35 Burst results for "Brian Man"

"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 6 months ago

"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They can heal Nobody recovered from addiction dead My feeling is if we can keep people alive long enough we know that eventually the majority get recovery Travis rosco in upstate New York is a good example of someone who did survive long enough to turn his life around After two near fatal overdoses he's been drug free nearly four years He says his life is good He's married reconnected with his family and has a career That's the fall comes back I mean now it's back in tenfold The morning we met Roscoe was on his way to a good paying job at a factory But what he really wanted to talk about was his new baby We just had a newborn daughter Congratulations That's wonderful Yeah thank you thank you And we're trying to buy a house right now you know if something I never thought would be possible and something I didn't really think I deserved for the longest time Everyone we talked to for this story agreed because of fentanyl this is a uniquely dangerous time for people with addiction but they also said it's important People with this disease know there's hope Most people will recover especially if they get the care and support and the time they need Brian man and PR news This is NPR news.

Travis rosco Roscoe New York Brian man NPR
Rep. Brian Mast Frustrated That ISIS Suicide Bomber Was Released From Bagram Prison

Mark Levin

01:40 min | 9 months ago

Rep. Brian Mast Frustrated That ISIS Suicide Bomber Was Released From Bagram Prison

"Brian man Is very wise man He's American hero He's my congressman in Florida as a matter of fact And it's always a pleasure to have you on the air Congressman how are you I'm frustrated sir as I know you are as well and host a different issue but proud to talk to you All right thank you First of all we hear that the suicide bomber that killed 13 precious American military personnel as well as well over a hundred Afghans was an ISIS terrorist who was released from the Bahrain prison as is correct This is absolutely correct And there's a really important compare and contrast that every American needs to be making right now between president Trump and President Biden So this terrorist I'm not even going to say his name because it should never be said This terrorist was handed over to us by India because he was captured trying to bomb a location in New Delhi He was turned over to our CIA and put in lockup back in 2017 So president Trump made him a candidate for waterboarding was able to extract ISIS targets from him and use him to kill terrorists The only thing that a terrorist should be used for is to be used to kill other terrorists That's the only thing they're good for President Biden released the same guy and he was able to now kill Americans That's the compare and contrast that every American needs to see on the way those two

President Biden President Trump Brian Isis Bahrain Florida New Delhi CIA Donald Trump India
7 Louisiana Nursing Homes Closed for Moving Patients Before Hurricane Ida

NPR News Now

00:54 sec | 10 months ago

7 Louisiana Nursing Homes Closed for Moving Patients Before Hurricane Ida

"In louisiana. Have shut down a chain of nursing. Homes after seven residents died in the aftermath of hurricane ida the state attorney general says an investigation is underway. As npr's brian man reports ahead of ida's landfall a company operating seven nursing homes in louisiana shipped residents to a shelter in a warehouse in the town of independence. Dr courtney phillips who heads the state department of health said in a statement the level of care at the warehouse was reprehensible the state has permanently closed the homes operated by the company and a video statement louisiana attorney general jeff landry said a probe is underway and our goal will be to determine who decided to move these patients to this apparently unsafe and potentially inappropriate facility more than eight hundred nursing. Home residents have since been relocated from the warehouse to other shelters scattered around

Hurricane Ida Louisiana Dr Courtney Phillips IDA NPR Jeff Landry Brian Department Of Health
New York Pauses J

NPR News Now

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

New York Pauses J

"York. Say they're joining other states. In suspending use of the johnson and johnson covid nineteen vaccine. The cdc and fda have raised concerns about rare blood clots following administration of the shot npr's. Brian man has the latest federal agencies. Say they've identified six cases where women developed blood clots after receiving the j. and j. vaccine they've called for a pause in its distribution new york health. Commissioner howard zinn healthcare provider. Statewide will follow the recommendation. So said people in new york who have an appointment for the j. vaccine will instead receive a dose of the pfizer vaccine so far roughly seven million doses of the johnson and johnson vaccine administered. Nationwide soccer noted that adverse reactions appear to be extremely rare. But he said people who've received j vaccine should contact a health provider if they experienced severe headaches abdominal pain leg pain or shortness of breath

Johnson Commissioner Howard Zinn CDC NPR FDA New York York Brian Pfizer Soccer Headaches Abdominal Pain Leg P
New York state legislature passes bill to legalize recreational marijuana

NPR News Now

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

New York state legislature passes bill to legalize recreational marijuana

"New york's legislature has voted to allow recreational marijuana use and governor andrew. Cuomo says he'll sign the bill. As npr's brian man reports york stands to become the fifteenth state to take the step. New york's rwanda. Legalization law aims to help more people of color. Play a part. In the new legal pot industry it also funnels forty percent of marijuana tax revenues into neighborhoods. Hit hard by addiction and by high numbers of drug arrests assemblywoman crystal peoples stokes who co-authored the measure said communities of color have been crippled by marijuana. Criminalization aren't is crafted in a manner that is designed to help rebuild those lives those lives and those communities studies show black and brown new yorkers were targeted disproportionately by marijuana arrests. Tens of thousands of people are expected to have their felony drug convictions. Expunged

Governor Andrew Brian Man New York Cuomo Legislature NPR Rwanda Stokes
GOP Rep. Tom Reed apologizes, announces retirement amid misconduct claim

NPR News Now

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

GOP Rep. Tom Reed apologizes, announces retirement amid misconduct claim

"Congressman tom. Reed of new york says he won't seek reelection and he won't run for governor next year read posted an online statement sunday. Npr's brian reports. He apologized to a woman who accused him of sexual harassment. Tom reed whose house district stretches across rural upstate. new york had been seen as a possible challenger. For new york's embattled governor andrew cuomo who faces numerous allegations of sexual impropriety. Then a former lobbyist came forward and accused read of touching her snapping her bra at a social gathering in twenty seventeen in his statement. Read apologized to the woman. Nicolette davis my behavior caused. Her pain showed her disrespect and was unprofessional wrote. He said he has since sought treatment for alcohol addiction. After leaving office at the end of his current term read says he plans to quote. Dedicate my time and attention to making amends for my past. Actions brian man. Npr

Congressman Tom New York Tom Reed Reed NPR Andrew Cuomo Nicolette Davis Brian
Purdue Pharma proposes $10 billion plan to come out of bankruptcy

Up First

03:25 min | 1 year ago

Purdue Pharma proposes $10 billion plan to come out of bankruptcy

"Pharma the maker of oxycontin filed. Its long bankruptcy plan just before midnight last night in a federal court right. So here's the plan. The company itself will be dissolved. A new organization will be created that would direct profits to help people who were hurt by the opioid epidemic but two dozen states came right out and they rejected that plan. They say it doesn't hold the sackler family which owns purdue pharma accountable. Let's bring bringing. Npr's addiction correspondent. Brian man Brian what does purdue pharma savings. This plan will do the company's president a he's a guy named steve miller and he says this new company that will be created from the ashes of purdue farmable essentially exist to benefit the public. The sackler will have no role or ownership going forward and over time. This new firm will generate hundreds of millions of dollars much of it from selling oxycontin which they say they can do ethically and safely. They'll also produce other medicines that will help people with opioid addiction. According to purdue pharma the total value over time To thousands of creditors will be billions of dollars and members of the sackler family also issued a statement last night. They said this plan offers. And i'm quoting here. An important step forward helping those who suffer from addiction. Okay but wire so many states unhappy about this a lot of reasons but a big complaint is from state attorney general most of them democrats who say that purdue pharma and its owners the sackler only offering up about five hundred million dollars right up front the rest of the cash payments including four point. Two billion dollars promised by the sackler themselves. All that money would be spread out in installments. Paid over most of the next decade that really angers critics like more healey. She's attorney general in massachusetts. What the are offering essentially as a way for the payments to be structured. That makes it convenient for them. They get to keep their billions and bank accounts and make money and use the to pay. You know the states out over time while they're oxycontin or chin keeps growly and there's another row bay for critics and it's affected a lot of the ten billion dollars in value. Promise by purdue pharma in this deal doesn't actually come in the form of cash that communities desperately need to pay for things like addiction programs in public health instead. This plan would provide low cost addiction treatment drugs like buprenorphine and lock zone which the new spin off company would make and sell at a discount. Then what happens to the sackler here. Because if the federal bankruptcy court approves this plan i mean they feel any personal thing at all. This is a really big question. After launching oxycontin and claiming it was safer than opioids other opioids the sackler and their company hauled in more than thirty dollars in revenue. Purdue pharma has since pleaded guilty twice to federal criminal charges for their marketing of opioids researchers say oxycontin contributed to this explosion of opioid addiction and death. Now the actors have agreed to give up control of their company. But some critics point out that purdue pharma was already sinking under the crush of all these lawsuits. So it's not clear how big a financial sacrifice that really is. Members of the family also added about a billion dollars to the earlier settlement offer. They made but in this deal they will keep most of their personal fortunes and they'll admit no

Purdue Pharma Brian Man Brian Sackler Family Oxycontin Steve Miller Pharma NPR Healey Massachusetts
Johnson & Johnson and other drug companies plan tax breaks to offset $26 billion opioid settlement

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:23 min | 1 year ago

Johnson & Johnson and other drug companies plan tax breaks to offset $26 billion opioid settlement

"Johnson and johnson has gotten a lot of praise for its single dose covid nineteen vaccine approved by the fda last weekend but as it works to end the pandemic. johnson and johnson is also among four of america's biggest healthcare companies that are negotiating a settlement for their role in the nation's deadly opioid crisis. Tens of billions of dollars are at stake but the companies are also planning to use corporate tax breaks including a new one created during the pandemic to offset those opioid payouts. Some members of congress are furious about this. Npr addiction correspondent. Brian man joins us now. Brian So we mentioned johnson and johnson but there are other companies in this situation rate. Rachel johnson and johnson's obviously the name brand company here. These other three cardinal health amirah source baragan and mckesson work more behind the scenes or these really big corporations that earned huge profits distributing highly addictive opioid medications and now they face this wave of lawsuits tied to that business we know from financial filings at the companies are close to a settlement. That would resolve all that. Here's a cardinal health. Ceo michael kaufmann speaking to investors last month of cover the opioid quickly. You know as i've said in the path that continues to be as you know complex the go a lot of moving parts but were continuing to make progress there under the tentative terms of this deal. Cardinal health and these other companies aren't expected to admit any wrongdoing but as much as twenty six billion dollars would be paid out to help communities slammed by the opioid crisis but now these companies have revealed plans to write off a portion of those opioid payments on their taxes. House that's is that supposed to work. Yeah this is really controversial. In financial filings. The firm say they plan to declare these opioid payments as losses which is a deduction right. It's similar to one. Anybody might use to pay less than federal taxes. So if they pay twenty six billion dollars in opioid settlements they could recoup as much as four billion in tax benefits and that really anger some lawmakers including congressman jimmy gomez. He's a democrat from california. He says these communities need that money they get away with it detonates. Less money going into into the treasury that means less money for programs that will help get with the fallout of the crystals the companies. Meanwhile say they're just following federal tax law and that appears to be the case. One of the companies cardinal health says it plans to use a new tax break created last year under the cares act. This was a law. Signed by former president trump meant to help companies that were struggling because of the pandemic is cardinal health. A struggling company. No and this again is why this is so controversial. These health care and drug companies have done really well financially over the last year but cardinal health has confirmed it still plans to use that pandemic tax benefit to recoup as much as four hundred and twenty million dollars in taxes. Already paid out. The company sent a statement. Npr saying their tax plan is quote permissible under federal law but congressman gomez described. This use of the cares act is outrageous and wrong. His committee the house oversight and reform committee sent letters to all of these companies asking for more information about their tax strategies. We expect to hear some answers to those questions by next

Johnson Rachel Johnson Baragan Ceo Michael Kaufmann Brian Mckesson NPR Congressman Jimmy Gomez FDA Congress America Treasury California Congressman Gomez House Oversight And Reform Com
Cuomo Attacks a Fellow Democrat Over Nursing Home Criticism

NPR News Now

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Cuomo Attacks a Fellow Democrat Over Nursing Home Criticism

"Governor andrew cuomo handling of nursing home deaths during the pandemic again today. Cuomo accused one of his critics of criminal behavior. Here's npr's brian man. Governor cuomo gained a national following his handling of the pandemic but now faces growing criticism for withholding accurate data about corona virus deaths in nursing homes. One of his fellow democrats assemblyman ron. Kim from queens accused cuomo in a letter this week of criminal misconduct and called for cuomo's emergency powers to be revoked during his daily briefing. Cuomo fired back accusing kim of taking improper payments from business owners and i believe it was unethical if not illegal and i believe it's continuing racket. The cuomo administration now acknowledges more than fifteen thousand nursing home residents have died during the pandemic nearly twice. The number of new york state previously reported brian men.

Governor Andrew Cuomo Brian Man Governor Cuomo Cuomo Assemblyman Ron NPR Queens KIM Cuomo Administration New York Brian Men
Former Walmart Pharmacists Say Company Ignored Red Flags As Opioid Sales Boomed

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:59 min | 1 year ago

Former Walmart Pharmacists Say Company Ignored Red Flags As Opioid Sales Boomed

"An npr investigation has found that pharmacists. Working for walmart tried for years to raise the alarm about the company's sale of highly addictive opioids. walmart says it broke no laws and acted responsibly. The company faces lawsuits including a complaint. By the justice department. Walmart has been an npr underwriter which we cover like other company and npr addiction correspondent. Brian man has the story to understand. The rule pharmacists and pharmacy chains like walmart played in the opioid crisis. It helps to look at one walmart. Customer a woman named christina dine. She was in her twenties when a doctor ohio prescribed her. Large doses of powerful opioids at the highest. I was prescribed three thirty milligram. Oxy code on a day with two fifteen milligram. Koto kind of thrown in there for quote unquote breakthrough pain. Dine had been diagnosed with bositis painful but not the sort of ailment were a highly addictive narcotic is generally recommended under federal law after a doctor writes the prescription especially one like dines that poses a serious risk of addiction. The pharmacist is also required to play an important gatekeeper role. It's a big part of their job to make sure powerful drugs are only dispensed when there's a legitimate medical purpose dine. Says she had her. Opioid prescriptions filled repeatedly for two years at a number of pharmacies including her local walmart. No one warned her about the danger. I never once had a pharmacist or any other pharmacy staff question. It questioned me. Ask me any questions whatsoever. Dine became addicted to pain pills and later heroin. This was twenty twelve and at first she didn't realize she was part of an opioid epidemic. Already killing tens of thousands of people year by the time dine fell into addiction. Walmart was doing business shipping. Hundreds of millions of opioid pills every year to its chain of pharmacies. The country a shawnee sheeran is a pharmacist. Who saw this happening in walmart. Stores where he worked in rural michigan. He says there were often lines of people. When the store opened waiting to buy opioids i see that bishops. Fifteen to twenty are already lined up to get their prescriptions. Filled cheering told npr. He saw things that scared people who looked healthy. We're getting a lot of pain pills. They were traveling hundreds of miles to fill their prescriptions at his walmart store when he tried to call doctors to find out what was happening. He often couldn't get them on the phone. He was so troubled. He sent warnings to walmart's corporate headquarters in arkansas. So i send the email to walmart executive levels. And i explain them that. Their large number of controlled substance and the narcotics dispensed not for genuine purpose. Which are for distribution on the street. Cheering says nothing happened to fix the problem. And that made him angry so he kept trying warning warnings managers at walmart. Pharmacies seemed to be feeding a black market for opioid pills. They told me. Do not reach out to the da or do not. Call the police if you're going to do so your employment. Going to be terminated immediately records show sheer did contact local police and the drug enforcement administration. He was suspended by walmart. And later fired. He sued the company under a federal whistleblower. Statute a case still pending. Npr tried to ask wal mart about this. The company declined repeated interview requests and didn't respond to a list. Detailed questions it turns out sheeran wasn't the only pharmacist. Raising alarms internal company documents made public in lawsuits against walmart. Show pharmacists all over. The country kept warning. Company executives about opioids and about pill mill doctors sending patients to walmart. There was no oversight from a top of out the over dispensing of controlled substances. This is a pharmacist. Who worked for walmart in the south. Who says he left a couple of years ago voluntarily take another job. Npr agreed not to use his name because he fears a family member. Still employed by walmart. Could face retribution. He says walmart pharmacies kept doing business with doctors. Even when there were clear signs. Things weren't right. They were primary care doctors. They weren't like paint management doctors. They weren't oncologists and they were prescribing. Large amounts of opiates now again as part of their gatekeeper role. All pharmacists have the authority to reject suspicious. Prescriptions and walmart points out in public statements. This does happen at its pharmacies but as walmart shipped and sold hundreds of millions of pills a year industry experts in the pharmacists. Npr interviewed said. There was enormous pressure at walmart to say yes to dispense opioid pills quickly. You know they the walmart didn't make it so that it was easy for you to say no or to do the right thing. Another thing. we've learned from court documents filed in lawsuits against walmart. Is that pharmacists. Weren't the only ones raising alarms. Federal regulators also kept telling walmart it system for managing opioids and keeping patients. Safe wasn't good enough under pressure from the. Da walmart signed an agreement. Way back in twenty eleven promising national reforms the pharmacist. We talked who said things never improved. Again walmart declined. Npr's interview requests but the company has created a public campaign to explain. its opioid practices. This video posted last year. On walmart's website. We all have a responsibility to dispense opioid appropriately. And so when somebody comes star pharmacy and we're going to dispense them a medication we're gonna do it responsibly. We wanna make sure that they're safe and legal filings. Walmart attorneys acknowledged the. Da warned the company about red flags patterns of prescribing behavior. That could mean opioid prescriptions. Were unsafe or illegal. Walmart's has those advisories work legally binding and says government guidance on opioids was often confusing and contradictory. The company also argues. It was the government's job not walmart's to crack down on dangerous pill mill doctors. These arguments will be tested in courts around the country as lawsuits against walmart and other pharmacy chains move. People like christina. Dine will be watching. After filling her first prescription for oxy codeine pills back in twenty twelve dina says it took years to put her life back together. I i got sober and two thousand fifteen. After my daughter's father overdosed died. A kind of went in and out. I struggled for a bitch but I've been sober. Since two thousand seventeen dine is doing better now working as a recovery nurse helping others with addiction but more than two hundred and thirty thousand americans have died from overdoses. Linked directly to prescription opioids. Brian man npr news.

Walmart NPR Christina Dine Bositis Sheeran Walmart Store Justice Department Brian Ohio Drug Enforcement Administratio Cheering Arkansas Michigan DA Christina
Justice Department Says Walmart Helped To Fuel Ongoing Opioid Crisis

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:33 min | 1 year ago

Justice Department Says Walmart Helped To Fuel Ongoing Opioid Crisis

"The justice department is taking on one of the world's biggest companies walmart a civil suit alleges that the retail giant sold huge quantities of highly addictive opioid medications and they did so in a way that violated federal law. Npr's addiction correspondent. Brian man has been investigating walmart and his with me this morning. Hi there bryan morning david. So let's start with exactly what the doj is alleging here about walmart. So federal data shows walmart's pharmacies dispense to billions of opioid pills over the years often in rural communities that have been devastated by this addiction crisis with the doj says now david is that company executives failed to stop a lot of suspicious opioid orders. Hundreds of thousands of them. Walmart also allegedly failed to report potentially illegal opioid orders to the drug enforcement administration during an online regulatory conference last week. Deputy assistant attorney general. Daniel five signaled that this kind of lawsuit was coming. Armistice are the last two s i guess prescription opioid diversion the too many pharmacies for too long abdicated responsibility so now the doj says it plans to hold walmart accountable for allegedly contributing to this addiction. Crisis killed hundreds of thousands of americans will do we know more about these allegedly illegal drug sales at walmart and how how they sort of played out. Yeah been looking at this. And i spoke with his swannee. Sheeran who worked for walmart as a pharmacist in rural michigan in two thousand twelve when the opioid epidemic there was exploding and he says he quickly encountered red flags patients who would come in with. Suspicious prescriptions for huge doses of opioids. Sometimes he saw patients travelling long distances to filter opioid and also talked to patients. Who couldn't explain why they needed these powerful highly addictive. Painkillers visited direct indication. That does prescriptions are not for any genuine medical purpose instead of being abused by the patient and being distributed on this street sheeran alleges that walmart regularly ignored these warning signs and just went ahead and dispense the opioids anyway and the justice department. Alleges walmart did this all over the country. Knowingly filling prescriptions. that weren't for any legitimate medical. Need i mean it's such serious allegations suggesting that a major company like this contributed to such deadly crisis. What what is walmart saying. What is their response here. Yeah they're pushing back hard. They say that they tried in good faith. Over the years to comply with conflicting confusing laws that regulate opioid prescribing. Walmart's attorneys also argued that the justice department has been trying to embarrass the company allegedly part of an effort to squeeze leverage a big financial settlement. I should say the. Doj says that they've handled this investigation by the book. I mean i suppose this is a serious moment for walmart in terms of of both legal risk and potentially financial risk. Yeah yesterday's federal suit. David really up the ante but walmart was already being sued by a bunch of state and local governments that alleged. The company's opioid sales were irresponsible and dangerous. Cases are moving forward in ohio and west virginia and on top of the legal claims that could run into the billions of dollars. Walmart faces months maybe years now of headlines and disclosures about these opioid sales and that means having its name associated with opioid epidemic that continues to kill tens of thousands of americans every year

Walmart DOJ Brian Man David Drug Enforcement Administratio NPR Bryan Sheeran Daniel Michigan West Virginia Ohio
Nurse Sandra Lindsay Receives First COVID Vaccine In New York

NPR News Now

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Nurse Sandra Lindsay Receives First COVID Vaccine In New York

"To rollout covid. Nineteen vaccines is underway. As the coronavirus death toll continues to climb toward three hundred thousand the first widely publicized vaccination in the us took place in new york city just hours ago. Npr's brian man has details. Michael dowling head of one of new york's largest hospital systems described this as a historic moment. This is a special moment that special day. This is what everybody has been waiting for to be able to give the vaccine and this is the beginning of the end of the covy issue. Applause broke out in the clinic. As the shot was administered to sandra linzie. A nurse. who's been on the front lines carrying for covid. Nineteen patients brian man. Npr news

Brian Man Michael Dowling NPR New York City New York Sandra Linzie United States Npr News
Supreme Court blocks strict COVID-19 restrictions on New York houses of worship

All Things Considered

04:14 min | 1 year ago

Supreme Court blocks strict COVID-19 restrictions on New York houses of worship

"Of New York state's strict attendants limits on religious gatherings. The rules were designed to help slow the spread of the Corona virus. It's 5 to 4 decision highlights tensions that have grown during the pandemic between secular leaders and some religious groups that also opens a window on the new makeup of this court. Now that Amy Cockney Barrett is on the bench. NPR's Brian Mann is in Westport in upstate New York and has been following developments have Ryan Hey, happy Thanksgiving, Ari. Same to you. New York has seen tens of thousands of covert 19 deaths. So what immediate impact is this ruling going to have on the state's attempt to fight the pandemic? State officials say there's no immediate impact. The Roman Catholic Church and Orthodox Jewish groups brought this legal challenge and state officials have already rolled back the so called red and orange zones that covered their churches and synagogues. So the rule limiting attendance to his fewest 10 people, even in big religious spaces. It wasn't actually being enforced. But the ruling could limit new restrictions here in the future at the number of cases really surges again in New York, and this also sends a message. You know two other governors around the country how the Supreme Court will look it at any of their restrictions. What's the reaction been today from the religious groups that brought this case? Yeah, they've declared victory. They say this is an important win for religious freedom. They point out that New York was still allowing so called essential businesses to operate in Corona virus hot spots without the same level of restriction. And this win for religious leaders is reversal from the Supreme Court's posture just last summer that gave governors ah lot more leeway fighting this pandemic. I spoke about this with Douglas Laycock at the University of Virginia, he's legal expert on religious liberty. Governor's orders in New York, where some of the mystery Cockney and in the country the first case where Amy Cody Barrett really makes a difference is compared to respect her Ginsberg and it slipped the result and they're not going to be different from the governor's anymore. They're really going toe examine closely for signs of discrimination. And Laycock points out, Ari that governors can still restrict religious gatherings. They just can't restrict them in ways that are different from rules for businesses or government buildings. And now New York governor Andrew Cuomo was named personally in the lawsuit. How did he respond to the ruling? He described this as a political statement being made by this more conservative bloc that now defines this court. But in his daily coronavirus briefing today, Cuomo did also acknowledge the complicated tension here. Look, I'm a former altar boy Catholic Catholic grammar school Catholic high school Jesuit, said college, so I fully respect religion. And if there's a time in life when we need it at the time is now. But we want to make sure we keep people safe at the same time, and and that's the balance we're trying to hit, especially through this holiday season. And I should add, are that this isn't really new. Here. We've seen deadly Corona virus outbreaks in New York around religious communities following ceremonies, funerals and weddings, for example, right from the start of this pandemic, and religious leaders have clashed repeatedly with caramel, also with New York City's mayor. Over how far elected officials can or should go to limit new infections. Now, you mentioned that this reflects the new makeup of the Supreme Court, and there was some tense language in the opinions tell us about what the justices said. Conservative Justice Neil Gorsuch wrote a concurrence of green with this decision that was pretty biting. He wrote that, according to Governor Cuomo, and I'm reading here, quote it may be unsafe to go to church. But it's always fine to pick up another bottle of wine shop for a new bike or spend the afternoon exploring your distal points and meridians. That's Reference thereto acupuncture clinics that remain open in New York. Meanwhile, in her dissent, Liberal Justice Sonia Sotomayor pointed out that in the past, the Supreme Court has given public officials broad leeway in cases involving religion where public safety is a concern, she pointed The fact that the Supreme Court upheld President Trump's ban on immigration from certain Muslim countries. So justice Sotomayor suggesting that this ruling reflects a double standard. NPR's Brian Man, Thanks a lot. Thank you worry. It's a tough call to make telling your family you won't be

New York Amy Cockney Brian Mann Ryan Hey Supreme Court Douglas Laycock Amy Cody Barrett Governor Andrew Cuomo Westport NPR Roman Catholic Church Barrett Laycock University Of Virginia Ginsberg Cuomo Neil Gorsuch Governor Cuomo Liberal Justice Sonia Sotomayo New York City
OxiContin Maker To Pay Out Billions In Civil, Criminal Penalties

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:10 min | 1 year ago

OxiContin Maker To Pay Out Billions In Civil, Criminal Penalties

"The makers of oxycontin one of the drugs blame for sending off the OPIOID crisis will plead guilty to federal criminal charges. The Justice Department announced those charges against Purdue Pharma yesterday as part of an eight billion dollar settlement NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man is with US Brian Good Morning. Steve, how's a settlement? GonNa work. Yeah. So if it's approved by a federal bankruptcy judge, Steve The purdue Pharma will admit to the three felony charges including a charge that they misled doctors about the safety of medications like Oxycontin, over time, then the company would pay out billions of dollars in civil and criminal penalties, Jeffrey Rosen, the deputy attorney general who outlined the agreement yesterday says the sackler family would also be forced to give up control of their company. Instead of being the owners of a major pharmaceutical company, they will have no stake in that company. Now that sounds like a lot but critics are pointing to the fact that Purdue Pharma was already in big trouble facing bankruptcy struggling to hold onto employees and flooded with thousands of lawsuits tied to the improper marketing of opioids, and despite all that under this deal does federal deal the sackler walk away with most of their personal fortunes intact by some estimates there worth as much as ten billion dollars because of OPIOID prophets, they'll pay a fraction of that in penalties only about two hundred, twenty, five, million dollars out of their own pockets and Steve. There are no criminal charges against them the sackler. Admit to know personal wrongdoing. Well, how do prosecutors explain the deal would include no criminal charges and the sackler not entirely but mostly giving up a pile of liabilities rather than a penalty they would really feel. Deputy. Attorney General. Rosen was asked about this yesterday and he says these penalties go as far as the government can right now holding purdue and the sackler accountable. There is no law that says if you've done something wrong, we should just simply strip somebody of all their assets in existence that's not how it works. It has to be that we are looking at specific ex wrongdoing civilly or criminally, and then having a proportionate response but a lot of people including more than two dozen state attorneys, general dozens of members of Congress advocates for people suffering from addiction. They all say, this isn't proportionate response. They say members of the sackler family played a personal role pushing the prescription opioid boom developing these illegal and deceptive marketing practices that made purdue. Pharma. So profitable the Tissue James is New York State Attorney General, and she's suing members of the. Sackler family, her team tracked hundreds of millions of dollars in opioid prophets that the sackler sent to offshore accounts. She told. NPR. This justice department deal doesn't go nearly far enough doesn't account the hundreds of thousands of deaths of millions of addictions caused by produce farmer in the sackler family all of destruction that they have caused it basically allows billionaires to keep their billions without any accounting for how much a really made James says her state probe of the sackler family will continue. Meanwhile, there's one more detailed, the settlement that sparking. Anger, it turns out purdue. Pharma doesn't actually have enough money left to pay out the billions of dollars agreed to in this settlement. So the plan is for the government to reorganize Purdue Pharma into what's known as a public benefit company that means prophets from future sales of opioids like oxycontin would be used to pay for drug treatment and rehabilitation programs around the country Greg mcneal lives in. Ohio. One of the states hit hardest by the OPIOID epidemic and he lost his son Sam to an overdose five years ago. He. Says this idea of the government getting into the OPIOID business now after it's caused so much harm. He says it just feels wrong it. It just seems ill advised having the government entered into that business. Gosh. There's something about that. That just doesn't doesn't add up at all. And I should say Steve Twenty five state attorneys general agree they signed a letter last week they send it to Attorney General William Bar arguing that this arrangement is ethically wrong and could shelter purdue Pharma and the sackler from future criminal or civil liability Brian Kennedy at least be said for the deal that there's some money here that might help people harmed by the. OPIOID. Epidemic. That will definitely that's what the Justice Department is saying. So let's take stock for a second nearly seventy two thousand people died from overdoses last year this is still ongoing. A lot of those were opioid deaths. What US attorneys say is if this deal is finalized by the bankruptcy court, it would mean extraordinary new resources for states and cities and tribal governments struggling to keep people alive. But one thing everyone agrees to here is that this problem is so big now affecting. So many Americans they say the eight billion dollars from purdue, Pharma is really just a drop in the bucket.

Purdue Pharma Purdue Sackler Justice Department Steve NPR Jeffrey Rosen Attorney Brian Man Deputy Attorney General United States Steve Twenty Ohio Epidemic Attorney General William Bar Congress New York James
Purdue Pharma Reaches Agreement With U.S. Department of Justice

Morning Edition

03:22 min | 1 year ago

Purdue Pharma Reaches Agreement With U.S. Department of Justice

"The Department of Justice just announced a settlement with Purdue Pharma, the drug company makes the opioid OxyContin. Critics accused Purdue and its owners, the Sackler family of helping to fuel the prescription opioid epidemic. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man is covering this say there, Brian. Hey, Steve. How are you? Okay. What are the terms? Look, this is a complicated deal. Basically what it means is that produce farm is going to pay out about $8.3 billion the Sackler family. The owners of this company will also give up control of this firm, which they really created and helped popularize opioids over the last 20 years. The Justice Department says. A lot of this money many of these resource is will go to communities around the U. S. Hard hit by this addiction epidemic. Remember about the quarter million Americans have died from prescription opioid overdoses alone on the cost of these communities of recovering even before the corona virus pandemic. This was a devastating public health crisis. And what the Justice Department says is that this deal will rout funds to those communities. One other interesting detail is that Purdue Pharma will now become a public trust company, and that's very controversial. That's something that a lot of critics have pointed to is as something of deep concern. Although there is some criticism of this agreement already, even though it's just been announced, What is it that critics would say It's not enough in the Sackler is giving up the entire company and some of their personal fortunes. Well, One of the things that's happening here is that the Sackler family will walk away with much of their personal fortune. This deal, Steve calls for them to pay out about $225 million in their personal assets. Critics, including New York Attorney General Leticia James, who has sued the Sackler is directly say that's not nearly enough. She put out a statement just minutes ago. Saying This doesn't hold them accountable for the pain and destruction left by what she described as their greed. Another thing that is really interesting here is that this Public trust company will still have to see the details of how it's organized. But this will sort of put the government in the job of producing opioid medications. This will put the government very closely in connection with a company that caused one of the major public health crises or at least contributed to it. Over the last couple of decades. A lot of state attorneys general say they don't like that arrangement. They think it creates a kind of umbrella for the sack, Lear's and produce that could prevent future prosecutions. Well, how are communities that are hard hit by opioids supposed to get the money from this deal? A lot of that is still we're going to see how the details of this process works. What the Justice Department said today is that this will provide extraordinary resource is they also say that under this newly organized public trust company opioid medications will continue to be provided. Remember, these medications do actually have a medical purpose when they're prescribed appropriately? They say that this will rout resource is both in terms of medications and funds. Too many of those communities Brian, Thanks for the update, always appreciate it. Very good. Thanks,

Justice Department Purdue Pharma Sackler Brian Man Purdue Steve Leticia James Lear New York Attorney
Former N.J., New York, Gov. Chris Christie Says He's Out of the Hospital After Treatment for COVID-19

NPR News Now

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Former N.J., New York, Gov. Chris Christie Says He's Out of the Hospital After Treatment for COVID-19

"Former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie is out of the hospital a week after he was diagnosed with a corona virus as NPR's Brian Man reports Christie is one of more than a dozen people in President Trump's inner circle who've contracted the virus a day after president trump announced he and the first lady tested positive Christie. A close trump ally announced he was infected. Christie is overweight suffers from asthma conditions that can increase complications from covid nineteen. He checked himself into a hospital last Saturday in a tweet today Christie said he's been released from the Morristown Medical Center in. New. Jersey he thanked the doctors and nurses who cared for him and said quote I will have more to say about all of this next week. Ryan men. NPR News. This is NPR.

Governor Chris Christie NPR Donald Trump Npr News New Jersey President Trump Brian Man Morristown Medical Center Asthma Ryan
Trump, Biden to visit 9/11 memorial in Pennsylvania on anniversary of terrorist attack

Morning Edition

00:59 sec | 1 year ago

Trump, Biden to visit 9/11 memorial in Pennsylvania on anniversary of terrorist attack

"Nation marks the 19th anniversary of the 9 11 terror attacks today. President Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden both plan to visit the flight 93 National Memorial in Pennsylvania. But not at the same time. Biden will also attend a ceremony at the World Trade Center Memorial site in New York before heading to Pennsylvania. NPR's Brian Man has more 19 years ago, terrorists used commercial airliners to strike the twin towers and the Pentagon, also bringing a passenger jet down in a field in Pennsylvania. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio says that heartbreaking day showed his city's resilience. People all over this country and all over this world were in awe of New York City and people grieved with us. But they also admired New York City because of the pandemic. Names of nearly 3000 people who died will be spoken. Today It's a 9 11 Memorial Museum in Manhattan. Using audio recordings made by families. A separate ceremony will include a live reading of the names of those Lost

New York City Pennsylvania Joe Biden World Trade Center Memorial National Memorial Memorial Museum President Trump Bill De Blasio Brian Man Manhattan Pentagon NPR
"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Takes a little wider view of the protests about racial justice in this country. What we often see on social media and in the news are scenes of chaos and violence. That's what draws the cameras. And those scenes can be frightening. But there are other parts of the protests that are not chaotic, not violent. NPR's Brian Man has been covering marches in New York City and in Rochester, New York, and has a reporter's notebook on what he's seeing. Here's the moment in these protests that usually make it into my stories. Ah, violent encounter between activists and police here in Rochester. The crowd rushes back, choking and coughing his tear gas bills of the street. This kind of unrest is obviously part of what's happening across the country. But I spent long hours with demonstrators and what I see. Most are moments like this people seeing as they march, sometimes hundreds of voices at a time. Is also a lot of conversation. People talking ideas teaching telling stories. Christopher Coals of poet here in Rochester speaks to hundreds of people sitting on the pavement in the middle of an intersection. I'll give you hope that can't be lynched drink. They can't put bullets, too. There is anger here in frustration. Cole's shares his poetry a stone's throw from the place where Daniel proved a black man lay on the pavement last March, naked a hood over his head surrounded. By officers. Food later died in police custody, sparking much of this city's unrest. But along with rage, there's a lot of talk of hope. We have to work together because I have Children in this world and we want to let the next generation inherent what we leave them listening in the crowd. There are demonstrators with helmets and plexiglass shields, some wearing red and black and teeth of colors. Obviously ready for confrontation with police, but they're the minority there. Also clergy offering prayers, street nurses giving first day black people and white people just looking out for each other. Melanie Funches organizes volunteers who offer counseling Now this work is hard. You all know me. I have one leg. The healing and love mate. That's my line. Okay, baby, any job? Many of the people here are taking real risks each night. Some of them are injured by pepper bullets fired by police. Others arrested They keep coming some nights, thousands of people marching through neighborhoods along the way. I keep being surprised by moments of quiet and beauty. At one point organizer's call on the crowd to kneel and meditate. All the collective energy that's out here tonight. Help piece After a moment of silence, they listened together while a Sam Cooke song plays over loudspeaker. Obviously, these demonstrations have been tumultuous times. But moments of grace are part of the story to music and poetry and prayer are part of an argument being made on the streets night after night, about the value and richness of black lives. Brian Man NPR NEWS, Rochester, New York. Tomorrow

Rochester Brian Man New York City NPR New York Christopher reporter
"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the people here are taking real risks each night. Some of them are injured by pepper bullets fired by police. Others arrested They keep coming some nights, thousands of people marching through neighborhoods along the way. I keep being surprised by moments of quiet and beauty at one point organizer's call on the crowd to kneel and meditate. All the collective energy that's out here tonight help he's after a moment of silence. They listened together while a Sam Cooke song plays over a 10 year old. Obviously, these demonstrations have been tumultuous times. But moments of grace are part of the story to music and poetry and prayer are part of an argument being made on the streets night after night, about the value and richness of black lives. Brian Man NPR NEWS, Rochester, New York. Tomorrow morning edition. We questioned a man who's trying to provide stability in a chaotic time we interview Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell about the economic recovery and about the economic future. This is NPR news, Media News and science with Brian Watt coming up at 6 22. Now it's 6 19 traffic news on Labor Day again with Joe McConnell. No news is good news. No stalls, Crashes, Lane hazards, Caltrans work or any weather advisories beyond the heat right now, anyway, no fog because the heat is dominating that and every everything's fine. Let's just size it up that way. Joe McConnell for.

Joe McConnell Brian Man Brian Watt NPR Caltrans Sam Cooke Media News Federal Reserve Jerome Powell Rochester Chairman New York
Rochester, New York, mayor and police chief say they won't resign amid Daniel Prude protests

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Rochester, New York, mayor and police chief say they won't resign amid Daniel Prude protests

"Police chief in Rochester, New York, say they will not resign. After days of sometimes violent protests. Demonstrators have accused local officials of covering up the death of a black man Daniel prude while in police custody. NPR's Brian Man has more. At a news conference Sunday, Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren said she won't bow to Protestersdemands. That she and her chief of police Laurent Singletary, step down. It is clear to me that there is more work to be done and I am committed to doing was necessary and I know The chief is committed to doing was necessary. Warrant also defended police use of force against protesters in recent days, saying there were credible reports Some activists plan to damage or destroy police headquarters. Tonight, Elders from the black Church community here plan to serve his human buffers between protesters and police to reduce the risk of violence. Brian Man NPR NEWS Rochester, New York A federal

Brian Man Rochester New York Laurent Singletary Mayor Lovely Warren Daniel Prude NPR Black Church Community Protestersdemands
New York protests: BLM groups calling for Rochester mayor, police chief to resign

The Sunday Show

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

New York protests: BLM groups calling for Rochester mayor, police chief to resign

"Of of demonstrators demonstrators turned turned out out in in Rochester, Rochester, New York, last night, demanding the city's mayor and police chief resigned. As NPR's Brian Man reports they're demanding justice over the death of Daniel Prude in police custody. Marchers gathered on the street where Daniel prude, a black man lay in March naked with a hood over his head surrounded by officers. Christopher Cole's told the crowd people want justice is the first time that the world is standing up for black lives is seeing us for the first time when the crowd turned toward Rochester's main police station, a large force of officers used tear gas in a military style vehicle to scatter the protest. New New York's York's attorney attorney general general the the tissue, tissue, James James announced announced he's he's convening convening a a grand grand jury jury is is part part of of the the investigation investigation into into proves proves death. death. Seven Seven officers officers have have been been suspended. suspended. Brian Brian Man Man NPR NPR NEWS, Rochester, New York.

Rochester Brian Man Daniel Prude New York NPR James James Christopher Cole Attorney
"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Brian Cool Fudge and others. Convinced donors to give more than $25 million live on the U. S Mexico border in El Paso, Texas, that we built the Wall Wallace on because every mile matters at first, Bannon and Cold Fudge told supporters the cash would be donated to the federal government to help build the official border wall. Later, the group promised to build private sections of wall on private land videos posted by we build the wall portrayed. The project is a grassroots effort, with families rallying to fulfill President Trump's vision. At one event. Mom held up her little boy, and he said, I want to help the president raised money and he's raised. You tell him $25,000. The organization promised to spend every penny donated building the wall with an all volunteer staff, no money for salaries or compensation. From the outset, the project's structure and apparent lack of financial safeguards raised eyebrows. When the Tien, who lives in Minnesota, sent a letter last year to officials in Florida, where build the wall is headquartered, warning the organization seemed to be misrepresenting itself to donors in particularly I just wanted to make sure the public was Protected. Florida officials say they opened an investigation, then passed the case to federal authorities. Yesterday, the U. S attorney in New York unveiled indictments against four men including Bannon and Cold Fudge, accusing them of wire fraud and money laundering. Investigators say the men used fake invoices and other schemes to divert more than $1.3 million, much of it going to pay for their personal expenses. Alan Oldie and Lorraine Hoyt or two of the donors who gave to the project. Both say they believe in the cause. Because I'd like to have security at our borders. Well, I think we've got to do something down at the border. I mean, from everything that I see on TV, I guess where I read that. There's a lot of places at airports and this would help the border Patrol from what I understand to limit the access of illegals coming across point who lives near the border in New Mexico, says she hopes these allegations aren't true will make me very happy and kind. Disheartened by that old lady who lives in Kansas says it's especially painful. The allegations involve prominent conservative activists and organizer's disturbing I mean, they take the goodwill in face of the American people that want to support to better their country. And they abuse it. To me. It's no worse than a crooked politician, and we have plenty of those in Washington, D c. Speaking yesterday, president Trump said he hadn't worked with his former aide, Steve Bannon, for some time. Meanwhile, a spokesman for the website go fund me which helped raise money for we build. The wall says roughly $6 million have already been returned to donors. Brian Man NPR news This is NPR news. It is 7 42. We're going to check in with Joey. Candor is taking us down to Menlo Park on the peninsula Trouble reported south, one of one of Marsh Road report of a crash, Although it sounds like a relatively minor won and also in South City on North, Wanna one at South airports, reported a hit and run. Over to the side and no sign of a slowdown. They're either. In fact, we've had very few slowdowns over the last hour or so had some bad backups earlier from crashes, but the relatively peaceful right now knock on wood Joe McConnell for Kiki Beauty, you don't drink, said Joe. All right,.

Steve Bannon President Trump Cold Fudge Brian Cool Fudge president Alan Oldie Lorraine Hoyt Joe McConnell border Patrol Florida federal government Texas El Paso Menlo Park U. S Mexico NPR Brian Man Kansas Tien
"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:40 min | 2 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

"In Washington lawmakers will question the trump administration about how and why this happened and here's Brian man has been following the story hi Brian morning David so I wanna ask you first about the story that you broke this week about the trump administration killing these proposed new regulations that that would have force the healthcare industry to prepare for an event like this pandemic in and do more to keep workers safe what what was behind that decision yeah the background here David is that after the H. one N. one pandemic eleven years ago the Obama administration decided that hospitals and nursing homes just for doing enough to keep healthcare workers safe so federal officials spent six years going through all the steps required to create new workplace safety regulations to protect workers from airborne and contact infectious diseases just like the coronavirus these new standards were set to go into effect in twenty seventeen and would have required hospitals to do things like stockpile protective equipment and plan for surges of sick patients but after president trump's election he launched a sweeping effort to stop this kind of new regulation here he is speaking in December twenty seventeen the never ending growth of red tape in America has come to a sudden screeching and beautiful halt so NPR review documents that show trump officials permanently shelved these infectious disease regulations two years before Copa nineteen head so they never went into effect okay well now we're in the midst of this pandemic can can you talk about the consequences of of that yeah for starters the hospital nursing home industry's just weren't prepared they didn't have enough equipment masks and gowns they didn't have plans in place to handle these surges of patients while reporting on this I talked with Benny Mathew a nurse at a hospital in the Bronx which is one of the hardest hit communities in the whole country he got really sick with covert nineteen Matthew told me that is the pandemic hit healthcare workers were just getting a lot of mixed messages about how dangerous it was and how they could stay safe you know the current wires coming to New York and it's inevitable and we need to be a right even the district apart of course and after your kitchen but nothing was done little so much confusion about what to use it means that they were getting different instructions on different days about what kind of protective equipment to use and then P. R.'s confirm this because there were no fixed regulations in place protecting workers the trump administration was able to relax worker safety recommendations which they did repeatedly even as tens of thousands of nurses and doctors were getting sick and and hundreds were dying okay so a lot of questions here and that brings us to today there's a hearing in Washington before the house labor committee what what are we expecting yeah so the heads of two key federal agencies David charged with keeping American workers safer expected to testify the chairman of this committee democratic congressman Bobby **** from Virginia told me his questions will focus mostly on what happens next going forward whether those safety rules developed by the Obama administration could be implemented now quickly on an emergency basis before a second wave of covert nineteen hits what are the barriers to creating awesome well standard Elvira we're not yes the nurses have been pushing hard for this emergency rule I should say David the trump administration is pushing back they still oppose adopting the safety standards NPR's Brian man Brian thanks here reporting here all right thank you David Hong Kong is on its way to losing its autonomy China's legislature has now approved a plan to pass a sweeping new national security law president trump is warning of possible sanctions against China over its treatment of Hong Kong and in recent days the trump administration has blocked the sale of sensitive technology to Chinese companies and your Scott Horsley has more it seems like a lifetime ago but it was only back in January the president trump was celebrating a trade deal in which China promised by hundreds of billions of dollars worth of additional American goods we're delighted that the Chinese consumers will now enjoy the greater access to the best products on earth those may grown and raised right here in the USA hog farmers were among those who saw big opportunity China has lost much of his own pork production to an outbreak of African swine fever and Marie is he above the national pork producers council says American farmers were eager to fill the void so far though sales have fallen short of their potential unfortunately when the Chinese have the chance to buy pork they're going to go to where the price is low and even with the trade deal American pork still faces a much higher tariff in China than its global competitors exports of farm goods factory products and crude oil are all running far behind what was promised in the trade deal Syracuse University economist Mary lovely says those targets were always going to be a stretch and the corona virus has made things worse the world has changed and clearly China's purchases are going to be affected one because their demand collapsed secondly American supply collapsed in so you had sort of a double whammy on their reaching these purchase target last week foreign policy magazine ran a story headlined trump's China trade deal is as dead as can be White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow told fox business the deal is still alive but not as important to the president as it once was right now it's been a lot of miscues from China trump has been harshly critical of China over its handling of the pandemic China was slow to acknowledge the corona virus can spread from person to person still China appear to been much more successful than the US at controlling the outbreak you and soon had wrecked the China program at the Stimson center says Beijing reach trump's criticism as an effort to deflect from his own government's missed S. I think the Chinese reaction as wait a minute maybe we are responsible for part of it but for you to completely blame everything on us that's not fair Bernie Glaser of the center for strategic and International Studies has historically China has been cautious about sape flexing its muscle in Hong Kong because it wanted to maintain a working relationship with the U. S. but with both countries now throwing sharp elbows lasers as the brakes are coming off in my view the pandemic is really just an acceleration of the downward spiral in the relationship which now appears to me to be honest in free fall I don't know where the bottom is but I feel like we haven't reached it yet the trump administration has been ratcheting up its restrictions on exports of sensitive technology to China and its calls for reduced dependence on China for critical goods like medical supplies are growing louder glazier once there's so much anti China sentiment in the U. S. the relationship may suffer even if there's a new president in the White House next year both Biden and trump are trying to position themselves as being the toughest on China and nobody is is talking about what in this US China relationship needs to be preserved that's ominous for the kind of cooperation between the two countries the world needs to tackle challenges like climate change and the pandemic Scott Horsley NPR news Washington this is NPR news and on this Thursday you are listening to KCRW.

Brian man Washington Brian morning David
"brian man" Discussed on Power Couples Rock Podcast

Power Couples Rock Podcast

09:33 min | 2 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on Power Couples Rock Podcast

"To do that but he just won't right you know. I'm I'd be more than happy to give him the platform to be able to do that but he won't you know there may be men that are listening and maybe they're starting to get an honor their skin a little bit like. Maybe I should be doing that more. And that's true you do but what. What would we say to someone? Who's listening that? Maybe their husbands not doing that. You don't want to Ha- you don't want to go back to the husband and say listen. You need to be talking about more to the about our kids in front of people and things like that. You don't WanNa be like that. You want to encourage that correct and support. That tried to to drive that forward allow for that But if someone is stuck in that situation where they don't they they currently are in a marriage where the father is just. The husband is just not doing that probably should be how. How would we practically work with them? In order to to hopefully have that manifest itself. So there's a couple of things that come to mind here one. Is that if the DAD is not comfortable speaking in front of an audience. Then allow the data write a letter okay and someone can read that or the child could read that in front of it because that's still the dad's voice. Yeah he's just Pandit and that even becomes even more sentimental because the child actually has something that they can carry on the rest of their lives. A legacy lead into the legacy enough time to count of Organiz his thoughts before the event actually occurs and helps him to really speak life into their child. So that's one thing that can happen in the end if he just doesn't like that communication deal the trust of the other things that we talked about like the affirmations and these are all these are all things you don't have to do every single one of every one of doesn't fit for a start somewhere and there's I mean social media. I know we don't. We don't always talk and and and Promote necessarily social media. We'd like real face to face social activity Almost always but I. I always love it when I'd see a post from Sonya talking about me as a Dad Jess Bash. Brian Man has just come out from nowhere or or anybody can post on your on. Your Wall. Happy Birthday. But someone's calling you a great dad because you're you know in gives you a reason that there's nothing almost nothing better nothing better. Or there's this organic picture That's been taken of you and your signs or you and your kids and it's been posted talking about chess. The Joy of having a dad present. I go so far so far for men. Yes so again. I love the exalting. His voice or creating a space or platform for his force to be heard awesome okay so legacy affirmation support and discipline exalt his voice and now we're at the are this one is retreat and that doesn't mean turn around and run the other way. This is a different kind of retreat. Yes so if you guys probably already know this by now if you Kinda know the way men tick they don't they need to go somewhere by themselves Every once in a while they need to go in at after. Get the name of the gentleman. We did a study with one time. He's a comedian speaker and he talked about what's called the nothing box and sometimes men because men are whatever differently. We all know that we're all wired differently. But men like to go into their nothing box and women if you're listening right now. It doesn't compute with you so you just don't understand why just it just know that it happens. Men like to unplug everything and go into their nothing box and basically what that is. That could be anything from sitting and watching a football game between two teams anyone. Could you know no one could care any less about the two teams on? It could be like you know twelve to three and it's the most boring football but the man. There's just something about being in their nothing box or you know. Insert Hobby X. hobby-wise here by himself. he likes to be by himself and there is something about that that helps to recharge. That helps that something in the DNA that allows that man to just feel better. I know so. The person that you're talking about is pasture Mark Gungor. Okay laugh your way to a better marriage and that was a great great study that we did together but it's so invigorating are remember oftentimes. I'll come home from work and Catherine will intentionally give me my space breath. She knows that I need that. Time to just unwind and just relax a little bit. So she's not the moment walking and she's not asking me to do X. Y. Z. She's I know you need your moment so take however long you take and and I'm conscientious of that else. I Okay I just need twenty minutes thirty minutes just to do that. So just those little small spurts of just me doing nothing. Yep Jess rejuvenates me. But also I love the space to where I'm just taking a data myself. Whatever that is whether it be like you said Insert X Y and Z. It may be playing tennis. He may just be hanging out with you Because hang out with another brother. Because that's rejuvenating we're doing right now is exactly what we're talking about. Believe it or not is not work for us to win this That this is part of the nothing box it is. Yeah but we're giving information when we're we're giving more than nothing right. I think so. Yes no I love that space and when a wife can be conscientious of that and giving the husband space that he needs to sort himself out to sort all of what he's been dealing with the entire day or the week and just allow him to kind of relax into himself before going into the next base. I think that that's awesome. Yeah Yeah we. We really hope that both men and women husbands and wives have been blessed by this conversation. We really want to hear more from you. Let us know on Social Media Facebook instagram twitter. Email us go to the website. Power Couples Rock Dot. Com is all kinds of ways to contact us with love. Hearing from. You would love to hear that feedback. I'd I'd love to encourage our wives maybe to do the same thing yes to to create a rockstar mom. Maybe we can talk about About doing that but anyway this these been the five ways to champion a rock star. Dad So you take away your laser. Take Away your laser focus for the five ways to champion. Rockstar. Dad Our legacy creating a legacy. That's spiritually. That's that's the pictures thing. Make sure that there's a that there's pictures with the husband and the kids an an encouraging them to do events together the A is affirmation. It's about confidence asking the kids. What they love about their dad and then sharing that Back with the DAD and in helping to affirm him as support discipline making sure. You're on the same page. The power of pause if you need that power pause pray over that situation while it's happening in e exalt his voice that's creating a platform for him to speak about his children. If the husband is not confident in speaking there are other ways to do that. There's there's there's letters there's there's social media and then finally our retreat create that space that nothing box. There's something about that in the DNA of a man that somehow it just it just powers powers him back up. And I like to just close my section of this by book ending Ed again with the Scriptures so for you all that neat though scriptures of gayness genesis two and eighteen being a suitable help before the husband Psalms one twenty eight which is a family blessing and then equations five twenty one through thirty three talks about the roles or sauce abilities respecting him loving between a husband and wife. There you have it power couples. Thank you and let's get power it up. Thanks for listening to the power couples. Rock podcast we hope that you've been encouraged inspired and supported. Please listen and subscribe to our other power pods as we are confident that they will strengthen your marriage also don't forget to follow us on facebook youtube twitter and instagram. It's there where we can extend these discussions together. Take these conversations and your marriage to the next level. Enjoy your day and power..

Jess Bash Brian Man Ha facebook Mark Gungor Pandit Sonya Ed Rockstar football Catherine tennis
"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reimagining banking offering savings and checking accounts that can be opened from anywhere Capital One what's in your wallet Capital One NA and the listeners of KQED cloudy skies today temperatures mid sixties to mid seventies this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon even those have spent their careers in law enforcement fighting drug crimes order me in from the opioid epidemic while Julie Garcia a former prosecutor in upstate New York which hand they drug cases her own family was being ravaged by addiction to prescription pain killers north country public radio's Brian man has this profile Julie Christie is spent much of her career as a prosecutor working in three county district attorney offices across New York state serving as head the a for a time here in Essex County she says her attitude toward drugs was pretty typical tough on crime until opioids hit her own home town in the early two thousands she got a call one day from her mom and her sister who admitted that they were using opiates getting high together they told me they were scared that was one of the worst moments of my entire life I was just a new prosecutor working out the Suffolk County DA's office and I remember being outside talking to my mom and my sister and like what we do your sister is living what she describes as a double life working days as a prosecutor then driving home to port Henry New York to small mining town where she grew up she found her mom sue and her sister Lani were buying oxycontin and other prescription pain killers from neighbors which was the most disturbing part for me was people getting other people addicted to intentionally and then the raising the price of the pills in people I know and I knew some of the people that were selling to my mom into my sister Garcia says her view of drug crime began to evolve as her mom and sister struggled through relapse after relapse they didn't look to her like criminals neither did the drug dealers import Henry who seems just as desperate and addictive when I was the DA you would always try to figure out a way to stop those people but then again there's another layer to that like why are they doing that what's their backstory Garcia drives me through her old neighborhood in the rocky hills above port Henry she now believes the opioid epidemic has as much to do with economics and poverty as crime the stores are closed here many of the houses boarded up the local iron mine shut down for good in the nineteen seventies this was such a different place when I was growing up here and there were kids everywhere yes yes as a prosecutor she got pushed back when she first started linking addiction to things.

Suffolk County DA port Henry New York NPR KQED port Henry Henry Lani Scott Simon Essex County Julie Christie Brian man New York prosecutor Julie Garcia one day
"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Private fortune they build selling oxycontin Brian man NPR news this is NPR and this is W. NYC in New York on Julianne wealthy democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren has released a proposal to stop government corruption the Massachusetts senator is announcing the planned this evening at a rally in Washington Square park in Greenwich Village worn wants to ban lobbyists from serving as political campaign fundraising bottlers she also wants to tighten limits on politicians accepting gifts for government action and bar members of Congress from nonprofit boards tonight's rally is at seven o'clock Staten Island congressman Max roses the settlement reached with Purdue pharma which you've been hearing about and W. NYC does not go far enough hundreds of state and local governments sued the company for its role in the opioid crisis at a news conference today rose said federal prosecutors should get involved I walked the Sackler family charged as criminal drug dealers their homes confiscated their cars confiscated their wealth confiscated both **** and abroad I spoke. X. men for the Southern District declined comment yesterday produ pharma filed for bankruptcy the first step in the complex settlement agreement the company doesn't have to admit wrongdoing but it'll pay more than ten billion dollars of a federal judge approves of the deal the Sackler family says it hopes people critical of the settlement will change their minds police in New York City say there are no signs of foul play in the death of the car's front man Ricco Catholic he was found by officers yesterday afternoon in his Manhattan apartment the car's help define the new wave era with chart topping songs like just what I needed they were inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame last year after being nominated twice before cassock was seventy five years old. it's seventy five degrees right now one.

New York City NPR Purdue pharma produ pharma Elizabeth Warren Ricco Catholic Washington Square park Congress Staten Island Massachusetts Greenwich Village congressman senator Brian New York rose Manhattan
"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:02 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

"Highly addictive pain killers north country public radio's Brian man is with us this morning he has covered the story closely thanks for being here Brian good morning Rachel so we have seen these court cases around the U. S. really pulling back the curtain on the drug industry and how it contributed to this epidemic what is new in these documents well first I think it's the scale we have incredibly detailed data now showing drug companies made and sold more than ten billion opioid pain pills a year in the US and sales grew even as these overdose deaths stored wasn't just one or two companies doing this it took an entire industry to market and distribute that many pills from generic drug makers like Mallinckrodt to the pharmacy chains on people's corners like Walgreens and CVS so over the weekend we got a look at more internal emails that were sent by these drug executives of these companies what were they saying about the dangers of these medications drug executives clearly knew very early the risks but they were committed to boosting sales and profits in two thousand nine when we were already deep into this deadly epidemic one top official at Mallinckrodt joked in an email about selling opioids to people who were ejected comparing prescription pain pills junk food just like to read those he wrote keep eating will make more while so that's what happened right the documents show that the companies did just keep making more more than seventy billion opioid pills or sold across the U. S. from two thousand six to two thousand twelve through the that time period and during that time I mean I guess the question is was there any put a push back from inside the industry was or anyone raising their hand saying Hey that maybe we shouldn't be pushing this high lease highly addictive drugs in fact with the civil lawsuits claim is that companies kept selling opioids in huge comedies even when buyers seem to be really suspicious one example here court documents just released in Ohio show the drug distributor McKesson delivering more than three million doses of hydrocodone pills to one small pharmacy in Baltimore Maryland it's a lot of pills and internal emails show company executives at McKesson raising concerns about the lack of proper safeguards but the pills just kept flowing this must be a PR nightmare for the drug industry I mean how are these companies responding yeah some of you would makers have just begun to settle more than two billion dollars have been paid out so far this year but most companies denied any wrongdoing Mallinckrodt sent NPR statement distancing itself from that email where their executive compared opioid pills to to read as they say it was an outrageously callous email it's their words from someone who hasn't worked for Mallinckrodt for a long time other companies we spoken to point out they were filling prescriptions written by doctors and they also say this market is highly regulated the federal government knew about the sales while they were happening so what does that mean Brian if the federal governments in the form of the D. E. A. knew the companies were selling a suspicious number of opioid pills and people were dying from overdoses why didn't the agency step in I think this is one of the big questions that emerge from this week's document dump the federal government as find companies repeatedly but critics say until very recently regulators did little to actually slow the aggressive marketing these opioids you know companies would pay these finds Rachel and then the data shows they often got right back to business selling even more pills a man with north country public radio thank you bye and we appreciate your reporting on this thank you Rachel now we have an update on women's equality women say they are still excluded from many positions of power even in a country that is governed by a woman the country is Germany where the chancellor's uncle Americal and our correspondent for this story is NPR's Deborah Amos it is highly derogatory an insult that describes working mothers and a slur untrue it turns out for a certain bird ready here it is raven mother it sounds worse in German robin looked at a raven Mazda is a mother who does not have children Allmendinger is the president of the Berlin social science research center she says the term raven mother has a long history from when Germans connected women with hearth and home not the work place a raven Mazda is a mother who is interest Melanie insert shop and chest and I and a tractor so it's still a cultural thing this regulator I mean very much so even a man you know would say off causatives Germany lags behind Europe's other big economies when it comes to women in business leadership role she says it's all women in Germany started way later than other European countries to enter the labor market in big numbers and that has to do with the history of German laws my name is Bob how you win I'm the CEO of a big burden welfare organization that is called the T. eight she says it was only in nineteen seventy seven that legislative change gave women gender equality in marriage and at last address the fundamental question that kept women from taking jobs outside of the home women very loud to work without a commission off the high speed women on the streets of Berlin have their own stories and that Richter says when she grew up in East Germany women were expected to work the kids went to stay run kindergartens she only learned about raven mothers went east and West Germany became one that's really unfair because it keeps the women far from the job market Hujan Westerman says she couldn't worry about name calling after her son was born she went right back to work I was never thinking about someone calling me a raven mother because my husband had no jobs that would have allowed me to stay at home and here's another thing about choice in Germany working women often chose not to have kids which contributed to a shrinking population it took a super mom to turn it around enter Ursula Vander line a medical doctor with seven children she became family minister in two thousand five her new policies including better childcare for younger children and parental leave for dads help to reverse the decline later funder line became Germany's first female defense minister now she's the next president of the European Commission the first woman to hold that job but public opinion takes time to change says the sociologist who to Almaden her nobody called thunder line a raven mother but they found other ways to complain how can you show off your kids you know how can you even dare to do it because you have money you can buy you know your nossos and child care facilities but to be caught are you confident in Germany use still Compton and neither can the raven she says go look it up ravens are a wonderful bird she says smart and they're.

Brian man two billion dollars
"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:40 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Highly addictive pain killers north country public radio's Brian man is with us this morning he has covered the story closely thanks for being here Brian good morning major so we have seen these court cases around the U. S. really pulling back the curtain on the drug industry and how it contributed to this epidemic what is new in these documents well first I think it's the scale we have incredibly detailed data now showing drug companies made and sold more than ten billion opioid pain pills a year in the US and sales grew even as these overdose deaths stored wasn't just one or two companies doing this it took an entire industry to market and distribute that many pills from generic drug makers like Mallinckrodt to the pharmacy chains on people's corners like Walgreens and CVS so over the weekend we got a look at more internal emails that were sent by these drug executives of these companies what were they saying about the dangers of these medications drug executives clearly knew very early the risks but they were committed to boosting sales and profits in two thousand nine when we were already deep into this deadly epidemic one top official at Mallinckrodt joked in an email about selling opiates to people who were ejected comparing prescription pain pills junk food just like to read does he wrote keep eating will make more well so that's what happened right the documents show that the companies did just keep making more more than seventy billion opioid pills or sold across the U. S. from two thousand six to two thousand twelve through the that time period and during that time I mean I guess the question is was there any put a push back from inside the industry was or anyone raising their hands saying haven that maybe we shouldn't be pushing this hi Lee's highly addictive drugs in fact with the civil lawsuits claim is that companies kept selling opioids in huge quantities even when buyers seem to be really suspicious one example here court documents just released an Ohio show the drug distributor McKesson delivering more than three million doses of hydrocodone pills to one small pharmacy in Baltimore Maryland it's a lot of pills and internal emails show company executives McKesson raising concerns about the lack of proper safeguards but the pills just kept flowing this must be a PR nightmare for the drug industry I mean how are these companies responding yeah some of you would makers have just begun to settle more than two billion dollars and paid out so far this year but most companies denied any wrongdoing Mallinckrodt sent NPR a statement distancing itself from that email where their executive compared opioid pills to to read as they say it was an outrageously callous email it's their words from someone who hasn't worked for Mallinckrodt for a long time other companies we spoken to point out they were filling prescriptions written by doctors and they also say this market is highly regulated the federal government knew about the sales while they were happening so what does that mean Brian if the federal governments in the form of the D. E. A. knew the companies were selling a suspicious number of opioid pills and people were dying from overdoses why didn't the agency step in I think this is one of the big questions that emerge from this week's document dump the federal government has find companies repeatedly but critics say until very recently regulators did little to actually slow the aggressive marketing these opioids you know companies would pay these finds Rachel and then the data shows they often got right back to business selling even more pills a man with north country public radio thank you bye and we appreciate your reporting on this thank you Rachel now we have an update on women's equality women say they are still excluded from many positions of power even in a country that is governed by a woman the country is Germany where the chancellor's ogle Americal and our correspondent for this story is NPR's Deborah Amos it is highly derogatory an insult that describes working mothers and a slur untrue it turns out for a certain bird ready here it is raven mother it sounds worse in German of robin a raven Mazda is a mother who does not have children Allmendinger is the president of the Berlin social science research center she says the term raven mother has a long history from when Germans connected women with hearth and home not the work place a raven Mazda is a mother who is interest Melanie insert shop and chest and a tractor so it's still a cultural thing this regular I mean very much so even a man you know would say off causative Germany lags behind Europe's other big economies when it comes to women.

Brian man two billion dollars
"brian man" Discussed on Cheap Heat

Cheap Heat

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on Cheap Heat

"And we see whether or not there are changes to these shows, and you would think the first order of business might be to really start a stab wishing what shows look like and sticking with them and not changing things day of which has been something that has plagued, WWE, creative forever. But particularly over the last couple of years where you hear constantly about shows changing judge. Just before. They go on the air, and that is something that definitely happens. So the question is, when you now have guys directing the show's really who are, you know, able to be the hands on guys for each show will that start to change. Because here's the amazing thing was having again, this conversation with my buddy. Brian man, the other day will watch stop and grounds. Vince McMahon is handling so much right now. And always the idea that he could fully handle creative for Ron smackdown every week. In addition to. Running the business side of WWE, at least for the most part. I mean, certainly Michelle Wilson's really important and there several other people who are. You know, high importance when it comes to business issues, but still it the buck stops with him. He starting the XFL. There is so much to do. There's a new company launching to compete with them on television. Numbers are down. If, if you're simply Vince McMahon in dealing with the fact and smackdown was up from last week, and it was number one eighteen to forty nine and it was up a few hundred thousand viewers from last week, though still down from last year. If he was just dealing with the fact that there's a viewership crisis. That's a lot to handle. If he was just trying to launch the XFL that's a lot to handle. If you're just dealing with creative. That's lot dealing with all of them is a borderline impossible task, and maybe not borderland just impossible. And the result is what we're getting no. That again that all would have been borderline impossible, what he was fifty fifty five sixty. You know, you're not talking about a guy into a seventies and one of the things that I think is really problematic for Vince McMahon as he gets older. And I'm sure he would not agree with this, or wanna hear it at all is the man works like a maniac, and frankly, sleep and rest are so important for one using their brain in any sort of. A proper complete capacity. And I say that as someone who you know, probably works too much. And I know what I'm like on the air trying to get my thoughts together when I'm not getting sleep, and frankly, it's just not good. You're just not able to be that good at thinking when you're not resting. I know the sound so basic and infantile but I think it's something we don't talk about enough because we all know that Vincent man's machine. He doesn't sleep. He sleeps few hours a night he's worth. He's in the gym. He's working constantly. He's on the road. Constant not to mention think about how tired, you are after like one business trip. One annoying day of travel. Think about how tired, you are then think about doing that multiple times a week every week, always, and then when you're quote unquote, back home. You're still your office 'til all hours of the night..

Vince McMahon WWE Brian man Michelle Wilson Ron Vincent
"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

"Jennifer Talbert heads the Janssen pharmaceutical division of Johnson and Johnson, which makes and sells opioids here's how she responded everything that we have done with our products when we promoted opioid products, which we stop marketing longtime ago was very appropriate and responsible, but according to the drug companies own documents firms, including Johnson and Johnson pushed unscientific theories about drug. Addiction. They did so allegedly to convince doctors to prescribe even more opioids after patients showed signs of dependency. David Armstrong, the reporter with propublica says this kind of disclosure is making it harder for the industry to protect its image. The narrative is clearly shifting on this story. People want some sort of reckoning some sort of accounting, and I should say David that we've seen this kind of thing before when tobacco companies were sued back in the nineteen nineties and the public then learned for the first time about widespread wrongdoing. The difference here is that these drug companies in their researchers have been seen by the public is healers and innovators who can be trusted to make products that help us when we're sick. And now that trust is taking a huge hit. I'm talking to a reporter, Brian man, who's been covering the opioid crisis for NPR, and Brian just listening to everything you've said there, it makes me wonder what's next. There's a trial coming up in Oklahoma rain. That's right, and attorneys are still fighting over millions of pages of documents and the people I've. Spoken to say there could be more smoking guns more evidence of really bad behavior. We don't know about yet. One real possibility, though is that there could be what's known as a global settlement of these opioid cases where companies agreed to pay billions of dollars. If that happens, David, you know, history could repeat itself the documents. We haven't seen yet telling the full story of this academic. They could be destroyed or hidden away. Brian man with north country public radio who covers these opioid lawsuits for NPR. Thanks, brian. Thank you, David. This is NPR news next time on KCRW is all things considered how California universities are responding to the largest admissions cheating scandal in American history fallout continues in Orange County as well after students posed for a social media image displaying the Nazi salute. In what China is no longer buying recyclables from the United States. Local news weather traffic. I'm Steve shiitake is I hope you'll join us for a Wednesday edition of all things considered from NPR and KCRW at four thirty..

Brian man David Armstrong NPR Johnson reporter Jennifer Talbert KCRW Janssen Oklahoma Steve shiitake Orange County United States propublica China California
"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Jennifer Talbert heads the Janssen pharmaceutical division of Johnson and Johnson, which makes and sells opioids here's how she responded everything that we have done with our products when we promoted opioid products, which we. Stop marketing longtime ago was very appropriate and responsible, but according to the drug companies own documents firms including Johnson and Johnson pushed unscientific theories about drug addiction. They did so allegedly to convince doctors to prescribe even more opioids after patients showed signs of dependency. David Armstrong, the reporter with propublica says this kind of disclosure is making it harder for the industry to protect its image. The narrative is clearly shifting on this story. People want some sort of reckoning some sort of accounting, and I should say David that we've seen this kind of thing before when tobacco companies were sued back in the nineteen nineties and the public then learned for the first time about widespread wrongdoing. The difference here is that these drug companies in their researchers have been seen by the public is healers and innovators who can be trusted to make products that help us when we're sick. And now that trust is taking a huge hit. I'm talking to a reporter Brian man who's been covering the opioid crisis. For NPR, and Brian just listening to everything you've said there. It makes me wonder what's next as a trial coming up in Oklahoma rain. That's right, and attorneys are still fighting over millions of pages of documents, and the people I've spoken to say there could be more smoking guns more evidence of really bad behavior. We don't know about yet one real possibility, though is that there could be what's known as a global settlement of these opioid cases where companies agreed to pay billions of dollars. If that happens, David, you know, history could repeat itself the documents. We haven't seen yet telling the full story of this epidemic. They could be destroyed or hidden away. Brian man with north country public radio who covers these opioid lawsuits for NPR. Thanks, brian. Thank you, David. This is NPR news and at five twenty nine we'll get another look at your early ride to work today. Joe McConnell's here with that joke stole the big jam on eight eighty northbound.

Brian man David Armstrong NPR Johnson reporter Jennifer Talbert Joe McConnell Janssen Oklahoma propublica
"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

"Jennifer Talbert heads the Janssen pharmaceutical division of Johnson and Johnson, which makes and sells opioids here's how she responded everything that we have done with our products when we promoted opioid products, which we stop marketing. Longtime ago was very appropriate and responsible, but according to the drug companies own documents firms including Johnson and Johnson pushed unscientific theories about drug addiction. They did so allegedly to convince doctors to prescribe even more opioids after patients showed signs of dependency. David Armstrong reporter with propublica says this kind of disclosure is making it harder for the industry to protect its image. The narrative is clearly shifting on this story. People want some sort of reckoning some sort of accounting, and I should say David that we've seen this kind of thing before when tobacco companies were sued back in the nineteen nineties in the public then learned for the first time about widespread wrongdoing. The difference here is that these drug companies, and their researchers have been seen by the public is healers and innovators who can be trusted to make products that help us when we're sick. And now that trust is taking a huge hit. I'm talking to a reporter Brian man, who's been covering the opioid crisis for NPR. Brian just listening to everything you've said there. It makes me wonder what's next is a trial coming up in Oklahoma rain. That's right, and attorneys are still fighting over millions of pages of documents, and the people I've spoken to say there could be more smoking guns more evidence of really bad behavior. We don't know about yet. One real possibility, though is that there could be what's known as a global settlement of these opioid cases where companies agreed to pay billions of dollars. If that happens, David, you know, history could repeat itself the documents. We haven't seen yet telling the full story of this epidemic. They could be destroyed or hidden away. Brian man with north country.

Brian man Johnson David Armstrong reporter Jennifer Talbert Janssen Oklahoma propublica NPR
"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

"This is crazy. A little high wire act feel. This far north the Hudson is a muscular mountain stream half covered in ice on the other side. We snowshoe across a frozen lake. The the mountains around us, but it's the so still and quiet and we're so deep into the wilderness. It's so cold out. You can hear the trees crack. We hikone. And here's where the day gets tricky were climbing a summit called mount Adams and miliion I reach a point where no one's broken trail for us. So we trade off going first plowing step by step through deep. Crusty snow. It's like climbing stairs made of sand up a one hundred fifty story building. It's as mentally tough. As it is physically tough to take a step and slide back down. It's not graceful at one point I tumble into a mountain stream hidden under the snow on one of the steep sections. Emily loses her balance, I fell completely on my back. You just there was like a turtle. Yeah. Slowly topples. We keep going and it's worth it her the tree line. Now. Everything is just. Covered in white really snowy cold the sun sweeps across icy peaks all around us. The view is mythical. It's like we've left New York state and stumbled into a version of winter street out of narnia, Brian man, NPR news in New York's Adirondack mountains..

New York mount Adams Hudson Brian man NPR Emily
"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

"This is crazy. A little high wire act. This far north the Hudson is a muscular mountain stream half covered in ice on the other side. We snowshoeing across a frozen lake. The the mountains around us, but it's just so still and quiet and we're so deep into the wilderness. It's so cold out. You can hear the trees crack. We hikone. And here's where the day gets tricky were climbing a summit called mount Adams, and Emily, and I reach a point where no one's broken trail for us. So we trade off going first plowing step by step through deep. Crusty snow. It's like climbing stairs made of sand up a one hundred fifty story building. It's as mentally tough. As it is physically tough to take a step and slide back down. It's not graceful at one point I tumble into a mountain stream hidden under the snow on one of the steep sections. Emily loses her balance, I fell completely on my back. You just it was like a turtle. Yeah. Slowly topples. We keep going, and it's worth it or above the treeline. Now, everything is just. Covered in white really snowy cold the sun sweeps across icy peaks all around us. The view is mythical. It's like we've left New York state and stumbled into a version of winter street out of narnia, Brian man, NPR news in New York's Adirondack mountains..

Emily New York mount Adams Hudson Brian man NPR
"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"She says the government shutdown fell to her like bad strategy a standoff in Washington that hurt regular people way out here in rural America just seems like there's other ways of doing it. Then, you know, putting people out of work, and, you know, wanting their income, then just seems like there's gotta be a better way. But I don't know what that way would be white says she to still backs the president and still wants his wall, built polls show the overwhelming majority of conservative voters still trust is leadership. But her doubts about the wisdom of the shutdown are reflected in polls show Trump losing ground in recent weeks nationwide. Even with some of his core. Supporters white men without college degrees evangelical and registered Republicans. Brian man, NPR news, Kevin New York. Nearly all the lettuce in this country has grown with water from the Colorado river, which means a nineteen year drought along the river has far reaching implications. Neighboring states are still trying to come up with a deal by Thursday to avert a crisis. Lauren summer of member station, K Q, E, D And NPR's, energy and environment. Team reports the Colorado river touches seven states goes through the Grand Canyon and reaches the faucets. A forty million people from Denver to Los Angeles. But it starts as just a trickle high in the Colorado Rockies. One of the cool things about a snow melt is it's really efficient at the end. So it tends to get in the river. Brad Udal is a climate scientist at Colorado state university and a few summers ago, we are at the very spot that run off becomes a river. No question. The nineteen year drought. Here has been bad. But climate change is making things worse. You heat up the climate. You are gonna get fundamental impacts of water cycle. We've known this for almost fifty years now a warmer atmosphere. Sucks up water drying, it out of plants and soils Udal says.

Colorado river Brad Udal Colorado Rockies Colorado state university white Washington Brian man America NPR Lauren summer president Denver Grand Canyon Kevin New York Los Angeles scientist nineteen year fifty years