7 Burst results for "Brian Lowery"

"brian lowery" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"brian lowery" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"And a desire to jealously guard that self now that basic existential need is driving many of our behaviors. That's kind of now. I. I have a number of students who continue to work a white privilege in particular but honestly my my interest are. Now moving more towards the how? Deep. Existential needs are driving. <hes> are integrated behavior. How does this topic go over with students? Do you find a lot of resistance when you talk about it in the classroom? I. I don't talk about this often in the classroom. Honestly so what I asked in motion when I'm in the classroom, do is work on leadership. And now as a senior associate dean. Spend even less time in the classroom, so I do often stand in front of students in talk about the responsibilities so working at Stanford students are both in incredibly talented in also incredibly privileged as I and everyone else associated with The this Stanford has negative, institution and many other <hes> really. Elite and. High Status Academic institutions and in front of those groups say is. When we behave the decisions, we make affect many other people, and it's very easy to focus on. Our decisions affect our outcomes what it means about our career what it means about our family. And lose sight of the fact that from our perch, those decisions actually affect many people's lives. In so I don't I don't talk in particular about race, but what I try to impress upon. People, in positions of power is that if we lose sight of? The consequences by behavioral and other people. We will likely end up. Supporting existing inequities right exacerbating existing inequities, and it doesn't. It doesn't require us to be bad people or racist just requires us to continue to go along with the system as it is the continued try to maximize on outcomes and that I think it's incumbent us to do more than that. So that's when I talk with students at best the message, I give them I. Don't find a lot of resistance of ad because again, people want to see themselves as good moral people so I think it's important to convey to them what that actually requires them and I think often. We don't do that. <hes> we focus so much on the individual individual racism or individual advancement, or whatever that we lose sight of the collective and our our our collective responsibility. And the system. And and also this is what in the going back to the Washington Post piece there, if you if you part of a corrupt system. You yourself are going to be corrupted right so if you want to maintain or elevate yourself thin, it's incumbent upon you to push against. The question of the system you you live in. I think you've given us a lot to think about Dr Lowry. Thank you for joining us today. Thank you for having me I appreciate

Dr Lowry senior associate dean Stanford Washington Post
"brian lowery" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"brian lowery" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"The no decades after the civil war as a way of reasserting y superiority, pulling down is symbolic important, but that's not going to create racial equity. The American. Psychological Association just released poll that found a large majority of Americans. Seventy two percent believe our country is at the lowest point they have ever observed and also found that seventy one percent said police violence toward minorities is a significant source of stress that they're feeling. At the same time just over two thirds, said the current movement against systemic racism and police brutality is going to lead to meaningful change in America. Given the work that you've done looking at white privilege and racism. How much credence do you give to those numbers? In the meaning, do take seriously. The people are concerned about the state of the country right now and that they really feel that this is going to lead to meaningful change I think the people are concerned right now. I think when you see the disruption in systems that causes legitimate concern. I think that people are I think the people really do believe things are going to change I think that there's likely to be at some point. The declaration of Victory How seriously do. That victory will be real That's hard to say I'm less optimistic about that, so I believe the numbers in terms of people reporting. Honestly, they've experienced right now. I think that the. Mechanisms in this country that are designed to maintain the status quo are incredibly powerful. And I think that people can engage in behaviors that maintain the status quo. And actually feel more a while doing it right. I think who doesn't WanNa take care of their child. Who Doesn't when their child all the advantages they can, and if we do that will maintain the status quo. so I think that the amount of work it will take to. Radically shift. The racial hierarchy in this country is vast in. I am while I I am hardened by the demonstrations and protests..

America Psychological Association
"brian lowery" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"brian lowery" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"The disadvantages that some groups face like the disadvantages. The bike like people endure, and the advantages enjoyed by white separately bills, things and they say like. Let's just eliminate those disadvantages, but when they start to experience a cost themselves, they find that unfair unjust. They don't understand why they should have to pay a price for someone else's for the elimination. Someone else's disadvantages so in concrete terms. What is it that white people need to do to fully dismantle white privilege? That's a really question. Some of it is supporting policies that actually redistribute sources that that will be a big one. would be accepting in. Accepting that the system will say education in this country is fundamentally as at personably fundamentally unjust in working on policies that push back against things like -Unding school through property taxes, which would have an effect on people's property values, perhaps short term. I think those just those two things alone I would say like less less start. They see how it goes I would be. Also thinking about not understanding that. diversifying organizations is not letting in unqualified applicants, but in fact on this. When you have the kind of privileges that we've had now, you're not really allowed the full pool of people to. have access to. Opportunities the people really benefiting from affirmative action on the people in the jobs right now like. Understanding that stuff Mata's a possibility I mean these are. Things that I think are going to be really tough, and and time will tell the people are gonNA. Are Willing to go there. After the energy of just the. Outrage over the deaths of. People at the ends of police passes. The US Census Bureau has projected that America's white population will drop below fifty percent in twenty, forty five, and that the nation will reach majority minority status in your view, will that have any impact on the notion of white privilege? To question well it already. Those projections already do weights there is. urged by say Jennifer Richardson. Incredible social psychologists say this shows that. When you present people with that information, whites often become. Threatened and respond and come away to try to maintain privileges they have. When that actually comes to pass I think if we have rectified the deep inequalities in the society right now. We're going to be in a really tough situation where you will have. Vast majority of the political and economic power in the hands of a minority. And it's not as if that had. That doesn't exist in other places, but I think if that is a dangerous place to be in a think, it's possible if there's nothing to suggest that simply. The shift in the demographics of the country will necessarily eliminate the privileges associated with race anything. Will I anticipate? People will try to hold onto the bandages off maybe even more tightly as they start to see them. Challenged is the tide toward pulling down confederate monuments, renaming places that were named for confederate generals. Is that helpful in the scheme of things, or is that just something that people are doing to feel good? Question I. Think about that. I think that for people of Color it's. Important. Symbolically it's important. In terms of people sense of comfort in there. They're all physical space. I think that that symbolism for White folks is also important by itself. Does it change much? I don't think so. But I. don't I don't know that I would. Label it just a feel-good of. Action I think there's. The symbolism can be important in is meaningful in thing that pulling Dow. Icons of what I would call white superiority, because a lot of those monuments will put up much active.

Census Bureau US Jennifer Richardson Mata America
"brian lowery" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"brian lowery" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"You have to be willfully ignorant not to see racial inequality in our society. So. The cloaking is a way of suggesting that what's happening is willful, but it doesn't require each individual person to participate at all times right, so that's the herd immunity. Hurt visibility part matter if enough people engage in it than it hides it allows allows active hiding from everyone, but it really is. This is what I think often hard to convey that it really is an active hiding. It's not. It's not. It's not that it can't be seen because the water we swim in, and that's sometimes how it's talked about from my perspective, it's the disparities are so great so stark and so easily. Accessible that they really has to be some process in place. To allow us to not see it that we have to engage in some psychological gymnastics as a society to deny its existence. I'm Gonna I think that's. Probably. On that probably white people it's there's discomfort when that when they're not allowed to do that and for black people and other people. Of Color it's. Can Be enraging to see people engaged this these mental gymnastics in a way that allows them to ignore. The pain of say the black community or chomp other communities of color. His the fact that so many white people are joining the protests evidence that at least some white Americans are engaged in dismantling. Even if they don't know that's what they're doing, I certainly hope so. I just say that I don't. Personally tend toward optimism. In some of that. I think is is realism I. The history of the United States is. Littered with movements that in the moment. seemed. were. Gaining traction, but there's inevitably been backlash to those movements. And at backlash tends to come when when you move beyond simple, the simply the sense of moral benefit, the people have from pointing out the pain of other people experience to the. Work of actually changing the system which comes at a personal cost, so the question will be when it comes at a personal cost. Will the energy that we see now in the streets remain. and. Those personal costs mean giving up some of the privilege right I. Mean You have to share some of the Pie? Yes, I think that. I think it may be hard for white people to fully understand. The benefits of being white and the society they can see. It's easier to see the pain. The people of Color Experience in black folks in particular right now experience. I think it's harder to internalize. The, degree of privileges at our enjoyed as a function of the system. And the question I think will be when we really moved towards trying to produce. Equity. Are People going to be willing to give up those privileges my my sense in my research. Some of my research I find that people. Can both acknowledge the existence of inequity see that particular policy reduced differences that are associated with that inequity and honestly feel as if it's unjust to support those policies. In part because people separate..

United States
"brian lowery" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"brian lowery" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"Don't personally benefit. Where denial is a way of sometimes denying the existence of privilege, meaning that nobody has white privilege. When the example I gave was really personal, but you can also see this the denial in. The way where you see some people focusing on. Very successful black people right as way of saying look, they made it. Therefore, there is racial inequality so there are other ways to get denial of privilege that it doesn't exist at all, and actually in this country and I think very recently. whites were claiming that they were. At a great, a target of discrimination as black Americans are. So there is. A lot of evidence that wipe uncomfortable with the possibility that white privilege exists at all and then further than day. Personally benefit from it. You've done research on how the way that you frame. A discussion of racial inequality and privilege affects people's reactions to them. Are there strategies to talk about racial privilege in a way that leads people to habit dismantle reaction rather than denial or distancing reaction. It's a good question. When people are willing to accept that privilege exists who is reasonably that they might actually support policies that dismantling work again instead and. It looks like when they don't when people feel. More affirmed in their self when they feel better about themselves, it's easier to acknowledge the existence of privilege. So that's what we do in a number of papers. We we show that when you affirm people sense of self when you get an opportunity to talk about what they value. What's important to them? There may have an easier time acknowledging the possibility that primitive existence that they might benefit from it. On in once, people acknowledged the existence of. You can get people to see that it exists then there's a greater likelihood of. More, I wouldn't say comfort but greater willingness to support policies that dismantle that twitch. Let's talk for a moment about the invisibility of white privilege in a recent research article you wrote that white people in the United States often don't even need to resort to the denial and distancing strategies. We've talked about because of something you call her invisibility. What does that mean? And how does hurt and visibility happen? It happens in part because the society is structured in a way to hide Privileged people benefit from so you can see this in obvious ways for example segregation. Very few white folks in America actually have black friends. In many few are. Live in circumstances where they see the disadvantages of the racial inequity in our system, so that that segregation allows for people to be remain blinds advantage because they don't see the disadvantage of the day exists lead on see the racial inequities of they blind themselves to the racial equity simply by the way. They go about their daily lives right. They don't have to make a conscious choice to to ignore it so much as it's hidden, it's hidden from them. By the way the society is set up, so that's one way to get hurt and visibility, and then each individual act that white people engage in to deny or distance actually serves. The Broadway community in that if I deny, it exists and create a narrative that it doesn't exist then that serves you even if you are actively denied it yourself. And these are some of the cloaking strategies that you described that people used to address some of the discomfort that they feel yes so again going back to the underlying psychology I think bears. When I talk about, we talked about invisibility. It's a interesting ironic way to talk about it because in reality..

United States America
"brian lowery" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"brian lowery" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"Over the past several weeks, protests against racial injustice of made headlines around the United States and the world. People of diverse backgrounds are turning out in large numbers and small towns and big cities incensed by recent high profile instances where police have killed unarmed black people. For some white Americans. This movement may be prompting them to consider some for the first time the white privilege they've benefited from all their lives. What can psychologist research tell us about how and why White Americans have long been able to ignore, and even deny the advantages they enjoy merely for being white. How to white people distance themselves from their privilege order to preserve it and do they realize it when they do so? Welcome to speak psychology, the flagship podcast of the American Psychological Association that explores the connections between psychological science and everyday lives I'm Kim. Mills our guest. Today is Dr Brian Lowry a senior associate, Dean and professor of organizational behavior at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business Dr. Larry has studied the psychology of racial privilege in the US including why White Americans are often blind to their privilege and how they react when it's brought to their attention. Recently, he published an op Ed in the Washington Post, describing his own experiences of racial discrimination and calling on White Americans to support policies that advance racial justice. Welcome to speaking of Psychology Dr Lowry. Thank him for having me in your op-ed. You discussed the racism. You've experienced including being targeted with racial slurs as a child and being unjustly stopped and searched by police as a teen. You connect those experiences with your research on racial privilege. Why did you feel it was important to write this op? Ed Now and have this conversation. That's a great question Kim. I wanted people to realize that this is just how common it is I think the recent videos in people's. Ability to see what's happening real time. Has has increased awareness, but I don't know that people will have understood in suggests until recently, just how common these kind of experiences are. And I want it to turn the focus from what's happening to black people in this country to what that means about the experience of of white people in this country..

Dr Brian Lowry Dean United States American Psychological Associa psychological science Kim Ed professor of organizational be Washington Post senior associate Stanford University Graduate School of Business Dr. Larry
"brian lowery" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"brian lowery" Discussed on 1A

"Maybe if I'd had someone like her to look up to as a young eighteen year old woman. I may have stayed in Kansas, Brian. I also wanted to ask you about Senator Pat Roberts of Kansas. He announced that he will not run for re election next year. What's our sense of how that might go? I mean secretary of state Mike Pompeo has been kind of floated some say that he has a good chance of winning. If he were to run, but he says he has no intention of running right now. What does that look like it's going to be crowded field? Obviously there has been a very public effort to recruit Pompeo. And if if he does change his mind, I would expect most Republicans to get out of the way. But if he doesn't it's going to be a very crowded field Senate present Susan Wagle who was mentioned by governor Kelley in your show. She's exploring a run the state treasures are running. I joked with congressman Ron ESTES yesterday that he was the only Republican in Kansas who didn't seem to want to run for the seat. And he assured me that well he didn't want to run he could have if he wanted to. So you should expect a very crowded Republican field. I wouldn't expect Democrats to take the race seriously unless you have someone like a Chris co Bach who is a divisive figure emerges Republican front runner. Democrats are kind of watching this race with a little bit of interest. If there is a device. Of candidate who seems to be gaining steam with the Republicans. You could see them actually make an effort to make this a competitive race. There's a it's been be an uphill battle. Because a democrat hasn't won a Senate seat in Kansas since nineteen thirty two, and we should be clear, by the way, Mike Pompeo used to be a congressman representing district in Kansas for three terms. Michael emailed, the expansion of Medicare is contentious because federal government funding of the programme phases out and the Bill for services becomes the responsibility of the state. I wonder how you see the governor's argument in Kansas as compared to some of the other arguments about why Medicaid expansion is still worth doing. So I think what the governor is is looking at is. You know, she's she's trying to make this into an economic argument. If you saw that she and that's been a the kind of consistent democratic refrain, which is this is federal money that can be coming into Kansas that we're passing up every year. And so I think it's you know, she is trying to make this as a kind of this as an argument that makes fiscal sense for the state. I think anticipating criticism like that. Liz tweeted as a lifelong Oklahoman, it's refreshing to hear how our neighbors are addressing Medicaid expansion and education hope Oklahoma can learn what bipartisan means with regards to the presidential election cycle before. I let you go. There are more than a dozen Democrats in the race. There could be two dozen by the time the show is over the big keeps getting bigger and bigger, and they're appealing to the base by pushing ideas like abolishing the electoral college, the green new deal packing. The supreme court. How does that affect democrat? Like, Laura Kelly who. Got a govern in a largely conservative state before we go. I I think that could put pressure on someone someone like lower Kelly, obviously, I think, you know, she she took a interesting stance when it came to the Lectoure college, but things like packing, the supreme court that probably would not fly very well in in Kansas where you have a lot of people who are conservative who who would get their antennas up. If you start talking seriously about that, you know, I think thinking back to what her role is in the presidential election. She someone who's being seen as a model for defeating Trumpism because she she defeated a candidate who had very close ties to Trump Trump came and campaigned for and she approached it with a very kind of moderate centrist message. So the people who are pushing the who are pushing the Democratic Party in that election. I think are looking to her as an example of how to proceed with this election, Brian Lowery, Washington. Correspondent for the Kansas City star. Brian thanks for talking to us. Thank you for having me. This conversation was produced by James Morrison and edited by Miranda full

Kansas Mike Pompeo Ron ESTES Kansas City Brian Lowery Laura Kelly Senator Pat Roberts congressman Senate supreme court governor Kelley Susan Wagle Democratic Party Trump Trump Chris co Bach James Morrison Michael Oklahoma