get big fast kill your category and worry about prophets later and it worked out for basis, although it almost didn't, but that's an entirely different story. But the the the dot com era is sort of about this. The the petScom example is it they they lost money on every bag of. Dog food that they shipped dog foods and expensive or not expensive. It's a heavy item to ship, and you know, they've got to compete on free shipping. Web van the grocery shipping place. They were supposed the original business plan. They were gonna make their money on the delivery charge. But then to quickly gain market share..

Facebook Tim Armstrong New York City EBay Edwards Craigslist New York Jeff Bezos Google Mark president Ben Jerry thirty minutes
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"But oh, nothing, and they don't even produce anything all of the content on social networks and social media are produced by the members. And so EBay number three. I think deserves credit for proving proving that that was possible. Well, so you say that EBay really showed us how to trust strangers. And that that was true. If we if we just went on EBay and said like, you know, I'm gonna give you money. So that you send me that sweater. But I don't know that it's all I mean, we can give them a little blame too. Because what we were really trusting is the crowd, right? Like, we were trusting like, so okay. I wouldn't send money to the person with a sweater and less, you know, they had a rating which meant a certain amount of people and so back then that was great because those were actually people, but now they're not people anymore right now. We're trusting like, okay. Well, you know, this this tweet has five now. And you know, re tweets it must be correct. It must be accurate. I must be able to trust it. So like the blame of because those are, you know, no longer people. There are a lot of bots. They're just a lot or it's just a lot of people living in their bubble wanting to believe something. So I mean, you can trace back the problems we have right now in like, trusting the wisdom of crowds or buts back to evening. I would I agree with you. Actually, I I would say that that may be one of the reasons is there was always money behind EBay. So you can't fake that like, you know, like there's zero marginal cost for sending another spam tweet or whatever. But if you don't deliver that stereo, or like, you know, the the check or money order credit card doesn't come through. I would give more blame to the shift from yahu to Google to Facebook in the sense in this sense. Now granted. There's no way that a human curated directory could've ever scaled to the internet at the size of today. But even the size of two thousand two thousand one so when Google and their algorithms solve the the search problem, and they do it at scale and the more pages they feed the algorithm..

EBay Google Facebook
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"So what everyone thought was it was going to be like it had been for the last fifteen or twenty years. So okay. Well, Jeff Bezos has cornered books. And okay. Yeah. He's moving into music and movies, but those are like books, you can ship them in boxes and things like that. But so one of the things that caused the dot com. Bubble to happen is everybody thought all right basis has got category acts. What's category? Why what's categories Z? And so that is not only is that what a lot of the money was thrown at. But it's what we remember what the popular imagination remembers if you remember the dotcoms at all is because they all those companies spent so much money to try to market to us to try to to build their brand in the way that that Amazon had I think that Amazon at least in the dot com era, basically focused on on media and people thought that they were going to stop there, and they never stopped. We sort of skipped over one other point which was the community sites like EBay portals. And I guess this would be the time of Craigslist as well. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Which I actually had to cut out of the book I had a little bit about Craigslist. Let me just make a real brief point about. Ebay because I actually wrote a piece about this and entrepreneur recently EBay quietly is maybe one of the most influential because we don't think about it. But we think about the FANG companies Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Google think of the three things that EBay gave us. I I it was just telling you how much people were afraid to do business even online EBay taught Americans how to trust strangers online number one that you could by a stereo from someone in Nebraska and never meet them never know their name never see their face. And somehow it would magically all work out. So I think that EBay went a long way to to training Americans not only the trust Rangers. But to trust the internet number two. How did they do this by creating that rating system so that you had reputation so that you could trust the seller that had a ratings and things like that we live in a tyranny of the five star review. Now. How would we? Things like Uber and Airbnb had EBay not proven that you could create the sort of ad hoc decentralized reputation system that it's not perfect, but works well enough most of the time and the number three EBay never owned anything. I tell the story in the book when the newspapers start coming around kicking the tires at EBay because for whatever people might think the newspapers were not dumb. They knew that their at their classified ads. Cash. Cow was endangered by the web and the internet, and they tried to come Jeff skull is they're just go as you might know is one of the cofounders sort of of EBay, and he says in the book that they the the guy that wants to come and buy them says, well, I'm never going to get this passed my board because you guys don't own anything. Like, what tangibly do you have here, and they try to convince them. Well, we have the value of our community. We have the value of what our members are doing on our platform. So again, we're used to that today that that that social, you know. Facebook is worth four hundred five hundred billion dollars makes billions of dollars a quarter..

Ebay Jeff Bezos Craigslist Amazon Facebook Rangers Jeff skull FANG companies Airbnb Nebraska Google Netflix four hundred five hundred bill twenty years
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"And we thank last pass for their support of triangulation, all right Amazon. Now, Amazon is a really unique one of the most unique companies in your book because it it started out as the it wasn't the first they weren't the first people to sell things on the internet. But they were the first biggest and they're still the biggest so talk a little bit about the beginnings of Amazon. Yeah. Well, real quick though. I wanna point out like there's so many stories in this book of where the the one that wins is not the first one. It's like the that saying that leaders always get EROs in their back. You know, it wasn't a Facebook one. It wasn't my space. But the even before my space friendster even before. There were six degrees. The fact that to this day, the the number one e commerce company in the world by far I think last week I heard fifty nine cents of every dollar spent online is it goes to Amazon. It was was the first is actually we got to give them a lot of credit for that. Because again, like, you know, no, one swooped in and and eight Jeff Bezos is lunch. What? So how how did it get started? Jeff Bezos is he's working on Wall Street at a firm, the aquatic firm, that's actually competing tooth and nail with Bernie Madoff squad firm and the internet and web takeoff and he's assigned by his boss. The Shaw to David Shaw to to research this as a business opportunity, and there's fame the famous story of he sees how the internet's taking off and he realizes this is the biggest thing of his life. Is he going to regret leaving Wall Street behind leaving his Christmas bonus behind? No, he's going to go off and do this internet thing, and he and MacKenzie his wife drive across the country and he's typing the business plan on his laptop. And he they don't even know where they're going to go. Okay. There's a several different internet stories internet founding stories that I've had to debunk in this book. I spoke to shell caffeine who was employee number one at Amazon he said, well funny story. The Jeff had been out to San Francisco the month before to hire me and the other employee number two. I can't remember his name at the moment. Oh, and we knew we were going to Seattle because he had already done the research if they're going to do books the Ingram and Taylor are the big book warehouses, and they have warehouses in Oregon. He doesn't want to be in California because California has a sales tax or higher sales tax. And so see we knew we were going to Seattle. So okay. And same thing happened with EBay, the whole idea that EBay was they he wanted his fiancee that have a place to to trade Pez dispensers that these are these are stories that are made up because they're nice cute little PR stories. But I think the bottom line story of Amazon is that Jeff Bezos, I believe this saw the internet saw that it was the greatest thing that would ever happen is lifetime the greatest business opportunity. And I what I don't believe is that he knew. I think he wanted he intuited from day one that it could be an everything store. I think that commerce could have efficiencies of scale and efficiency in terms of being more convenient for for consumers. But he he started with books because I believe in. I if everything we've read about him, I believe his mind works this way, he was going to test the hypothesis now as soon as he proved that books that people would buy things because remember in ninety five I in fact, again back to my library research as late as nine hundred and ninety nine I'm reading articles after article after article in Forbes fortune and BusinessWeek people winner people ever going to trust buying doing commerce online putting their credit cards online..

Jeff Bezos Amazon David Shaw Seattle MacKenzie friendster Facebook Ingram EBay Bernie Madoff caffeine San Francisco California Forbes fortune Pez Oregon BusinessWeek Taylor
How Amazon became the world's biggest e-retailer

Triangulation

03:46 min | 2 years ago

How Amazon became the world's biggest e-retailer

"Amazon is a really unique one of the most unique companies in your book because it it started out as the it wasn't the first they weren't the first people to sell things on the internet. But they were the first biggest and they're still the biggest so talk a little bit about the beginnings of Amazon. Yeah. Well, real quick though. I wanna point out like there's so many stories in this book of where the the one that wins is not the first one. It's like the that saying that leaders always get EROs in their back. You know, it wasn't a Facebook one. It wasn't my space. But the even before my space friendster even before. There were six degrees. The fact that to this day, the the number one e commerce company in the world by far I think last week I heard fifty nine cents of every dollar spent online is it goes to Amazon. It was was the first is actually we got to give them a lot of credit for that. Because again, like, you know, no, one swooped in and and eight Jeff Bezos is lunch. What? So how how did it get started? Jeff Bezos is he's working on Wall Street at a firm, the aquatic firm, that's actually competing tooth and nail with Bernie Madoff squad firm and the internet and web takeoff and he's assigned by his boss. The Shaw to David Shaw to to research this as a business opportunity, and there's fame the famous story of he sees how the internet's taking off and he realizes this is the biggest thing of his life. Is he going to regret leaving Wall Street behind leaving his Christmas bonus behind? No, he's going to go off and do this internet thing, and he and MacKenzie his wife drive across the country and he's typing the business plan on his laptop. And he they don't even know where they're going to go. Okay. There's a several different internet stories internet founding stories that I've had to debunk in this book. I spoke to shell caffeine who was employee number one at Amazon he said, well funny story. The Jeff had been out to San Francisco the month before to hire me and the other employee number two. I can't remember his name at the moment. Oh, and we knew we were going to Seattle because he had already done the research if they're going to do books the Ingram and Taylor are the big book warehouses, and they have warehouses in Oregon. He doesn't want to be in California because California has a sales tax or higher sales tax. And so see we knew we were going to Seattle. So okay. And same thing happened with EBay, the whole idea that EBay was they he wanted his fiancee that have a place to to trade Pez dispensers that these are these are stories that are made up because they're nice cute little PR stories. But I think the bottom line story of Amazon is that Jeff Bezos, I believe this saw the internet saw that it was the greatest thing that would ever happen is lifetime the greatest business opportunity. And I what I don't believe is that he knew. I think he wanted he intuited from day one that it could be an everything store. I think that commerce could have efficiencies of scale and efficiency in terms of being more convenient for for consumers. But he he started with books because I believe in. I if everything we've read about him, I believe his mind works this way, he was going to test the hypothesis now as soon as he proved that books that people would buy things because remember in ninety five I in fact, again back to my library research as late as nine hundred and ninety nine I'm reading articles after article after article in Forbes fortune and BusinessWeek people winner people ever going to trust buying doing commerce online putting their credit cards online.

Jeff Bezos Amazon David Shaw Seattle Mackenzie Friendster Facebook Ingram Ebay Bernie Madoff Caffeine San Francisco California Forbes Fortune PEZ Oregon Businessweek Taylor
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"That to to search was the relevancy that Larry in Sergei's page rank algorithm created and so even though if you searched on excite you would if you were searching for windsurfing, you would find the page would be there, but it might be on page nine hundred, but Larry and Sergei's relevancy algorithm. Put that at number one. And then the the game was over exactly when the very late nineties. I worked at a company called look smart. I don't know if you've ever Looksmart on percent. They hired a bunch of liberal arts majors like myself. I wasn't a recent. Vijay? I was probably like twenty five or twenty six but recently moved to the bay area where I had to make more money than my job in a bookstore. Made me, and yeah, they hired us to sit there in a room of room. And it was it was y'all who clone and they had some people doing a directory, and then they hired this group of people salt called they called a search editors. And or I think that's what we're calling we answer people's questions. So we would actually answer people's emails. This was the, you know, the dot com bubble which we will get to that you write about greatly. But yeah, it's it was people would ask us like where do I find, you know, the best thing to get bloodstains outta my clothes? I don't that's so a little bit Corre, but then alive Cora sort of thing. You know who else I learned from researching the book who actually was somewhat successful before? A he made Wikipedia was Jimmy Wales at doing yahu. Loans essentially or like not Yahoo. Clones. But more directories for specific nieces and things like that. I had no idea but actually in the dot com era. He had some success doing that. Well, it's so many of our emails that we we would respond. We'd basically say here try this brand new search engine it's called Google. These terms than it should get you your results. So like, basically we are an advertisement for Google. And not surprisingly it didn't. I think I think Looksmart still exists in some form or another. But I'm sure Don Pyle still exists somewhere. Another hold on. I'm looking right now. Okay. Will you look dog pile, and then we'll talk about Amazon, but and we'll talk about what happened there, and we'll talk about Google and EBay and Facebook and all of our old friends. But I I want to take a minute to thank our sponsor. What's his last pass? Now, if you you probably already know if you're listening to this, you know, to have a secure password, you know, not to use the same password, you know, to use numbers and letters and not write it down on the little piece of paper and have lots of them. But if you work with a large group of people chances are, maybe not everyone knows that. And maybe you have passwords that you need to share among your company, and there's not a super easy way to share. If you don't use last pass. But last past is a great it's great for personal use. It's great for business use we use it here at twit which I love it's part of our it's. Of our benefits. I guess we have personal and business last pass last pass.

Google Looksmart Vijay Larry Sergei Jimmy Wales Don Pyle Cora Yahoo Amazon Facebook EBay
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"Yeah. Yeah. And and also before nineteen Ninety-three, you could not legally do commerce on the internet the internet by law was supposed to be a you. So you couldn't sell ads you couldn't put. Classifieds up you couldn't. And even though at the time. There wasn't the technology to do transactions with SSL and things like that that actually Netscape invented so. Right as late as nineteen ninety-five. I I had on he's in the book too. I think a Kremlin. Can't remember his first name, but the founder of match dot com who also famously bought sex dot com, and was one of these very early domain name squatters or investors. I guess is a better term for it. Right. So as late as as a nine thousand nine hundred that's one of the reasons that Amazon only got started in ninety five once once they once they could figure out what they could get domains than they had the whole process of figuring out what the the domain was that they wanted. Yeah. That's a great story in the book to. Yeah. So I mean, that's why you used to see like for a long time. It's like the real you would understand a site to be real and true. If it had the backslash back, you know, a university, plus backslapping. Whenever you know, a million things every right now, it's a little suspect because the only way that you could have access to web hosting account is if it was through your company or through your university. So again like Yahoo. Its first thing is Stanford dot EDU squiggly squat slash Aki Bono or something like that forward slash Yahoo. Because you know, it was a research project to begin with. And then also, you know, it wasn't like, well, let's go out and get the domain for this thing. Which is the first thing that every business does today. So let's move onto the early search engines and Yahoos yahu you right? Was never a tech company. Talk a little bit about that. They it's funny because in the I did a lot of literally going to the library and getting magazines from the time because not every fortune and Forbes, some magazines are better and newspapers are better their archives on others. And then there's a lot from the time that are gone, like industry standard and things like that. It was surprising to me that by as early as nineteen Ninety-six. Jerry Yang is telling interviewers it's telling journalists straight up that we don't want to be a tech company. First of all what people forget is that for a very long time yahu was not even a search engine. It was a directory, and they had hundreds of paid salaried employees whose job was to surf the web. And then when they find a new website put it into this hierarchy into it was a glorified yellow pages for for the. The for the web. But that's what people needed in one thousand nine hundred four and nine hundred ninety five and ninety six again because you know, it's not well, go to Amazon dot com. Go to something something squiggly forward slash whatever. But they also didn't because I think it was because they knew that there was nothing to differentiate just being glorified directory. So they had they knew that they had no moat. We, you know, Warren Buffett would say, but they had no technological advantage. If AOL had been the first one to come up with a really robust directory. They would have had the who before. Yahoo. So they intuited the very early on that first of all we're going to brand ourselves as the friendly place to go on the web. And the number two. We're going to brand ourselves as the the useful place and the fun place. And so what yahu pioneers is, you know, what seems obvious today is that you you don't just go to the website to to search the internet. You also they have free Email there, and you can put your calendar there. And if you give. Them your zip code. They will give you your local weather. You're telling me your favorite team. They'll give you the latest sports scores for your favorite team..

Yahoo Warren Buffett Amazon Netscape Aki Bono founder Jerry Yang AOL Forbes
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"Subsequently on the internet history podcast. She was a PR guru with that. Jim Clark brought over from Silicon Graphics. When when he and Mark Andriessen started Netscape. But I also think that it was this. It was Jim Clark being a superstar. Jim Clark is famous for being one of the few impossibly on the only person still to have founded three billion dollar companies. He took up with Marc Andreessen. Mark andriessen. Is this super well not superstar, but he was marketed as this wiz kid nerd superstar? He was on. He was in people magazine's most interesting people, I discovered that research book in ninety four and ninety five so, yeah, they were hyping this up as a new thing. And then I think that the thing that made Netscape the hype around Netscape really really take off. And I talked to a lot of people Wall Street people from the time about this is that if you think about the landscape in ninety four ninety five again, it's hard to visualize this today. But there was one game in town. And it was Microsoft, Microsoft has had slim slain sloop all of its all of its rivals. And it you cannot. It's impossible. If you weren't there to realize how much they were astride the technology industry. And there was nobody else. And if anyone else came up they were gonna kill. And so the the what the promise of Netscape from day one was they were going to do to Microsoft, but Microsoft had done to the entire technology industry that they were going to be a platform play that Microsoft was this platform, I with Dawson than with windows that if everybody in technology had to either be on pay a toll to Bill Gates to be on or what have you and so by popularizing, and mainstreaming the web the web browser the thinking went would be a platform and a software platform that would rival what what Microsoft et achieve with windows and Microsoft pioneered things like doing plug ins and things like that. Because they wanted. They wanted to be this. Platform play. And so I think a lot of the hype was if again Silicon Valley and the tech investing world in general had been sort of in a lull, and the all anyone could think of is all man, you missed investing in Microsoft IPO, nineteen Eighty-six. Well, here's here's your second chance. And so I think that that was a lot of what it was is everyone saw that. This was the second Microsoft, and Microsoft, of course, did not jump on the bandwagon the internet bandwagon really so early at all talk talk about what they what what were they doing during this time this ninety. I mean, I guess they were developing windows ninety five well that was certainly a lot of it. And if you'll remember that was delayed. It was supposed to come out in ninety three. I think originally so. Yeah. But at the same time there at the height of their powers again they've beaten everybody, and so basically in one thousand nine hundred five they're they're essentially doing their victory lap. I've heard this off the record stuff, but I've heard from. Some people that they were thinking that that gates might have retired a couple he might have retired in ninety ninety six ninety seven had the internet not happen and the web not happened. But they were gates is not dumb. No one would ever accuse him of that. He knew that networking computing was coming and as I argue in the book, the only mistake that he made was that he thought that he had to wait for the technology to catch up. He thought that broadband had to reach critical mass, and he figured that that would happen between two thousand and two thousand five which by the way, he was one hundred percent right about he also thought that again, you know, he's a technologist. He loves computers. He wants a computer on every desk and every room, but he didn't actually believe this is my theory backed up by research and things that people told me that the computer could be a mainstream device he thought that if networking computing was going to take off for normal. Americans and again in nineteen ninety-five home. PC penetration is around thirty percent. It's not even fifty percent yet. So he thinks it's gonna come through the TV what's in every home in one thousand nine hundred ninety television. So he thinks I'm waiting for broadband. I'm waiting to deliver it in TV..

Microsoft Netscape Jim Clark people magazine Silicon Graphics Mark andriessen Marc Andreessen Bill Gates Silicon Valley Dawson three billion dollar one hundred percent thirty percent fifty percent
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"And it was it was a wonderful time to be alive. Certainly was. So I do want to hear a little bit about your background. How did you get into internet history? How how did I mean? Besides starting those companies what interests you about internet history. Well, it it just bothered me that there was no book about when the internet entered our lives. There's excellent books. I have them on my shelf where the wizards stay up late, John Marcus book, there's all sorts of about internet culture. Even the academic books about going back to Arpanet and. How the internet came out of academia slash military government stuff, but what has been more trans formative disruptive, whatever to all of our daily lives and normal people as well than the internet. And so I kept waiting for someone to do a book that said, remember AOL? Here's what happened to AL, or here's why Facebook beat my space, or in the thing that I thought about was people have very personal connections. These are companies they're corporations on one sense. You can say well it that's that's boring to talk about. But like my wife argued vociferously for more about excite because excite was where she got her first Email address from you know, what I mean? And I and I fought hard to keep information about geo cities in there because people of a certain age listening that was your first homepage. And when you were thirteen that's where your identity was and things like that. So I thought that someone should do a book about the how these things infiltrated all of our lives. Not only for the people that live through it to be like, here's the people that did this to you. Here's the decisions that they made. Here's the mistakes that they made. But also for if your. Especially if you're entering tech, and you're twenty six, and you don't even know there was a my space or in a oh, L or whatever. Here's here's how we got to now. Yeah. I mean, in many ways, the characters of the books are these companies are these companies as you go through, and you know, they're sort of historical figures when you think about like companies like, you know, mosaic like your products as well. That is something that people haven't thought about it. And then I mean, even more recent towards the end of the book like companies like singular, which was the deal with the iphone. There's they're they're old old friends in our lives no longer there anymore. And it was like re meeting them in learning more than I had about the known about them. So why did you let the book ends are Netscape and the iphone? Why did you choose those and not say like, Internet, Explorer and Google? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Well, I'll take the second part. I because it's the easiest one to answer. I the the modern technology world that we live in. If you didn't at least explain how we got social and mobile than I didn't think that people would be informed about why how we got to the now. The reason I started with Netscape there's many reasons I again because I remember Netscape going public. I was one of those nerdy kids that watch the nightly news every day at six thirty. And I can remember vaguely. But I can remember that that led the news that night that there was this company that did something called an IPO and it made Bill. It was worth billions of dollars and people seem to think that this was really crazy unusual and weird and one of the things that I hope I captured in the book is we're used to today. The this entrepreneurial culture, this you can twenty year olds, you know, go to Silicon Valley to strike it rich and be worth billions of dollars. This was not this is a recent thing in eighty I'm a kid of the eighties in the seventies. Eighties into the nineties you want it to be a rockstar. You wanted to be you wanted to go on wall. St. if you wanted to get rich this idea that you could create a company, and it could be a thing. I feel like it in my childhood, there weren't new companies invented all either. So the the fact that Netscape you can argue it was the first dot com. It was the first real company to be an internet company..

Netscape Facebook John Marcus Google AOL Bill twenty year
"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"brian mccullough" Discussed on Triangulation

"This is the show where we talked to some of the most interesting people writing about or working on the internet today. And today, I am very excited to talk about some internet history. We have with us Brian McCullough, who of course, is the host of the internet history podcast and the author of the new book how the internet happened from Netscape to the iphone welcome to the show. Brian Megan so good to be talking with you again, it is it is really good to be talking to you. I I should also say you are the host of the Technion ride home podcasts as well. Which is a great short daily news podcast, which I know how hard is to do since. I once did that. And so I I I love listening to its great. Well, thank you. Thank you. So we're just talking about this a little bit. I am forty five. So this is one of the first history books that I've read that not only takes place. All during my lifetime. But also the the meat of it takes place after I was an adult already. So an I assume the same as maybe you might be a little younger than me. But I'm forty I'm forty. Okay. So so maybe you were you were a bit of a youngster then like during the time this book starts in the Netscape era. I remember it though. And you know, just as a little bit of background. I I don't want to bore people. But you know, I I'm not a historian. I'm not a journalist. I wasn't a writer. But I was I founded three web companies the first one was in ninety nine. So the joke that I've been making is that I just was annoyed that no one had written the book about my career or the industry as I knew it. And so it may be in a way. That's what it is. Yeah. I mean that the the the the part that I feel like was ripe for a book. I always thought was the dot com era because I moved everyone's going ninety eight and it was just like the very beginnings of that..

Netscape Brian Megan Brian McCullough Technion writer
How to watch the Apple WWDC 2018 keynote online

Mac OS Ken

01:56 min | 3 years ago

How to watch the Apple WWDC 2018 keynote online

"By the way if you look a bit more information about gdp are and some of the issues around it that is the topic of today's checklist by secure mac what is gdp are what is who is how does gdp arafat who is and finally what are some of the upside down downsides of these new rules search tuned for checklist by secure makor give it a lesson on the show site secure mac dot com slash checklist i think i sounded relatively intelligent on this one but it's hard to remember abbas doing something interesting with this year's ww dc opening breezing tation cult amac's as it streaming the event for google chrome and mozilla firefox cts until now one's only option for watching was either through apple's technology or microsoft edge on a windows ten machine or you know being there in person no indication in the piece as to why the change my brain wonders whether apple is using its event to test video on the other platforms ahead of its n ticipant entry in the streaming tv or maybe apple's just feeling a little koumba ya more news in a moment but first award about another news show tech meme ride home i try to give you your fell of apple news but that's not all the tech there is to know that's what's great about tech meme ride home i worked the night away to bring you a digestive apple news in the morning while tech me mine homes brian mccullough works the day away to bring you a digest of wider tech news in the evening for your ride home mac os kind of in the morning tech me ride home at night one two combo keeping you in the know.

Arafat Abbas Apple Brian Mccullough Microsoft