35 Burst results for "Brian Mann"

"brian mann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 3 months ago

"brian mann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Gas to Poland and Bulgaria The move is in response to Europe's support of Ukraine in the two months since Russian forces invaded that country NPR's Brian Mann is in Odessa in southern Ukraine Moscow is playing hardball here They rejected a call for a ceasefire and they're cutting these oil and gas supplies to punish European countries helping Ukraine natural gas futures shot up as a consequence UN officials say they did get an agreement in principle to some kind of evacuation plan but we've seen this kind of statement repeatedly and it's never come to anything Russian attacks on that industrial site in mariupol where Ukrainians are still fighting Those attacks have continued and been intense Millions of people in China's capital are continuing to take COVID-19 tests this week as officials in Beijing hoped to avoid a lockdown similar to the one that's in place in Shanghai David rennie is the Beijing bureau chief for The Economist he spoke to NPR's morning edition They have done everything for the last two years to keep COVID out of Beijing We have uniquely strict rules here and China did an extraordinary job for two years of keeping covered levels kind of incredibly low It involved incredibly tough controls but Shanghai has just been hit by a massive wave Rennie was courtesy of Skype This is NPR news from Washington And it's doubly in my sea in New York at 7 32 good morning I'm Michael hill 48 and partly cloudy out there now Today mostly sunny and staying only in the mid 50s for a high We have delays this morning on NJ transit northeast corridor In the news New York governor Kathy hochul supports a bill to make it easier for candidates to voluntarily remove themselves from an election ballot It's become a charged issue in Albany at a former lieutenant governor Brian Benjamin resigned amid bribery charges but he remains on the June 28th primary ballot Governor hochul says Benjamin is unlikely to move at a state which is one of the few legal ways to get him off the ballot The fix she says is to change the law I.

Ukraine Brian Mann mariupol NPR Beijing David rennie Odessa Bulgaria Poland Shanghai Moscow China UN Europe governor Kathy hochul Rennie Michael hill New York Skype
"brian mann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 4 months ago

"brian mann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"After we talk they set off again A mother and her two little ballerinas pulling that pink suitcase through the park Brian Mann and PR news lviv Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have confirmed the largest comet ever seen The icy heart of the mega comet is about 80 miles in diameter we're told which makes it larger than the state of Rhode Island NPR's deepest shiver on reports It's called the sea 2014 UN two 7 one which is a pretty short name given its gargantuan size This comment is 50 times bigger than average So it really is big compared to the average comet that we've seen And in fact it's the biggest one that's been seen so far That's David jewitt and astronomer at UCLA He's one of the scientists who confirmed this comet's record breaking size And he says even measuring it was a feat It took him 8 months That's because what he's really focused on is the icy core called the nucleus So the important part of a comet is kind of the solid bit in the middle But it's the hardest part to measure because it's surrounded by kind of an atmosphere that swamps the brightness of the nucleus But jewett and the researchers were able to solve this problem using the Hubble Space Telescope and their own modeling that allowed them to extract the light coming from the comet's nucleus and separate it from the light coming from the comet's tail The comet is barreling at a speed of 22,000 mph but it won't ever get close to Planet Earth In fact the closest this comet will even get to the sun is 1 billion miles away You know nobody should expect to go outside and see this thing through a pair of binoculars or just by naked eye and it's not going to be really spectacular nighttime object But jewett says the discovery underscores that our solar system is still an unknown and unfamiliar place with thousands of comets left to be discovered There are tens of thousands maybe hundreds of thousands of smaller bodies in the outer solar system that we haven't discovered yet because we haven't looked hard enough It might be the largest comet discovered to date but for jewett he.

Brian Mann David jewitt jewett NPR NASA Rhode Island UN UCLA
"brian mann" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:13 min | 8 months ago

"brian mann" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"The time of year for celebrations but the holidays are also a season when alcohol can be a problem So as you prepare to head out to parties and family gatherings where people will be drinking and Pierre's addiction correspondent Brian Mann has a few tips for staying safe and healthy I want to promise right up front this isn't a finger wagging scolding sort of conversation Experts say most of us will do just fine with our drinking through Christmas in new year's But it is important to keep in mind alcohol can be risky for some people Here's Kim kerns I did not go out and not drink I drank all the time with friends Currency is 39 a stay at home mom who lives in Massachusetts For years she says the holidays felt like a slippery slope This is the time of year This is when everybody's drinking You know oh we're decorating the Christmas tree even though it was 11 a.m. I think this deserves mimosas Last year she says things got out of control She scared herself drinking too much All the experts I talked to agree the holidays are a time when alcohol can trip people up Part of it like kern says is the fact that it's just everywhere Alcohol is tangled up in a lot of the rituals we love But doctor Anna lemke a researcher at Stanford University says the holidays also leave some of us more vulnerable Holidays are often a time of great expectations which can be disappointed when things don't go according to how we envision that they could go or should go and although we can love our families and friends getting together can be stressful So that's the first thing to be aware of just the simple fact in the next few weeks some of us may be more prone to risky or problem drinking as a way to cope with stress The experts I talk to offered some red flags to watch out for and also some simple strategies to stay healthy The first suggestion from out of lemke is to have a good idea how much alcohol is safe Folks who are worried about their use but want to continue to drink should keep careful track According to lemke three alcoholic drinks in a day and 7 drinks in an entire week that's considered safe for women For most men it's a little.

Brian Mann Kim kerns Anna lemke Pierre Massachusetts kern Stanford University lemke
The Sacklers Want Immunity From the Opioid Crisis

Morning Edition

01:43 min | 1 year ago

The Sacklers Want Immunity From the Opioid Crisis

"Trials underway in New York for Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin. Members of Sackler family who owned the drug company have testified they bear no responsibility for the nation's deadly opioid epidemic. As part of the bankruptcy deal, the Sackler czar demanding immunity from lawsuits for themselves and for a network of companies and organizations. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann has been following this Brian you've reported before the Sackler want to clean slate for themselves, no more opioid lawsuits. But this deal in particular would also shelter a bunch of other people and companies from liability. How would that work? This has been a major flashpoint in this trial A and it was again yesterday as part of produce farmers bankruptcy settlement The sack Lear's who say they've done nothing wrong, have agreed to pay $4.3 billion to fund addiction treatment programs, but the Sackler want something really big. In return, their attorneys have drawn up this single spaced list of individuals, organizations and companies. This list runs for 12 full pages. If this deal is finalized, everyone on the list would be sheltered permanently from lawsuits linked to opioids and oxy cotton and from a wide range of of other lawsuits. And why does that matter? So this is interesting. Critics say the Sackler is in their empire are at the center of one of the biggest man made public health disasters in US history. Hundreds of thousands of people have died in this epidemic. Their company has pleaded guilty to federal crimes linked to the OxyContin business. First in 2000, and seven and again last year again, the Sackler is deny wrongdoing and have never been charged. But there are still big unanswered questions about how this prescription opioid crisis happened and who in the sack Lear's network might be liable. For some of the harm and let me give you

Sackler Sackler Czar Brian Mann Purdue Pharma Oxycontin NPR Lear New York Brian United States
Senate Starts Debate on Biden's $3.5 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

BBC World Service

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Senate Starts Debate on Biden's $3.5 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

"To combat climate change, expand health care and education, access and overhaul immigration laws. Senate Budget Chairman Bernie Sanders says Democrats plan will improve the lives of Children, working families and the elderly. He described the goal of their plan this way. Restore the faith. Of the American people in the belief That we can have a government that works for all of us. Once the Senate approves a budget resolution outlining those goals, Senate committees will get to work drafting legislation. Susan Davis NPR NEWS Washington New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says he'll leave office in 14 days amid allegations of sexual misconduct involving Nearly a dozen women as NPR's Brian Mann reports. The move came as Cuomo's political support continued to crumble. In a televised address. Cuomo maintain that the

Senate Bernie Sanders Governor Andrew Cuomo Susan Davis Brian Mann Washington New York NPR Cuomo
Does the Landmark Opioid Settlement Do Enough to Help?

Weekend All Things Considered

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Does the Landmark Opioid Settlement Do Enough to Help?

"We just mentioned the opioid epidemic. This week, four of the world's biggest healthcare companies, including Johnson and Johnson reached $26 billion settlement for their role in the opioid crisis. These corporations made and distributed huge quantities of prescription pain pills at a time when addiction and overdose rates in the U. S were surging. So what happens now? NPR correspondent Brian Mann reports full time on addiction and is with us now to walk us through this complicated deal, Brian. Welcome. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me first. Could you just go over the main points of the settlement? You know these companies the drug maker Johnson and Johnson and also these three big drug wholesalers, AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson They've agreed to pay a maximum amount of $26 billion, And as part of that agreement, a huge percentage of the money will go to drug treatment programs and social service programs. Health care things like that, and negotiators say this is a big improvement over the tobacco settlement of the 19 nineties. Where, if you remember, a lot of the money has been siphoned away by governments for other things not used to reduce smoking. So this money would be paid out over 17 years, and supporters say that will mean a steady stream of funding for programs that might help with this long term process of ending. This devastating public health crisis. Now two states Washington State in West Virginia, have already announced that they won't sign on to this national settlement and the city of Philadelphia has also rejected it. Why, Why is that? Is there something that they say is missing? Yeah, For one thing, there's no admission of wrongdoing by these companies or their executives, You know, as part of this wave of lawsuits against these corporations that got deep into the opioid business. We've learned factual details about how they flooded communities with pain pills. They kept growing that drug pipeline even as addiction rates and deaths grew. Internal documents from some of these firms showed that at times executives joked about the people suffering addiction. And a lot of these officials who reject this

Johnson Brian Mann Amerisourcebergen Cardinal Health Mckesson NPR U. Brian West Virginia Philadelphia Washington
At Least 60 People Dead in Florida Condo Collapse

Closer Look

01:41 min | 1 year ago

At Least 60 People Dead in Florida Condo Collapse

"Survivors began at the site of the partially collapsed condo building in Surfside, Florida crews are now looking for bodies. The status of the search has changed with little hope of finding any more people alive. The death toll has risen to 60. As many as 80 people are still unaccounted for. NPR's Brian Mann reports on how families and rescuers dealt with the reality that the operation had to shift from rescue. To recovery. Rescuers, clergy and family members held a moment of silence last night to mark this painful transition officials say the debris field turned out to be devastatingly dense and compacted with no voids or sheltered places for survivors. Alan Kaminsky, Miami Dade County Fire chief spoke to reporters. This decision was not an easy one as our hearts still hoped to find survivors, but the experience And expertise indicated that was no longer possible. Searchers are now focused on finding victims still missing in the debris. They're working around the clock to reunite bodies, with families still waiting for their loved ones. Brian Mann. NPR NEWS Miami Beach, Miami Dade County Mayor Danielle Levine. Cava says search teams are also working to reunite families and survivors with treasured belongings that are buried beneath mounds of concrete and metal. Any religious items, any engraved items, any firearms any safe and any currency. Is being specially set aside. Separately, North Miami Beach officials saying a condo building that was evacuated due to safety concerns must remain vacant until the condo association submits a new 40 year re certification report. Addressing all structural issues. The Crestview Towers is located just a few miles from Champlain Tower South. United States

Brian Mann Condo Building Alan Kaminsky Dade County NPR Surfside Mayor Danielle Levine Miami Florida Cava Miami Beach North Miami Beach Condo Association Crestview Towers Champlain Tower South United States
Florida Building Collapse: Report From 2018 Warned of 'Major Damage'

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Florida Building Collapse: Report From 2018 Warned of 'Major Damage'

"Issues requiring extensive repairs were found several years ago. In the waterside building that came down early Thursday in the Miami area. NPR obtained the structural engineering report from 2018 flagging problems, including with waterproofing, There's still no word on the cause of the collapse. Meantime, no survivors were found in the rubble overnight. 159 people are unaccounted for NPR's Brian Mann reports. Rescue crews are facing hazardous conditions. Officials here say they are still hopeful residents of the condominium could be found in the dense pile of debris. But speaking late Friday, Miami Dade Fire and Rescue Chief Alan Kaminsky said the effort has been complicated by heavy rains and by a fire that continues to burn inside the ruins. There's so many hazards were an encounter and and the fire just compounds it. The fire is deeply seated, deeply rooted under the structure, So you've seen it in and out, and unfortunately, we keep Having flare up so there and it's just not accessible, Officials say rescue personnel from across the U. S, as well as Israel and Mexico or helping with the effort.

NPR Brian Mann Miami Dade Fire And Rescue Alan Kaminsky Miami U. Israel Mexico
New York Lawmakers Expected To Legalize Recreational Marijuana

Morning Edition

01:54 min | 1 year ago

New York Lawmakers Expected To Legalize Recreational Marijuana

"15th state along with the District of Columbia to legalize recreational marijuana. State lawmakers are expected to vote on that later today. Officials say they hope to create a regulated industry with tens of thousands of jobs while ending racially biased drug arrests. NPR's Brian Mann reports. Police across New York State still arrest hundreds of people every year for possessing small personal use amounts of pot studies show people of color are far more likely to be prosecuted for marijuana possession. Senator Liz Krueger, a Democrat from Manhattan, says her bill will end that. I think it's a huge change. We're going to be a sponging the criminal records. Of tens of thousands of people. Governor Andrew Cuomo says he'll sign the measure. His office estimates annual tax revenues from legal pot sales could eventually reached $350 million a year with his many as 60,000 jobs. Cougar says the law directs those benefits to neighborhoods hit hard by addiction and high arrest rates. 40% of the revenues That will come out of the taxes from legal marijuana will go right back into those communities that were harmed by the drug wars. Critics of this bill acknowledge pot legalization is unstoppable. Sandra Doorly is a Republican prosecutor who heads the New York State District Attorneys Association. We understand that It's going to be reality. Doorly worries The measure doesn't give police clear authority to deal with motorists impaired by marijuana. If you legalize marijuana, and you stop someone who you believe is impaired, you know, how were we going to be able to prove it? Democrats agree It's hard to detect motorists impaired by marijuana, and they're backing new research to develop better roadside cannabis tests. Recreational use of marijuana remains a federal crime. Brian Mann

Brian Mann Senator Liz Krueger District Of Columbia NPR Andrew Cuomo Sandra Doorly New York State District Attorn Manhattan Doorly Cougar New York
"brian mann" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"brian mann" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"In your story. Where's the painful part that was really defining in who you are. That just made you were. You had to make the decision one way or the other. Yeah well. I mentioned the house. Fire that i had in college which was really this sort of my entry into full time ministry because they were so supportive after that trauma. But yeah and i'm still processing this year and a half ago I was in full time. Ministry have been for a long time steps into a leadership role In a church that i love but at a church that was really a very mission driven. And i would say sort of crisis driven church and When i was in the creative role it was great. But i had stepped into more of a leadership role to manage the day to day and it was just. It was too much for me. And i almost knew it from the from the beginning again. The harmonize her. Wanna make smooth things out you know kinda minimize problems and conflicts. And just you know looking back. I can talk to up two years. We don't do it. But i after a few months i just had to step back and i just i could see that i was getting unwell. I was facing real. Burn out I was starting to manifest symptoms of anxiety and depression couldn't sleep in so made the tough decision to step back hoping that would alleviate The pain that i was in and it actually did the opposite. The moment i i chose to step back just spiraled and i were worry about. What am i going to do next into doing this. My whole life The worry about you know my worth anything in working still do. Depression tends to just closing on you. At one point. I had trouble sleeping have trouble having coherent thoughts. I mean it got really bad. And i had some very close friends and family including including my dad. A very specific way. That rallied around me in my most painful least impressive lease lovable moment In showed me unconditional. Love and support in rallied to my rescue and that that changed. I've gotten really good at telling other people's stories and figuring out the perspective. But i really lost sight of my own and to be able to be loved when i was the least lovable and to be cared for when i wasn't producing and when i was you know this goes back to me as a kid on a piano in a stage in front of everyone. I just learned this lesson that i can make people happy by doing something. Well and here. I was feeling like an absolute failure and yet there are people who surround me and love me and That brought me. I mean it took time that brought me back to life In a way. I'm still sort of processing. But that's how i got some profound healing but it was. It was through me feeling like my story was finished that it was over. I was done. I was just hanging love. This is how the story ends and god proving to me that no actually you're wrong. This isn't just your story. We're in this thing together and Yeah realizing that. I could be loved Even when i wasn't just jamming out. Great films and great content. But that i could actually love for who god created me to be in my weakest moment. was.

two years this year and a half ago one one point
"brian mann" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"brian mann" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Not just sarcastically. To say you still have a back. I laughed. I thought i was the reason for the back door. Anyway let me bring this. Let me bring this around. Because i really do have a protectiveness. The certain senior pastors in even this morning i was watching. There's a special on sandra day o'connor coming out. You know the person. I supreme court justice and just broke so many glass ceiling for women. And she's had this huge life just groundbreaking stuff but when asked about the kind of the number one thing. A pain for her was the public. Scrutiny and i just feel like for senior pastors that issue pub public scrutiny where they just do stupid things because they're longing for privacy sent make any sense. Yeah i think so again. I think you know and again i i do believe leaders living above reproach i think we live in a particularly sort of shaming culture days Where we when someone somewhere has decided that you're no longer the person that should be there. There can be an army mansfield up two sort of cancel you and take you out of the equation and again sometimes are very valid reasons But also times. I think just because you're a spiritual leader but also organizational leader but also a counselor but also a teacher but also but also but also I think we have just stacked the expectations. Because we've stacked the job title up with all the whole people and that's one thing if it's fifty people i mean that's hard I couldn't be all thanks to fifty people. But i can try. But if it's five thousand fifty thousand Then yeah i i think. There's a star really disconnect with what one person can actually do and you create a really challenging situation and then all of a sudden one that person fails all my gosh what happened like how could this you know how could they have how they messed up. You know how could somebody who you know. We trusted having a farewell. Pasturing can be a very intimate thing. and in some ways past passers misread things or make a horrible decision and that ends their career. Or you know. Suddenly you have power when you didn't have power before you're a church planter but now you're a big deal passer and that power changes your equations and the calculus of how decisions get made and all of a sudden you know. You've you've got corrupted your you know your judgment to some degree or you've made some people mad and they're gonna come get you. I mean i think in so many ways. It's so much expectation on leaders in. Yeah it's it's tough to have a normal life than raise kids and have a good marriage With all of that happening so no.

five thousand fifty people one thing this morning one person fifty thousand sandra day o'connor two one
"brian mann" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"brian mann" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Me the time like do you heard you feel betrayed. I probably would have given you the sort of Well you know. It's not that big a deal. I'll just go focus on my work but it took me a long time to realize how much pain was. Actually in and i was angry at my leadership for allowing this to happen it was angry at this high for essentially betraying me But i think. I was angriest at myself for being so trusting and putting my trust in people and I wish i'd had that kind of clarity at the time. But i didn't so i put my head down. I decided to stay at the church. Try to do good work. But the more. I managed that pain the more i just found myself getting cynical and sort of passive aggressive wish some. Which is my humor. Italian very sarcastic. So that's kind of my coping mechanism so couple of months later. I got the chance to attend a creative retreat out. Here in california with a guy named donald miller was hosting retreat called storyline and it was essentially kind of away a framework for figuring out what store you're actually living and grant. Brian lemon erupted lemonade. Per second because your story if you started it yeah. I actually started to get defensive of the church and here here i am right. Turk charts and and yet the reason is because she just started talking about somebody who was behaving politically. Yeah and and isn't that one of the top reasons we hear people say but the church is so political. And i want to stop and say really like every other organisation because really isn't kind of political meaning how we try to negotiate with other people and i don't.

donald miller california couple of months later Brian lemon one Per second Italian Turk
"brian mann" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"brian mann" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Ryan before i start picking your brain about the power of story. I want to hear a party. Your story that took you from the creative world into church. There has to be a story in that. There's always a story. I was raised on the front pew of the church. My dad was a pastor My entire life so I started playing piano when i was really young so played piano in church in high school. I started composing music. I decided i wanted to move to the los angeles I went to. Usc attended their film scoring program. There learn how to write music for film and television and then my senior year in college. I had a fairly dramatic house fire. I got out okay. but It was it was a very painful experience. And i didn't realize it at the time but i was suffering through a lot of. Ptsd in the months following that in la became a very sort of lonely and isolating place for me and the church. i was attending in pasadena Near la at the time was so supportive The church small group. That i was a part of really rallied around me and helped bring me back to life and so i got more involved in the church there I during their music staff a year later as an organist and Was working in hollywood during the week. doing music production and film. Tv scores and on the weekend was playing the organ and music for the church and then a year after that. Got the invitation to come into full time ministry on staff at a church here in the bay area menlo park. It's now called menlo church but it was menlo park presbyterian church Back in the day so yeah that started at twenty plus year journey fulltime creative ministry and music production film production. I worked in conference Work in europe for a while and then a lot of just what i would call visual storytelling capturing people's stories on film so yeah that was my way into ministry. You know i so associate you with cutting edge work in the church. It's hard to imagine you an organised. But you were really the pure The pure musician. And i. I think it's fascinating where you've moved from there but you know You know our listeners. Really should know that brian was a consultant for me when i was thinking about doing this show and he helped me clarify part of what i wanted to do Part of our brand script includes the line. The problem is that you've likely been hurt by church. Which can leave you feeling resentful. Initially disillusion creating roadblocks on your spiritual journey ryan. That's our brand script but is that party your story to have you been hurt by the church and little resent fuller disillusioned.

brian los angeles europe pasadena Ryan ryan twenty plus year menlo church a year later a year after la menlo park Usc hollywood menlo park presbyterian church
"brian mann" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"brian mann" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Welcome to urge bruce. Good bad duty about jazz ruined. You've ever had questions about the jurors may be a bit jaded your attitude doors religion. You come to the right place. Our host he was an honors velocity student ordained a presbyterian minister planted three george's father did was university. But now now you just an aging curmudgeon never quits asking the question. Why roads dr john. Your story isn't finished. Virginia woolf one said if you do not tell the truth about yourself you cannot tell it about other people. Let me repeat that if you do not tell the truth about yourself you cannot tell it about other people. That is rather scary. If you think about it. For years ago. I went through a life changing radical character defining unnerving transition. I'm not gonna tell you exactly what it was. Because i'm not ready to get that vulnerable but i will say to you. I am not the same person as i was for years ago. I thought it was just a choice until every day. I found something out that was new about myself. Here's what's strange about that of all the things in life. I might have doubted one thing. I did not doubt was that i was the world's number one expert in john bash. Nobody knew me as well as i knew me. How could they. isn't that rather self evident. I once heard a woman. Say i'm not much but i'm all i'm thinking about now. I'm not quite that bad. But i did claim to have a certain amount of self awareness. My share of psychology classes to graduate degrees was a minister for twenty five years with more than a few therapy sessions of my own. That isn't that qualify. Me to know myself in short answer is no. Have you ever heard the question. Would you rather be happy or right. Most people asked this expecting it to be rhetorical. I have the kind of brain which doesn't work so well with such questions. Right or happy Doesn't this open up the possibility to be a happy idiot. Let's not dismiss right to quickly particularly appreciative of people who can come into such pondering and help me to think about life differently. Their way to truth is not near oppositional. As i would like. It's much more sensitive and caring usually include some fun stories along the way. And today we have such a person ryan man is an artist communicator churchmen and currently holds the title of story ninja at city coast creative in sonoma's california. Welcome brian man. To church hurts. An thank you so much to.

twenty five years today ryan Virginia woolf one thing three sonoma dr john ninja george number one john bash years ago california one ago brian bruce
New York Launches Vaccine Status Mobile Phone App

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:48 min | 1 year ago

New York Launches Vaccine Status Mobile Phone App

"Status. Officials say the Excelsior past will give people quicker access to gatherings, including sports arenas and large weddings where the state's public health Ruth rules are still in effect, NPR's Brian Mann reports. When Governor Andrew Cuomo gave a briefing this week, He talked a lot about re opening businesses and venues getting the economy going again. But he also gave a warning. We have made tremendous progress, but anyone who says it's over They're wrong. 71 people passed away. There are still thousands of new coronavirus cases confirmed in New York every day and dozens of deaths. The challenge, says Mark Door with the New York State Hospitality and Tourism Association is reopening more places like sports arenas and Broadway theaters when the Corona virus is still lurking. I think confidence is the biggest dilemma I guess to overcome as we head into the busy season confidence and getting people out to travel, so New York State partnered with IBM to create Smart device app that includes a scannable barcode similar to the one used in airline boarding passes. They say it's voluntary. It's free. The download keeps most of your personal information, private. Horses. Business venues can check customers barcodes to find out if they've been vaccinated or tested negative for the Corona virus. Within the last three days, the business will be able to really quickly recognize. At the proper protocols have been followed in order to have a safe entry into the business from the start of the pandemic. Smart devices have been used for contact tracing and public health alerts. Disappears to be the first app in the US that shows this kind of personal corona virus status, though officials in Hawaii or working on a similar vaccine passport, Melissa Fly Shoot, who heads the New York State Restaurant Association. Doesn't think smaller venues like

Brian Mann Governor Andrew Cuomo Mark Door New York State Hospitality And NPR Ruth New York IBM Melissa Fly Hawaii New York State Restaurant Asso United States
Purdue Pharma proposes $10 billion plan to come out of bankruptcy

Morning Edition

03:45 min | 1 year ago

Purdue Pharma proposes $10 billion plan to come out of bankruptcy

"Pharma, The company that makes OxyContin filed its bankruptcy plan last night, And here is the plan, the company itself will be dissolved. A new organization will be created that will direct profits to help people. Hurt by the opioid epidemic. Now, two dozen states immediately rejected this plan to help answer why NPR's addiction correspondent Brian Mann is with us. Hi, Brian. Hey. Good morning, Noel. How did Purdue Pharma described this plan working overtime. Yes. So what the company's president Steve Miller says, is that a new company is going to be created from the ashes of produce farmer that's going to essentially exist to benefit the public. The sack lawyers will have no roller ownership. And over time, this new firm will generate hundreds of millions of dollars, much of it from selling OxyContin, which they say they can do ethically and safely. Will also produce medicines that will go to help people suffering from opioid addiction, and they saved a total value of all that overtime will be roughly $10 billion. Members of the Sackler family also issued a statement late last night, saying, this plan offers and I'm quoting here. An important step toward providing help to those who suffer from addiction. It was clearly thought through. Why did so many states come out and rejected? Offhand? Yeah, there were months of negotiations leading up to this and a big complaint from state attorneys general, most of them Democrats, Noel is that produce farmer and its owners. Seculars. They're gonna only offer of about $500 million, right. At first. The rest of the cash payments, including $4.2 billion promised by the Sackler is themselves. That would be spread out slowly in installments that would be paid over most of the next decade. And that slow pace really angers critics like Maura Healey, she's attorney general in Massachusetts. What the sacristy are offering essentially is a way for the payments to be structured. That makes it convenient for them. They get to keep their billions of bank accounts and make money and use the interest to pay. You know, the state's out over time. Well there OxyContin fortune keeps growing. And there's one other rub here for critics, and that's the fact that a lot of that $10 billion in value that produce farmer talks about it doesn't actually come in the form of cash, which communities really need to pay for addiction programs. And said the plan envisions providing low cost addiction treatment drugs like people, Morphine and the lock zone, which this new spinoff company they hope to create, would make and sell at a discount.

Brian Mann Sackler Noel Purdue Pharma Oxycontin Steve Miller Pharma NPR Maura Healey Brian Massachusetts
Should Emergency Rooms Be Equipped to Deal with Addiction?

All Things Considered

04:01 min | 1 year ago

Should Emergency Rooms Be Equipped to Deal with Addiction?

"Visits to hospital emergency departments plummeted. But a new study shows more people than ever are turning up at hospitals seeking help for drug addiction and overdoses. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann found many emergency doctors have struggled to respond. Emergency departments are great at treating things like chest pains and asthma attacks After the pandemic hit. A lot of those people stopped showing up at hospitals. They were scared of catching the coronavirus. But Kristin Holland, a researcher at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says patients experiencing addiction needed help. So desperately They kept coming. The thing that really stood out to me about all drug overdoses and opioid overdoses. Those were the only two for which we saw. An increase. Holden study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, analyzed roughly 190 million emergency room visits. The data shows even people who didn't catch the coronavirus were hit hard by the pandemic. People are indeed experiencing poor mental health, suicidal thoughts, substance use, potentially as a coping mechanism. But there's a problem. Experts say Many emergency departments aren't well staffed or trained to help patients with these kinds of problems. Dr. Mark Rosenberg is president of the American College of Emergency Physicians. Emergency physicians have always been able to treat the overdose, but we did not have tools to treat the addiction. Or the dependency. Rosenberg's organization has worked for years to convince emergency departments to improve addiction care. But he says, reform has come slowly. He points to the fact that most emergency doctors still don't use buprenorphine. It's a drug proven to help people with opioid addiction, avoid relapse. Only one third patients get medications for Opioid use disorder in the emergency department. Experts say regulatory hurdles and stigma around people with drug use disorders have kept many emergency departments from improving their addiction care. Dr Stephen Veal heads the emergency team at Halifax Medical Center in Daytona Beach, Florida. I think there was a lot of hesitancy because it's not what we've done. It's not what I've trained in, and it seems like somebody else should do it. But I think that what finally pushed emergency physicians out of their comfort zone to do something is just the number of people that we've seen die. After a spate of overdose deaths. Three years ago, Veal changed his department using buprenorphine and also adding a new member to his team. Larry Brooks is a trained addiction counselor who now works with patients in the ER as soon as they're revived the overdose patients that comment to an emergency room They're at their most vulnerable. They're at their lowest point that they've ever experienced. You know, the you know, been dead. Or at least near dead. And brought back to life during the pandemic. Brooks Hospital has seen a new spike in drug cases, Brooke says. It's made a big difference. Having an addiction program in place. This is the best time for us. As health organization and a community as a whole. To make an impact and say, Look, somebody is here. You're not going to get kicked right back out the door and go into withdrawal and have to find something else and then be back here in two hours, But experts say emergency Department addiction programs like this are still rare. CDC researcher Kristin Holland says she hopes data from her study will convince more hospitals to change our takeaway from this is meeting people where they are and if people are coming to the emergency department for these outcomes, that's where we need to meet them. Well, death from covert 19 have dropped from their peak. The CDC has fatal overdoses nationwide keep rising with more than 220 drug day. Brian Mann NPR news

Kristin Holland Brian Mann Centers For Disease Control An Dr. Mark Rosenberg Opioid Use Disorder Dr Stephen Veal Halifax Medical Center Journal Of The American Medica American College Of Emergency NPR Holden Asthma Rosenberg Brooks Hospital Daytona Beach Larry Brooks Veal Florida Brooke CDC
Schumer Joins Congressional Democrats' Call for New York Governor Cuomo to Resign

Radyo Lekol

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Schumer Joins Congressional Democrats' Call for New York Governor Cuomo to Resign

"Calling other on Governor sabotage Andrew Cuomo wit to resign. to buy guy, The two Deb lawmakers Lukey. described allegations Neil against their Fellman, fellow Democrat is credible. Kimye Rogge Here's Rana NPR's Plaza Brian Mann. Equity Six Partners women have accused Governor and the Cuomo of sexual Lady harassment or and improper she can be touching more allegations constricts he's your denied magic city A Senator coma. Schumer Say a and Gillibrand lab. They're happy. are the latest members Bacteria of Cuomo's demean own party. vendor To say the time Not has commercially come for the embattled aware. governor Bella to Shannon's go. market fip In their statement, The military, senator's praised See the women who've come that forward fed through as these brave read and said Cuomo has nobody quote lost s the confidence little of his governing aid. partners See? The and European the people A of second New York. new yen Cuomo's dig political us support off has collapsed US in recent security days. But he With said Isaiah repeatedly he Alicia won't resign. Bruckner, Catalonia Cuomo says Mavynee those calling know on this him to step down before Calgon an mentally investigation is completed Well connected by New York's attorney downtown general are quote Little reckless 80 and dangerous. affect Brian Mann downtown NPR news, Miami. According to a new poll So it's from The

Cuomo Lukey Brian Mann Fellman Kimye Rogge Andrew Cuomo Governor Bella DEB Gillibrand NPR Schumer Neil Coma Shannon Mavynee Calgon Bruckner New York Catalonia Isaiah
Schumer, Gillibrand call for resignation of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

All Things Considered

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Schumer, Gillibrand call for resignation of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

"York Senators Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand are now calling on Governor Andrew Cuomo to resign. The two lawmakers described allegations against their fellow Democrat is credible. Here's NPR's Brian Mann. Six women have accused Governor Cuomo of sexual harassment or improper touching allegations he's denied Senator Schumer and Gillibrand are the latest members of Cuomo's own party to say the time has come for the embattled governor to go. In their statement, the senator's praised the women who've come forward as brave. And said Cuomo has quote lost the confidence of his governing partners and the people of New York. Cuomo's political support has collapsed in recent days. But he said repeatedly he won't resign. Cuomo says those calling on him to step down before an investigation is completed by New York's attorney general are quote

Governor Andrew Cuomo Brian Mann Governor Cuomo Cuomo Senator Schumer Kirsten Gillibrand Chuck Schumer Gillibrand NPR York New York
NRA counter-sues New York attorney general trying to dismantle gun rights group

The Takeaway

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

NRA counter-sues New York attorney general trying to dismantle gun rights group

"Is countersuing New York State's attorney general Leticia James. The move coming is James continues her legal effort to dissolve the gun rights group. Here's NPR's Brian Mann. James sued the N R a last August in the state court in Manhattan, alleging its leaders, including Wayne LaPierre committed fraud, siphoning off tens of millions of dollars in charitable contributions. At the time. James, a Democrat who supports tough gun control measures, said she hoped to quote dissolve the N R A because no organization is above the law. Now, the N R A, which is incorporated in New York is countersuing. In a new legal filing. The gun group accuses James of inappropriately using state laws to target a political organization, calling the effort of blatant and malicious retaliation campaign. Earlier this year, the financially troubled gun rights group filed for bankruptcy and announced plans to reincorporate in Texas. Brian Mann NPR NEWS A federal judge has

Leticia James Brian Mann James Wayne Lapierre New York NPR Manhattan Npr News Texas
Charges dropped against officers seen shoving 75-year-old man

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Charges dropped against officers seen shoving 75-year-old man

"Felony assault charges against two police officers. NPR's Brian Mann says the charges stemmed from injuries sustained by an elderly man during a black lives matter March. Officers Aaron Tarkovsky and Robert McCabe, with the Buffalo Police Department were captured on cell phone video in early June, shoving 75 year old Martin Georgino on the ground. He cracked his skull on the pavement and spent a month in the hospital. Every county district attorney, John Flynn charged the officers with felony assault, but now a grand jury has dismissed the case. Speaking at a press conference, Flynn predicted that critics will accuse him of not prosecuting the case against the officers. Aggressively enough. Look at each one of you in the eye right now. I'm telling you. That I sandbag nothing, Flynn said. The grand jury proceedings are secret so he could release no details explaining why the charges were dropped. Brian Mann NPR NEWS This is NPR news.

Brian Mann Aaron Tarkovsky Robert Mccabe Buffalo Police Department Martin Georgino Every County NPR John Flynn Flynn Npr News
Study identifies first potential treatment for meth addiction

All Things Considered

03:28 min | 1 year ago

Study identifies first potential treatment for meth addiction

"Has come roaring back, and during the pandemic, it has grown even worse. Deaths from meth overdoses surged by roughly a third last year, but there is some good news for the first time, Researchers say they have found a medical treatment that helps some people trying to recover from meth addiction. The study was published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann reports Jessica Martinez started using meth when she earned money as a sex worker paying her way through college. Her life quickly unraveled. Oh, I was shooting up every day. Sometimes 2 to 3 times a day mess is incredibly toxic and incredibly addictive. Martinez, who works now helping others with meth addiction, says when she started her recovery two years ago, it was brutally hard, in part because there was no medical treatments to help with cravings and withdrawal for heroin users. There's nothing down there, Suboxone I just wonder why we haven't researched this drug yet, but research has been happening at clinics around the country. Doctors working with the National Institute of Drug Abuse found a combination of two drugs now tracks own and bupropion helped many of their patients avoid relapse. Peace progress on it's quite significant. Dr Nora Volkow Biz, the institute's director. She says the clinical trial found roughly one in nine patients who used these two drugs in combination saw significant improvement. That may not sound like a home run. But she says, for medications, treating mental health or addiction, that's a strong result. Well, cops says it appears the drugs work together to ease depression and cravings. I mean, we have started to help them that way. This is done. We'll leave them to achieve recovery again. Many patients weren't helped by this treatment, but because these two drugs are widely available for treating other medical conditions, Volkov expects doctors to begin trying the method even before it wins approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Right now, I'm in the moment that the paper is published. Doctors are going to be reading about it than may prescribed the medications off label to their patients. Dr. Laura Raise a psychologist researching medical treatments for meth addiction at U. C. L. A She says. Today's study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, changes the landscape of meth treatment. So far, we have come up empty. So I believe that this finding this clinical trial really is a breakthrough in many ways, because there have been many, many failed trials. This new treatment arrives at a moment when meth overdoses are killing four times more Americans every year. Compared with the decade ago. Matthew Donahue with the Drug Enforcement Administration says the trend is fueled by a pipeline of cheap meth smuggled from Mexico. It's almost like methamphetamines form the sky right now. With the amount that's coming through the borders through boats on planes, Donahue says methods everywhere from the deep south to the Pacific Northwest. He thinks the lack of medical therapies has complicated efforts to curb demand. There's one more reason new treatment approaches to help people quit meth are desperately needed more methods being laced with another deadly drug, the synthetic opioid fentanyl. Last year in the U. S. Meth and Fentanyl together pushed overdose deaths to roughly 82,000 grim new record. Brian Mann NPR news

Brian Mann Jessica Martinez National Institute Of Drug Abu New England Journal Of Medicin Dr Nora Volkow Biz Volkov NPR Martinez Dr. Laura Raise U. C. L. Matthew Donahue Food And Drug Administration Depression Drug Enforcement Administratio Donahue Mexico Pacific Northwest S. Meth U. Npr News
"brian mann" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"brian mann" Discussed on KCRW

"Life from NPR News. I'm Janine Herbst. Hours after the insurrection by pro Trump rioters who stormed the U. S Capitol building yesterday. Congress reconvened overnight and certified Joe Biden as the next president. A shocking scene has some calling for President Trump to be removed from office he's blamed for stoking the violence by continuing his baseless claim that he won MPR's clouded Greece. Alice has more The House and Senate voted by overwhelming margins to reject objections to the electoral votes. Debate in both chambers was stopped when violent protesters breach the capital, forcing an evacuation. Several Republicans reverse course on raising objections after pro Trump extremists forced the evacuations. However, some GOP members, including Senator Josh Holly of Missouri, still objected to the results after the security breach of the capital. The debate stretch into early Thursday but ultimately confirmed once again that Joe Biden was indeed president elect. Fly to Greece. Ellis NPR NEWS Washington and President Trump now says there will be an orderly transition of power to President elect Biden in Washington. National Guard troops are moving into the capital to help local and federal police maintain order after yesterday's violence, and the city's mayor says a state of emergency remains in effect for the next two weeks. NPR's Brian Mann has more. Speaking to reporters. Mayor Bowser blamed President Trump for inciting Wednesday's chaos and said he should be held accountable for people died. One woman from a gunshot wound three others from health emergencies near the Capitol grounds. C. Metro police chief Robert Conte said 14 officers were also injured by the pro Trump crowd to remain hospitalized. One member suffered serious injuries after he was pulled into a crowd and assaulted one also receive significant facial injuries from being struck by projectile. Conte said Pipe bombs were found near the national headquarters of the Democratic and Republican parties. Cooler containing Molotov cocktails was also discovered in a vehicle parked on the Capitol building grounds. Brian Mann NPR news Democrats will effectively control both chambers of Congress, as well as the White House is NPR's Barbara's front reports. Georgia Senate candidate John Ossa has won his runoff election, Assad's victory Simmons Democratic control in the federal government for the first time in a decade, he defeated incumbent Republican David Perdue, an ally of President Trump. The incoming Senate is now split evenly. 50 50 between the Democratic caucus and Republicans as vice president, Kamila Harris will be able to cast tie breaking votes a sauce when means Democrats will have the power to hold hearings and bring democratic legislation to the floor. All soft, will be the first Jewish senator from Georgia and the youngest sitting senator at age 33. Barbara Sprint NPR news And you're listening to NPR news. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Cesar says states should not let federal guidelines slow down the campaign to inoculate people from covert 19. MPR's Rob Stein has more Asia says states should try to prioritize health care workers and long term care workers and residents for the first shots but can vaccinate other groups like the elderly. If that's going to slowly, those are simply recommendations. And they should never stand in the way of getting shots in arms or ever. Heaven forbid, wasting a dose of vaccine in a vile, it's more important to vaccinate a czar is also defending the pace of vaccination so far. The federal government is shipped more than 17 million doses. Two states, but only about five million shots have been administered. Rob Stein, NPR news at the Justice Department and the federal Court system to the list of U. S government agencies and companies that suffered cyber attacks that U. S officials linked to Russia. The Justice Department says Microsoft emails were breached, but they don't think classified systems were affected and the case management system for federal courts across the country were breached, possibly giving hackers access to sealed court documents. Well financial markets. Asian markets ended the day and mixed territory. The Nikkei Up 1.6% the Hang sang down more than a half percent. U. S futures contracts are higher, adding to Wednesday's gains. Our futures contract up about a quarter of a percent..

President Trump president NPR News NPR Joe Biden federal government Senate Brian Mann MPR Congress vice president Rob Stein Janine Herbst Barbara Sprint Georgia Senate Robert Conte Senator Josh Holly senator U. S Washington
Multiple explosive devices found amid Washington DC protests

BBC World Service

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Multiple explosive devices found amid Washington DC protests

"Authorities, responding to Wednesday's riot in the nation's capital say they found explosives at three locations around Washington, D. C. Four people died in the chaos at the U. S Capitol and more than a dozen officers were injured. NPR's Brian Mann. Reports D. C. Metro Police chief Robert Conte says his officers recovered firearms and other weapons as they fought to restore order to pipe bombs have been recovered One pipe bomb from the DNC another pipe bomb from the RNC. Cooler from a vehicle with with a long gun it that also included Molotov cocktails. This also was on the grounds of the United States Capitol. Speaking to reporters, Conte said to police officers remain hospitalized, one after being dragged into the pro trump crowd and beaten More than 50. People were arrested yesterday and D. C. Mayor Morial Bowser said an effort is underway to identify others who stormed the

Brian Mann D. C. Metro Police Robert Conte U. NPR Washington DNC RNC Conte United States D. C. Mayor Morial Bowser
Some healthcare workers refuse to take COVID-19 vaccine

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Some healthcare workers refuse to take COVID-19 vaccine

"Officials in New York say they faced skepticism among some health care workers refusing to be vaccinated for the coronavirus. NPR's Brian Mann reports a campaign is under way to convince hundreds of thousands of New York doctors and nurses to take the vaccine. New York has made frontline health workers a top priority for vaccinations. But speaking during coronavirus briefing the head of New York City's vast public health system, Dr Mitchell Katz acknowledged a lot of workers or saying know these people. Worked in the trenches for the last 10 months, taking care of one covert patient after another, and it's not shocking that many of them feel like Hey, I got through this If I didn't get sick after doing all of this, I'm not going to get sick. Officials say they need more than 70% of health workers vaccinated to help protect hospitals, nursing homes. And other facilities from

Brian Mann New York Dr Mitchell Katz NPR New York City
Cuomo urges requiring negative COVID tests for international travelers to U.S.

Morning Edition

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Cuomo urges requiring negative COVID tests for international travelers to U.S.

"In New York are urging the Trump administration to tighten restrictions on travelers from Great Britain and from other countries where the UK corona virus variant spreading fast. MPR's Brian Mann reports New York City was hit hard by the first coronavirus Wave, which was blamed largely on travelers visiting from Europe. Yesterday on Twitter, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio called for a temporary ban on all travel from the UK governor Andrew Cuomo, meanwhile, called for the U. S. To implement mandatory tests on all overseas travelers, not a travel ban. Just mandatory testing. We have gone through this just test all international travelers before and tree. New York is already using sheriff deputies to enforce quarantines on travelers arriving from the United Kingdom. The UK variant of the Corona virus has already been confirmed in a patient living in Saratoga Springs, New York, Brian Mann, NPR News

Trump Administration Brian Mann Mayor Bill De Blasio New York City MPR UK Great Britain New York Andrew Cuomo U. Europe Twitter United Kingdom Saratoga Springs Npr News
"brian mann" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"brian mann" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Another thing we've learned from court documents filed in lawsuits against Wal Mart is that pharmacists weren't the only ones raising alarms. Federal regulators also kept telling Wal Mart It's system for managing opioids and keeping patients safe wasn't good enough. Under pressure from the D E. A WalMart signed an agreement way back in 2011 promising national reforms. The pharmacist we talked to said things never improved again. Wal Mart declined NPR's interview requests, but the company has created a public campaign to explain its opioid practices. Including this video posted last year on Wal Marts website. We all have a responsibility to dispense opioids appropriately, and so when somebody comes to our pharmacy, and we're going to dispense them a medication We're going to do it responsibly. We want to make sure that they're safe. In legal filings. WalMart attorneys acknowledge the D E a warned the company about red flags and patterns of prescribing behavior that could mean opioid prescriptions were unsafe or illegal. WalMart says those advisories work legally binding and says government guidance on opioids was often vague, confusing and contradictory. The company also argues it was the government's job not Walmarts. Toe crack down on dangerous pill mill doctors These arguments will be tested in courts around the country. As lawsuits against Wal Mart and other pharmacy chains move forward. People like Christina Dine will be watching. After filling her first prescription for oxycodone pills Back in 2012 Dyn says it took years to put her life back together. I first got sober and 2015 after my daughter's father overdosed and died. I kind of went in and out of struggled for a bit, But I've been sober since 2000 and 17 Dine is doing better now working as a recovery nurse helping others with addiction. But more than 230,000 Americans have died from overdoses linked directly to prescription opioids. Brian Mann NPR news This afternoon on all things considered. Nearly one third of covert 19 deaths have come in long term care facilities, and it's getting worse last month saw the highest toll so far among residents and staff in long term facilities. Distributing the vaccine has become a race against a still spreading virus. Listen by telling your smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. This is NPR news member station by name That would be KQED public radio. Of course, more of morning edition is ahead and we do have the foreign program coming up at the top of the hour. Also perspective just ahead. Local doctor, one of the early recipients of a covert 19 vaccine more about that coming up. Also ahead. The California report on KQED Day Freeman away this morning, I'm Michael stated a 43. We'll check traffic.

Wal Mart Wal Marts Christina Dine NPR Brian Mann oxycodone KQED Dyn Day Freeman California Michael
Former Walmart Pharmacists Say Company Ignored Red Flags As Opioid Sales Boomed

All Things Considered

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Former Walmart Pharmacists Say Company Ignored Red Flags As Opioid Sales Boomed

"NPR news. And NPR investigation has found. Wal Mart was warned about dangerous and illegal opioid sales by its own pharmacists. NPR's Brian Mann has more. What we found in our interviews and in court filings is WalMart, pharmacists and emails and memos for years warning company executives that Walmarts Pharmacy chain was selling opioids. Even when there were red flags, signs the pain pills were being abused or even sold on the street. Wal Mart executives declined NPR's interview requests. But in public statements, they say the company acted ethically and did nothing wrong. These opioid lawsuits against Wal Mart come with possible

Npr News NPR Brian Mann Walmarts Pharmacy Chain Wal Mart WAL Mart
"brian mann" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"brian mann" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"NEWS. I'm Jack Spear. Days after Congress passed a $900 billion coronavirus relief Bill, President Donald Trump is now threatening to leave the measure into disarray. Trump last night in a message on Twitter called it the disgrace and said $600 stimulus checks under the plan to be up to $2000, New Jersey Democrat Josh Cotton heimer chairs the co chairs the House Problem Solvers Caucus. Told NPR's all things considered today was blindsided by the president's opposition. We had Democrats and Republicans in both the House and the Senate. Get behind this. The administration was was on board. At least we thought so. Andre. This is critical support for so many people who are hurting right now so many families and small businesses So so I, you know, kind of shock right now. Republicans agree and say that raising the stimulus payments could cause other aspects of the plan, including an additional $300 in weekly unemployment benefits to be altered. Trump is threatened, do not sign the measure. Officials in New York City say they are stepping up enforcement of quarantines for travelers from the United Kingdom. NPR's Brian Mann reports. It's part of an effort to contain the spread of a new variant of the Corona virus that could be more contagious. Mayor Bill de Blasio says law enforcement will make home visits to confirm travelers from the UK are quarantining for two weeks. There's real urgency about what might happen if this string gets introduced on wide level here, so we're gonna be very, very aggressive about that. Sheriff Joseph Aceto says. Anyone found violating the rules will pay $1000 fine for each day they leave their home or hotel room. Deputy sheriff will be serving you with a mandatory quarantine order telling you that you have to obey three airlines. Delta, Virgin Atlantic and British Airways have also agreed to require passengers to test negative for the coronavirus before they board flights from the U. K to New York City. Brian Mann NPR News consumer spending in the U. S declined last month as the coronavirus surges across the country. NPR's Alina cell yuk reports. It's the first decline of the measures since spring consumer spending accounts for more than two thirds of US economic activity, the Commerce Department says. In November. Consumer spending fell 0.4%. It's the first decline since April, 1 states and cities went into major pandemic lockdowns last month to Corona virus cases were staging a new search and prompted new shutdowns and restrictions on outings to stores and restaurants. Earlier data on retail sales showed clothing in department stores and restaurants and bars taking the biggest hits. Also, personal income slumped in November, down 1.1% as many families ran out of the pandemic financial aid and boosted unemployment benefits. Lena's L Uke. NPR NEWS Washington Stocks lost some ground in the final hour of trading to end the session on a mixed note. The Dow was up 146 points, but the NASDAQ fell 36 points. The S and P was up two points. You're listening to NPR. Supermodel from the 19 nineties, has died as NPR's NEDA. It'll be reports Stella Tennant died Tuesday, just five days after her 50th birthday. She was part of a group of super models from the United Kingdom. She was part of an invasion of supermodels from the United Kingdom, along.

NPR President Donald Trump Stella Tennant Brian Mann United Kingdom New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio New Jersey Jack Spear Sheriff Joseph Aceto president Twitter Congress Josh Cotton Commerce Department US
"brian mann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"brian mann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Countersuit. NPR ADDICTION correspondent Brian Mann is here. Hi, Brian. Hi, Ari. Tell us more about what the Justice Department alleges. Wal Mart did wrong. Yes. So WalMart runs one of the biggest pharmacy chains in the country, a lot of those pharmacies in rural towns that have been devastated by this opioid crisis. Federal law requires companies that sell opioids like OxyContin to do so, really carefully monitoring for signs that pills might be used improperly or sold on the black market. And reporting any possible problems to the Drug Enforcement Administration. Now, according to the DOJ, Wal Mart did exactly the opposite, filling huge numbers of unsafe and illegal prescriptions allegedly doing so for years without alerting the government. We're talking about one of the biggest companies in the world. Here was this Justice Department suit against Wal Mart Unexpected Actually, this legal fight has been brewing for a long time. Back. In October, WalMart filed a preemptive lawsuit against the Justice Department, essentially trying to head off his case, and at the time, Walmarts attorneys acknowledged they might face civil and also criminal charges. Since then, NPR has been looking into this, and we found that some of the company's own former pharmacists tried for years to raise the alarm about allegedly illegal activity. Schwann. A hearing is a pharmacist who worked for Wal Mart in rural Michigan. He told NPR he saw a real red flags, pill mill doctors and people addicted to opioids who were allegedly using Wal Mart as a drug source. I start my job at eight, and I see that patients 15 to 20 are already lined up get their prescriptions filled morphine sulfate, oxycodone and other straight narcotic, which are from the schedule took a degree. Now here and work for Wal Mart in 2012 in 2013. When the prescription opioid epidemic, Ari was raging, killing tens of thousands of people a year, and he alleges that when he told Wal Mart managers that opioids were being sold inappropriately they told him, he says, to keep quiet. They told me Do not reach out to the DEA, or do not call the police. If you're going to do so, your employment going to be terminated immediately. Now she runs not alone, making this allegation. In addition to the federal lawsuit that was filed today, Ari WalMart faces a wave of opioid related lawsuits from local and state governments all over these opioids sales and you said Wal Mart has also filed a countersuit against the Justice Department. What is the allegation there? Yeah, This is really interesting. Wal Mart. First of all, denies any wrongdoing. And in that lawsuit filed in October, they alleged the DOJ and the Drug Enforcement Administration are trying to embarrass the company trying to squeeze it for a big civil settlement. WalMart says it tried to sell opioid safely, but was stymied by conflicting state and federal regulations. In a statement this afternoon, WalMart again accused federal agents of ethics violations. And they said they only filled legal prescriptions issued by licensed doctors. Just briefly. What's at stake here? What could the penalties be of Wal Mart loses? Yeah, this could run into the billions of dollars are the money could be significant, much smaller firms like produce farmer that have been caught up in the opioid crisis have settled for billions. But there's another potential cost here and that's reputation. Wal Mart is just the latest name brand American company to find itself entangled in the legal and public relations backlash from opioids. As these lawsuits against Wal Mart move forward, the company faces the potential of months of headlines linking its pharmacies with this addiction epidemic that's killed more than 400,000. Americans. That's NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann reporting on the Justice Department today suing Wal Mart for its sales of opioids. Thanks, Brian. Thank you. The vaccines are coming. Millions of doses are being shipped out across the country this week, bringing hope also bringing logistical challenges and a few hiccups as state and local officials try to sort through distribution. Today, we're going to check in on how it is going in one state Arkansas, Dr. Jose Romero is Arkansas secretary of health. He also chairs the committee that advises the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC on who gets vaccines first. He is here with both his hats on Dr Romero. Welcome back to all things considered. Thank you. It's a pleasure to be bad to start with. Just giving us a sense of scale. How many vaccines have you been able to administer so far in Arkansas? To date. We have Mr 12,762 doses. Andre. We have distribution now to 18 of our major hospitals, including the health department out his 19. That was for the Fizer vaccine. We now have vaccine being delivered to our nursing homes. And that's the journey back to OK. So you've got both coming in. Have you gotten all the vaccines you were expecting? I'm asking because, as you all know some states receiving fewer than they were told they were going to get We haven't had that problem. We are getting an allotment. That's appropriate for what we need. At this point. I'm sure you would like more able to wrap this up as quickly as possible. Yes, that would be great. But we deal with what we have. Um, have you had any road bumps? So far? I think the distribution has gone well, yesterday we had a little hiccup in that when it was being delivered to one of our pharmacies. There wasn't somebody there to receive it. Synthetics. I think it was. It went to deliver it. But the vaccine was not left at the doorstep, so no harm done, But we learned from that where you need to That people know when the vaccine is coming, and we're putting measures in place to not let that happen again. And what about challenges with keeping the vaccines as cold as they need to be? We've heard a lot about they both have to be refrigerated. Fizer vaccine and exceptionally cold temperatures. Has that been problematic? It has not for us. So our initial rollout of the vaccine was dissenters that had the capability of ultra cold storage on by the distribution of the vaccine to the pharmacies, which we are using to reach..

Wal Mart Justice Department Ari WalMart Drug Enforcement Administratio Brian Mann NPR Arkansas CDC Dr. Jose Romero morphine Mr 12,762 Walmarts Michigan secretary oxycodone
"brian mann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"brian mann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This as new infection rates continue to rise in many parts of the U. S cases have increased by about 30% over the past couple of weeks. Reporter Will, Stone says. Some states attribute the uptick to people gathering during the Thanksgiving holiday. It's still too soon to say if the country saw big spike of cases related to holiday travel and gatherings. There are signs that happened in some states, including Pennsylvania, New York and Texas, to name a few. But there are communities were covert 19 infections did not seem to increase because of the holiday. With cases so widespread, experts say it may be hard to know the full impact for some time. Will stone reporting. Meanwhile, the FDA is expected to give the green light to modernize vaccine within days, if not hours. Members of the Sackler family say they did nothing wrong in their company's marketing of OxyContin and other opioid drugs. As NPR's Brian Mann reports. The company Purdue Pharma has admitted criminal wrongdoing that fueled the deadly addiction crisis. During the heated House Oversight hearing, Chairwoman Carolyn Maloney from New York demanded to know who will be held accountable for the illegal marketing of OxyContin. Another Purdue opioids pleaded guilty. Criminal charges, which individuals at Purdue committed those crimes, but produce farm a CEO Craig Landau and former board members David Sackler and Dr Cathi Sackler denied any personal wrongdoing. There is nothing that I can find that I Would have done differently. The Sackler is became one of the wealthiest families in America by selling opioids as overdose deaths urged. Some lawmakers are calling for them to four for that wealth and face criminal charges. Brian Mann NPR news You're listening to NPR news and this is W. N. Y. C in New York on Shawn Carlson. New York City's public hospitals have canceled elective surgeries as of Tuesday this week, as the number of covert patients they're handling continues to rise. City Health and hospital CEO Mitchell Katz. We're doing the necessary surgeries and the emergency surgeries, but we have consistent with governor's request. We have canceled elective Procedures and we do have the extra 25% capacity of the state has asked us for Cat said the city's public hospitals currently have 65% occupancy in both ICU and regular beds. More than 2000. People are hospitalized with Cove it in New York City's hospitals. That's according to the state. It is the highest. The hospitalization number has been in months, but it's not close to the 12,000 patients. City hospitals were caring for The peak of the outbreak in the spring. Recreational marijuana is one step away from being legalized in New Jersey lawmakers voted on historic legislation today that he criminalizes possession of up to six ounces of marijuana and sets up a regulatory framework for the States Cannabis industry. Reverend Charles Boyer is the founder of the group, Salvation and Social Justice. He says the legislation is a crucial step towards addressing the disproportionate harm done to black and brown communities over the years through discrimination, drug enforcement policies. If the state was involved through unjust laws. An unjust application of the laws. So many years. The state also must play a role in repair. Boyer says he'll continue pushing for equitable access to the cannabis market, and you insured revenue from the industry actually goes to impacted communities. Oven. A. Murphy is expected to sign the legislation. Governor Cuomo here in New York, assigned in the LA ban on the sale of Confederate flags or swastikas on public property. But Floyd Abrams of free speech expert says the law is not likely to withstand scrutiny because it concerns displays on public grounds. Because it's public. First Amendment applies And because the First Amendment applies the statute is almost surely unconscious. Tutu sh Inal Abrams says the U. S is far more permissive in this regard than Canada or much of Western Europe, where he says such a law would likely.

New York City Dr Cathi Sackler Charles Boyer Brian Mann Floyd Abrams Purdue Pharma CEO New York Chairwoman Carolyn Maloney Cannabis NPR Purdue Reporter Governor Cuomo Stone marijuana
"brian mann" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"brian mann" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Today marks a turning point for New York's frontline medical workers. A critical care nurse in New York City named Sandra Lindsey has become the first person in her state outside a trial to receive the vaccine developed by Fizer in its German partner buying Tak. NPR's Brian Mann says today was a big moment in a campaign that's expected to encounter hurdles and distribution beyond heavily populated areas. There's also this challenge to get this vaccination out to people in areas where there aren't many hospitals and clinics. And there's also just still a limited supply of this vaccine. So ah lot of decisions being made right now about who gets the vaccine. Who's going to be first in line? Obviously, these medical workers are are right at the front of the queue. It. Also a lot of seniors are are on the list, a lacrosse New York and across the country. NPR's Brian Mann Johns Hopkins University says the U. S is close to reaching 300,000 deaths from covert 19. Meanwhile, a coronavirus relief package remains in limbo. We have an update from NPR's BRoberts pride. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said he spent the weekend negotiating with other congressional leaders on the relief package and emphasize that legislators will have to compromise in order to get a deal. Coronavirus. Eight could be passed along with a year and spending bill On Friday evening, President Trump signed a one week temporary funding measure in order to avoid a government shutdown. Barbra's front reporting this is NPR. Live from KQED news. I'm Brian what San Francisco Health officials are reporting their highest number of covert 19 cases since the pandemic began, the city announced 323 new cases on Saturday. Yesterday, the state announced more than 30,000 new positive tests. More than 1.5 million Californians have tested positive since the pandemic began close to 21,000 have died from the virus. Public health officials say they're afraid the already surging infection rates and hospitalizations will keep climbing, and that people will ignore precautions to gather for the holidays. Santa Clara County is launching a new door to door Cove. It 19 testing program in an effort to reach communities hardest hit by the virus. KQED is Marco Siler, Gonzales reports. Starting tomorrow, four teams made up of public health workers and community organizers will knock on the doors of residents in East San Jose and their goal. We would like to test us many as we can. Dr Anna Lilia Garcia is leading the program. She says. It's hard to know how efficiently they'll be able to test people over the next few weeks. As we do this and find our rhythm and see how it goes. We're going to be able to gauge what it takes to have one. 2345 tests in the household and how long that takes. People can expect the results within 48 hours via text or email. For.

NPR New York Brian Mann New York City Brian Mann Johns Hopkins Unive Dr Anna Lilia Garcia Majority Leader Steny Hoyer Sandra Lindsey KQED Fizer Santa Clara County San Francisco Tak partner President Trump door Cove 21,000 Barbra
"brian mann" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"brian mann" Discussed on KQED Radio

"After these headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Windsor. Johnston, In another legal blow to the Trump campaign of federal Appeals Court has tossed out a lawsuit to block the certification of Joe Biden as the winner of the election in Pennsylvania. Attorneys for the president are vowing to appeal to the Supreme Court. Despite the judge's assessment that the campaigns allegations of voter fraud have no merit. University of Richmond law professor Carl Tobias says it's a long shot. I think it's a thorough repudiation of what the plaintiffs are asking for, and I don't think the Supreme Court is going toe be any more generous. And is likely you didn't I an appeal, But we'll see. The president, meanwhile, is turning his attention to George's upcoming run off elections. Trump says he's planning to travel to the state next weekend to campaign on behalf of Republican senators David Perdue and Kelly Leffler, who are seeking to retain their Senate seats. NPR's Frank Award Oh, Nia's reports, The outcome of these races will determine control of the chamber. President Trump was responding to a story on the conservative website Newsmax, warning that Trump voters and Georgia may boycott the critical election. Trump tweeted quote. Now the 2020 election was a total scam. We won by a lot and will hopefully turn over the fraudulent result. We must get out and help David and Kelly to great people. There's already been a recount of the Georgia vote, which has showed no widespread fraud. The White House says. Trump is scheduled to travel to Georgia a week from Saturday, December 5th Franco or Dona is NPR news. The Justice Department will soon allow federal executions to be carried out using methods other than lethal injection. NPR's Brian Mann reports. The new rule change, made in the final weeks of the Trump administration would allow the death penalty to be administered by other means, including firing squads and poison gas. The new rule goes into effect Christmas Eve and allows federal executions to follow the procedures, quote prescribed by the laws of the state in which the sentence was imposed. That could mean electrocution, inhaling nitrogen gas and in a few states a firing squad or hanging. This comes after Attorney General William Barr resume federal executions this year after a 17 year hiatus. The administration has scheduled five Morrell executions before the end of Trump's term. President elect Joe Biden opposes the death penalty and supports legislation that would ban the federal practice while incentivizing states to end capital punishment as well. Brian Mann NPR News Today is black Friday, the traditional start to the holiday shopping season. Retailers across the nation are hoping to recoup some of their losses after months of declining sales in mid the Corona virus pandemic At the close on Wall Street today, the Dow was up 37 points. This is NPR news. Starting next month. Some passengers traveling from three U. S airports to Italy may no longer be subjected to 14 Day quarantines. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports Italy is set to approve experimental coronavirus tested flights from the U. S pending official approval. Passengers from New York Newark in Atlanta will no longer have to quarantine on arrival if they test negative for the Corona virus within 48 hours of departure and also upon arrival. In Rome. The experiment involves Alitalia and Delta Airlines. The only passengers from the U. S now allowed into Italy. Are you citizens, their relatives, holders of Italian resident's permits and people coming for study or health reasons. All tourist travel from the U. S remains bad. Delta's president, Steve Seer, said in a statement. Carefully designed covert 19 testing protocols are the best path for resuming international travel safely and without quarantine until vaccinations are widely in place. Sylvia Poggioli NPR news Rome Ireland is said to loosen its coronavirus restrictions. Starting next week. The country will allow stores, pubs and gyms to reopen travel between counties will also be allowed. Six weeks ago, Ireland became one of the first European countries to re impose tough restrictions and that a spike in the number of cases People will also be able to invite up to two other households into their homes between December 18th and January 6th. This is NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include little passports, offering activity kids to keep kids engaged and expand their minds. They'll explore France and Brazil and build a volcano and submarine from their kitchen table. Little passports dot com. Support comes from Bridge Bank and division of Western Alliance Bank offering flexible financial solutions to technology and life sciences communities. It's politics with Amy Walter on the take away. It's good to have you with us for some post Thanksgiving conversations. We hope you had a rest will holiday. One of the most enduring tales Americans tell themselves is that America is the land of great economic opportunity where anyone who wants it can make it into the middle class. Sure there is some really rich folks and a few poor ones. But overall, this is a country built by and sustained by hard working regular folks just pulling down an average salary. No other group of voters gets the attention and commitment of politicians than the middle class. And given that about 70% of Americans think of themselves in this group. Well, this pandering makes a lot of sense. I am Product of that middle class. And when I am president, you will be for gotten no more. We will make the code more fair by knocking the Tobu down on the road. The middle class. We believe the harder you work, the more money you had a hand in your pocket. Building stronger communities. New ladders of opportunity that they can climb into the middle flats and beyond the wealth of our middle class has been rift from their homes, moved classes being able to send your child will park and you're gonna come safely. He never sent him to the local public school that you know if they do well, they be able to go beyond school..

NPR News president Trump NPR Supreme Court Joe Biden Brian Mann Sylvia Poggioli Georgia Italy Washington David Perdue Kelly Leffler University of Richmond Windsor Appeals Court
"brian mann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"brian mann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Need add Grayson was seventy five he has an apartment in the containment area and no family nearby so he's gone out by himself to buy a few essentials what could really be done except because she's washing units just hope for the best the containment area and its restrictions are set to remain in place at least through March twenty fifth officials say that could change depending on the virus is spread Brian Mann NPR news new Rochelle and finally today it's no exaggeration to say that the corona virus outbreak is upsetting nerve racking anxiety inducing to many so we want to do our part to help you feel a little less stressed out for this we've called on our friend and peer music Stephen Thompson who's taken on the task of putting together a list of songs to help ease our anxiety during this crisis and he is with us now in our recently clean studio Steven welcome back it's great to be here don't touch anything okay I wouldn't dare all right so first what is one song that for you defines the meaning of an anti anxiety song well the first song I picked is called Nick Drake tape by a band I love called Clem snide I used to actually sing the song to my children to calm them down and it is always had a really calming influence on me in part because it's a song about using music as a mechanism to settle your nerves let's hear a little bit okay let trait J. U..

Grayson Steven Brian Mann NPR Stephen Thompson Nick Drake Clem J. U
"brian mann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"brian mann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Modeling kraut pharmaceuticals comes just weeks before a major federal trial set to begin in Ohio is north country public radio's Brian Mann reports that case is still going forward thousands of local and state governments are suing drug companies over their role in the deadly prescription opioid epidemic next month a major test case begins expected to establish the scope of the industry's liability that test case focuses on just two counties Cuyahoga and summit both in Ohio now in crowd a maker of generic opioid medications has now agreed to pay the two counties twenty four million dollars in cash and provide another six million dollars worth of medications used to treat overdoses two other firms named in the suit aller again and and have already settled twenty other drug makers distributors in pharmacy chains are still scheduled to go to trial October twenty first in Cleveland the more settlements appear likely Brian man NPR news Gaza health officials say Israeli forces killed two teenage. Palestinians Friday no me several off reports on the violence of the Gaza fence this ministry of health said that the Palestinians were fourteen year old and seventeen year old boys the Israeli army had no comment on their deaths it says it's six thousand two hundred people quote instigated Bryant said Israel's security fence and hurled quote explosive devices grenades and firebombs the army says it responded with right dispersal means because the health officials say Israel has killed hundreds of Palestinians since weekly protests began at the Gaza fence in March two thousand eighteen. protesters demand to return to their historic homeland now part of Israel they also want to lift Israeli restrictions for better living conditions in the Gaza Strip the protests have waned in recent months but the Israeli army called Friday's demonstration quote especially violent for NPR news I'm Neil me selloff in Tel Aviv stocks closed mostly higher the Dow was up sixty nine points to end the week this is NPR and you're listening to W. NYC I'm Jamie Floyd governor Cuomo says New Yorker should have a bigger say in next year's presidential primaries but his proposal to do something about it has fallen on deaf ears in his own party W. N. Y. C.'s Fred local reports earlier this week lawmakers submitted a bill to Cuomo to make next April twenty eighth primary day Cuomo went public with his serious misgivings in a radio interview he said New York would more strongly influence the choice of the democratic nominee if it held its primary in February much earlier in the electoral calendar but national Democrats oppose that idea so within hours W. NYC was told that formal intends to sign the bill even so he vows to keep pushing for another date change one that would move the state and congressional primaries from June up to April to consolidate all three primaries on the same day Democrats in the state legislature are rejecting a bad idea to NYPD has opened a new facility for victims of sex crimes down on center street Liz Roberts is the deputy CEO of the whole organization safe horizon and says the design of a space can make an enormous difference to someone reporting a sexual assault the right color paints clean and comfortable furniture or a welcoming environment all of those things can create a space where the healing process can actually began NYPD also renovated special victims facilities in the Bronx and Brooklyn with upgrades to sites in queens and Staten Island. under way last year the city's department of investigation found spaces for sexual assault victims to report crimes were inadequate and firefighters who spent more time at ground zero are more likely to develop heart problems that's according to a new study by doctors at the Albert Einstein college of medicine it tracked almost ten thousand FDNY responding and found those who arrived earlier or spent more time at the World Trade Center have a higher risk of suffering heart attacks strokes and other cardiovascular conditions or diseases.

Brian Mann Ohio Gaza Cleveland twenty four million dollars six million dollars seventeen year fourteen year