35 Burst results for "Brian Man"

OxiContin Maker To Pay Out Billions In Civil, Criminal Penalties

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:10 min | Last month

OxiContin Maker To Pay Out Billions In Civil, Criminal Penalties

"The makers of oxycontin one of the drugs blame for sending off the OPIOID crisis will plead guilty to federal criminal charges. The Justice Department announced those charges against Purdue Pharma yesterday as part of an eight billion dollar settlement NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man is with US Brian Good Morning. Steve, how's a settlement? GonNa work. Yeah. So if it's approved by a federal bankruptcy judge, Steve The purdue Pharma will admit to the three felony charges including a charge that they misled doctors about the safety of medications like Oxycontin, over time, then the company would pay out billions of dollars in civil and criminal penalties, Jeffrey Rosen, the deputy attorney general who outlined the agreement yesterday says the sackler family would also be forced to give up control of their company. Instead of being the owners of a major pharmaceutical company, they will have no stake in that company. Now that sounds like a lot but critics are pointing to the fact that Purdue Pharma was already in big trouble facing bankruptcy struggling to hold onto employees and flooded with thousands of lawsuits tied to the improper marketing of opioids, and despite all that under this deal does federal deal the sackler walk away with most of their personal fortunes intact by some estimates there worth as much as ten billion dollars because of OPIOID prophets, they'll pay a fraction of that in penalties only about two hundred, twenty, five, million dollars out of their own pockets and Steve. There are no criminal charges against them the sackler. Admit to know personal wrongdoing. Well, how do prosecutors explain the deal would include no criminal charges and the sackler not entirely but mostly giving up a pile of liabilities rather than a penalty they would really feel. Deputy. Attorney General. Rosen was asked about this yesterday and he says these penalties go as far as the government can right now holding purdue and the sackler accountable. There is no law that says if you've done something wrong, we should just simply strip somebody of all their assets in existence that's not how it works. It has to be that we are looking at specific ex wrongdoing civilly or criminally, and then having a proportionate response but a lot of people including more than two dozen state attorneys, general dozens of members of Congress advocates for people suffering from addiction. They all say, this isn't proportionate response. They say members of the sackler family played a personal role pushing the prescription opioid boom developing these illegal and deceptive marketing practices that made purdue. Pharma. So profitable the Tissue James is New York State Attorney General, and she's suing members of the. Sackler family, her team tracked hundreds of millions of dollars in opioid prophets that the sackler sent to offshore accounts. She told. NPR. This justice department deal doesn't go nearly far enough doesn't account the hundreds of thousands of deaths of millions of addictions caused by produce farmer in the sackler family all of destruction that they have caused it basically allows billionaires to keep their billions without any accounting for how much a really made James says her state probe of the sackler family will continue. Meanwhile, there's one more detailed, the settlement that sparking. Anger, it turns out purdue. Pharma doesn't actually have enough money left to pay out the billions of dollars agreed to in this settlement. So the plan is for the government to reorganize Purdue Pharma into what's known as a public benefit company that means prophets from future sales of opioids like oxycontin would be used to pay for drug treatment and rehabilitation programs around the country Greg mcneal lives in. Ohio. One of the states hit hardest by the OPIOID epidemic and he lost his son Sam to an overdose five years ago. He. Says this idea of the government getting into the OPIOID business now after it's caused so much harm. He says it just feels wrong it. It just seems ill advised having the government entered into that business. Gosh. There's something about that. That just doesn't doesn't add up at all. And I should say Steve Twenty five state attorneys general agree they signed a letter last week they send it to Attorney General William Bar arguing that this arrangement is ethically wrong and could shelter purdue Pharma and the sackler from future criminal or civil liability Brian Kennedy at least be said for the deal that there's some money here that might help people harmed by the. OPIOID. Epidemic. That will definitely that's what the Justice Department is saying. So let's take stock for a second nearly seventy two thousand people died from overdoses last year this is still ongoing. A lot of those were opioid deaths. What US attorneys say is if this deal is finalized by the bankruptcy court, it would mean extraordinary new resources for states and cities and tribal governments struggling to keep people alive. But one thing everyone agrees to here is that this problem is so big now affecting. So many Americans they say the eight billion dollars from purdue, Pharma is really just a drop in the bucket.

Purdue Pharma Purdue Sackler Justice Department Steve NPR Jeffrey Rosen Attorney Brian Man Deputy Attorney General United States Steve Twenty Ohio Epidemic Attorney General William Bar Congress New York James
Purdue Pharma Reaches Agreement With U.S. Department of Justice

Morning Edition

03:22 min | Last month

Purdue Pharma Reaches Agreement With U.S. Department of Justice

"The Department of Justice just announced a settlement with Purdue Pharma, the drug company makes the opioid OxyContin. Critics accused Purdue and its owners, the Sackler family of helping to fuel the prescription opioid epidemic. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man is covering this say there, Brian. Hey, Steve. How are you? Okay. What are the terms? Look, this is a complicated deal. Basically what it means is that produce farm is going to pay out about $8.3 billion the Sackler family. The owners of this company will also give up control of this firm, which they really created and helped popularize opioids over the last 20 years. The Justice Department says. A lot of this money many of these resource is will go to communities around the U. S. Hard hit by this addiction epidemic. Remember about the quarter million Americans have died from prescription opioid overdoses alone on the cost of these communities of recovering even before the corona virus pandemic. This was a devastating public health crisis. And what the Justice Department says is that this deal will rout funds to those communities. One other interesting detail is that Purdue Pharma will now become a public trust company, and that's very controversial. That's something that a lot of critics have pointed to is as something of deep concern. Although there is some criticism of this agreement already, even though it's just been announced, What is it that critics would say It's not enough in the Sackler is giving up the entire company and some of their personal fortunes. Well, One of the things that's happening here is that the Sackler family will walk away with much of their personal fortune. This deal, Steve calls for them to pay out about $225 million in their personal assets. Critics, including New York Attorney General Leticia James, who has sued the Sackler is directly say that's not nearly enough. She put out a statement just minutes ago. Saying This doesn't hold them accountable for the pain and destruction left by what she described as their greed. Another thing that is really interesting here is that this Public trust company will still have to see the details of how it's organized. But this will sort of put the government in the job of producing opioid medications. This will put the government very closely in connection with a company that caused one of the major public health crises or at least contributed to it. Over the last couple of decades. A lot of state attorneys general say they don't like that arrangement. They think it creates a kind of umbrella for the sack, Lear's and produce that could prevent future prosecutions. Well, how are communities that are hard hit by opioids supposed to get the money from this deal? A lot of that is still we're going to see how the details of this process works. What the Justice Department said today is that this will provide extraordinary resource is they also say that under this newly organized public trust company opioid medications will continue to be provided. Remember, these medications do actually have a medical purpose when they're prescribed appropriately? They say that this will rout resource is both in terms of medications and funds. Too many of those communities Brian, Thanks for the update, always appreciate it. Very good. Thanks,

Justice Department Purdue Pharma Sackler Brian Man Purdue Steve Leticia James Lear New York Attorney
Former N.J., New York, Gov. Chris Christie Says He's Out of the Hospital After Treatment for COVID-19

NPR News Now

00:49 sec | Last month

Former N.J., New York, Gov. Chris Christie Says He's Out of the Hospital After Treatment for COVID-19

"Former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie is out of the hospital a week after he was diagnosed with a corona virus as NPR's Brian Man reports Christie is one of more than a dozen people in President Trump's inner circle who've contracted the virus a day after president trump announced he and the first lady tested positive Christie. A close trump ally announced he was infected. Christie is overweight suffers from asthma conditions that can increase complications from covid nineteen. He checked himself into a hospital last Saturday in a tweet today Christie said he's been released from the Morristown Medical Center in. New. Jersey he thanked the doctors and nurses who cared for him and said quote I will have more to say about all of this next week. Ryan men. NPR News. This is NPR.

Governor Chris Christie NPR Donald Trump Npr News New Jersey President Trump Brian Man Morristown Medical Center Asthma Ryan
Trump, Biden to visit 9/11 memorial in Pennsylvania on anniversary of terrorist attack

Morning Edition

00:59 sec | 2 months ago

Trump, Biden to visit 9/11 memorial in Pennsylvania on anniversary of terrorist attack

"Nation marks the 19th anniversary of the 9 11 terror attacks today. President Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden both plan to visit the flight 93 National Memorial in Pennsylvania. But not at the same time. Biden will also attend a ceremony at the World Trade Center Memorial site in New York before heading to Pennsylvania. NPR's Brian Man has more 19 years ago, terrorists used commercial airliners to strike the twin towers and the Pentagon, also bringing a passenger jet down in a field in Pennsylvania. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio says that heartbreaking day showed his city's resilience. People all over this country and all over this world were in awe of New York City and people grieved with us. But they also admired New York City because of the pandemic. Names of nearly 3000 people who died will be spoken. Today It's a 9 11 Memorial Museum in Manhattan. Using audio recordings made by families. A separate ceremony will include a live reading of the names of those Lost

New York City Pennsylvania Joe Biden World Trade Center Memorial National Memorial Memorial Museum President Trump Bill De Blasio Brian Man Manhattan Pentagon NPR
Rochester, New York, mayor and police chief say they won't resign amid Daniel Prude protests

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Rochester, New York, mayor and police chief say they won't resign amid Daniel Prude protests

"Police chief in Rochester, New York, say they will not resign. After days of sometimes violent protests. Demonstrators have accused local officials of covering up the death of a black man Daniel prude while in police custody. NPR's Brian Man has more. At a news conference Sunday, Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren said she won't bow to Protestersdemands. That she and her chief of police Laurent Singletary, step down. It is clear to me that there is more work to be done and I am committed to doing was necessary and I know The chief is committed to doing was necessary. Warrant also defended police use of force against protesters in recent days, saying there were credible reports Some activists plan to damage or destroy police headquarters. Tonight, Elders from the black Church community here plan to serve his human buffers between protesters and police to reduce the risk of violence. Brian Man NPR NEWS Rochester, New York A federal

Brian Man Rochester New York Laurent Singletary Mayor Lovely Warren Daniel Prude NPR Black Church Community Protestersdemands
New York protests: BLM groups calling for Rochester mayor, police chief to resign

The Sunday Show

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

New York protests: BLM groups calling for Rochester mayor, police chief to resign

"Of of demonstrators demonstrators turned turned out out in in Rochester, Rochester, New York, last night, demanding the city's mayor and police chief resigned. As NPR's Brian Man reports they're demanding justice over the death of Daniel Prude in police custody. Marchers gathered on the street where Daniel prude, a black man lay in March naked with a hood over his head surrounded by officers. Christopher Cole's told the crowd people want justice is the first time that the world is standing up for black lives is seeing us for the first time when the crowd turned toward Rochester's main police station, a large force of officers used tear gas in a military style vehicle to scatter the protest. New New York's York's attorney attorney general general the the tissue, tissue, James James announced announced he's he's convening convening a a grand grand jury jury is is part part of of the the investigation investigation into into proves proves death. death. Seven Seven officers officers have have been been suspended. suspended. Brian Brian Man Man NPR NPR NEWS, Rochester, New York.

Rochester Brian Man Daniel Prude New York NPR James James Christopher Cole Attorney
Demonstrators in Rochester, N.Y. protest at city hall over Daniel Prude’s death

The Sunday Show

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Demonstrators in Rochester, N.Y. protest at city hall over Daniel Prude’s death

"Of of demonstrators demonstrators of of demonstrators demonstrators turned turned turned turned out out in in out out Rochester, Rochester, in in Rochester, Rochester, New York, New York, last last night, night, demanding demanding the city's the city's mayor mayor and and police police chief chief resigned. resigned. As NPR's As NPR's Brian Brian Man Man reports reports they're demanding they're demanding justice justice over over the death the death of Daniel of Daniel Prude Prude in police in police custody. custody. Marchers Marchers gathered gathered on the street on the street where Daniel where Daniel prude, prude, a black a black man man lay in lay in March March naked naked with a with hood a hood over his over head his head surrounded surrounded by officers. by officers. Christopher Christopher Cole's Cole's told told the crowd the crowd people people want want justice justice is the is first the time first that time that the world the world is standing is standing up for up black for black lives lives is seeing is seeing us for us the for first the first time time when the when crowd the crowd turned turned toward Rochester's toward Rochester's main main police police station, station, a large a large force force of officers of officers used used tear tear gas gas in a in military a military style style vehicle vehicle to scatter to scatter the protest. the protest. New New York's York's New New York's York's attorney attorney attorney attorney general general general general the the tissue, tissue, the the tissue, tissue, James James James James announced announced announced announced he's he's convening convening he's he's convening convening a a grand grand a a grand grand jury jury jury jury is is part part is is part part of of the the investigation investigation of of the the investigation investigation into into proves proves into into proves proves death. death. death. death. Seven Seven Seven Seven officers officers officers officers have have been been have have suspended. suspended. been been suspended. suspended. Brian Brian Brian Brian Man Man NPR NPR Man Man NPR NPR NEWS, NEWS, Rochester, Rochester, New York. New York.

Brian Brian Brian Brian Man Ma Daniel Prude Prude Rochester Brian Brian Man Man New York James James James James NPR Daniel Daniel Prude Christopher Christopher Cole Attorney
Tropical Storm Laura, Marco head toward Gulf states

NPR News Now

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

Tropical Storm Laura, Marco head toward Gulf states

"Louisiana and Mississippi have declared states of emergency as to tropical storms head towards the northern Gulf coast. The National Weather Service has high winds could start as early as Sunday night NPR's Brian Man reports tropical storm Marco is on track to make landfall. I with the National Weather Service predicting it will hit with hurricane strength. A second storm Laura is expected to land mid week states from Florida to Texas run alert Mississippi. Governor Tate Reeves is urging people to evacuate vulnerable areas. Early, what we cannot have happen is to have a mad rush of people into our sheltering space because of covid nineteen, we are trying very very hard to maintain. Social distancing the requirement of mask. Officials, Say Marco could dump five inches of rain causing flash floods in some

National Weather Service Marco Mississippi Governor Tate Reeves Brian Man Louisiana NPR Laura Florida Texas
Drug Companies Face Lawsuits From Opioid Crisis As They Respond To The Pandemic

All Things Considered

03:13 min | 3 months ago

Drug Companies Face Lawsuits From Opioid Crisis As They Respond To The Pandemic

"This week, Johnson and Johnson announced a $1 billion deal with the federal government to develop a new Corona virus vaccine. It's one of many drug companies on the front lines of the covert 19 response, but many of these same firms are facing an avalanche of lawsuits for their role in the opioid epidemic. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Man has been following this and joins us now. Hi bran. Hi, Stacy. Somewhere in this seems like kind of a complicated moment for the drug industry in two very different stories playing out, But first tell us where things stand with the opioid lawsuits. Yeah, eso covered 19 basically shut down the court system nationally for months, but now that log jam is breaking loose and thousands of these civil and criminal cases they're grinding forward again. Big federal trial against pharmacy chains involved in the opiate epidemic just got the green light in Ohio. And next month, a lawsuit against two drugmakers Endo and Mallinckrodt goes to a jury trial in Tennessee. I spoke with Gerard Stranz, one of the lead attorneys representing local governments. In that case, they're demanding billions of dollars in compensation from these companies. Justice delayed is justice denied, and they know that when they sit in front of a jury of the community members would have to explain their conduct. There is no explanation and they're going to have to answer for what they've done. Remember, the federal government says 1/4 1,000,000 Americans have died after taking these opioid medications, and the drug industry is still scrambling to cope with the legal and financial fallout from that. Is there a risk that that opioid look, lawsuits could destabilize or maybe even bankrupt drug companies? I mean this at a time when they are really needed to respond to the pandemic. You know, people are talking a lot about this. Some drug companies have already filed for bankruptcy because of opioids and other firm Mallinckrodt said this week they may file for Chapter 11. So there is concern that holding these companies accountable for the addiction epidemic could disrupt their ability to make these important medical products. Rebecca half a G studies opioid litigation for the Rand Corporation and the University of Michigan. All of these companies have other products as well as opioids that are used for medically necessary purposes. So the goal is not necessarily to put these pharmacies thes manufacturers these distributors out of business altogether, and that would actually be bad for public health and or the health care industry. So one thing I'm hearing Stacy's. As these court cases all move forward. There's new pressure to reach some kind of national opioids settlement that would end all this uncertainty for the drug industry. I mean, obviously, the opioid lawsuits have been a huge black eye for the drug industry. Do you think the pandemic will give them a chance to repair some of the damage to their reputations? I think that is part of the story. Right now. Johnson and Johnson is a good example. Last year Oklahoma one A half $1,000,000,000 decision against the company of the state's attorney general described Johnson and Johnson as a drug kingpin organization for its role making and selling opioids. It's terrible PR. Now the company's casting itself really differently is a public health champion. Of course, a lot of state and local governments say not so fast. They want billions of dollars from these companies before they put the opioid crisis

Johnson Stacy Mallinckrodt Brian Man Ohio Gerard Stranz Rand Corporation University Of Michigan Oklahoma Endo Rebecca Tennessee Attorney
New York DA Got Trump Financial Records After Deutsche Bank Subpoena

NPR News Now

01:02 min | 3 months ago

New York DA Got Trump Financial Records After Deutsche Bank Subpoena

"Court filing suggest abroad criminal probe of president. Trump's business organization is now underway is NPR's Brian. Man tells us a prosecutor in New York reportedly gained access to more of president trump's financial records. Cyrus. Vance. Is District Attorney in Manhattan and according to The New York Times. He subpoenaed Deutsche. Bank last year for trump's financial records sources told The Times the bank complied Vance has also been fighting to get trump's tax records in court filings this. Week Vance's office also signalled a wider investigation into what prosecutors call public reports of possibly extensive and protracted criminal conduct at the trump organization. Vance's a Democrat and trump has called his investigation a continuation of the witch hunt by the president's political enemies. Last year trump was forced to disband his charity in New York. After the State Attorney General found, he broke the law by misusing donations for personal and political gain. Brian Man NPR news this is NPR.

Donald Trump Vance President Trump NPR The New York Times Manhattan Brian Man Prosecutor Attorney Deutsche
Suspect in federal judge's home ambush railed against her in misogynistic book

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Suspect in federal judge's home ambush railed against her in misogynistic book

"Has identified the gunman who allegedly killed the son of a federal judge in New Jersey. Yesterday. The judge's husband was wounded is NPR's Brian Man reports. The suspect himself was found dead today. The FBI says Roid and Hollander went to the family home of Judge Esther Solace in New Jersey on Sunday, fatally shooting her 20 year old son, Daniel. And wounding her husband, Attorney Mark and Earl Solace herself was uninjured. Then Hollander's body was found across the state line in New York by state police taking part in the manhunt. It's widely reported he died of a self inflicted gunshot wound. The authorities have yet to confirm any details. They also haven't identified a motive. Then Hollander was an attorney who described himself as a specialist in anti feminist litigation. This deadly shooting comes as the U. S marshal Service has reported a sharp increase in threats against judges.

Hollander Judge Esther Solace New Jersey Earl Solace Attorney Brian Man U. S Marshal Service FBI NPR New York Roid Daniel
Doctors And Dentists Still Flooding U.S. With Opioid Prescriptions

Up First

03:45 min | 4 months ago

Doctors And Dentists Still Flooding U.S. With Opioid Prescriptions

"New NPR investigation shows that doctors are still over prescribing opioids emphasis on still. It's been years since we have been referring to. As an epidemic hundreds of thousands of people are dead of overdoses, families. Family's destroyed. Children have been removed from their homes. Addicts are struggling to recover and still. Why would doctors be doing this? Our addiction correspondent Brian Man has been looking at publicly available data. Hey, Brian Good morning. You've been on this story for years and at a certain point, it just looks reckless. How could doctors still be over prescribing opioids? Yeah, it seems remarkable. What a lot! Lot of experts tell NPR's for all their dangers. opioids are still kind of hard wired into the American healthcare system. A lot of people for example have insurance that will pay for opioids, but not alternative pain treatments, also a lot of doctors were trained during the opioid boom, and they still see these medications as a quick convenient solution to patient pain. Here's Dr Jonathan Chen. He's a physician in California. Who Studies prescribing patterns if you look worldwide? We're like five percent of the population, but we consume eighty percent of the world's prescription opioids. It's not just a handful of doctors. Doing kind of all arts become a culture that this is normal so normal end deadly twenty the latest year. We have good records. Noel forty people were still dying every day from prescription opioid overdoses. Millions more saw their lives shattered by addiction. There are now tighter regulations in a lot of states. The healthcare industry gotten a ton of trouble. There were lawsuits. Billions of dollars were paid out or will be paid out. Are you saying that none of that worked? But what NPR found is prescribing has come down from the really crazy high levels. We saw during the peak of the OPIOID boom, but critics and people who studied this say progress has been slow and also really uneven. Here's Gary Guy. He tracks prescribing patterns for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is still three times. The amount of opioids being prescribed as there was in nineteen. Nineteen ninety nine and there's also substantial variation across the country. The experts we talked to said that last part is really troubling. It turns out. OPIOID prescriptions have come down a lot in some parts of the country. That's a big success story, but we found other areas of the US especially rural areas and parts of the south where the prescribing boom is still going full tilt enough prescriptions being written in those communities every year for every man, woman and child to get a bottle of pills. Are there differences within the healthcare industry like are certain types of doctors over prescribing while others are not. This is really interesting, so with the CDC. Found is a lot of healthcare. Workers Ignore Federal Safety guidelines that's across the industry, often giving these medications for twisted ankles and lower back pain that could be treated with tylenol or an ice pack, but studies also show yes, that there are sort of opioid. With in health, care, surgeons for example are giving out. Millions of VEX has pills every year, a new study from the University of Pittsburgh found dentists have actually increased the number of powerful opioids. They give out what that means is a lot of these pills going out into communities that can be diverted and misused. Here's Keith Humphreys. He Studies opioid prescribing at Stanford University you have this incredible reservoir pills, but doesn't exist in other countries, so it's it's remarkable. This continues and that we put this much potentially deadly drug out on the street every year, but that's situation we're in, and that's obviously super dangerous for those communities.

NPR Dr Jonathan Chen Gary Guy CDC Keith Humphreys Brian Man Brian Good Family United States VEX Stanford University Noel University Of Pittsburgh California
Police Reform Legislation Moves Swiftly Through New York State Legislature

All of It

00:55 sec | 6 months ago

Police Reform Legislation Moves Swiftly Through New York State Legislature

"Lawmakers in new York's legislature are expected to pass the second wave of police reform legislation a day after the majority approved a ban on chokeholds here's NPR's Brian man a lot of these reforms appointing a special prosecutor to handle police cases tracking data to detect bias in policing and making disciplinary complaints against police more public have been debated for years in Albany but in twenty eighteen Democrats want total control of the state legislature and black lawmakers now hold top leadership posts senator Kevin Parker from Brooklyn told NPR that means protesters were hurt on the Republican Senate which has no diversity in at all other than the battering of women they would have never which is why much of the legislation that would have been languishing over decades law enforcement organizations and police unions are rallying today hoping to block some of these reforms from going into

New York NPR Prosecutor Albany Kevin Parker Brooklyn Republican Senate Senator
Cities across US announce police reform following mass protests against brutality

Morning Edition

01:21 min | 6 months ago

Cities across US announce police reform following mass protests against brutality

"Demonstrators across the country are demanding changes to policing and some state and local governments are heeding those calls lawmakers in new York's legislature passed a first wave of bills yesterday and here's Brian man has been following this and joins us now Brian governor Andrew Cuomo has said he'll sign these bills into law what's going to change well maybe the most dramatic change is going to be a law making co called illegal when used by police in some cases it'll be a felony a lot of police departments across New York state had already banned this procedure but now it will be a criminal offense and this measure was named after Eric garner a black man who died in twenty fourteen after he was placed in a chokehold by a white officer his dying words I can't breathe were recorded on a cell phone video they became one of the rallying cries of the black lives matter movement and yesterday state senator Brian Benjamin who represents Harlem said this reform just had to happen we unfortunately have not been providing safety for African Americans in this country what this bill does is says you know what we're going to try to move closer to a system where everyone feels safe in this country and one remarkable thing yesterday Rachel a Republican senators to block similar reforms for years in New York they voted with Democrats on the Senate passed

New York Brian Man Brian Governor Andrew Cuomo Officer Harlem Rachel Senate Eric Garner Senator Brian Benjamin
Trump Considers Quarantining East Coast Cities

All Things Considered

02:26 min | 8 months ago

Trump Considers Quarantining East Coast Cities

"We're gonna start the program at the epicenter of the corona virus pandemic in the US that's New York as of this morning there were twenty nine thousand confirmed cases of covered nineteen in the city president trump said today that he is considering imposing a federal quarantine that would restrict travel for millions of Americans on the east coast as part of the effort to slow the spread of the virus and I am now considering we'll make a decision very quickly very shortly a quarantine because it's such a hot area of New York New Jersey and Connecticut as president trump speaking this afternoon in Norfolk Virginia this could affect more than ten million Americans north country public radio's Brian man is with us now from New York state where he's been following developments Brian thanks for joining us what we know about this quarantine idea well we don't really know a lot yet the president's been asked about this through the day reporters looking for clarification on how this might work trump says he's looking at the idea it does appear he's talking about some kind of mandatory federal quarantine and clear how that would be enforced as speaking in Virginia he said it would be structured so that some traffic in and out of New York City would still be allowed trade would continue in some way I should say Michelle that folks have been talking to a New York City there were already really scared right now more than two hundred people have died in New York state in the last day alone floating an idea like this is adding a lot of uncertainty about what happens next in people's lives and what about other officials have our other officials they're reacting to the president's proposal especially there in New York yeah governor Andrew Cuomo pushed back against us pretty hard at his daily briefing today in Albany he sounded like and he's been taken off guard by the suggestion and said the president never discussed it with him I don't even know what that what that means I don't know how that could be legally enforceable and from a medical point of view I don't know what you would be accomplishing I can tell you I just I don't even like the sound of it Michelle after that trump's acting chief of staff mark meadows at the White House is evaluating all the options looking at trump's authority to do this and the president says this kind of quarantine is something some governors have been asking for governors who are nervous about people who are leaving New York City and who could in some cases be spreading

United States New York Donald Trump New York New Jersey Connecticut Norfolk Virginia Brian Man President Trump New York City Michelle Andrew Cuomo Albany Acting Chief Mark Meadows White House
Sacklers withdrew over $12 billion in a decade from Purdue Pharma

Morning Edition

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Sacklers withdrew over $12 billion in a decade from Purdue Pharma

"An audit of Purdue pharma shows more than twelve billion dollars were pulled from the drug company before the owners members of the Sackler family filed for bankruptcy earlier this year Brian man with north country public radio says thousands of lawsuits link the oxycontin maker to the nation's opioid epidemic two big questions in the produce form a bankruptcy our how much did the sectors profit personally from the sale of oxycontin and how much of that money can or should be forfeited as part of

Purdue Sackler Brian Twelve Billion Dollars
"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reimagining banking offering savings and checking accounts that can be opened from anywhere Capital One what's in your wallet Capital One NA and the listeners of KQED cloudy skies today temperatures mid sixties to mid seventies this is weekend edition from NPR news I'm Scott Simon even those have spent their careers in law enforcement fighting drug crimes order me in from the opioid epidemic while Julie Garcia a former prosecutor in upstate New York which hand they drug cases her own family was being ravaged by addiction to prescription pain killers north country public radio's Brian man has this profile Julie Christie is spent much of her career as a prosecutor working in three county district attorney offices across New York state serving as head the a for a time here in Essex County she says her attitude toward drugs was pretty typical tough on crime until opioids hit her own home town in the early two thousands she got a call one day from her mom and her sister who admitted that they were using opiates getting high together they told me they were scared that was one of the worst moments of my entire life I was just a new prosecutor working out the Suffolk County DA's office and I remember being outside talking to my mom and my sister and like what we do your sister is living what she describes as a double life working days as a prosecutor then driving home to port Henry New York to small mining town where she grew up she found her mom sue and her sister Lani were buying oxycontin and other prescription pain killers from neighbors which was the most disturbing part for me was people getting other people addicted to intentionally and then the raising the price of the pills in people I know and I knew some of the people that were selling to my mom into my sister Garcia says her view of drug crime began to evolve as her mom and sister struggled through relapse after relapse they didn't look to her like criminals neither did the drug dealers import Henry who seems just as desperate and addictive when I was the DA you would always try to figure out a way to stop those people but then again there's another layer to that like why are they doing that what's their backstory Garcia drives me through her old neighborhood in the rocky hills above port Henry she now believes the opioid epidemic has as much to do with economics and poverty as crime the stores are closed here many of the houses boarded up the local iron mine shut down for good in the nineteen seventies this was such a different place when I was growing up here and there were kids everywhere yes yes as a prosecutor she got pushed back when she first started linking addiction to things.

Suffolk County DA port Henry New York NPR KQED port Henry Henry Lani Scott Simon Essex County Julie Christie Brian man New York prosecutor Julie Garcia one day
Drug companies reach settlement, averting first federal opioid trial

Morning Edition

04:03 min | 1 year ago

Drug companies reach settlement, averting first federal opioid trial

"The morning there's been a major development in a case to determine who bears the responsibility for America's opioid crisis this morning for drug companies reached a tentative deal in a landmark case in Ohio where the crisis is clean thousands of lives the development came less than two hours before the trial was set to begin here the latest is north country public radio's Brian man he covers opioid litigation for NPR and he joins us on Skype from Cleveland so Brian it was just a couple hours ago you and I were talking about this case and the suit was moving forward there's gonna be trial was gonna start today now there's a tentative deal working his house yeah well first of all they were very sneaky and they did these talks through the weekend and through this morning behind closed doors so this was a surprise to everybody but yes there is a tentative deal now and it's with four companies involved three of the major drug distributors in the country including the cats and then cardinal health also the drug maker tavern and what they've agreed to do is pay out about three hundred million dollars in total that's cash but also some medical supplies that they're going to donate what's interesting here is that this only involves two Ohio counties right this is not a global national deal this is only for summit in Cuyahoga county counties and so this leaves some big questions about what this will mean for the rest of the country right so I'll ask about that minute but first if if for companies are part of the cell the settlement does that mean the remaining two are still going to trial what's gonna happen now the Walgreens and one other firm essentially Savile or severed from this deal and also suffered from this trial so this trial is not now going to go forward what will happen is that they will be bundled together with all of the thousands of other lawsuits that are still unresolved that will go forward and essentially there will still need to be some future test case to determine their liability and also with the larger liability for the entire pharmaceutical industry I mean all it's my understanding all of the companies have been pushing for some kind of settlement because presumably going to trial just makes them look worse in some way yes it is it's terrible P. R. what's come out through this litigation over the last year has been devastating for the pharmaceutical industry internal documents emails that have shown a lot of alleged wrongdoing as though that's bad the other thing that's happening here Rachel is that these companies are scrambling to find a global solution right we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars here for just two relatively small Ohio counties you multiply that by all the counties in the country it by this opioid epidemic and it's sort of death by a thousand cuts so by settling this now what these companies do is by themselves some time to go back to the bargaining table with state attorneys general and others and try to hash out something on the scale of the tobacco deal of the nineteen nineties that really puts this all behind the industry they didn't get that done here it's still just a local deal but it does by the more time to go back to the bargaining table while I'm at at this point range of any sense of where all of that money that is that's been agreed to and in the settlements where it's gonna go I mean you mentioned just these two counties yeah so someone kind of hokey counties have begun talking about how they're going to spend this money and and you know we have clinics and law enforcement in foster care programs all the different social service programs that have been hit hard by the opioid epidemic and and what's also gonna be happening now is thousands of other communities around the US are going to be sort of reading the tea leaves if these two counties were able to get this much relief by suing should we sued to should be signed on to these big consolidated federal cases that are moving forward so really in terms of the policy making how you operate at them because going to be treated this is just another sort of data point everybody now is going to be kind of

America Three Hundred Million Dollars Two Hours
Reckoning with U.S. opioid crisis as $8 billion Ohio trial kicks off

Morning Edition

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Reckoning with U.S. opioid crisis as $8 billion Ohio trial kicks off

"Who bears the responsibility for the opioid crisis in this country two decades and more than two hundred thousand overdose deaths later today is the first in the opioid epidemic that aims to answer that crucial question the first landmark federal opioid trial begins this morning in Cleveland six companies that earn billions of dollars making distributing and selling opioids are being sued by two counties in Ohio the trial is seen as a bellwether test the jury's decision will establish liability for the entire drug industry for the role that it played fueling the epidemic north country public radio's Brian man covers opioid litigation for NPR he joins us from Cleveland Brian thanks for being here hi Rachel these companies being sued include some big names Walgreens McKesson cardinal health they were all hoping to avoid a trial right to try to negotiate a cell as a settlement even up to the last minute what happened why couldn't they get that done yeah I was pretty intense in the last days top executives flew her to Cleveland to meet with the judge overseeing this case and a source involved with the talks told NPR companies were offering a billion dollars a year over the next eighteen years and also offering to donate billions of dollars worth of prescription drugs to be used to help people suffering from addiction that sounds like a lot but given the scope of this epidemic you know hundreds of thousands of Americans dead many more suffering now from addiction communities and some state attorneys general they just wanted companies to pay more so now the trial's going forward thousands of communities obviously are going to be watching this just describe what's on the line for them yeah I've been speaking over the last year to a lot of local officials and first responders medical professionals and they just said they need money to fight this epidemic to pay for things like law enforcement in hospitals and foster care programs a lot of people are still dying in this epidemic so if there is a big payout that money could say lot save lives critics of the drug into he said there's something else at stake here too Rachel a sense of accountability and justice Kathryn Clark is a congresswoman I spoke with in Massachusetts we have to make an example of this corporate greed that delivered such devastation to communities throughout this country so you know there's a lot of anger out there this trial's going to test whether that anger really translates into arguments that hold up in court I should add the Johnson and Johnson lost a civil trial this summer in a state court in Oklahoma so you know if the industry loses again here in this federal court it will start to look like a trans so how do they avoid that what arguments of the companies making what the big argument is that they're selling a highly regulated product that you can't buy without a prescription the federal government did know all along how many pills they were selling so you know the companies are going to make the case to this jury that it was a regulatory failure a government tell your and and not a corporate failure I understand there's a new argument being made here by the communities who are are doing the suing in in this case it's it's around a public nuisance claim can you explain this yeah this is actually fascinating rates on it could have big ramifications he's opioid lawsuits claim the drug companies created a public nuisance selling these medications so aggressively public nuisance laws never been used in exactly this way before so this parts experimental and some conservative legal thinkers especially those working for the drug industry hope the jury won't go for it they say the job of solving big public problems like the opioid epidemic should belong to state legislatures and Congress not the courts here's Luther strange is a former Republican senator from Alabama now a private attorney working for members of the Sackler family who own Purdue pharma he spoke about these public nuisance lawsuits to a gathering of the federalist society I've read actually written on this recently it's because it is a blooming problem it comes up the system it prevents the ease of settlement of large cases now and just in the opioid world you have two thousand towns and cities and municipalities now she's a pretty form is not on trial in this case they filed for bankruptcy last month so their liabilities being hashed out in a different court but this federal trials can impact the rest of the industry testing whether thousands of these public nuisance lawsuits will hold up if they do hold up in this court the payouts could be on the scale of the tobacco settlements of the

Billion Dollars Eighteen Years Two Decades
"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Private fortune they build selling oxycontin Brian man NPR news this is NPR and this is W. NYC in New York on Julianne wealthy democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren has released a proposal to stop government corruption the Massachusetts senator is announcing the planned this evening at a rally in Washington Square park in Greenwich Village worn wants to ban lobbyists from serving as political campaign fundraising bottlers she also wants to tighten limits on politicians accepting gifts for government action and bar members of Congress from nonprofit boards tonight's rally is at seven o'clock Staten Island congressman Max roses the settlement reached with Purdue pharma which you've been hearing about and W. NYC does not go far enough hundreds of state and local governments sued the company for its role in the opioid crisis at a news conference today rose said federal prosecutors should get involved I walked the Sackler family charged as criminal drug dealers their homes confiscated their cars confiscated their wealth confiscated both **** and abroad I spoke. X. men for the Southern District declined comment yesterday produ pharma filed for bankruptcy the first step in the complex settlement agreement the company doesn't have to admit wrongdoing but it'll pay more than ten billion dollars of a federal judge approves of the deal the Sackler family says it hopes people critical of the settlement will change their minds police in New York City say there are no signs of foul play in the death of the car's front man Ricco Catholic he was found by officers yesterday afternoon in his Manhattan apartment the car's help define the new wave era with chart topping songs like just what I needed they were inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame last year after being nominated twice before cassock was seventy five years old. it's seventy five degrees right now one.

New York City NPR Purdue pharma produ pharma Elizabeth Warren Ricco Catholic Washington Square park Congress Staten Island Massachusetts Greenwich Village congressman senator Brian New York rose Manhattan
"brian man" Discussed on Cheap Heat

Cheap Heat

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"brian man" Discussed on Cheap Heat

"And we see whether or not there are changes to these shows, and you would think the first order of business might be to really start a stab wishing what shows look like and sticking with them and not changing things day of which has been something that has plagued, WWE, creative forever. But particularly over the last couple of years where you hear constantly about shows changing judge. Just before. They go on the air, and that is something that definitely happens. So the question is, when you now have guys directing the show's really who are, you know, able to be the hands on guys for each show will that start to change. Because here's the amazing thing was having again, this conversation with my buddy. Brian man, the other day will watch stop and grounds. Vince McMahon is handling so much right now. And always the idea that he could fully handle creative for Ron smackdown every week. In addition to. Running the business side of WWE, at least for the most part. I mean, certainly Michelle Wilson's really important and there several other people who are. You know, high importance when it comes to business issues, but still it the buck stops with him. He starting the XFL. There is so much to do. There's a new company launching to compete with them on television. Numbers are down. If, if you're simply Vince McMahon in dealing with the fact and smackdown was up from last week, and it was number one eighteen to forty nine and it was up a few hundred thousand viewers from last week, though still down from last year. If he was just dealing with the fact that there's a viewership crisis. That's a lot to handle. If he was just trying to launch the XFL that's a lot to handle. If you're just dealing with creative. That's lot dealing with all of them is a borderline impossible task, and maybe not borderland just impossible. And the result is what we're getting no. That again that all would have been borderline impossible, what he was fifty fifty five sixty. You know, you're not talking about a guy into a seventies and one of the things that I think is really problematic for Vince McMahon as he gets older. And I'm sure he would not agree with this, or wanna hear it at all is the man works like a maniac, and frankly, sleep and rest are so important for one using their brain in any sort of. A proper complete capacity. And I say that as someone who you know, probably works too much. And I know what I'm like on the air trying to get my thoughts together when I'm not getting sleep, and frankly, it's just not good. You're just not able to be that good at thinking when you're not resting. I know the sound so basic and infantile but I think it's something we don't talk about enough because we all know that Vincent man's machine. He doesn't sleep. He sleeps few hours a night he's worth. He's in the gym. He's working constantly. He's on the road. Constant not to mention think about how tired, you are after like one business trip. One annoying day of travel. Think about how tired, you are then think about doing that multiple times a week every week, always, and then when you're quote unquote, back home. You're still your office 'til all hours of the night..

Vince McMahon WWE Brian man Michelle Wilson Ron Vincent
"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

"This is crazy. A little high wire act feel. This far north the Hudson is a muscular mountain stream half covered in ice on the other side. We snowshoe across a frozen lake. The the mountains around us, but it's the so still and quiet and we're so deep into the wilderness. It's so cold out. You can hear the trees crack. We hikone. And here's where the day gets tricky were climbing a summit called mount Adams and miliion I reach a point where no one's broken trail for us. So we trade off going first plowing step by step through deep. Crusty snow. It's like climbing stairs made of sand up a one hundred fifty story building. It's as mentally tough. As it is physically tough to take a step and slide back down. It's not graceful at one point I tumble into a mountain stream hidden under the snow on one of the steep sections. Emily loses her balance, I fell completely on my back. You just there was like a turtle. Yeah. Slowly topples. We keep going and it's worth it her the tree line. Now. Everything is just. Covered in white really snowy cold the sun sweeps across icy peaks all around us. The view is mythical. It's like we've left New York state and stumbled into a version of winter street out of narnia, Brian man, NPR news in New York's Adirondack mountains..

New York mount Adams Hudson Brian man NPR Emily
"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"brian man" Discussed on KCRW

"This is crazy. A little high wire act. This far north the Hudson is a muscular mountain stream half covered in ice on the other side. We snowshoeing across a frozen lake. The the mountains around us, but it's just so still and quiet and we're so deep into the wilderness. It's so cold out. You can hear the trees crack. We hikone. And here's where the day gets tricky were climbing a summit called mount Adams, and Emily, and I reach a point where no one's broken trail for us. So we trade off going first plowing step by step through deep. Crusty snow. It's like climbing stairs made of sand up a one hundred fifty story building. It's as mentally tough. As it is physically tough to take a step and slide back down. It's not graceful at one point I tumble into a mountain stream hidden under the snow on one of the steep sections. Emily loses her balance, I fell completely on my back. You just it was like a turtle. Yeah. Slowly topples. We keep going, and it's worth it or above the treeline. Now, everything is just. Covered in white really snowy cold the sun sweeps across icy peaks all around us. The view is mythical. It's like we've left New York state and stumbled into a version of winter street out of narnia, Brian man, NPR news in New York's Adirondack mountains..

Emily New York mount Adams Hudson Brian man NPR
"brian man" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

"Second what do we get with paul george what do we get if we ride this thing out what do we get if we don't do it where we if we do it's brian man it's it's not it's not it's the best player ever arguably right if he's not that he's certainly the best player right now zac never gets hurt boys gives you an incredible performance and he's at the peak of his game and he's he's willing to say yes and this goes back to our conversation with quite leonard okay the whole idea of well you know what if coups turns in quite leonard is that cornered is a first team all lebron is lebron so whatever this might become an okay great but lebron is lebron and they're still a lot of trade on that tire you have to you have to do it for a couple of reasons like in the business world they always talk about the double bottom line and that's let's make some money do good for someone you know the double bottom line philanthropy comes to mind in that respect you can still make money having a foundation and pay some people's employees etc but also you doing good to other people and doing well for them here's a double bottom line when it comes to nba franchise time the dodgers wanted championship nineteen eightyeight don't remind me yeah last year right the last time chargers wanna champs you oh never i'll wait okay the last time the rams wanna championship well that oh ninety nine zero one so yes i'm like la teams.

paul george leonard lebron dodgers rams zac nba
"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Role at a challenging time a high school shooting in parkland florida touched off nationwide protests and even states with republican governors like florida and vermont that have had wide open gun laws have passed new gun restrictions brian man npr news this is npr news from washington russia says one of its military helicopters has crashed in syria killing both pilots officials with the defense ministry in moscow say it was an attack helicopter that went down in the east of the country hostile fire is not suspected officials say it appears to have been a technical problem last week a russian fighter jet crashed in the mediterranean while taking off from an airbase in syria preliminary election results in lebanon suggest large gains for hezbollah considered a terrorist group by the us npr's lima l orion reports lebanon's interior minister announced the preliminary results for the country's first parliamentary elections since two thousand nine hezbollah and iranianbacked group and its allies including the largest christian party won over half the seats it's a political and moral victory says hezbollah's leader sidehustle nasrallah meanwhile the party belonging to prime minister saddle hetty suffered big losses but because of the the powersharing deal the country's religious factions agreed to at the end of the civil war in the ninety s had really will be asked to form a government and can likely keep his post lemon npr news beirut as bella has been supporting syrian president bush or al also in syria civil war since two thousand twelve stocks in asia ended the day higher after china reported a rebound in exports last month they rose almost twenty two percent from the same month a year ago wall street is coming off a day of gains as the cost of crude oil closed above seventy dollars a barrel for the first time in three and a half years i'm dave mattingly npr news in washington support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include the estate of joan b kroc who's bequest serves as an enduring investment in the future of public radio and seeks to help npr produce programming that meets the highest standards of public.

asia dave mattingly president sidehustle nasrallah moscow washington npr vermont kroc china florida bush bella hetty prime minister hezbollah
"brian man" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KOMO

"The explosion officials had increased a cash rewarded the package bombing case that has is rocked the texas capitol the austin police department hasn't said if it believes last night's explosion is related to the other three that date back to march second but continue to ask citizens to be on high alert austin police chief brian man would want to put out the message that we've been putting out and that is not any packages for anything that looks like a package do not even go near it at this time the specifics of last night's explosion haven't been released police say two men were hurt and taken to the hospital neighbors in the area were asked to stay inside their homes police say they'll know more as the morning moves along chief manley says it's clear the package bombs were meant to send a message the person or persons understands what that message is responsible for constructing deliberating these devices and we hope this person or persons is watching and we'll reach out to us before anyone else is injured or anyone else is killed police won't speculate as to what that message may be but people in and around austin have brought up the possibility it could be race related because the neighborhood where they occurred is populated heavily by minorities last night's explosion though on the complete opposite side of the city with a different demographic tensions are rising as weeks have gone by since the first bomb and no suspects cheap man only says department has received hundreds of tips but none have panned out so please keep the calls coming we don't want the tips to slow down we need that and you may have the one piece of information that lets us put this all together the atf and fbi are working closely with austin police as days continue to pass without answers the department is now offering a one hundred thousand dollar reward for information leading to an arrest in the case that in addition to fifteen thousand dollars offered by the governor's office while police work to determine a motive and any connection to the package bombings in the most recent blast a city remains vigilant and on alert i'm clayton neville it's twelve past the hour when america in the morning returns the.

austin police department manley austin atf america texas brian man fbi one hundred thousand dollar fifteen thousand dollars
"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Violent tendencies and my colleague brian man talked with eighteen year old chad williams at a vigil this afternoon a williams says he's down the alleged shooter since middle school and he and williams says he was often in trouble her hiding in he got expelled from school at we know that the alleged leader had an air fifteen rifle in williams has he was really interested in guns in silvio is gone books he had like a gun was like assault rifles and i knew he was crazy right i didn't think he would do something like this we also talked with a man from mississippi who says last year there was a comment on his youtube page from someone named nicholas crews saying quote i'm going to be a professional school shooter the fbi says youtube deleted that comment the agency looked into the port but can't make any connection to the accused in this case and authorities say they are continuing to talk with people who know the accused and look into social media activity that one other possible disturbing development that we're hearing about is that he may have had connections to a white nationalist militia group have you been able to now down confirmation on that it's a tallahassee based group called republica florida and the leader of that group jordan chair of says crews participated in paramilitary grills but investigators say they haven't confirmed that yet and you noticed that overall picture of this young man at the centre all this is still confusing we know that he had a rough life both of his parents are dead his father died when he was young in his mother just about four months ago we talked with attorney jim lewis who representing a family crews with staying with for the past three months and he gives a different image of the accused he was very respectful in terms of the family follow the rules of the household and was very appreciative of uh you know 'cause the home that this family gave him because he didn't have one lewis says the nineteen year old was depressed stillgrieving the loss of his mother but the family didn't see an indication that he was violent and peers jeff brady reporting from outside the broward county courthouse in fort lauderdale jess thanks so much thank you the weapon used in yesterday's shooting was an ar fifteen rifle and if that sounds familiar that's because it's the same type of.

brian man chad williams silvio mississippi nicholas crews fbi youtube tallahassee jim lewis broward county courthouse republica florida attorney jeff brady fort lauderdale eighteen year nineteen year three months four months
"brian man" Discussed on Only A Game

Only A Game

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on Only A Game

"We kept doing it and we we got the hit lined up and everything but i wasn't very valuables quarterback with a broken hand so kind of an unceremonious end to my stunts career brian was out of stunt work and he knew where things were headed with the avengers for fun i formally submitted my retirement paperwork so that i could see my name on the espn arena football league ticker line is having retired at the age of twenty six years did you know at that moment that your biggest past was still ahead of you not by it'd be idea for the next few years brian worked for a healthcare consulting company he tried to stay away from football there are some people that asked me if it was like a death was at that big of a deal and i actually like in it more to a divorce because when there's a death that's finite it's over but football didn't want me anymore they wanted somebody younger and sexier and i could go see football anytime i wanted football just didn't want to see me anymore but then on january 31st 2017 brian learned that football wanted to take him back for one more night it had been more than a decade since he'd retired from the afl he'd been working desk jobs in the rice athletic departments it's two thousand fourteen but who else in the houston area had more experience and both showbiz and as a quarterback brian man was the perfect guy for the job it on the night of january 31st he reported to lady gaga.

football afl brian man espn arena houston twenty six years
"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The loss of salt deductions would hit every man woman and child right in the tax return but only about a third of filers claimed salt deductions their largely higher income households and new tax law benefits them in other ways francs similar tino of the nonpartisan tax policy center says most those people will still pay less overall next year the growth of two for one low low tech fate their tax cut might be smaller and that's the real fear for leaders of high cost states with loss of the solve deduction a state like california is now even more costly for higher income tax payers in comparison to a bordering state like nevada which has no income tax some california republicans are weighing whether they would support democratic proposals to avoid the hit state senator john morlock doesn't ruled out so we're going to benefit those that we really need to keep here because if we lose any of our top 1 percent we lose a portion of about fifty percent of our personal income taxes more locks a former accountant and his main concern is that the california bill is to cute that's wonder if it's really something that should be pursued because it'll be squashed states are considering one other tactic the fight the loss of the salt deduction one the brought new york governor cuomo a long ovation in his state of the state speech suet as doubletaxation we believe it is illegal and we will challenge it in court as unconstitutional new jersey has also threatened a lawsuit while california's attorney general says he's reviewing legal options frankly our news and then bradford in sacramento the winter storm gripping the eastern united states his forced millions of people to scramble for heat and shelter but people who work outside for a living often have no choice but to just endure north country public radio's brian man reports had been to the arctic before and it feels a lot like this howling wind snow scouring your faith and temperature tho cold your hands start to freeze up immediately but the thing is i not in the arctic i'm in upstate new york in a parking lot outside a dunkin' donuts a plow pushes drifts snow the guy behind the wheel zach nathan is bundled up like the.

tax law california nevada income tax senator john morlock accountant governor cuomo new york zach nathan tax policy attorney sacramento brian man arctic dunkin fifty percent 1 percent
"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The nonpartisan tax policy center says most those people will still pay less overall next year the relative to for one low tech state they're part cut might be smaller and that's the real fear for leaders of high cost states with loss of the solve deduction a state like california is now even more costly for higher income tax payers in comparison to a bordering state like nevada which has no income tax some california republicans are weighing whether they would support democratic proposals to avoid the hit state senator john morlock doesn't ruled out so we're going to benefit those that we really the cheap here because if we lose any of our top 1 percent we lose a portion of about fifty percent of our personal income taxes more locks of former accountants and his main concerns that the california bill is to cute catch wonder if it's really something that should be pursued because it'll be squashed states are considering one other tactic to fight the loss of the solve deduction one the brought new york governor cuomo a long ovation in his state of the state speech suet as doubletaxation we believe it is illegal and we will challenge it in court as unconstitutional new jersey has also threatened a lawsuit while california's attorney general says he's reviewing legal options french our news i'm ben bradford in sacramento the winter storm gripping the eastern united states his forced millions of people to scramble for heat and shelter but people who work outside for a living often have no choice but to just endure north country public radio's brian man reports had been to the arctic before and it feels a lot like this howling wind snow scouring your faith and temperatures so called the your hands start the freeze up immediately but the thing is i am not in the arctic i'm in upstate new york in a parking lot outside a dunkin' donuts a plow pushes drifts snow the guy behind the wheel zach nathan is bundled up like the michelin man when it's colder and when it's windier that's whereas the worst you have to dress up even exserb bundled now it's a hassle were for guys like zach the colder it gets the.

california nevada income tax senator john morlock governor cuomo ben bradford new york zach nathan tax policy attorney sacramento brian man arctic dunkin michelin fifty percent 1 percent
"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Minutes to enjoy this season and to listen to what's happening now in new york's adirondack mountains north country public radio's brian man has been climbing there i'm heading for new mark mount cragg of rock the trail takes me past the son swept alpine league framed by hide loves i keep hearing a south like some would smashing dinner plates it's been so cold here they're already big sheets of ice on the cliffs but now in this day the sun is just so king it and it's lit up and daggers of eyes are just calving off making this amazing sounds kind of echoing through the valley it's icy enough that i straps spikes to my boots to give me traction because they work my way up the rocks is his silent i can here just little tiny traces of water moving under the snow soft wind will move the trees just little and the ticket easier moving higher love me the day is a chemistry of sun and ice it so warm that i stripped my tshirt but then i find gardens of little ic sculptures it's called 'needle ice caused by water squeezed up out of the frozen ground when you touch the listen to this i hike on scrambling over icy ledges the trail suddenly opens the sky and sun and a horizon of snowy peaks of climbed up to this big stage of rock the top noon mark almost the flag water like wave of mountains that stretch out the wind comes up bitter cold and i pull on my coat the sun is already dropping below the ridge is they start for home brian man npr news in new york's adirondack mountains.

new york brian man
"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The shooter in las vegas massacre had several in his possession when he opened fire last weekend killing fifty eight people and wounding almost five hundred others for turning the gun on himself the group is asking the bureau of alcohol tobacco firearms and explosives to review it to determine whether it complies with federal law and gun dealers and retailers in bet checking away from the bump stock devices north country public radio's brian man reports the devices are vanishing from catalogues and store shelves walmart cabela's in many of the big online gun dealer suspended sales of bump stocks this week their websites give error messages received those products are permanently out of stock so manufacturers of temporarily suspended sales in some gun viewers who say the normally back broad gun rights seemed unwilling to defend the devices or another term runs a gun shop here in las vegas gift to get the wiggs in the dims a win barely bumps thought deaths farc is not the important some news organizations reported a surge in sales of bump stocks after democat craddock senator dianne feinstein introduce legislation that would ban the devices and pr has found no evidence that gunowners are racing to buy the kits brian man npr news las vegas meanwhile clark county fire chief greg castle is praising his team for their performance at the music event that night in las vegas he says there was a standby crew around sixteen ems paramedic personnel and that they performed wonderfully or training paid off or training paid off new what to do it was much grander than we ever envisioned however we were able to handle it and he says they were prepared because las vegas as an international tourist destination and he says it has many soft targets tropicalstorm nate is expected to intensify to a hurricane and hit the northern gulf coast this weekend and here's wale it reports preparations are underway from south louisiana to though florida panhandle new orleans is staging boats in high water vehicles than handing out sandbags to residents in advance of nate which is expected to strike as a hurricane on sunday mayor mich landrieu has declared an emergency law to the citizens of new all as there is no reason to panic with there is reason to prepare we just need to be ready of a heavy wind and heavy rain who louisiana national guard will be in new orleans to.

mich landrieu louisiana florida greg castle fire chief clark county senator democat craddock walmart federal law new orleans south louisiana nate las vegas dianne feinstein cabela brian man sixteen ems
"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Energy when you fired the first bullet and keeps using that energy to sort of shove your finger against the trigger for are you and so you had a steady stream although we're also learning in recent days and gun owners will know this it's not manufactured the gut his not manufactured or fire so many books so quickly overheat snow and in fact it jumps around a lot to when you fire it this way so you lose accuracy and the overheating of this gun firing at that rate means it'll jammed up fast which probably accounts uae had twelve of these so we could swap guns as the heated up is there any more insight into why the gunman acted this way uh not really yet on why he was thinking what he was thinking we don't know that but there is love interest right now on the person who's being as his girlfriend mary lou dan league police say he's she's been out of the country says before the attack last night she came back she flew to los angeles she was met there by law enforcement scholes and she is expected to be questioned they've been calling a person of interest that means she's not necessarily a suspect here but i think they hope that she can shed some light on what led up to this especially because there had been some reports now that the shooter sent money overseas to the philippines where she was so martin's sending money to the philippines he stockpiling weapons he modifying weapons he's bringing in cameras is this level of preparation normal for people committing these kinds of mass killings normal well it is not unprecedented in mass shooter situations there is often it of pattern here of preparation of setting yourself up of thinking through what you're gonna do amassing an arsenal so i'm afraid of this doesn't look that strange martin thanks very much a com that's npr law enforcement correspondent martin cost to the morning we are also keeping our focus on some of the at least fifty eight victims that's the number that's being used now two of those victims came from anchorage alaska north country public radio's brian man grew up in alaska and brian who were your fellow will esperance i'll save one was dorian anderson as she come south las vegas with.

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"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The major economies but the idea is not to be necessarily realistic but to send a portentous message not just to north korea but to china as well at least let me just ask you a run mentioned president trump bump sort of putting pressure on south korea saying that they shouldn't trying to appease the north what what what is that will head to south korea reactor that come from united states the presidential office here says that it has actually gotten assurances from the us national security council in a letter saying that the alliance remains as strong as ever said this is more daylight between the president himself and what he's tweeting and what the administration a thing to south korea which is something that we have seen in some foreign affairs under the trump administration of four all right and run out being an npr's elite few talking about these latest developments in north korea thank you both very much thank yet meles it is hard to even described this effort this massive effort is under way right now to clean up all of those areas a hit along the gulf coast by hurricane harvey night israeli that's because harvey left behind a massive mess including wrecked houses here's how houston mayor so esther turner put it on nbc's meet the press yesterday every community every every part of this city was catch by this storm and so people now already putting that debris out and we what i said to the president we need to get that re debris remove like yesterday otherwise what have a public safety hazard like yesterday david and there's also concern odd near south texas is chemical plants and superfund sites reporter brian man has been looking into that he's on the line from beaumont texas hit o'brien good morning david so it's the risk here i mean they're they're there have been a a growing chorus of people saying that these there could be chemicals that we just don't even realize our emmys flood waters there have been talking to the coast guard the.

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"brian man" Discussed on The Modern West

The Modern West

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"brian man" Discussed on The Modern West

"In the heart of the town of fort wash aqui on the wind river reservation workers are putting the finishing touches on the tychy village a low income tribal housing development brian man is the deputy director of the eastern schone tribal housing authority and he's showing me around do you mind if we walk over and kind of take a closer look at this community center i don't know if we'll be needing hardhats here but okay man says it's taken years to get the money to demolish the old housing development that was full of specis and lead paint and build this new one twenty stylish single family homes are arranged in a modern neighborhood eight families have already moved in we tip toe through the construction zone to the community center in the middle of the coldest sack building around front with the merely florida's ceiling windows native culture the circle represents many things in the circle of life and we try to implement that here the plan is to host events in classes here for the whole tribe but renting a house at taiji village won't be easy they're over sixty families on the waiting list right now the waiting list can take years and we look at the list of people have submitted applications in early two thousand two thousand the list got even longer as the process of funding the new development went on year after year and the main challenge was finding the dollars to make the tikey project happen that literally took two years of financial review nance has applications for housing projects like this one are often highly competitive pitting tribal housing projects against state once and the federal scoring process is often biased against rural housing projects you have to have a project that was within so many miles of conveniences including stores schools access to healthcare community facilities the closest cities to the reservation are riverton in lander both small under ten thousand people man says after two attempts eastern shoshoni finally succeeded at getting a two point seven million dollar low income tax credit project which gives investors ten years of tax credits in exchange for money for low income housing projects and they've used successes like that one to leverage more capital in two thousand fourteen they received a total of six point four million.

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