24 Burst results for "Brian Marcy"

Attention Capital's Joe Marchese on the crisis - and opportunity - in how we measure eyeballs on the internet

Digiday Podcast

11:29 min | 5 months ago

Attention Capital's Joe Marchese on the crisis - and opportunity - in how we measure eyeballs on the internet

"Welcome to the digital podcast Brian. Marcy this week I'm joined by Joe. Marquel JOE is the former Fox executive who is now the CEO of attention capital an investment firm and operating company. That's focused on those media. Companies THAT CAPTURE ATTENTION. Attention is required. One property girl boss. Jani discuss why he thinks the attention. Konami is in what he calls a state of subprime. And why you can still build an AD media company in two thousand twenty but just not one that's based on. Cpm DISPLAY ADS. Hope you enjoy Joe. Walk into podcasts. I thank you for having known each other so long. We have this is this is Serious throwback here so going back to social vibe you're we're GonNa talk about Social Vibe later. Gay But what you're doing. I mean you've had you've had a really fascinating career. I mean I think when we first knew each other You start up then And you went through that startup pivoted. You did the pivot and everything this you sold it. Yup He had an accent the and then instead of doing the sort of serial entrepreneur route you went in to like a large media organization. Yeah and so You saw the innards of that right and now you're back sort of on. I would say the investor side but something more explain. What attention is so? I mean attention is a company. It's an IT's an operating company It's just a company that's built to buy other companies And and kind of that fit a particular thesis okay. What's the thesis That the entire global economy runs on top of the attention. Economy of which advertising is the most visible market And that the attention economy is in a state of subprime. Okay explain The mets like subprime. Yeah yeah the the metrics that we use to measure Attention or that we used to represent attention or becoming less and less tied to what people are actually spending their time doing so. I think that there's An opportunity right now to say that there are things that have better and more attention or higher quality attention than the metrics give them credit for I mean you guys talk about this plenty and digitally as cover the industry of advertising but in the in the chase of really what we'd call vanity metrics impressions and page views an There so uncoupled from what people are actually what quality attention is and so therefore things that have quality attention are probably undervalued of put simpler We've kind of convinced the world's been convinced by by big tech for the most part that everything can be measured And if you can't measure it don't buy it then that to me makes makes me think everything that's hard to measure is probably undervalued. Yeah but you've kind of been on about this for a while you're right because I can remember talking to you about different like different metrics. Vp and whatnot. Because you saw the problems when it comes to CBC or CPM right And then I'm sure like within than Fox. He saw the limits particularly of of how. Tv is measured. Yeah and and you know it's funny People assume that you'd really hate TV. Measurement as a digital person. Yeah but to be honest like I'm kind of bullish on panel data because panel data. It's hard to fraud Like like I mean they you know. There's there can be entire phone farms. In other countries that Census data like digital data. Pick up but sit at digital guys. Were always an usually. They're all guys. I were always railing against Nielsen. And how terrible Nielsen is and you get to the other side and your leg. Actually this isn't that no no. It's not that bad I will say like look. Nielsen can be inaccurate. But there's not a warehouse full of TV's racking fake impressions right like like panel. Data is a representation of What a certain set of people are doing. And then you extrapolate like. This is how much time we have the. You know. It's all the classic things like every every four there's more ad impressions in the world and digital world. The more people are watching more ads. And Chiavari think we're just trying to shove them in there so this is all true so why in the world of all the things that you would want to invest in would media. I mean it seems like a terrible. I don't WanNa talk you out of it. It's too late to do too late. I'm here explain to me why this is an opportunity so I actually think that I think there's a couple of things that that are huge opportunities right now which is As platforms grow and as as they chased these vanity. Metrics Trust begins to erode right quality. Goes Down I mean look all platforms engineered towards volume not quality. And and what I mean by that is they are if you make something for a penny and sell it for two pennies. You've made a penny of profit if you make something for ten dollars until it for twelve dollars you've made two dollars of profit. Humans like the two dollars of profit that makes sense computers. Say That none of that. Penny one hundred percent margin. Let's do that a trillion times right and that is why you see like some of the largest advertisers in the world on on the major platforms. are selling very low cost goods right so same thing applies to products as applies to news so in this world where trust is a roading. the curator brands kind of become king. Like no one goes to the front page of Amazon negotiating. You don't you. Don't start at the front page of time to go shopping. You come there with an idea of what you're going to buy And I think the great example of this wire cutter right. I mean wire cutter which you know. curates what electronics. You should buy. has built trust with the community Obviously The New York Times acquired a while ago but these curator's in wire cutter I think is to the next evolution of of the web. I guess we're still going at the Web. Go for here. What craigslist was to the window version? and then post craigslist. There was Angie's list and that was a brand being put on top of it. I mean I have something to shock you With Angie did not meet every contractor. Angie's list those are those are television. Commercials Yeah and that's a brand that got built up and why does that matter? We'll because people would start there rather than starting out a search engine or starting an open platform. I think what's interesting is particularly. Let's stick with the wire cutter as an example. I mean people in media. I think love love the wire cutter. I think with good reason Mostly because it's an anti-scale play anything algorithm mic. It seems like is gamed. Yes I mean because when you go to Amazon and like I don't know about you but if I'm buying those like okay the bestseller best reviews whatever and then you're like you know we've written about it you know there's Yup armies of fake one hundred dollars and anything that can be gamed like that will be and that's what brands are supposed to be. So I I'm a huge fan like I am. I am anti a lot of things in the way. Advertising is kind of polluted The Internet and chasing kind of the metrics that don't matter I'm a huge fan of brands. See Brands are the things that you hold responsible for that you trust too right like Brand less like Kind of commodities. If there's you know lead in the toy or they're you know the you know the classic stories of you know Tylenol. An the the brand is the thing that consumers hold responsible when you go to a platform It's almost like you. They're extracting the margin from brands. And I think that there's a huge role to be played in. In consumers minds to be building up brands that can be cures for them for different areas of life. Okay so this was the the the thesis differentiated. Good time because trust is is you know. I think there was that article Max read wrote. It does sort of everything is fake on the Internet a couple years ago. That sort of summed up this this period that you know we were talking over the years right. It was all leading up to this this primis of online advertising See Pile of money That'd be nice right money. It's attention capital capital. So it's a great way nickname your company capital and people like you and I can only imagine So how much what is like two hundred million. I NOT NON reported non real time to to talk. I don't know so. What have you bought so far So first partnered with James Murdoch's lupus systems we bought the TRIBECA Film Festival invested in controlling stakes together and then Girl boss most recently company. Okay so explain. Each of those different types of properties. But why does this fit your thesis? Well so you look at areas of life where people are looking for curation in so tribeca in the entertainment space and girl boss kind of in employment career Lifestyle and so the way we look at it as he'd attention capital is there's two types of things there's community brands so we define a community. Brandis if they threw an event. Would someone get on an airplane and go there Do they permission to curate? Some aspect of the world's tribeca. Obviously they haven't event They literally curate films. They don't make all the films they tell you. Here's what to see with someone. Where the brand on their t shirt. They don't have to be an apparel company but people would wear tribeca shirt and is the community self sustaining without always having to make content right because if you always have to make content. That's a treadmill that you have to run on versus. Is there a community of people who people go the events The thing that gets the most exciting about TRIBECA 's ethos as a brand that was founded after nine eleven downtown. We're here in downtown. New York and And the idea of independent storytelling equality versus volume. Like you just can't see that many movies like we have to be able to curate down to select few all of those things I mean. That's a brand that were incredibly excited about and a founder and CEO. And Jane Rosenthal that we want to work with and kind of expand I. I'm struck that both of them have a quote unquote events component. They're able to turn people out Yup We we are big believers digital so I might be talking my own book cure but we think that there is something to be said about you know and I think people are coming around to about being able to turn out a community of people. Hundred percent We are huge huge believers in in a I R L digital connection real life to digital connection that it's proof that you have that type of influence in the world like versus again factory said the algorithms can be game but people showing up at a movie theater camp. Yeah I mean like you know. I always went back to the sort of game. Of Game of thrones recaps. It's like you know the the reason that there were. So many. Game of thrones recaps. Is I mean it's not just because of like passion or the brand is it's it's because that's what turned page views right exactly. It's entrepreneur right. I don't hate the player. Geno hate the game. I agree on some of the players.

JOE Tribeca IT Angie Amazon Nielsen FOX Founder And Ceo Craigslist Konami Mets Jani Marcy Jane Rosenthal CBC CEO Fraud
Time President Keith Grossman on Display Ad Revenue

Digiday Podcast

12:28 min | 5 months ago

Time President Keith Grossman on Display Ad Revenue

"Up to the digital podcast. I'm Brian Marcy today. Joined by you've guessed a few times. Keith Crespin President of time Have been on here before your Bloomberg. You've now been at time since July. I want to get to the decision to go to time because I think it's really interesting because you were at engine very briefly and all of a sudden. I was shocked. I was like you're at time Explain making them. I'm sure this was like a unique opportunity but at the same time I'm really interested from a career perspective about you know. There's probably pressured like pass it up now. No actually it was interesting when I loved my time at Bloomberg. I was there for five years. Yeah and every year we were there. We grew double digits and in the final year week. We launched tick tock which now quick take You know timing. By the way David I just in You know launch to the New Economy Form. We had really successful year. We ended the up sixteen percent and for me like what I was. Struggling with personally was My entire career. I was very much in the revenue track and The advice I kept on getting was in order to one day ultimately become a president or CEO. I had to diversify myself. Move myself into a horizontal sort of role coo role and the opportunity to engine presented itself. And I thought that I was going to be there for two years or so And really begin to understand how to think about Bringing together thirteen disparate companies and and really sort of turning it into one cohesive unit and I was talking one day to A Greg set lock over at Spencer Stuart and this just goes to show how weird and serendipitous life can be at at. I asked him his advice on something and at the end of our conversation I was walking out and I turned around and I said to Him Greg. Thank you. That was really helpful advice. Like how can I ever return the favor? And he said to me. Do you know anyone who wants to be president of time and I said what are you talking about? And he said well you know mark and Lynn bought time back in November. And they're looking at how they want involve evolving and where they want to invest in it and They need more than just a cro and building up the team and They're they're just looking at the marketplace right. Now do me a favor. Send me the JD for it. I'll give you some people who I think might make sense. And that night. He sent it to me and I read it and I sort of was like Whoa. I've done everything here. Other than run consumer marketing and I went to bed and I woke up the next morning and I couldn't stop thinking about it and I wrote Greg a note and I said Greg if I wanted to throw my name into the game for this would you Allow me to sort of Be considered for the role. If not no worries I'll send you some other names. And he said let me speak to Edward Edward dealt with the CEO and Next thing you know Edward Said Let's meet on Friday. We had half an hour and the half an hour went two and a half hours and Edward at the end of the meeting. Said what are you doing a Monday and I said well? I'M GOING TO LONDON. And he said it's a shame if you're free Monday at heavy meet with mark. I said Benny off said yes. So I said we'll get meeting with Mark Benny off a Monday. And it was Friday at five thirty. I go I will I'll move my trip to London and so Edward takes out his phone any texts mark and gets back. He says Cheryl on Monday I think it was nine. Am and so. I changed my my trip around London Monday morning. I met with Mark coincidentally was the day that salesforce bought. Tableau so the nine meeting moved to twelve because he was on on the news and everything and three and a half tests. I is right. I mean that's not like a small deal no not not in the slightest right I was I was blown away. The then he's still kept the meeting but it was an amazing Do some multibillion dollar deal like before lunch and then and then you know I. I don't know how to respond to that regulate from from my end but I It's like how was your day. spent a few billion But but then You know he met with Lynn his wife. And you know everyone at time and and You know the Family Office. Because we are privately owned entity any offs and So what attract? But what attracted you to the opportunity? Because I mean I think a lot of people would look time as a quote unquote legacy publication. Obviously having A billionaire benefactor. Maybe we can talk about whether it's a benefactor or like an owner wanting to make like a real profit is an advantage but you know from the outside it would seem like a pretty challenged brand went through a several Tough years shirts changed hands. I think the answer to that is how I think I look. Industry is I look at the Industry. Ultimately is it's it's an amazing industry loved this industry. I think that more people should come into this industry as as people think it's a scary industry I remember we talked about one time. Doing like a confessions of an optimist. I love like these like distraught. Well it's all anonymous pessimists and I'm going to go on the record optimist and you know like Warren. Buffet has a great quote of you know. Be Fearful when others ingredient greedy when others are fearful and. I think that this is a great moment. Where if you have the support And you know the intent of time is to be a profitable business ended is moving in that direction and we are up in Q. One and we are. We're up in January. We'RE PROJECTING UP IN Q. One we are going to be. We're aiming to be profitable this year from a cash flow basis but And that's our intent is to run a responsible business but If you look at my career I went to wired and I started at wired the week after it was about to be closed for the DOT COM bubble. That was my first job. As a sales associate I worked on the launches I work on turnarounds and I work on saves right so like like I like the idea of If the business is ultimately debate called Meets Investment Advisor. The time brand is one of those incredible brands. Incredible Ninety seven year history it actually has great foundational elements of it. But it's gone through say ten years of neglect Through mismanagement through transitions of owners. And now that it has dedicated focused resources. I think that we're in a really strong position to Evolve the time brand to really capture the attention of of the next generation of consumers and from my perspective as I kept on looking at the deck and assessing this opportunity would I really saw was the challenges at the end of the day was evolution of Time magazine to Time. Right because everyone. We'll call it. Time magazine and you have to sort of evolve to the time brand and then is it relevant to the next generation of consumers. Yeah right and when you look at the second part I and you look at all of the hard work that Well that's critical right to the strategy. Because I mean you can milk legacy brands. That means something to a certain demographic I mean like good housekeeping is a fantastic. It's a good business That doesn't mean it. It's gotTA challenge so. Let me ask you a question. Who Do you think reads? Time magazine from Demographic Perspective the magazine itself Give me the most general demographics. You could possibly imagine my mom really seeing. It's an older female. Yeah okay so I either get older female older male right If you look at time on its social feeds right on twitter. We have sixteen and a half million followers on instagram. Eight and a half million followers on facebook twelve and a half million followers linked in two million magazine hold on. I'm going to second the demographic of that sixty one percent under the age of thirty five Fifty two percent female and thirty three percent non Caucasian. And so what you find is is that you have this entire aspect of the time brand not the magazine that reaches a completely different demographic that is showing the value to the next generation. The issue has been that none of those areas have been productized. None of them has been marketed as time. The brand is always been sort of presented as Time magazine. And so when you think about it you don't want to discount the magazines value. The magazines values tremendous the reason that we have such huge footprint socially is because of the history of ninety seven years that we have is the magazine but The brand has evolved to a new generation to mean something totally different. But I guess how do you square both sides right because when I think of of time the end from the outside Lake I think of two halves there was like these sort of d day commemoration issue half and ensure that is like outrageously profitable Which is obviously for a different generation. And then there's a kind of like I like time went into that sort of viral content sort of thing where like ton of facebook friendly fair and and Social content that gets gets big numbers and a lot of people. Got Those kind of big numbers but mostly on differentiated. Kind of stuff that You know it just. It's it's feeding the Internet beast. Now I think that that's a fair assessment of the marketing industry of the media industry. I don't necessarily agree that that's where we've gone with time on social but I think that what's happened if I can sort of step back for a second is is if you look at sort of the industry at large Historically a brand Served as the demand within the marketplace in the supply was the consumer right and that was when time was just a magazine. That's when everyone was just magazine prior to the Internet prior to the equity of connectivity of all of these devices when all of a sudden everyone is connected. I'm really interesting thing happens. Which is that. The supply becomes the brand right like time becomes a supply and demand becomes the consumers time right And that's the only thing that everyone is sort of focusing on is is like. How do you capture consumers time? Now what's interesting against that equation is is that when a brand is. The supply and supplies ultimately unlimited. Like your job is as you have to think about. Sort of. What's the value that you provide them? What's The utility you provide? But it doesn't mean that you have to do that. Holistically across everything in a In a synergistic way what it means is that you have to think about what is the experience that the consumer wants and then how do they actually perceive your brand so in a world of infinite choice? You think that's actually dream. But what actually happens? Is that the consumer with their timers paralyzed because they have like unlimited selection. And so we're the time brand actually presents a tremendous amount of power is in this red border now. The red border for some people manifest itself as a print magazine right and that's one way of experiencing sort of the red border for others just manifest itself as as online video right we produce four hundred digital videos a month For some people it is how we do our twitter handle and how we give will sort of information and news in that area. In some instances it's digitally in some instances like we will move into to the audio space. But I think that for us what we WANNA realize is that people don't have relationships with platforms anymore. They have relationships with how they want to experience the content and then secondarily Certain Demos are going to experience the contents completely differently. And it's an advantage to say. Well we know that the magazine reaches an older demographic and we know that time for kids is a younger demographic why wouldn't if we ever consumer is D- And productized time for kids in a manner that can be sort of a a toy for a child or a kit for child's surrounding education. Why wouldn't we promote it to the older demographic that's probably the parents or the

Time Magazine Mark Benny Edward Edward Greg Twitter Facebook Bloomberg President Trump London Lynn CEO Brian Marcy Keith Crespin COO Spencer Stuart David Family Office Cheryl Buffet
Vox Media CRO Ryan Pauley on acquiring NY Mag

Digiday Podcast

02:14 min | 6 months ago

Vox Media CRO Ryan Pauley on acquiring NY Mag

"Welcome to the digital podcast and Brian Marcy. This week I'm honored to be joined by fellow Philadelphia. Eagles Fan. Rhyme polly Ryan is also. She grabbed officer Media Ryan. Welcome thank you for having me first. Time longtime yes. Should we Should we talk mostly about the Super Bowl? Let's talk let's talk trade deadline you get into it. Yeah but let's start with. It's been four or five months since the New York deal for four months. Okay what's been the big change? Yeah so we. We announced the deal late last year. Deal closed and before the before the end of twenty nineteen sort of ran. The full integration. So on the revenue side we've completely done the integration. From an organizational standpoint one sales team marketing team won content studio which has gone. Really smoothly. we went. We went quite quickly To get everything done through the end of the year and then came out. It's just always sort of the big new year unveiling for It's a way to start the year But and then took that message channel. I mean this is the biggest. It was the biggest deal of oxted. Yes we've done. We've done a number of deals over the decade but but this so explain to people who don't know what that kind of like inner integration processes like. Yeah well it will. I think we ran a relatively smooth one. But you have to understand what the what the start start from the client standpoint and that sort of what are the account overlaps. What are the what is the team structure? Look like and how does it and then culturally? How does everyone out of the processes the workflow goes? What are the marketing materials? Where the words and the numbers we describe the product we take to market and and thankfully with the New York media integration. The cultures were quite similar. The companies were complementary and so there was actually not a lot of client overlap less than thirty five percent of of customers. spent significant Advertising budgets with with both companies only thirty five percents. Yeah so it was a really interesting It was really interesting process to go through to see and you can see where the so. What categories will you adding more advertisers in so we we historically vox? Media has been really strong in Tech In auto financial services And CG Food and Food and beverage tail and historical new.

Polly Ryan Brian Marcy Eagles Oxted Philadelphia New York Officer
Protocol president Tammy Wincup on applying the Politico playbook to tech coverage

Digiday Podcast

12:03 min | 6 months ago

Protocol president Tammy Wincup on applying the Politico playbook to tech coverage

"Welcome to the digital podcast Brian. Marcy and today I'm joined by Tammy link-up Tammy is the president of protocol which is a new tech publication which is from the publishers politico. Tammy welcome thank you. Thanks for coming in so explain a little bit. This is not the politico go for tech. It is not good We're super excited to have launched protocol yesterday and it is coming coming from the publisher of Politico Robert Alberton But it has a very very different focus. And so you know I I love to dive into what you know. What what are those one of those pieces you know? We are focused exclusively on technology on the people the power and the politics of Technology Eh. And this idea was generated by Robert over a year ago and really made a decision to actually make it they separate and bring a separate leadership team in a different ethos and focus but build on you know the the spectacular reputation and spectacular spectacular journey. That politico has had and that we are really lucky to kind of be able to build on that brand. But it's it's a separate view on the world suffered audience audience so explain why that even matters like that. It's not just the spin off from politico because there's look there's a lot of advantages to having a new publication that comes out of publication with a reputation Track record and a lot of other things going forward so why does it. I don't know what does it make sense to. It'd be like this is a different company. Well I I get the best of both worlds right. I have the ability to To look at the amazing track record and the amazing using could've story that politico has built And some of that DNA. I absolutely hope to replicate. You're not like recreating the technology stack and all the stuff right. I mean media's heart already why why why. Why would anyone duplicate this stuff? Well I think some of the pieces the best. Look I come from an industry that says you so you take the best of what others having you build upon it and some of that tech stack is just absolutely brilliant and others. You know it was You know it's a thirteen year old old company so we're looking at tools and opportunities and frankly services down the road that we're going to be able to build on. I think that that is actually you know as frankly. Frankly an entrepreneur in this That's actually really exciting to be able to be told that you can you know you can build using all of the muscle muscle memory of being building a really successful digital media company politico and then go and actually focus on a new audience that I now so just to to to stay on this for a little bit the structure so it's not like the editorial team is different but then all the other services are the exact same from politico like it's not like a shared sales force correct nothing short business and there's more advantages because there are a lot of I mean look media is you know particularly subscale media You know that eats into all the margins so explain why it's it's worth recreating a lot of stuff. I get thirteen years old. And maybe some of the Ad Tech Stacks not the best at this point because there's just a lot of style they've invested a lot in I. I believe that there's this top notch and look my sense is that we will. We will use a lot of what they have from a best practices perspective I think you actually have to start not with if You know not with the operation itself you actually have to start. I believe with what we're trying to accomplish. Which is the business in Tech Community that insider cider community is very very different than politics and policy insider community What they care about what they wanna read? Every day it's very business and industry industry focus piece And so you know my belief. Is that the vision of what she wanted. Accomplish has to start with that and then build both the editorial side and the business side for the audience and customer. You know I come from the tech world and come with viewpoint that you have to start with your customer career audience first and then build the editorial the content of the services that you want for that And so some of that is a playbook that politico GEICO has and has deployed wildly successfully and You know we will. We will take that and try and do the same but there are pieces of it. That technology the executive actually wants different. So you say technology executive do you mean an executive at a technology company or an executive at a non quote quote Unquote Technology Company that is dealing with the after effects of technology which is every executive absolutely that is precisely why we know the moment is right for new publications Pacific. lyod tack you. You just nailed it right there. Is that the intersection. It is no longer my adult lifetime. Having spent spent a good chunk of my career in technology it is changed to your point rent of being an industry. Vertical Call Technology L. Story to truly infiltrating and being a part in a Matrix Organization of other industries. Right so having come from Fintech or attack look at health check and so we actually really feel like. There's a gap of where we can go in terms of bridging this kind of tack and mainstream industries and and again from my viewpoint You know there are two book ends of what's out there right now. There is You know you're a business business either attack on enterprise and consumer tack or you're in a big vertical as leader trying to innovate with tack and you're trying to figure out on a daily basis. What's going going on? You either have things that are written for a mass audience for which on the topics that I care about on on. Ai and five G.. Gee and quantum and what's going to happen in Fintech in terms of payment services and things like that you don't get the depth necessarily that you need to actually make decisions for Your Business MHM on the flip side having come from venture backed businesses. It was very very difficult if you weren't a Unicorn or if you're not you know. Thank Company Day to actually find yourself being talked about in the media Unless you're raising money or unless you are announcing some widget okay and so it's not going to be product driven. Obviously there's a lot of quote unquote technology publications over the years where really venture capital Publication correct There's no shortage of people writing about the latest air pods or whatever So you're GonNa leave that aside And obviously technology is now now I. I think it's sort of moved into a few different. I mean it's obviously it's a horizontal story within the changing nature of all industries On the it doesn't side and then there's there's Society Angle And then obviously the government angle which I know you're still going to be covering has a great intersection You you know with with political on that piece. I think he'll you know you'll see us. So there's overlap there's absolutely I the article about California Privacy Law and people scrambling. Yeah try to get rewritten. I mean that could easily be employed right. I think it's interesting like that's a perfect story or even if you look at Linda stories yesterday around ethicists in salesforce. Right I think that's well first. Let's talk about the policy piece rate. That's a story that has policy implications. Has You know state implications. I think the story was very much could be seen on in either publication potentially uh-huh. I think what's fascinating about some of the stories that you saw yesterday on our launch day like Linda Story. Now this is You know those are thorny topics. Those are not bullet point topics. Those are bullet points to we occasionally since I like this You know that's a story that mark. Benny off retreated yesterday. And it. You know it was a story about salesforce but it wasn't necessarily you know it's a tricky issue and I think that that's that's the point on tech right now tech is no longer in in its infancy where we have the promise of kind of all it. Could you know could be. It is a full blown adult and it's it's messy and I think to talk about you know we have to actually go into some of these details around the people Around the politics because suddenly mature quote quote Unquote Power Center. That's having unintended consequences. That of course it is like that. That's that's where it is but we want to. Actually we WANNA hang in those issues and and and and cover them up and you saw the gaps. I guess because I think when you came out Obviously a lot of people say. Oh there's a lot of tech publications and understand Dan and honestly a lot of the stuff I just ignore. Because it's like it depends on how you execute like really like I mean there's always room for new media brand. I feel like I can't think of an area where there are is an room for one. You just have to do better right at the end of the day. We got to have a different Lens so the Lens. That protocol is bringing to this massive Asif issue like how would you sum it up. Yeah I think it's about audience focus and scope Were not writing for everyone right. Just like politico doesn't right or you know is really focused on the decision-makers now if I'm a decision maker in a C. Suite You know are. Are you trying to explain that a little bit. So you're are you. Are you writing to help them do their jobs better or are you helping them. Sort of unpacked these gigantic thorny societal governmental whole like Issues my belief is that if we do that second one right you are helping them do their job better particularly if you're if you're taking If you're taking topics and not just giving them cursory looks so for example. The today we launched a new product called braintrust The question of the week where we go out and actually ask experts parts around that topic That is actually really important because at the end of the day technologies nauseous about the product right. It's about the people making decisions visions in terms of that and the breath of that conversation. If you're sitting in a thin services company or a healthcare company and you're trying to deal with. How am I gonNA use a to better to better look at an issue in the house? You don't necessarily have that network and so how does protocol bring that network to you in a way. That's not a cursory kind of two lines trying to define a Is So our goal is to our newsletter in source code to be able to have that daily actionable invoke kind of start my day knowing at the big level at the high level. What's going on but then to be able to find those in depth You know those in depth conversations which I think you'll see a you'll see us have as well so you get income from politico. You didn't come from the media. said he came from the tech industry and then under this crazy I mean why would you go home to the media industry. This is crazy. Hazy decision explain this. What did you see? I mean because I think it's interesting people There's a lot of advantages that coming in with fresh eyes to an industry and I think a lot of people you know. They think they sort of they know media. Because media's like very tangible I think on one level but then up-close it's like wow a lot of this doesn't make sense right or was it not though. Well I'll tell you soon right Kanye Day then you officially say none of you know. Look I think there are lots of things both personally and

Politico Executive Linda Story Tammy Robert Alberton Tech Community Fintech Marcy Publisher Geico Unquote Technology Company President Trump California Kanye
Flighthouse CEO Jacob Pace on building a media company on TikTok

Digiday Podcast

11:32 min | 7 months ago

Flighthouse CEO Jacob Pace on building a media company on TikTok

"Welcome to the digital podcast. I'm Brian Marcy this weekend. Georgia Jacob Jacob is the CEO of Flight House. which if you don't aflaid houses digital digital media company most tectonic but beyond tectonic does stout a number of us what like a billion a month billing vis a month? Yeah twenty one million subscribers bribers on Tick Tock Jacob. Himself is Gen Z.. CEO You described as a baby face of a baby face. Mogul that works. Twenty five eight and also The New Yorker said that Jacob has the radic energy of champion sled dog on on a break. How accurate do you think that is both say? We'll see weirdly Jacob. The same thing has been said about me. Oh why energy. So let's let's talk about. Let's talk about Flight House first and then then how you got involved but like for those who are unfamiliar. Who might not be inflate houses You you know. Target demographic explain it. Yeah for sure. So essentially flight house is Basically the largest entertainment brand on six right now so we're really the only ones producing original content So for anyone. That's not familiar with like tick tock. Of course it's a short form mobile APP a little similar to just kind of like a newer sort of breed of it right. Yeah And even like you know Taylor Lorenzo's point who was like on this podcast like she's like it's just way more robust than vine and just a lot more editing features. A different kind of sense of humor. Humor so essentially a very simple way of like describing us to someone that might not be familiar as like. We're the you know. Think about this as like a buzzfeed complex of tick tock so we're producing original content while everyone else is kind of you know creators in their own right. But we're making individual sort of tick Tock Stars and whatnot like what you're doing and is your building a brand brand. Yeah exactly so explain. I mean you have series. We have a serious so one of our biggest ones. Actually which I think to date has probably done over. I would say in the range of like one to two hundred million views. Overall is this one called Finish the tick tock later. That's cool. Yeah those those always do really well. I think the first when we upload it did like thirty million views on the first episode and it just went super crazy on the platform also explain. I mean it's always weird. You have to explain tectonics not yeah do explain for those who've who have not seen it at how or how it works super simple So obviously finished. The lyric is kind of a popular segment. It's kind of around the Internet right like like on Youtube and instagram. We've seen it where a popular song is played. And then the two guests that are playing it Essentially it stops at a certain point. Where like let's say it's the hook and then whoever presses the Buzzer I had dreams where I can't move Thing and guesses the lyric correctly wins inking of of you. So we've basically taken that segment and introduced it specifically for Tick Tock so we get big talk traders as well as You know big take talk songs kind of in the mix and so you have all these kind of very relevant names to the platform like guessing the lyric and it's like very interactive with the audience. Okay so explain tick tock songs. Yeah not ever hold this like familiar with that word subculture of its own. I mean you know I think old town roads. That's probably the biggest example of that. And then you have songs like la La la You know by whites. UK and BB. No money Released all these different records that are blowing up added Tick Tock I think as of recent we've seen that Arizona's Urfa Song Roxanne for Drug San Right now. I'll come on on this. Let's stick nick with with Old Town road. All right we'll see the big one hip to Tanaz. Yeah exactly but now explain I mean there. There are a lot of songs that blow up up until now so I mean this this is John Nra The the complete the lyrics like they exist outside of ticked on. Yeah I mean it's you know it's you adapted it to tick Tock back So basically a lot of these songs Blow up on Tick Tock right so a lot of these creators and users and when I say creators as I mean anyone from the big you know multi-million users to even just people that have a few thousand Get behind these different trends and essentially you know make talks if everyone kind of gets on the same page. That's an old town road happens differen- But a lot of these records the music industry right now is like really really really really prioritizing talk because obviously the the known ways of blowing up records are like spotify apple music youtube and so talking aways like a new soundcloud to the music industry. Okay you know on soundcloud. You had a lot of these artists like you know the whole soundcloud rap wave like pomp. And whoever and even billy ILITCH got big on on southbound right So now it's breeding a lot of these artists like soundcloud where you have You know little Nasdaq's and whites UK and Arizona and so that's kind of where part of our business model fits in is sort of working with the music industry to figure out the best way to kind of engage tick tock So they kind of promote their records so tick tock itself Self Sununu type of platform. So what makes media that works on Tick Tock I mean. We've I think a lot of us have seen who aren't on talk you know. Have I've seen the compilations and stuff like this. And there's a lot of creativity there but how do you translate that into into media. You know. Series repeatability yeah. I mean I think we're sort of scratching the surface on that right now Obviously I think in media there's a way to kind of entertain your audience where you sort give them the low hanging fruit and then over time you try to reel them into something That's a little bit sort of Bigger than that initial concept right so our way of kind of Are Low hanging fruit was finished a toddler. We kind of knew that if we gave them a product that was easily digestible. They'd be able to Kinda take face value but then I think as we kind of go forward it's like how do we make it less. SORTA talk specific and more flight. How specific and how does our brand really show and You know I think I was thinking about this the other day. I definitely think that you know one of the things that really make successful. Content of ours is interactivity so when we can kind of create a series where our audiences can kind of play along and they kind of do that with finish the tick tock lyric right like when they're watching it. They kind of feel like they're playing along as well and they can kind of guess. The lyric Kinda jump in there and I think that there's probably a huge factor for the success in our content. What are some other series? The F- We have finished the tick tock lyric. We have another one called Shit Talk Right now where we basically get artists that actually when we pull it up right now you see podcast Jacob. Yeah we have a lot of really a lot of cool new ones that were kind of rolling out right now but let me ask you this. Is there anything that you tried on tic TAC. That didn't work and why. Oh I didn't work Yeah we've had a lot of series that we've kind of rolled out that haven't done as well as finished at six and we try to make educated guesses as to why they don't work can again. I think interactivities kind of one of those ones that we always fall back on is like if we can make it as interactive as we can. It's always gonNA perform better Oh Yeah we have another one called like Suggestion box basically like fans will kind of jump in and Okay so interactive seems to be under activity read for sure for sure on talk for sure and then like even you know one that that didn't do as well as we wanted. It's Hugh But that was a really cool series was We had this one called it. was basically artist trippy. Read sure yes. So he was on. He was on Flight House recently. And it was this series called love advice with trippy red and and we actually got him a relationship therapist Inside our facility and trippy basically went through like fan comments of like Them them wanting relationship advice in Lubbock is and him in the relationship that are pissed with kind of like answer the questions and give advice and it okay On talk it has like I think three hundred four hundred thousand views on youtube right now which is like decent in our is But I think it wasn't as interactive. It was more of it was more of a one way thing versus like a two way interactive thing you know and I think that's just kind of what we're trying to build right now. So how do you see the type of media that works on Tick Tock. Different from the type of media works on say snapchat. Yeah it's pretty similar. I mean I think tick tock we definitely try to target it's at its Gen Z.. Culture Like just hyper focused on that. Like who are the artists that they find very relevant to the tick Tock Stars that they find really relevant snapshots pretty similar because is it is sort of mobile. I and the way that you sort of consume content is like vertical. It's mobile and like that's how we produce all of ours has Tom. I have a younger audience. Are you aiming for a different type of audience than than you would. I mean it depends on how you define that right like after like thirteen. Eighteen to seventeen right now a big portion of our audiences around thirteen to twenty okay and mostly female thing about snapchat though and I will say this is something that we don't do on talk is the graphics snapshots very graphic. It'll like a lot of stuff moving like in Ou- spinning For us as we try to just keep it focused on the person for now but we're experimenting with a lot of stuff even next year. Okay so who makes this stuff. We have team. Yeah so we have editor Tina. The seventeen year olds or their house. Yeah I know we're all kind of in our twenty something. Okay Yeah so you know we've been around the block. He's a Dovan stuff go. Yeah Yeah so how did you become involved with. You didn't start flight. Oh No so when I was around eighteen. You're you're like brought in as as the the old guy. Yeah exactly yes. So when I was eighteen I was working at our parent company. Create Music Group where I'd been there for a couple years because The one of the cofounders flew out when I was like sixteen and I just did a lot of business development and anr for them. And at the time I was trying to figure out like new creative ways to kind of promote our artists and so I saw musically. 'cause I was just very familiar with the space and I saw this page called Flight House and I just kept seeing everywhere so when it was at like a million followers Reached Out Start it's Kinda work with the kids that started it who were probably like a year two younger than I was at the time it was two brothers and we sort of brought them in and we acquired The brand from them and then just they were just like creating content on their own so it wasn't even original content. At the time it was it was like remixes so basically on musically there was sort of a library of music that users can tap into right so they'd offer all the top forty songs and in you know any song that was pretty much put out by a major label and where Flight House got big was they would upload sort of sped up at its and slowed down and remix versions of songs And the users on musically sort of found that to be like a valuable enough thing to follow a paid for and so some of these remixes would get like you know ten thousand one hundred thousand sometimes up to a million repos on musically at the time and that sort of how it started and then as it turned into tick tock we were like all right. Let's figure you're out a way that this can be more than just a remix sort of brand.

Flight House. Georgia Jacob Jacob Youtube CEO UK Brian Marcy Buzzfeed The New Yorker Arizona Spotify Taylor Lorenzo Lubbock Tanaz John Nra Billy Ilitch TOM Self Sununu Editor
Group Nine's Geoff Schiller: Legacy media organizations have caught up

Digiday Podcast

08:02 min | 7 months ago

Group Nine's Geoff Schiller: Legacy media organizations have caught up

"Welcome to the digital podcasts. and Brian Marcy. Today I'm joined by Jeff Schiller Jeff is newly minted. Ciro Groom from nine. Jeff came over from the pump sugar acquisition which just close to a couple of weeks ago a couple of weeks ago. Okay so look. You're part of pop sugar for a while as as an independent entity As a partner like what. What is the potential you see? You know joining forces with group nine and in its portfolio of brands. So it's really interesting. The marriage is such a perfect marriage at a molecular level because the brands pop sugar Seeker Dodo now. This realis- they all have a common theme very optimistic very positive. And that's a through line and so I think just generally speaking that helps for a monetization perspective when we go out to market and we say look our companies bound by optimism. You can kind of think through how one plus one can eagle three so I think on a foundational level. The editorial alignment of saying thrillers. Just wants to help you kind of experience. The unexpected whether it's from food drink or travel or pop sugar wants to help you as a female kind of just explore all the areas that Define you versus versus just being relegated to one bus lifestyle. But then he got now this but now there's a little bit of the outlier right to some extent. I mean the way that I think about. Now this is yes it is news and and News is kind of core to what it started as a couple of years ago but I think as a brand it really reflects the currency in terms of what young people care about which is issues. And so it's it's the Lens in which they consume. It is news but it's really more so for young people issues climate climate change equality etc.. Those are really what define now this and you could argue. Certainly they're potentially depressing stories. That are out there but the lens that there are lots of depressed race out. I try to be an optimist but the Lens. Now this Kind of kind of takes through who These these complex issues to really be positive and hopeful and so it is the most utility driven versus being lifestyle driven but I also again that positive through line kind of makes it easy for us as we think about the future and monetization. So we're we're recording this before the holiday break and then You'll you will be heading off immediately to to see us which I will not be on the genus. Sorry good luck with that but you'll be meeting with lots of different marketers and and stuff like this and this maybe it'll be the first time since the merger went went through Wha what's your like sort of top line message for why they should care. Wise is a good thing for are your partners so I can answer that. Through two lenses one is more from the kind of larger macro conversation that's going on and the other would-be more from a client facing perspective macro wise merger mania. Whatever we called it a lot of these companies got together out of necessity Out of survival and pop sugar and group nine got together because it made sense because it was thought you were going to say that they got together for survival survival. No no no we we. It was not under duress. You had our chief officer Brian. I did And the profitable notable pop sugar kind of playbook and you had group nine the dominant stake in in reaching young people dominant stake in social video. Everything everything came together from a complimentary perspective including Brian and Ben who have known each other for a long time but really through even down to what they're passionate about you know I. It's all super complimentary so I think that on the macro level weren't out liar because we're like I said we'll be a case study for success success in terms of merger mania also because it wasn't done GonNa State of duress okay. Are you talking about refinery. I'm not tired. Whatever are you talking about? I'm not talking about anyone in particular on the client facing side in terms of value. So you have this really big list of of consolidated media companies. The VOX is the old school ones. The Conde's the hearst the meredith the vices the bustle digital groups for us us when we talk about young people. It's number one. We reached them at scale and number two. They spend more time with us than anyone else in the entire competitive set and so that is third party. Syndicated that's not our made up proprietary. Whatever that's com score in terms of actual time spent and attention for us is that at core currency from you know what we think the future cohorts in Gen y Gen Z.? Trade on it's you know. I want to be captivated by something and captivate them more than anyone else in the competitive set so I wanNA push on the scale thing for a little bit. Why is scale still pretty important because a a lot of people have come on this podcast and sort of been like skills dude skills dead and like not really I mean scale drives a lot of this and for what you're talking about You know adding together all these different brands. you're gonNA have a single salesforce right absolutely tech stack single all these sort of things. There's a bunch of efficiencies. I'm sure that come out. Like you know everyone when they announced sees mergers. Try Not to talk about this but like there. It is more efficient. But there's a a lot of advantages to having a bunch of brands under one roof. So I think that nothing's ever truly really new and so you look at the magazine. Zine companies their portfolio of brands. They have the same shared services model. One printing press one back office. There's a reason I mean conde still trying to get there. You're for sure but other other brands. The hearst Meredith Lega those have been in existence for a really long time for a reason because in order to scale you need to have that back office support that isn't replicated across every single brand so there's the economic scale which is shared services and then there's the audience scale. which is you have to be big enough to matter absolutely critical in a world where you have facebook? It's the same narrative facebook and Google and Amazon and target and Walmart Media Group. All of those guys out there. That are huge scale is is is is I guess the way that I frame it upscale is is no longer a lead statement. It's more of a check box right so if you don't check that box then you're going to be in trouble and it's like anything. I mean we keep talking about this and these these different podcasts. Hell the the middle gets gets crunched. And it's easy to fall into to the metal but I mean I guess together. You'd think that you guys are are not in the Middle Lake are are one of the scale players. Oh Yeah No. It's not even a thought it's factual we are number one. Overall in terms of time spent from Com score perspective were number one in terms of social The Olsen Dr Com score both say the same thing so I think within our larger competitive set of all the brands is that I mentioned. We are a clear leader and that competitive set you you think it's not it's not quote unquote just the the the vox is The bustles but it's the the I'm GONNA another quote unquote like the traditional like the hearse. The Conde's absolutely that narrative of them being behind is it in my mind a two year old narrative and I'm not talking about restructuring. I'm talking more so about audiences. They were behind. They looked at digital pure place. Copied their playbook playbook and I think I think they're pretty caught up so we have to consider them a credible threat to our business and to try to take whatever share they have that is legacy and bring it our way.

Conde Brian Marcy Jeff Schiller Jeff Partner Facebook Ciro Groom Dr Com Wise Meredith Lega Middle Lake Officer BEN Walmart Media Group Google Amazon
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

14:28 min | 10 months ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Before we get to this week's interview. I want to encourage you to subscribe to one of digitize other podcasts and that is making marketing every week I speak to leaders in media with this podcast and in making Marketing surprise surprise sharing attack speaks with marketing leaders particularly those with new brands in recent weeks charene sat down with the CO founders of a brand that makes shoes in quarter sizes a CMO of one of the oldest insurance companies in the game that's metlife and the head of marketing over at one of the most visible France that is quip that podcast is making marketing subscribe now wherever you listen to your podcasts. Welcome to the digital podcast asked him Brian Marcy before we get started I wanNA give my usual reminder that you should become a digital plus member but I have an extra inducement digitally plus gets you unlimited access who are content all of our content and even working on a member bonus version of this podcast that should be next year we're not quite sure how that will look but it will happen I promise you mean we also give digital plus members exclusive research and newsletters and a lot more for a limited time go to digital dot com slash subscribe he's podcasts at checkout and you'll get thirty percent off that's thirty percent that's podcast checkup try this week I was joined by Josh thin comb the Global Sierra The Dow Jones Josh and I discussed what revenue diversification looks like Dow Jones with strong subscription business data events and content marketing services are due to its model and we also delve into life after the third party Cookie Hobie enjoying Josh on the podcast thanks for having me it's been a while it has been a while so explain exactly what's under your re-met sure so I oversee advertising and marketing services for our media properties which are the Wall Street Journal Barron's Market Watch financial news and in global business. Not The subs business tell me why these are not an opposition what you're doing and then what what the subscription side is yeah I mean I think if if the advertising goal was just a mass as much scale as possible then you could see a paywall and you know sort of blocking of access to some of our content as in conflict with the advertising business but actually see our businesses selling scarcity selling access to highly engaged first professional audiences and that's exactly what we're building through our membership business okay advertising business a little challenge these days Yeah uh-huh media companies so the market is demarcus challenging that said we have some really interesting bright spots in the AD business okay I'm on the bright spots with the good stuff first thing is I think our digital advertising offering sort of coming into its own admittedly I think the journal and the brands have been a little sleepy on the digital ad front but the actual underlying resources that we have the data that we have is digital advertising gold and I think this has been the year this past year where we finally put the focus and the investment to create really interesting differentiated digiland products and we're seeing record growth as a result so that's you know sort of a growing up I think of the journal digital ad business is growing growing shrinking it's not shrinking okay the opposite of shrink yes exactly right getting bigger so that's a clear bright spot and I think there's more upside for us in the short term because again we're we're scratching the surface of what's possible with the data that we have we had one person in Ad Tech when I started just over a year ago now a sizeable team whose entire job is is to create interesting digital ad products off the back of our first party data and what's an example so well in addition to just offering highly accurate audience segments built off our first party data because of our membership business we had a product that we launched this year called fee attic which was a contextual targeting tool actually built off another product that Dow Jones owns called Fat Tiba so we've built a patented a that sits on top affect Tiba which is a product that ingests thirty three thousand new sources from around the world million articles a day in this algorithm it creates a taxonomy of of themes and get smarter and more nuanced every day then we apply that taxonomy to every new piece of content that we publish on the journal or Barron's Market Watch so we can offer our advertisers the opportunity to be adjacent in real time to incredibly specific themes in terms contents it's much more sophisticated than keyword targeting for example and that's been sort of the hit of the year in Digital Advertising I think we over delivered on our expectations by about three acts in the first year and that's something obviously that average has can't get from Google and facebook I think you know there are very few if any companies that have the access to this much quality content coming through Activa and and certainly no one has is this exact sort of machine learning algorithm we've patented it and you know we're finding that it's again not only incredibly sort of popular with advertisers it's performing much better than almost any other targeting Approach that we take so on the targeting front obviously the pendulum swung very hard towards audience targeting tell you what happened there I don't feel like Holy Shit really and you know we've been talking about it swing back to context I mean are you actually see in this in the market hopeful no I I you know I think it's it's in the interest of publishers that it does but I I think there is some truth in it you know number one audience targeting doesn't take into account in many instances context I think that creates you know some of the brand safety issues we've seen people just chasing audiences said forgetting about anything else so I think there's a sort of a a rationalization around all right well you know I might be getting purser thinking I'm getting a person that I want but where did I find them and what's the context of it so that's the first thing the second and probably bigger change is going to be you know the inability to establish identity at scale across the open web you know as as we enter a world with cookies and more restrictions on third party data so people are going to look for in my mind sort of one of two things one publishers who have significant against amounts of First Party data and can establish some kind of identity on their platforms and and and our properties are in the enviable position of having pretty significant sort of logged in consumption base where we have a big digital membership business we know a lot about the people that are coming to our sites so from an audience targeting perspective you know we're going to become increasingly I think in rarefied company in terms of media companies who have I party data at some amount of scale secondly a are the other the other way to kind of address this this coming cookie apocalypse as it were is to look for proxies audience targeting which is contextual targeting right back to where the I guess the web started to some degree and I think contextual targeting tools are becoming more sophisticated like the one we rolled out we're not the only ones working on products like this so I think you're gonNA see again focus on publishers who have a lot of first party data and I think you're going to see the use of contextual targeting you know come back into vogue think broadly will be the winners of this this cookie pacalypse there's a lot of things going on right now to limit the use of third party cookies in third party cookies have been the workhorse right so that digital advertising was built built on the back of the walled gardens and the big platforms. I think they do well. They've done they this will help them you know th they have identity at scale yes oh they're not as dependent obviously in some cases not really at all dependent on third party data so this will help them and you can say all right what helps them sort of hurts the rest of the publishing industry and in aggregate that may be somewhat true but among the sort of non walled garden options I think you will see sort of winners and losers you know and and winners will be the one who do have a lot of valuable first party data that they can bring to the party needs some scale scale yeah absolutely right our brands are are at an all time high I'm happy to say in terms of paying members but also total digital reach so you know given the audiences we cater to we've got enough scale on which to apply this targeting to be a really interesting option for reaching sort of the the business elite and Oh you know I I like to think we'll be among the the winners in the sort of non walled garden world but it is gonNA come down to sort of a half and half knots in terms of First Party data you know all of the scrutiny on the platforms to actually benefit publishers in in the in the reality of the ad cricket or is that just something that's going on like you know at this really high level yeah no I I think it already is benefiting US actually you know I can't speak to what there's sort of internal motivations are but you know we are seeing better commercial opportunity coming from the platforms than we ever have had so you know we've we've done a couple of big deals this year with platforms I think the general environment is one where they are valued or they are being forced to value so quality journalism and recognize they have to pay for it in some way so I think the relationship between the platforms and and quality publishers is better today than it's maybe ever been and that could be a result of some of the scrutiny on them instead of doing it because they have to but I also think you know consumers are demanding more of them in terms of of what they read on those platforms and wanting to know that there's quality vetted actual information on there it seems like apple is sort of like the favourite platform apple is is apple's very publisher friendly because they're not focused on their AD business they tried to protect exactly right we are partners with apple news plus but that's yeah you sort of nascent advertising platform at this point but Yeah we did we did a a big deal with twitter this year we produced daily video show on twitter called what's now producing twenty plus videos a day live streaming all of our events so how does it work do you sell into that today sound both sort of both it's sort of a coordinated effort and they're they're great partners actually I I think you know twitter has been really fantastic partner both from a you've you know content creation support partner but also in the on the ad sailing side with you know collaborative sales teams in good terms and so we've been really pleased with facebook partner don't know well read into that let's talk about how you stitch you stitch the value proposition together because I mean you're you're coming to the market with a lot more than just all in brands sort of marketing life in the following way one I can help them better understand their target audiences especially when those target audiences are C. suite executives or institutional investors are individual investors the kinds of people that were really effective at reaching an understanding so the the first piece of it is is sort of an insider intelligence piece which is what are these people care about how are these people spending there time what's keeping them up at night a lot of which I can infer from what they're doing on my platforms and how they're using my products so that's the first piece and I think that's obviously helpful for brands because they're getting into the minds of of their customers the second thing I can do is offer them access to those customers through advertising and a very targeted way putting them in front of the right folks you know across the different properties whether that's in print or digital or events which which we can get onto a minute but I can also help them create for this audience so if I sort of I know what is interesting to CFO's as an example I can also because of the products activa get a sense into so much content sort of exists out there in the world on on any number of topics I say here's some white space but it's an area of interest and let us help you you know eight four or shoot for if it's a video or you know program for if it's an event this audience and I think we bring a philosophy with it which is the one that the Journal and the barons newsrooms you know employees every day which is we need to add value to these people's.

Dow Jones Josh metlife head of marketing France Wall Street Journal Dow Jones Brian Marcy Josh thin thirty percent
Barron's Group's Almar Latour: Building community is key to subscriptions

Digiday Podcast

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Barron's Group's Almar Latour: Building community is key to subscriptions

"Welcome to the digital podcast. I'm brian marcy and this week. I'm joined by all marla tour. Omar is the publisher barron's group and that is home to not not just barons but also mar watch mansion global financial news and penta la- gut the great moammar. Thank you for joining us. Thank you so great a beer okay so i went through some of the properties but give us an overview of of this group and how it fits within within dow jones yeah think of the group as a financial decision making platform we have a large the number of readers and users who have a questions about how it what what action they should take and <hes> response to what they see on the news and we help provide that answer <hes> whether you're a beginner or all the way up to a billionaire or or people in between who are on their first job or <hes> mid career there will be different types of of questions that you have and and so as happens each piece of of this group as a piece of an answer <hes> so barons often <hes> has readers that are wealthier are very very serious about the market <hes> financial news has s. professional readers and as a covering the financial industry marketwatch is highly accessible and reaches a large large number of people mainly u._s. and so together we we try to provide answers it no matter which stage of your financial cycle michael you're in to to help you make that decision. So that's the idea of

Mar Watch Mansion Brian Marcy Barron Omar Publisher
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Journal, which are banking on corporate credit cards. Barstool sports is not for everyone. But it has legions of rabid fans, aka stories barstool CEO, Eric inner Dini joins me this week. I'm Brian MARCY. And this is the digital podcast on this week's episode. I speak with Erica about barstools audacious goal to reach one hundred million dollars in revenue in just eighteen months. Really? She says it she promises us. Erica. Welcome back to the podcast. Thanks for having me when you were on a couple years ago. You talked about you can't build like an advertising supported business these days on the internet. Yeah. And that that definitely played out. Yeah. Explain a little bit. Because I think Barcelona I've always thought it's an interesting example of a of a modern media company that people say, oh, scales, dead and stuff like this. But that has extreme loyalty explain how you measure that kind of loyalty for people who are not immersed in the barstool world. Sure. So mostly we feel it, and I know that doesn't sound quantifiable. We we are on the internet all the time at a company one of the things that's really different. I think about us is that when we make content. We then go talk about that content and our audience reacts to that content pretty instantaneously. So we have a good instant feel of if the joke lands, or if it doesn't or if something is interesting or it's not. And one of the reasons that's important, and what's different about barstool in that is that our our personalities spend a lot of time talking to our fans about the content that they make our fans give us content that we then promote in in adjacency to the original piece of content that we created. So we see the reaction on Twitter primarily we see it on Instagram. Most definitely we see it in comments on our blogs. We see it with people like you whereby if we're promoting, you know, Dave's interview and digital you'll see the comments and interaction around our retweeting of his article exponential to what you would find from a traditional media. I mean, we're small publication. Like, I think Dave's tweet was like our number to reform sure yet day yet. And we see that it's not just digital. We see that with NASCAR. We saw it at the Super Bowl. Like we see that in. In in mainstream culture when Dave Dave in particular. But also, Dan cats like when when they engage around a topic. Sunday night's game of thrones. Our guys had so many comments about Sunday night's game of thrones. They had one of them had thirty two thousand likes thousands of re tweets. So there's just a very instantaneous reaction that we see primarily and measure in the form of commenting and likes. Okay. My ad tech tweets do not get this kind of. Yeah. Yeah. How do you explain where barstool fits because? I mean, it's barstool sports. But it's not really site sports. Are just a way too short seems to me to to Orient House. It's mostly what like two lifestyle brand to comedy brand. Everyone's a list though, they are. But we actually are. So, you know, we we spend a lot of time on sports, basically, what we are as you know, one part media brands one part influenced collection of influencers one part lifestyle brand. And when I say lifestyle brand, you'll often find. And people wearing our clothing buying our.

Dave Dave Erica Eric inner Dini Brian MARCY CEO Twitter Orient House NASCAR Dan one hundred million dollars eighteen months
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"That is I n t r o. I hope you give it a try. Memes have emerged as a new form of communication entertainment that bafflement, but they're the way that a lot of young people both entertain each other and express themselves one of the biggest Meam accounts out there. His quan. This is an Instagram juggernaut. It has an amazing twelve point three million subscribers. It was started by a Canadian teenager. But it is now the biggest property of imagine media a social publisher that is focused on creating content for teens and young adults primarily on Instagram and Snapchat, imagines various accounts and have thirty five million, followers and two billion video views a month, which sounds like quite a lot. I'm Brian MARCY. And this is the digital podcast on this episode. I speak to Brock shor guy. He is the CEO of imagine media Brock his the case for why it's Graham accounts with massive audiences are not just cultural phenomenons, but also sustainable and profitable media brands in and of themselves. We also talk about creating video for Snapchat and Instagram at a time when many other publishers have cooled off on video for platforms. Barack welcome to the podcast gray through here. Okay. So for those in the audience do not know imagine explain exactly what it is in and also certain because it's an interesting backstory, so imagining the social publisher we are creating content for millennia login audiences wherever they are. Right. These days, mostly on Instagram Snapchat. This is where we find them. We start a company for years ago initially with the goal to build an owned and operated mobile app called comedy..

Snapchat publisher CEO Instagram Brian MARCY Brock Barack Graham
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Wrote a sports attracts a mighty and Tashin audience and sports betting has gone from fringe activity to the mainstream. I'm Brian MARCY. And this is the digital podcast today on the show. I am joined by Pat king CEO at action network at describes action network as the Bloomberg of sports media. They don't provide avenues for betting, but they will acquit byu with all the knowledge you need to know to make those vets where legal I might add. I talk about the dynamics of being owned by the Turner sports betting going from that niche activity to the mainstream and much more. Hope you enjoy it. Pat. Welcome back to the podcast you're on a couple years ago. Maybe a little less when I used to be in the ads business used to be. You're not in the ads business explained the action network for those who are not degenerate gamblers we want to appeal to all people care about sports and care about bag gambling. But I think the simplest way described the action network is where the Bloomberg for sports betting data and information, we're not operators. We don't take bets. We don't feel bets. We just try to better inform consumer that's making decisions about how they want to wager. And where they wanna wager and what sports teams what tactics and what strategy and we want to provide the best information data sources to inform them. This is like a this is a booming area. Right. I mean because a lot of things are changing. I think about like, you know, probably when we were growing up. You know, sports betting was a fairly fringe activity. And now supreme court decision came down. A New Jersey has gone legal. I assume this is kind of like cannabis it's going to roll all across the country. Well, we'll see if it's comparative to that. But it definitely will roll. I mean getting back again when we were kids, and how other people bet they usually bet peer to peer person to person, you know, the they're betting in box bowls for the Super Bowl or betcha bedding in March madness will be in a few weeks. But to your point when pass bows overturned the professional amateur sports act, which was enacted in nineteen ninety two. And I was overturned in the springtime that definitely opened all doors. Now, you can gamble legally in eight states New Jersey's you mentioned being a huge one. I mean every weekend every bar in in Hoboken and Jersey City turns into day facto sportsbook, am I got it's it's another reason for me never to go to Hoboken. But, you know, even you know, this this phenomenon tapping that people are literally walking across the George Washington Bridge in embedding people are taking the train from wherever they might live in Pennsylvania and coming across New Jersey into New York and bedding. So. It's become a real phenomenon. It's over a billion dollars just in three months right now. Churning group owns action. It's roll up of different sites. That's right. Churning service. Yeah. Turning group is our primary. Primary funding source they really staked in built the company. It was a new co that was built inside of the turn in group, and then we acquired to other businesses. One is called sports action, which is a super high end more kind of expensive kind of deep into the pool betting platform fantasy incites in fantasy labs which is really for the daily fantasy player the person that wants some edge against fan duel and draftkings where they might be betting and playing even season-long fantasy which ultimately becomes a super useful tool for a category, that's really exploding embedding, which is prop bets. So instead of just bathing the over the under the winter, the loser, you're able to bet you know, does Stefan curry have two or three three pointers in the second quarter. Right. And triangle is investors in a few interesting businesses? We've had. Erica on from Parr stole. But seems to be focused on finding these really passionate areas. I mean, because you know, when you said, you said, you're glad you're not in the ad business anymore because like it is really difficult to make ads work in a lot of different areas that are mass..

New Jersey Bloomberg Pat king Hoboken byu Brian MARCY CEO George Washington Bridge cannabis Turner Jersey City Stefan curry Erica New York Pennsylvania Parr billion dollars three months
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"As a New York Times shifts to be more focused on audience revenue. It has simultaneously shifted to be all about building the New York Times brand in two and a half years ago. It brought in its first chief marketing officer, I'm Brian MARCY. And this is the digital podcast episode. I speak with David Rubin the CMO app New York Times discuss how the time sees its brand being about the truth. And the challenge of not being pigeonholed as an anti-trump. David welcome to the podcast. Thank you. Okay. So you're you're are about two and a half years into this role. Yes. Okay. Explained the role and how this fits into the times orientational now particularly in in driving subscribers and really being a sort of consumer. I yes, I'm the chief marketing officer at the times, and it's a new position we think it's the first time the times has had a CMO history goes back long enough that we don't want to commit as broad statement. But I that's good journalism. You'd always say he didn't never say the first, right? But I don't know who the other would be. And so the the reason the rules being created this is that as we're pivoting to being a consumer subscription brand telling our story and building deeper longer relationships with with our readers becomes critical. You know, you're only going to subscribe, if it's something you're using regularly and seeking out and. So marketing becomes really important not just as sort of a transactional relationship. But as something that sort sorta holistic that's telling you what what makes us special, and what makes us different. And so our team's job is to do that is to figure out what the message of the time should be and to put out there in the world. So this is not performance marketing per se. I mean, there is performance MARTINI circulation before it is an aspect of what we do. So the the I guess the remnants of the circulation team from, you know, a decade ago have moved into up until about a year ago about about four months ago three months ago, we had a consumer revenue team and an audience and brand team. And I was looking after the audience brand team and the consumer revenue team was sort of what you're calling performance marketing. We've now put those together in a single marketing unit. Why is that important to I think it's really important because I think the a lot. Mike arrear has been about thinking about the short term in the long term as related aspects, not independent ones. And so I think you do have to focus on them organizationally as separate separate things have activities against each. But ultimately, you want them to come together as a thought so that you're building performance with the story, you wanna tell and the story you wanna tell with performance..

New York Times chief marketing officer David Rubin Brian MARCY Mike arrear three months four months
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Welcome to a special episode of the digital podcast. I am Brian MARCY every week on the show. You hear from digital media executives about the strategies, they are taking to build sustainable businesses. But strategies are one thing and execution is another in this series of the next five weeks. We're publishing bonus episodes of the digital podcast where we go in the weeds on everything from how to build a profitable events business to making a great podcast for this episode. We look at what goes into making an essential Email newsletter Email has had a renaissance over the last few years, particularly as publishers focused more on direct connections with their audiences. I sat down with Zach Seward chief product officer and executive editor. Of course, he ever sees product development at a total strategy and audience growth courts, we discussed what goes into it. Effective Email strategy. Zach welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much. So tell me about your role because you have moist interested in people have one foot in two worlds, and you've got a foot in the editorial world and a foot in the product world. Yeah. My background is as a journalist. That's all ever wanted to be since I was eight years old, and I was doing that. Or would you call aditorial jobs when it came to courts the rule became as you said like a hybrid initially. We didn't have product product team that with a dozen people, but we were doing product like things like building, the website, or Email products, etc. As we grew. We created the real product group or now forty fifty people strong and the competitive advantage. We saw was to marry great editorial and great product design, and engineering and. When you do those well in tandem, I think that's that's how you get a great editorial product. It's just how how is it different from places you had been before because everyone will will say something like this. But the reality is they've got they've got legacy structures that sort of work against the right? It's all about the structure. I think right. It's not I don't think it's a lack of capability, right? Typically, the product teams on the so-called business side, and it's on a different floor that certainly my experience in prior jobs. And as a result is just this huge disconnect. What the newsroom is trying to express through the product. And what the product teams trying to express turn out to be very different things. There's not a ton of alignment, the even just the logistically the process of building the product is separate. It goes go off with the product goes off and builds this thing Cording to business objectives. Delivers it to the newsroom news fills in the spaces that have been allotted to it. It led to the experiences. I think on news websites, apps and emails that did feel a little disjointed it fell optimal. Yeah. Let's let's let's put it that way. And so my boss is the editor in chief, Kevin Delaney a courts, and so that means the product team is a part of our newsroom, that's a crucial part of the strategy is where we're all right there. And in my job, specifically is to make sure that as we've grown the alignment remains there between what were building a product team. And what we're we're trying to achieve as an editorial team. And of course, our business objectives. We all believe cross organization that it got start with a great Joyal product. And and that's what's going to. Make a great advertising product, and let advertisers want to be part of its fortunately, it's it's the whole proposition, of course, in the market to advertisers is that let's talk about a specific product. And it's E mail because I think a lot of people have looked at courts, you know, fondly for a really nailing Email, and at a time, everyone is all about Email all of a sudden again, but at a time when a lot of people were overlooking Email, explain how courts goes about building a great Email product. Where does it start? So we today have to daily emails the courts daily brief which send in the morning whenever your morning wherever you are on the world and the courts obsession, which is sent in the afternoon daily brief has been there since day one accords which was in two thousand twelve and so when we when we launched we.

Zach Seward chief product officer product development Brian MARCY Joyal editor in chief Kevin Delaney Cording executive editor eight years five weeks one foot
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"The slew of bad news about Facebook keeps coming but not front is not exactly a new problem. However, it does perpetuate this at a massive scale. And that is something that Craig Silverman is focused on his work at BuzzFeed. I'm Brian MARCY. And this is the digital podcasts on this week show. I speak to Craig who is a media editor at BuzzFeed. And we talk about the vicious circle of how ad spending helps to fuel a lot of the propaganda and fake news. That is out there. Hope you enjoy it. Craig welcome to the podcast. Thank you, really happy. They are here. I really am have been fascinated by the your beat and the work that you're doing at BuzzFeed now is like to do a little journalists journalists conversation every now and again. Tell me how this came to be. I mean, how did this beat around misinformation? How how did it get formed? Well, it was it was actually the thing that made BuzzFeed reach out to me. So in in two thousand fourteen I was doing a research project at the towel center Columbia where basically I was looking at how news websites deal with unverified information. So a claim is out there. Like, maybe it's an tweet and what you news websites. Do you know to they write it up? And when they write it up to they describe it as unverified or a claim in the headline. And then what if it turns out to be true or false? How do they react to that? And so I was doing this research project, and we were gathering data. And then we had visualized the date on a website to sort of show that, you know, basically, the the takeaway was the stuff that was false was kidding way. More engagement on Facebook on Twitter. And then when it was debunked. You know, it got basically no attention and the attempts to debunk misinformation were failing compared to the completely false stories or the envy. Verify claims that turned out to be false people just didn't pay attention to it. Once you actually knew the end game. And so you know, I was doing that. I was kind of you know, promoting the site. I was talking about at that time in two thousand fourteen what I started calling fake news, which was completely false stories done for financial benefit. And I got an Email from Ben Smith in early twenty fifteen saying, hey, is this your website is kind of cool come in and talk to us. And he was kind of like, you know, come see me, the next time, you're in New York, and at that point my fellowship was ending. And I need to figure out what I was going to do next. So I I literally like, hey, I'll be there next week. And I booked a flight not telling him that I was booking it for that reason. And that was really when the stuff started to get a lot of attention because hoax is have always been around misinformation always been around the rumors have always been around. But now we have platforms, and and they. I think they were used around that time really to weaponize this kind of misinformation hoaxes for political or financial gain. Yeah. That that timeframe of like twenty fourteen into two thousand fifteen looking back now for the financial stuff for the business model. So that's one piece of it. That's different is. There's a really good business model that is easily attainable for a wide variety of people to actively spread falsehoods and misinformation and in particular about American politics. So like, you know, you've had the National Enquirer before, but that was a hard business to get up and running the distribution challenges and all that. But now it's like throw up a website get add sense on it, you're in business..

Craig Silverman BuzzFeed Facebook Ben Smith Brian MARCY National Enquirer editor Columbia Twitter New York
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"The heyday of digital media companies funded by venture capitalist might become to end. Now, it is time for serious businesses. Whether the changes, Jim Lanzoni president and CEO of CBS interacted says it's high time this happens. Brian marcy. And this is the digital podcast on this week's episode. I speak with Jim about big opportunity. That's CBS's in OTT how advertising still works great in many ways, but still CBS is working to reduce their reliance on the ad vol. We also get gyms resolutions for two thousand nineteen hope you enjoy it. Jim welcome to the podcast. Thank you, Brian. Okay. So what is right now? OTT? Are you looking at his big threat or big opportunity? Well, definitely big opportunity, especially if you're me running the digital group at CBS. So you know, if you kind of go back to when I started here is about seven and a half years ago. You would have no idea how big OTT would have gotten in how fast. So I don't know how you think about defining it for me OTT is specifically like Roku apple TV streaming devices. That is now seventy five percent of our streams are coming through those devices, not seventy five percent of people, but total streams of the people who watched through those devices watch a lot of content. And and so I, you know, we do think it's a big opportunity. It's also big one from an advertising point of view because you can be very addressable with the ads especially with our subscribers very one to one. So so we definitely think it's an opportunity present about protecting the TV. I mean TV is the core of the business. What I think if you're thinking two thousand eighteen forward. Yep. You start to think about the traditional TV is part of a multi-platform strategy and by far the biggest right, and it's one hundred million households and or the number one broadcast channel. And then you have things like Showtime also on TV, but I think everything through the entire stack of what we're doing needs to now forward consider everything from mobile all the way through to the actual television. And then the not devices like, you know, somewhere in between on that. So how is that changed in seven and a half years since you came because I mean, you came from more of a pure play internet background. Yeah. So valley come into a big traditional media company, quote, unquote, right? Well, look at say, the the first big way is just that when I started we were still very much a desktop business. So a PC business, right? Six percent of our traffic in twenty eleven was mobile. So over sixty percent like for CBS interactive overall..

CBS Jim Lanzoni Brian marcy president and CEO CBS interactive seventy five percent sixty percent Six percent
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Hello and welcome today Bod cast. I am Brian MARCY. On this week's episode. I am joined by my neighbors Jason and Colleen Walker. They are the husband and wife team who co-founded mind, body green, a wellness site. They insist their brand that just happened to get it start in media. We talked about their advertising strategy and how to any guests on this podcast complain about the duopoly. They also talked about how they diversify their revenue streams, getting deeper into the events business. Hope you enjoy it, Colleen. Jason welcome. Thanks for having us. Okay. So let's get started with just give people a background on mind, body green, and when it was founded in what what you both saw on the market? Sure. So the company was founded in two thousand nine. Rewind a bed. So twenty years ago. I'm forty three. Now I played basketball, Columbia, and back then this is nine hundred ninety eight what you did after college if you had college debt, no scholarships back then. So you know, middle class kid from Long Island, I had college debt. You went to to Wall Street, so I became an equity straighter was able to pay off my debt. Nine. Eleven happened affected me like it did a lot of New Yorkers at the time and decided I wanted to do something different. Something that was a little more media purpose left to become an entrepreneur, how to series of startup experiences. And I found myself around two thousand eight, two thousand seven. I was flying over one hundred thousand miles domestic in one year. I'm six foot. Seven. Imagine what that looks like. An coach seat is not pretty so old basketball experience. Yeah, domestic, you go international. You're cheating on the mile. Okay. A lot of little flights, so flying stress, old basketball injury. I had to extruded disks in my lower back, pressing on my Saddik nerve l four zero, five.

Colleen Walker Jason basketball Brian MARCY Long Island Columbia twenty years one year six foot
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Hello and welcome to the digital podcast i'm brian marcy on this week's episode i am joined by richard gingras vice president at google news and a veteran of both publishing and tech worlds each week i have publishing executives on invariably talking about the big tech platform so it's nice to put their concerns to a platform exac although richard cautions that lumping platforms together is a big mistake we talk about whether google really has a responsibility to build a sustainable publishing ecosystem how google can assist publisher is building direct reader revenue and much more hope you enjoy it richard welcome to the podcast thank you i have so many guests here week after week talking about google and facebook that it is amazing to have someone from google here that i can now turn all the questions on fair enough okay so the number one thing that i often here is the question about what is google stake in finding a sustainable model for publishing it's a great question and i do get asked at once in a while because they say you know like we announced google news initiative why are you doing these things is because you wanna you know have better relationships with publishers and and and assuage your critics i mean neither one of those are bad objectives but they're not the primary objective i like to think yes we have some sense of societal value of journalism in open societies that's important but i think it's also important to recognize just the nature of our business right i have been frequently these days challenging folks when they used the term platforms as generic because it's not mind platforms particularly the ones we typically refer to dramatically different i worked at apple apple's a great hardware platform proprietary os proprietary hardware provide a great experience it's their version of a clean well lighted place they'll make decisions about what goes.

brian marcy vice president google publisher apple richard gingras facebook
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Welcome to the digital podcast candidate i brian marcy i'm here in the riviera i'm going to speaking with media executives throughout the week i said i have to do a shot every time he curses so i'm going to be carried out here my name's roy moore on the editor in chief of digital may thank you for being here rich is the ceo of complex and he's very graciously agreed to share his baking in the fucking faking heat and we were make this interactive but richard it's want to start off with are we in a pivot to reality when it comes to media i don't think you're being aggressive enough with that calm i think that actually occurred i don't know if you remember this we did a podcast a while ago the one of the other ones in the in in new york and i was like you know i made the analogy like you know there's ever been on a big sailboat and when it's when it's going and the wind stops if you're on a big boat there's so much romance him that unless you're the person who's looked up and realized there's no women the sale you're like in your slowing down but you don't feel it because of the momentum that's exactly what happened about a year ago in media when all the margin started compressing and all the revenue sorta compressing and all these people who stopped raising capital and have been unprofitable and have been sucking it down going oh it's gonna get better like it's not a pivot to reality the reality happen it's just it's late realization of it is the real fucking problem you didn't actually it's like when you come to a party and the rose as actually run out but like everyone's drunken so they don't actually realize it so it's just it's just interesting the meat industry has become camp in some ways and vice versa no i and i think it's the unfortunate thing is it's not just the reality happened a while ago what and it's a it's a very dark reality because it's disproportionate it's going to affect a lot of companies and on top of it it's it's gonna drag down categories and some people that are on their way up that could have really good businesses that are going to get screwed over in the process is this just a factor of a lot of companies raising too much venture capital venture capital always stayed away from media because media does not scale like technology different multiples better multiples though so it's like it doesn't scale but better multiples because of the sex factor of media remember media cell has the people who have sole or have raised of raise that multiples far beyond the revenue moguls and far beyond what like multiples are or ever have been so i think it's doubleedged sword i don't i don't blame venture capital i don't think that that's the issue i think the real issue is you had a lot of people on the media brand side behave really badly reverse engineering the business to optics out in the marketplace and i think instead of putting the consumer i and thinking about how and how that's going to create a long term sustainable business on a foundational basis to the advertising community and brands people were like well this guy just sold for this let me go chase that and in reverse my business model to look more like kids were there and i venture accelerated it an amplified it but i don't think that was the cause i think that was just an amplifier within it so arena c massive consolidation than do you think in digital probably not ready i mean we talked about this as well i think you're gonna see five or six companies either own directly or indirectly in have portfolios of a largescale verticalised france i just i don't even think that's up for debate and i think it's happening right now and the unfortunate effect of that related to what i was saying before not the complete things but it's like anybody who's out like an independent strong as they are right as they are you might lose because they don't have the leverage and the buying power and the ability to go have high level agency conversations of largescale basis are going to be left out in the cold because everybody's you know i same analogy i use last time and you question my like why i sold.

roy moore editor in chief
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Today's show is brought to you by air table air table is part spreadsheet part database and all amazing the thing with air table is entirely powerful but it's also flexible take maintaining an editorial calendar you need to manage an entire editorial process with tight deadlines and lots of moving parts we are racing to finish the new issue of digital magazine it is the change makers issue so i can tell you that this process can get very confusing very quickly but with air table you can get organized in your way that's why places like buzzfeed group nine and time all us air table air table is flexible enough to adapt to your process but also it is powerful enough to keep everything and everyone on schedule visit air table dot com slash digital to get fifty dollars in free credits hello and welcome to the digital podcast i'm brian marcy on today's episode i talked to alonzo kary he is the co founder and president of genius you might remember genius as rap genius the lyrics annotation service i use to figure out the back story in meek mill songs genius which has your standard startup story going back to a dorm room is now nine years old live or not they have they shifted from a rap genius to simply genius a few years back with the idea that they're annotated service could be applied to basically the entire corpus of human knowledge now they've gone back to their roots aiming to basically be a museum of the stories behind music and in doing so genius has branched into original content with its own video series illinois and i discussed genius focusing on music rather than everything it's two years two year efforts gives me at building a business model and why youtube and not facebook is the focus of its platform strategy and we also talk about geniuses love hate.

digital magazine brian marcy co founder youtube facebook buzzfeed alonzo kary president illinois fifty dollars nine years two years two year mill
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Welcome to digitally podcast brian marcy i am doing this from london and on today's episode i speak with the telegraph media group's chief customer officer robert bridge chief customer officer is an interesting role and i wanted to talk with robert about how media companies become sort of customer centric usually when talking about customers media companies are talking about advertisers but nowadays increasingly talking about their audience because everyone is on the road to the pivot to paid telegraph is no different what's interesting is tell take on subscription which is an alternative to a meter paywall puts about twenty percent of their content behind a premium gate and robin i also talk about why apple news is better for them at driving subscriptions than facebook and there's also some gdp our talk at the end so stick around for that one note this podcast is now available for early access to our digital plus subscribers if you wanna get a head start on our podcast every week sign up for digital plus and you get to listener podcast on saturday digitally pluses our membership program that includes original research early access the top stories and this podcast exclusive events a quarterly magazine event previous and much more for more information go to digital dot com you will see the digital plus tab on the menu bar at the top use the code podcast for twenty five percent discount now here's my conversation with robert hopi enjoy it robert welcome to the podcast thank you thanks for having me we so you're chief customer officer of the telegraph media group and i i found this very interesting because of been thinking a lot about how weird the.

brian marcy chief customer officer robert facebook robert hopi london robert bridge apple twenty five percent twenty percent
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Before we get to this week's episode we have special offer for you our podcast listeners we have passes to our next digit a plus live podcast event this is usually exclusively for digital plus members but we are going to make few available to your listeners on january twenty four th at five thirty p m i am going to speak with bleacher report ciero howard memon at their offices here in new york city and there's much to discuss the pivot to video dunrite and done wrong what this latest facebook movin and abandoning news in the news feed means four publishers the importance of brand of media today and whether rushed to commerce were hit a wall and much much more please join us these passes as i said are normally available just to our digitally plus members but if you would like a paths please email us at plus events at ditched acom be sure to include your first and last name is limited number of passes will be given out on a firstcome per sir basis so act now again that is plus events at digit a dot com black of the digital pack asked them brian marcy on today's episode i speak with meredith artly she is the editor in chief and sep at cnn digital just to note this episode was recorded before facebook's big announcement house changing the news feed said that is not an issue we discussed directly but we do discuss it indirectly and we discuss a lot more such as the role scale place which is still big issue in digital publishing and much more hybrid with welcomed the podcasts hey thanks brain so you've been at cnn digital now eight years give me the how it's changed over that time very briefly though the the sort of eu pox that has gone through you don't want the full detailed timeline here yeah i got it.

brian marcy facebook bleacher howard memon new york meredith artly editor in chief cnn digital eight years
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Is more important than it's ever be companies grew up with passerby readers day if you don't have a consumer whose actively looking for your content is very difficult to build and slashed his we looked would snapchat stood with advertising and storytelling it's clear that digital can be more than the thing that we think it is looking to this episode of the two today podcast i'm to he'll patel senior reporter to today filling in for brian marcy today we're joined by 1000 to rent evp of client partnerships embassy universal us infants were joining us it's exciting to be here it's my first podcast great of i haven't had a few so this with the should be a good one up before we get started uh that if you could cut of two years ago embassy universal deliver of restructuring of its sales team could you walk us through it like a refresher of what exactly changed why the change was sort of enacted in what your role is at the company now so i actually joined the company probably almost six years ago and it was soon after linde acharya now are at chairman you know took a broader role and was overseeing all the advertising sales for the entire company and we actually started what is now client partnerships you know back then um and and at that time the focused was how do we create a crossdivisional marketing a group and functionality across for our clients across the mall many assets of the company so yell at that time it was very marketing focused.

reporter brian marcy evp chairman advertising sales patel six years two years
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Round is more important than it's ever be companies grew up with passerby readers for debt if you don't have a consumer whose actively looking for your content is very difficult to build and select as would snapchat doing with advertising and storytelling it's clear that digital can be more than the thing that we think it is welcome to visit a podcast i'm brian marcy editor in chief of digital and today i'm joined via skype by orrin cats f orrin is the head of programming at tastes spent or unwelcome figure very much very a delighted to be here okay so we we don't do a lot of skype podcast but you know we're not in the same cities who decided to give this world also afl it'll all work out i think most people assume this podcast no tastes made but give us the sort of two minute story of how tastes made started you're now five years in and in a some of the top line numbers absolutely so tastes made were a media and technology company creating contents largely in food travel in the lifestyle categories and really geared at creating content globally and across digital and mobile devices with a millennials kind of being or key audience segments we really originator cofounders we worked together a previous job the very quick story is that as they were sitting around a table enjoying food and enjoying meals uh you know they realized that they were talking as much about the food is what business they wanted to start in there was this feeling that you know we could really connect the world through food as a starting point and create content.

skype mobile devices brian marcy editor in chief orrin technology company five years two minute
"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"brian marcy" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Welcome to day deep di i'm brian marcy intern chief of ditch day today i'm joined by senior editor in chief moses who just finished a story hot off the presses with her own just davies over in london the tag team on a story about this big news about google building an at blocker google the largest advertising business on the planet building a tool into its browser to block adds the chew welcome hi brian so give us the background well as you said google is one of the biggest at giants on the internet so it sounds uh counterintuitive uh or hip uh uh it sounds sounds like hypocrisy pick your additive for google to set out to block ads uh but a lot of people think that this is a defensive move by google it sees rising rates have added locking it has been trying to keep the web at the open web safe for users who has has different constituencies right it has all the advertising that it get that it sells but it also has publishers that it needs to keep healthy so it has content for users when they go to google in it has to keep your users uh you the key it has to keep the user experience good so people will continue to go to go to google okay sets the the virtuous cycle you know users advertisers publishers and stuff like this put this in context though between what were seen as far as how publishers are feeling about the platforms themselves because you've written just recently how google actually is now being seen as more of a friend to publishers than safe facebook.

senior editor davies google advertising business facebook brian marcy intern