35 Burst results for "Brian Lehrer"

Mayor De Blasio Announces 'Hometown Heroes' Ticker Tape Parade

Brian Lehrer

00:38 sec | Last week

Mayor De Blasio Announces 'Hometown Heroes' Ticker Tape Parade

"Amanda Blasio has announced a ticker tape parade through the Canyon of Heroes for next month to honor essential workers. That announcement apparently omitted funeral workers got them as reported. Ben Jaca says many of them feel the role they play throughout the pandemic has been overlooked. It seems as though people are still really uncomfortable talking about death and talking about the really stark scary things that happened last year when it came to these refrigerator trucks. And all the bodies literally piling up all around the city. City Hall spokesperson says they always planned on including funeral workers in the July 7th

Amanda Blasio Ben Jaca City Hall
U.S. and Iran Holding Talks Via Nuclear Deal Signatories

Brian Lehrer

00:57 sec | 2 months ago

U.S. and Iran Holding Talks Via Nuclear Deal Signatories

"Countries are doing their utmost to resurrect the Iran nuclear deal in the coming months. Talks open tomorrow with two other signatories to the accord, China and Russia. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports France is calling on Iran to show a constructive stents. Following a call with his Iranian counterpart over the weekend, French Foreign Minister Jeeva Julianne said in a statement that he's asked Iran to refrain from further violations of current nuclear commitments. The U. S. Will not take part directly and discussions Tuesday. But for the first time since the Trump administration pulled out of the Iran agreement in 2018 and reimpose sanctions, Ah U S delegation will be present. The 2015 accord lifted economic sanctions on Iran in return for restrictions on its nuclear program. The talks are intended to help identify steps necessary to return to full compliance with the nuclear deal. Iran says U. S sanctions must first be removed. Eleanor

Iran Eleanor Beardsley Jeeva Julianne Trump Administration NPR Russia France China U. Eleanor
Minneapolis police chief begins testifying in Derek Chauvin trial

Brian Lehrer

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Minneapolis police chief begins testifying in Derek Chauvin trial

"Or hearing from the Minneapolis police chief who's been quoted saying he believes George Floyd's death was murder. The prosecution is focusing on police Department training that show Vin has cited in defense of his actions during Floyd's arrest last year. During which the officer kept his knee on Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes earlier, the jury heard from the emergency room doctor who pronounced Floyd dead after trying to resuscitate him. Prosecutor Gerry Blackwell as Dr Bradford Longer felt if the paramedics who reported to the scene of Floyd's arrest Indicated they suspected a drug overdose or heart attack. There was no report that, for example, the patient complained of chest pain, or was clutching his chest at any point or having any other symptoms to suggest the heart attack that information was absent. The witness testified that based on the information he had at the time he believed that Floyd most likely died from asphyxiation. The other officers charged in connection with Floyd's death are expected to stand trial this summer. The White House

Floyd George Floyd Gerry Blackwell Dr Bradford Minneapolis VIN Police Department Heart Attack White House
What the Deal to Legalize Marijuana Means for New Yorkers

Brian Lehrer

01:53 min | 3 months ago

What the Deal to Legalize Marijuana Means for New Yorkers

"Cuomo reportedly struck a deal yesterday. To begin the process of legalizing recreational cannabis for adult use. In New York state proponents contend that opening the state up to legal weed will create an industry that will generate tens of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in tax revenue for the state. Yesterday's agreement specifically addresses the punishing toll that the uneven enforcement of low level marijuana offenses in the state has had on poor black and brown communities. It includes a provision to re invest millions in tax revenue generated from cannabis sales. Into these communities, and the state plans to set aside a portion of business licenses for people of color and women. Now, these plans have generally not produced the intended equity results. In other legal weed states. So can New York do better? What are the terms of the agreement? Why now? And when will you be able to walk into a store and buy some with me now on these questions, and more is Alice and Martin, co founder of Cannabis Wire, a news organization covering the cannabis industry nationally and globally she's been described as the queen of the we'd beat. And she's monitoring the legislative proceedings in Albany. Very closely. Hi, Alison. Welcome back to W. N Y. C. Hey, Brian. Thanks for having me. I always love coming back and let's start with that basic last question first, if this does pass next week. When can people walk into a store or I guess they'll be called dispensaries and buy marijuana products illegally. Well, you know, I don't have a crystal ball like anyone else. But I would say Ballpark at least a year, maybe two years. It takes time to get the market up and running. It takes that much time. Well, rulemaking. Of course, that's that's really the sort of sausage maker after bills passed, then you know a lot of lot of heads, get into the room and figure out sort of the nitty gritty details. Will there be any

Cuomo Cannabis Wire New York W. N Y. C. Hey Alice Martin Albany Alison Brian
CDC warns movie theaters are dangerous places to be if you are not vaccinated against Coronavirus

Brian Lehrer

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

CDC warns movie theaters are dangerous places to be if you are not vaccinated against Coronavirus

"Let me start here. Movie theaters We opened in New York City over the weekend. We've we did a call in on that for people who went back to the movies in the city. This weekend. They've been open many other places for a while with capacity limits. Is there any good data on covert spread and movie theaters? You know, there's plenty of data that shows that Cove. It does spread quite effectively and closed indoor settings. And so that is still technically considered a high risk setting. And I would say I would only recommend doing something like that unless he if you were fully vaccinated, and you know that the people that you were going whether fully vaccinated that I'm gonna always there on the conservative side here. But indoor activity has always been considered based on the data, high risk

New York City
New York City high school reopening plan coming next week

All Things Considered

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

New York City high school reopening plan coming next week

"Mayor De Blasio says he is aiming for public schools to reopen fully next fall. Wi sees Jessica Gould has more the era of hybrid learning could be over soon. Speaking on the Brian Lehrer show, the mayor said he envisions welcoming back all students in person in the fall. We will be fully open in September. There would be five day a week instruction for everyone. But de Blasio says some students may prefer learning virtually and the city plans to offer an all remote option as well. More immediately, he says, next week he'll be announcing a date for high schools to reopen to in person students. Hey, schools opened in October but shut again in November when Corona virus cases started to rise sharply. Elementary schools have been open since December. Middle schools reopened last

Mayor De Blasio Jessica Gould De Blasio Brian Lehrer
Ron Johnson Makes Senate Read 600-Page COVID Relief Bill Aloud

Brian Lehrer

01:37 min | 3 months ago

Ron Johnson Makes Senate Read 600-Page COVID Relief Bill Aloud

"Got to this morning's official debate on the coronavirus relief bill in the Senate Republican Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, decided to make a show of his opposition to the bill by having the Senate clerks read out loud the entire 628 page thing. New York Times notes as a point of reference that the sixth Harry Potter book clocked in at 652 pages, and many of you know how thick that was, By the way, that was Harry Potter and the half Blood Prince. In case you were wondering Imagine reading the whole half blood Prince allowed without a break. The relief bill took 10 hours and 44 minutes at about the same length. Here's 44 seconds of what that was like. Section 27 oh five funding for grants for healthcare providers to promote mental health among their health Professional workforce section 27 06 funding for community based funding for local substance use. Disorder Services section 27 oh seven funding for community based funding for local behavior. Health needs section 27 away funding for the National child Traumatic Stress Network. Section 27 09 funding for Project Aware section 27 10 funding for you Suicide prevention section 27 11 funding for behavioral health, workforce, education and training. Section 27 12 funding for pediatric mental health care access section 27 13 funding for expansion grants for certified community behavioral health. on it went. The reading ended at just after two in the morning. Washington Time

Senator Ron Johnson Harry Potter Senate Wisconsin New York Times National Child Traumatic Stres Washington
Calls for Governor Cuomo to step down

Brian Lehrer

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

Calls for Governor Cuomo to step down

"Small group of progressive activists and elected officials marched outside Governor Cuomo's office yesterday and called on him to resign. WN my sees George Joseph has more The protesters were outnumbered by the press, but they were passionate Amelia did. Cotton, a Queens Democratic district leader, says she made up her mind after hearing about the dubious nursing home death numbers and the harassment allegations. If I were in a workplace and I had those allegations, I'd be fired, and there's no reason that the governor of New York State should be held to a lower standard than anyone else. Most Democratic leaders haven't done the same. Instead, they've been asking for an independent investigation. Cuomo did not respond to W. N. Y C his request for

Governor Cuomo George Joseph Amelia Cotton New York Cuomo W. N.
New York Sues Amazon, Saying It Inadequately Protected NYC Workers From Covid-19

Brian Lehrer

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

New York Sues Amazon, Saying It Inadequately Protected NYC Workers From Covid-19

"New York's attorney general, is suing Amazon over the company's alleged mistreatment of workers during the pandemic. Attorney General Leticia James says the company failed to take adequate health and safety measures. To protect employees in New York, for example, by knowingly operating at Staten Island warehouse with dozens of workers who had the Corona virus and not notifying other workers who came into contact with them. James says the company also illegally fired employees who raised concerns. A spokesperson for Amazon says the lawsuit doesn't paint an accurate picture of the company's actions. It sued James's office last week, alleging that she is overstepping

Attorney General Leticia James Staten Island Warehouse New York Amazon James
Iran issues rare threat to develop nuclear weapon if "pushed"

Brian Lehrer

00:18 sec | 4 months ago

Iran issues rare threat to develop nuclear weapon if "pushed"

"His country could push for a nuclear weapon if international sanctions remain in place. The remarks were carried today on state TV. And they mark a rare occasion that a government official says Iran could reverse its course on the nuclear program. A judge has Excuse me. A judge has

Iran
New York City Mayoral Candidates Unite To Stop "Superspreader" Ballot Petitioning

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:37 sec | 4 months ago

New York City Mayoral Candidates Unite To Stop "Superspreader" Ballot Petitioning

"New York City public advocate Germany. Williams and seven of the leading mayoral candidates are urging city and state leaders to suspend ballot petitioning under city and state law, candidates must gather thousands of eligible signatures to secure a spot on the June primary ballot on the Brian Lehrer Show. Mayor de Blasio said he thinks candidates need to do something to show grassroots support. There's lots of ways that could be done, potentially including online, so I very much would like to see. Change here because we're in the middle of pandemic, but I am not certain that something can do alone. DiBlasio says he thinks the change would need to be made at the state level.

Mayor De Blasio New York City Williams Germany Diblasio
South African Variant Of Covid mutations May Be Stealthier

Brian Lehrer

00:59 min | 5 months ago

South African Variant Of Covid mutations May Be Stealthier

"And let's start with some of this vaccines versus variants news you recently wrote. Madonna and Fizer Both said their vaccines were effective against new variants of the coronavirus discovered in Britain in South Africa, but they are slightly less protective. Against the variant in South Africa. Why might the South African variant B stealthier So the South African variant has some mutations that are very tricky. It has one in particular that's called the Forward four K that changes the shape off the spike protein a little bit That's the protein that the vaccines are using to generate an immune response. And so the idea is that if the shape of the protein has changed a little bit that the antibodies find it a little bit harder to latch on to the protein, so the vaccines are a little bit less effective. Good news, though, is that they are effective. I mean, these vaccines are so good, so much better than we need them to be that it's not really a big deal to lose a little bit of their

Fizer South Africa Madonna Britain
Black and Latino New Yorkers Trail White Residents in Vaccine Rollout, New York

Brian Lehrer

04:16 min | 5 months ago

Black and Latino New Yorkers Trail White Residents in Vaccine Rollout, New York

"Sharon W. N. Y. C. And since the earliest days of the pandemic, as you know, black and Latino people in New York City have died from covert 19 at twice the rate of White New Yorkers. Now is vaccines become available. Those communities that have been hit the hardest are not getting prioritized in a rollout system that seems to be giving an advantage to groups that skew whiter and wealthier. According to City data released over the weekend, three white residents received a covert 19 vaccine for every black or Latino person in the city. So more specifics. White people make up 32% of the city's population. Would have received 48% of vaccine doses. Well, Latino residents make up 29% of New York City residents, They comprise only 15% of vaccine takers. The black community accounts for a quarter of the city. But their vaccination wait is nearly 11%. The data is incomplete because a large portion of non city run vaccination sites and failed to report vaccinations by race, But public health experts say that this data that we have shows a definite and concerning trend that is being repeated in much of the country. With me now is City Council member Mark Levin. He chairs the council's Health committee and is calling on the city to make specific changes to its vaccine rollout. And we also have doctor who J. Blackstock. She has some of you know, from her appearances on this show and elsewhere, is an emergency medicine physician, founder and CEO of advancing Health Equity and Yahoonews Medical contributor. She has suggestions for the Biden Harris administration to fix an excellent equities in the distribution system. At the national level. Welcome back to WN my see both of you. Hi, Good morning. Brand. Thank you so much Frying and council member for listeners who did not hear the mayor's press conference on this over the weekend. Can you further elaborate on the data that was released? I know you and others. I've been calling for its release for weeks. Well, we We have an incomplete picture. Brian. I want to stress that we only got a piece of the data which illuminates inequality, but it does offer race and ethnicity breakdowns and you ran through them. White New Yorkers are getting vaccinated at triple the rate. Of African American Latino New Yorkers. Really, That's the discrepancy. That's even greater than some of the other covert inequality that we've been seeing in this crisis. But we're still lacking something really fundamental. We have no zip code level data. Which could compare the Upper East Side to the South Bronx, Um, another critical view of inequality. It's really perplexing that it hasn't been released yet. Because the day that the data is there. The city collects addresses on everyone in vaccinate, so we're still fighting for more transparency. It's not too soon. To get beyond hand breaking ringing and 0.2 solutions. We need to fix this. We need a new Web registration system that stop blocking out people who don't have tech savvy or English language skills. We need to stop. Of crowding out people in vaccination sites and low income neighborhoods who are competing against people generally white, middle and upper income people from all over the region. We can do that. By having prioritization and scheduling for local neighborhoods at their vaccine site. We need to change eligibility and away that fixes the era of committing so many critical groups like people who deliver food people who work in taxis in restaurants, nail salons, people who are who are incarcerated. And finally find we have toe get out of City facilities and go door to door. We have to be going door to door. Vaccinate. We actually can't deliver the vaccine door to door for people who are homebound. Other states are doing this and also simply to make appointments for people who are not able to Get onto a home computer. Let's go door to door with ipads and sign people up. This problem can be addressed and we need to not just talk about it. We need serious action. To reboot our equity strategy for

Sharon W. N. Y. C. J. Blackstock New York City Advancing Health Equity Yahoonews Medical Biden Harris Administration Frying And Council White New Yorkers Mark Levin Health Committee City Council South Bronx Brian
Amanda Gorman makes history as youngest inaugural poet

Brian Lehrer

02:06 min | 5 months ago

Amanda Gorman makes history as youngest inaugural poet

"It's interesting that Democrats choose to honor poets and Republicans aren't really into that. That aspect of the inauguration. I think it's really Really beautiful the way poets have been able to stitch together an American collective narrative through their poems. You know, in the past democratic inaugurations, I've remember my Angelou. Marry Angelo reciting that poem, and I think that was the first time that I was moved really internally moved by hearing her words and then, obviously Elizabeth Alexander. So I'm looking forward to today. I think s so many of us feel a five relief but also cautiously optimistic. I mean, we we do know that there are domestic terrorists of sort of threatened to ruin this day, so I think a lot of people want to get to 12 o'clock. And they want to get sort of. They want to savor the day but also get through the day. So it feels like a new administration is on followed footing. And here's maybe where the poetry and prose meat a little bit as reported in USA Today this morning. Amanda Gorman told the AP that she was not given specific instructions on what to write for the inaugural poem, but that she was encouraged to emphasize unity and hope. Over quote, denigrating anyone or declaring Ding Dong. The witch is dead over the departure of President Donald Trump. She's calling her inaugural poem The Hill we climb. Woman says she has been given five minutes to read. I believe the My Angelo poem also was five minutes prior to what she called the Confederate insurrection on January 6th. She had only written about 3.5 minutes worth, she told the AP. She said That day gave me a second wave of energy to finish the poem, adding that she will not refer directly to January 6 but will touch upon it. She said the capital mob did not upend the poem she had been working on because They didn't surprise her and quote the poem isn't blind. It isn't turning your back to the evidence of discord and division. So some

Marry Angelo Elizabeth Alexander Amanda Gorman President Donald Trump Angelo Poem AP Ding Dong USA
Capitol officer praised as a hero for handling of mob

Brian Lehrer

00:21 sec | 5 months ago

Capitol officer praised as a hero for handling of mob

"Of alone Capitol police officer who happened to be black, now being described as a hero, letting rioters inside the Capitol chase him. As he chose his path strategically to draw them away from where members of the Senate were and toward a different room, where he had backups waiting.

Capitol Police Senate
Gynecologist on what is known about COVID-19 vaccines benefits, risks for pregnant women

Brian Lehrer

03:51 min | 6 months ago

Gynecologist on what is known about COVID-19 vaccines benefits, risks for pregnant women

"Lindsay and Randolph you're on w. N. Y. C with vaccine expert Dr Ruth Karen from Johns Hopkins. Hi, Lindsay. I thank you guys so much for having my call. Sure. Sure. No. I am currently 25 weeks pregnant and health care worker so I am eligible in my feet. Get the vaccine and actually have an appointment on Friday. You know there's super limited data on pregnant women getting the vaccine and so I was just curious as to your thoughts about pregnant women. Getting the vaccine on, but the potential risks and benefits are to that. Right. So, um, So thank you for that question. Lindsay, and I think it's I think it's a question that probably many people, and maybe many of the listeners here have, um, what I would say is that we, um, unfortunately, we don't yet have a lot of data from studies and pregnant women. For either of these vaccines. We do have some data. There were women in the trials who this trial's did not include pregnant women. But there were women who became pregnant and the course of the trials. Just a very small number for each trial on Bui have not seen any adverse outcomes from those, um, from those studies. Um, but again, those air very small numbers. Um, there is, um, you know, I'm sure that you've seen the statement from the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Um, which Is somewhat helpful and that it goes through some of the considerations. But at the end of the day says, Of course this is a decision between you and your, um, your health care provider. There is not evidence that M R and a can harm a pregnant woman or harm the fetus. We do not have that, Um, that kind of evidence. Um, and there is not Theoretical reason to think that these that this product would be harmful. There are side effects of these vaccines that pregnant women might particularly want to note and fever is something in particular. And I believe a cock has recommendations around pre medication for fever, You know, considerations around pre medication for fever, particularly In the case of pregnant women. Um I can tell you interestingly, of course, um, recommendations for pregnant women very in countries. So in the US, we have what's called this permissive recommendation. Um, the UK Great. Britain has recently changed its recommendations They initially recommended not using the vaccine and pregnant women. They're now saying that pregnant women Who are on the front lines because they're for example, because their healthcare workers should consider using the vaccine. Muchas we are saying in the U. S. And Israel. Pregnant women are being prioritized for vaccination on day. There are many pregnant women who are because of their risks that you know the risks of covert and pregnant women. Pregnant women are at greater risk. A serious disease from Cove it than non pregnant individuals. And so that is why that population is being prioritized in Israel right now. Um Boy, the visor of vaccine and likely will be the same for them. A daring A

Lindsay N. Y. C Dr Ruth Karen American College Of Obstetrics Johns Hopkins Randolph Fever BUI Britain UK U. Israel United States
New York City’s mayoral election needs an upgrade

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 6 months ago

New York City’s mayoral election needs an upgrade

"Democrats running for the office of New York City mayor. But some political analysts say the candidates haven't offered enough specifics about what direction they want to take the city in W NY sees Brian Lehrer show Daily News columnist Harry Siegel said few of the Democratic candidates have released detailed policies and plans including around crime, and the NYPD. The police need to be doing more Do they need to be doing Wes? We have the right number of police is this is this way too many Can we afford this? Given the massive budget shortfall. The city has that those are the sort of questions I want to hear these candidates engaging with now. The Democratic mayoral primary is on June 22nd

Harry Siegel Brian Lehrer New York City NY Nypd WES
ANALYSIS: So You Wanna Be New York City Mayor, Huh?

Brian Lehrer

04:18 min | 6 months ago

ANALYSIS: So You Wanna Be New York City Mayor, Huh?

"How Do you see? Large democratic mayor of field shaping up in general. So far, it is kind of overwhelming for people to get their minds around such a long list. I said We were gonna go down through the list, and this isn't even gonna be Complete list. We've begun having the candidates on the show already, and I keep saying to the listeners this June primary is going to come up on people faster than you realize. But my goodness the field is so crowded. With Eric Adams in Scott Stringer and Maya Wiley and Shaun Donovan and Kathryn Garcia and Ray Maguire and Carlos Man, Chaka and Diane Diane. Morale is and Laurie sudden. And that's an incomplete list. And now we're here. Max Rose and Andrew Gang may both be getting in are their lanes in this race like we used to say in the presidential primary, the conservative rain laying the progressive lane or how can a voter who isn't a political science professor like you begin to sort this out for themselves? Right. I mean, in some ways, it's both overwhelming and underwhelming at the same time. I mean, sadly, so many voters can't really fully focus Brian on local elections, just Jack because we haven't gotten past January, 20th And especially for voters of color, Knowing what the president has has said the types of people he supported his members of his own party, essentially trying to actively create a coup within American democracy. It's a very unsettling political moment, and a lot of folks can't really focus. Fully on a local election until there is a peaceful transition of power, which quite honestly is not guaranteed at this moment. And so once we get past January 20th it's a 2 p.m.. Then I think that there's a sigh of relief when we can start looking at. Okay. Well, who are who are the millionaires? Who were, you know, sort of waking up in the morning, saying I should be a leader? That's one bucket. Who were the folks who were currently unemployed and need a job. So hey, I should run for mayor too. That's another bucket. Who were the progressive folks who have interesting ideas for New York in some sort of some sort of managerial experience, but no previous electoral experience. That's another bucket. Then you have sort of the you know the politicians who have been elected to office once or quite a few times, and they want to expand that sort of leadership style. In a city that might be looking for something totally different. And so we have minimum four buckets. Obviously, there's descriptive politics. Some people think it's far time that New York City has female leadership. Some people want to make sure that there's leadership of color, whether it's another black mayor, Post Dinkins or if we should have someone from the Latin next community, and so there's lots of different angles. I think right now because it's so crowded. It's hard to Even hear what people actually saying. But also that's on the candidates, because because of rank choice voting, many people are reticent to attack their opponents. They're reticent to say any big, bold ideas. It's kind of a milk toast election as a as of now, that's not garnering any attention. From the vast majority of New Yorkers. And we know that municipal elections in New York City have have abysmal, embarrassingly low turnout for someone who will not only be the leader of New York but political figure on a national even international scale. Can I just? Yeah, e You want to say something really quickly about Henry's point about 1993 moving forward with crime. I think we need to back up just four more years and think about the Dinkins years and what Mayor Dinkins was was successful and trying to re imagine the police department in a more community policing way, and we have to be honest about the amount of money we pay out as citizens. For bad behavior of the NYPD and how bad officers are continuously protected on considered, I would say, terrorized particular communities, and the fiscal implications of that bad behavior, you know, goes beyond just training. It is a fundamental re imagining that mayoral candidates must talk about because there's something going on that Justin The top brass leadership. But there's some sort of corrosion throughout particular departments in the city that needs to be rooted out in a real substantive way that we just have never seen before. Well,

Eric Adams Maya Wiley Kathryn Garcia Ray Maguire Carlos Man Diane Diane Max Rose Andrew Gang Scott Stringer Shaun Donovan Chaka Post Dinkins Laurie Brian New York City Jack New York Mayor Dinkins Dinkins Henry
"brian lehrer" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

04:42 min | 6 months ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"It was just a couple of years after the end of were one. There was like a red scare at that time right. They didn't want you said bolsheviks nikki they didn't want bolsheviks coming in. But then i think it connected with this sinoe phobia. That people had in the fact that they didn't like a lot of jews coming in and a lot of italians coming in. And how do you pick apart. What was sort of rational national policy and what was just hayden fear and racism and xenophobia. We gotta say it was all in there. Yeah and it can be difficult to have those conversations about what the motivations were because so much of this history gets wiped out in some ways or we just don't we just don't tell it in detail. We think of the us prior to the twentieth century as a place with immigration restrictions. Right we think the us restricting based on national origin but not on political ideology but of course this period people were being turned away left and right because what their politics were which would seem to clash with our ideas of the us. Is this place where you have a first amendment right to whatever politics that you want and so because we don't tell accurate enough things about our past. It's difficult to draw. Good lessons from him Let's start to wrap up a little bit but brian. I wonder if we can talk a little bit just about how immigrants have shaped new york and her story of immigration in particular as related to new york. Your show is such a home for immigrant. Voices and sort of you know really does treat new york as the city of immigrants and i'm just wondering like over the course of your time on the radio like how you've seen immigration change and shape the city in different immigrant communities leave their mark on on new york city over the last thirty forty years or you know doing what we call a local radio show and there is a national element. I guess i might as well plug it. There's a thing called. Brian lehrer a daily politics podcast but doing primarily a local show. Our definition of local is anything of interest to people in new york listening area and that wind job including so many things that are international. Because lives here. When you look at new york today there were so many nationalities here in fairly large numbers because of the immigration act of nineteen sixty five which reopened immigration after forty years of restriction after the ellis island era and the nineteen twenty s laws. That nikki was talking about the shut. It down now. There are people from everywhere in fairly substantial numbers..

new york nikki hayden us brian Brian lehrer new york city ellis island
"brian lehrer" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

05:25 min | 6 months ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"December seventeenth nineteen hundred ellis island in new york harbor opens as an immigration inspection station on the day it welcomed over two thousand immigrants. Does the united states the island has been used as an immigration facility. A few years earlier but that building burned down and this was the opening of the fancy new building and would turn alice island into ellis island in many ways the symbol of the american immigrant experience at least in the first few decades of the twentieth century I don't really need to play up. The significance of alice island both in terms of the way the immigrants who came through their transformed in this country but also the place it has in the public imagination. So let's just get into this segment. I will say though that. I really liked doing something. Nineteen hundred nikki. We've done like. I was looking at all the years we've done it with like eighteen. Thirty four nineteen seventeen and nineteen hundred. Nice and clean. That's not the only reason this. But i do like the the cleanliness but mostly for the nice round number. That's exactly. It was just easier to type when i fewer easier to do math. When you're trying to figure out how far away it was exactly. That of course is nicole. Hammer of columbia. Hello mickey hello. Jody and our guest for this episode. Very special guest is brian. Lehrer host of the brian lehrer show on wnyc. Brian thank you for coming on. Jodi and i will say that. I was a producer on brian. Show for many years. I think. Brian is the voice of new york city and the best radio host in the country. But thank you for a guest on this program up. Bryan you've been on. Wnyc for a long long time. Where you do you broadcast live that day in one thousand nine hundred at a else island opened well. I was just back from the spanish. American war of helping the united states establish american imperialism around the world for the very first time. I thought you looked like a rough writer not on the internet long not quite but but let's start actually maybe just Describing the island itself. I mean you want to paint the picture of of where it sits in new york city. Well ellis island is in new york harbor. It's right by liberty island which houses the statue of liberty so they are like a pair. Of course there are so intertwined. People think of the statue of liberty and emma lazarus's palm in conjunction with immigration. But it wasn't liberty island. It was ellis island right by it. That people actually went through and part of it is in new york and part of it is in new jersey and they of actually squabbled and even gone to the supreme court over. Who owns it and i think that turns out to be over eighty percent new jersey. But that's a little footnote..

ellis island alice island new york harbor mickey hello united states brian lehrer brian Brian nikki Lehrer Jody new york city Wnyc Jodi nicole liberty island columbia Bryan emma lazarus new jersey
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer on WNYC the New York state legislators among those that are beginning to act on police reforms that have been stuck in the political mind for a long time the measures rising in Albany right now include a ban on chokeholds by police the repeat of the the repeal I should say of the law known as fifty eight which keeps police officers disciplinary records sealed and more with us now New York State Senate majority leader Andrea Stewart cousins her own district covers much of Westchester senator Stewart cousins always a pleasure welcome back to W. NYC thank you so much Brian it's always good to be with you and and I really appreciate the way you handle all of these topical issues with so many extraordinary gas so thank you for letting me be among them thank you so much and I'll say extraordinary colors which we certainly heard great uncles are absolutely in the last segment let's start with the bill that passed both houses of the legislature yesterday I see call the Eric garner anti chokehold that what would the law DO well this will make it very very clear that choke holds are are not permissible and if you are you know using a chokehold in order to to subdue someone that you you know that you feel is that a suspect and so on it's not acceptable so it's basically clarifying the use of the show cold when they are prohibited as well as criminalizing the you could use it so cold when it results in the death of a person by a police officer so it will now be a class C. felony I which it will give you a minimum of three and a half years and up to fifteen years so I think it's important one of the things that that the what we will be doing in the next three days is really again clarifying in many ways what's acceptable and what is not acceptable in police state police had had the ability in many ways to construct their own rules and they have been able to sort of navigate in their own circle circumstances in the way they feel is right so whether it's the chokehold whether it is repealing fifty a which we will do today whether it is medical attention while it somebody's been in custody whether it's the the the use of weapons reporting so if you're discharging a weapon with you you've hurt someone or not it must be reported so it's it's an oh by the way if someone like that seventeen year old girl that was recording what happened tragically to George Floyd was was maybe in New York and maybe someone didn't appreciate that she was recording it is now clear that the people have a right to record and we are not only doing that but Afghan or state police now to have body cameras so this is really I think trying to create that kind of transparency the track kind of accountability and and just rules that will prevent some of what you know I guess has been confusion at all so I think it will be a step towards trying to regain trust with communities if the specific communities of color tell me more about right to record are there circumstances under current law where if somebody is recording a police encounter that the police have the right to tell them to stop I haven't you know Bedlam I think that is the issue we have seen in a lot of different circumstances where somebody will say oh give me that phone or you know take the phone from her though so what I did there it was silent in terms of what happened so begin this policy which broke again a path fifty ninety three yesterday said that that the bill will this law means that you have an affirmative right to actually record that whatever is happening with police as a stand by I you know this as as a bystander rather so I think people are doing things some people with some some police reacted fine I would you saw what happened with the the torchlight situation means as they seem to be absolutely no concerned at all that this guy was actually killing someone over in the ninth minute minute period and people are recording button here in New York we now are telling you specifically do not bother anybody who is recording you it is not allowed to sell at very least it's an affirmation of what's already somebody's right exactly the United States what about you just talked about the the bystanders I see they're doing this in Minnesota now do you have in the New York State Legislature anything that would make it a crime to not intervene as a police officer if you see a fellow officer committing what appears to be a criminal act as in the case of their children and George Floyd here and now not among the bill that we are passing right now but it is certainly something that that I believe you know you would have faith in human nature that you would not do that but I think it waited we kind of get it back is the the medical attention while in custody so the way it works now I guess you know we see the theme that if somebody is saying I can't breathe either I'm going to you know let die need I need something diabetic or whatever it does not seem that there is any particular attention paid to that so we are getting at that somewhat with what we call the medical attention while in custody battle and you know just this I said to the officer has a responsibility to help the human being who is in distress I'm not saying a minor ailment or whatever but if someone is telling you look on mathematics I'm going into attack I need to be able to to get my medicine you do not have the right to safely with this person problem results in death you do not have the right anymore to just say oh well you know I didn't believe them all well I don't think so you know I I I did so I think we sort of getting it back but you know some of these things and I think all of us would agree some of these things would you would think be human nature you would think people would have a response that would be different from unfortunately a lot of the callousness that we've seen over you know the inferred for communities of color over generations but certainly now the whole whole world is seeing and how many instances so we want to make sure that that bad cop are exposed and flagged and and you know taken away from a position of responsibility that they have to protect and serve it because we want good cop to be able to be good cops and you know one of my police commissioner then an offering with a you know the only thing that allows for bad cop or good cop so we want to make sure that that good cops are allowed to be good that they are doing things that community wants them to do and we need the community you know need for them to go and in the bad cops go away and the other thing of course on the the civilian side we yesterday the nine one one full of reporting bell fellow that Mister Cooper and miss Cooper and and you know this this this calling nine one one because if you see somebody you're uncomfortable with you know a black person a brown person creating emergency I that's not acceptable either that incident in central park two weeks ago and the watcher a white woman called the police on a black man bird watching and asked her to put her dog on a leash as the law requires in the park and she called nine one one instead a black man was threatening her life fifty one five yes we have to talk listeners we can take a few phone calls for the.

Brian Lehrer New York
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Who were serving a felony your personal servants public employees first responders public healthcare workers but also people served up a lot other ways and to me they're all we value and we miss and we honor and we honor their families and so I came to the conclusion that even though we saw some progress in Washington in terms of including in the stimulus support for the families of first responders who were lost we did not see the kind of consistent support that these families would need so I said I want to see the state legislature provide full line of duty death benefits for any city worker died because of cold air during this crisis Mr mayor thank you as always I hope you have a safe Memorial Day weekend any observances that you're planning personally what we're going to figure that out but again like so many new Yorkers can be low key and very local and keep it simple and and with a real sense of remembering why Memorial Day exists honoring those who served us and gave their lives for us talking next week thanks a lot thank you Brian Brian Lehrer of WNYC more to come next time on the New Yorker radio hour would you volunteer to be infected with the coronavirus to test the potential vaccine many of the people that I have seen volunteered to be a subject in human challenge trials seem to think that they are low risk we know so little about this virus other than that it can be lethal the ethics of human challenge trials.

Washington Brian Brian Lehrer
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer on WNYC and we'll get to our next segment shortly but I need to ask you something that's important for the station we are in a miniature W. NYC spring membership drive today and it's a paradox because it's a miniature drive under maxed out circumstances usually this time of year we go on a little bit of a pause as Memorial Day is approaching as summer is approaching and we do a nine day annual membership drive to help fund the work that we do here is a not for profit news organization we depend on memberships as you probably know but this year we're in a paradoxical situation like a lot of other news organizations we have lost revenue from some of our funders who can't do that right now and at the same time we have incurred big extra expenses like buying and installing all this extra equipment so that they're showing all the other shows can originate from our homes and I'm told that they're doing physical work down at the office to make it safe for the new realities when people start to go back so we have declining revenues and increasing expenses so here's the paradox we don't feel comfortable doing a regular nine day membership drive continuing coverage is just too important right now and we are just not going to interrupt regular programming for nine days as we usually do it just feels inappropriate to us so we're doing a three day membership drive instead of a nine day one today's date too so thank you first of all to all of you who have donated so far but this miniature drive with maximal importance ends tomorrow seems like we just began we did just began in seems like we're about to end we are there to and maybe this is the last moment that you happened to be listening before it ends so thank you so much in advance for.

Brian Lehrer NYC
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer on WNYC and it's weak line of remote learning for all New York City public schools and it's been starting up pretty much for all the schools in the greater New York area here in the city we have the biggest school district in the nation in normal times if you don't know the stats eighteen hundred separate schools serve one point one million students just to keep the sheer magnitude of this tectonic shift to distant learning distance learning as a reference point at the beginning with so many students having their life in education thrown into limbo we know this will be one of the harder new realities to adapt to for students for parents for educators so we will be following this closely in the coming weeks and months and W. NYC is teaming up with the education news organization Chalkbeat to cover it with the latest news now and to tell you how you can help report this story because they are asking for your help for the sake of improving everyone's experience I am joined by WNYC host and reporter should meet about shoe and Chalkbeat reporter covering public schools Lima I mean Sinead and Ranma hi thanks for coming on this morning hi thanks for having us and I want to start before we get into these issues by technology in the death of Mr Xander romaine and I hope I'm saying her name right the principle of Brooklyn democracy academy in Brownsville who died because of complications due to the coronavirus she was thirty six years old do either of you have anything to share about principle remains impact in her community yes so my colleague Alex reported on this actually a couple nights ago and you know we heard from as far as her legacy as a principal I think mostly what we heard was that she you know devoted her entire life to the school and she was really dedicated from all accounts to sort of making the school a fabric a part of the fabric of the community in Brownsville and that you know it was remarkable we also got emails in yesterday okay and people were sort of saying the same thing that she made it a point to get to know all of our students she really worked hard to try to make the school which was a transfer school first it is who are over age and under credited to try to make it so that it was a tailored experience almost for everybody who went there and so it seems that she stood out as a principal from all accounts that we heard now to me that you want to tell our listeners how you and Chalkbeat are asking them to participate I know you've got a big crowd sourcing project going just starting obviously with respect to the distance learning era and maybe we can get some calls going that it to the point of what you want to hear so what do you tell people what your project is and how they can best contribute sure WNYC and Gothamist have paired up with Chalkbeat we decided to work together to document this huge shift in the way that education is being practiced here in the New York area this is such an unprecedented time to be teaching to be learning and there's really no one better position to document this moment than the people who are doing the teaching and the people who are doing the learning and of course their families who are inevitably affected by this so there's lots of talk about remote learning right now but we really want to hear from from students from the teenagers who are being affected by it we wanna hear from the teachers who are having to shift the way that they delivered their lessons to students and we also are welcoming comments from parents because this is actually touching their lives a lot too we have a short survey that we work together to to put out and reporters from Chalkbeat are looking at it reporters from WNYC and Gothamist or looking at it and it just has a number of questions you can select whether you're a.

Brian Lehrer
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone as our world continues to change in this way that was unimaginable just a few weeks ago even just a few days ago I mean the world changed a lot yesterday afternoon with all the different closures and other announcements so we're all living to various degrees in a state of shock this morning and I just wanted to acknowledge that because I guess it's probably best to just say that out loud to each other to help us face whatever each of us is facing with us and to help us get through this together as a city as a country as a world I hope everybody listening right now has a good private support system we will keep trying to be part of your public support system and do our best to provide information and community but not everything is different and we began as usual on Fridays with our weekly ask the mayor segment my questions and yours for mayor bill de Blasio two one two four three three W. NYC two one two four three three one nine six nine two if you want to call in or you can tweet a question just use the hashtag ask the mayor Mister mayor welcome back to W. NYC thank you very much Brian brown I want to thank you for what you just said I think it's really really important that we have knowledge the shock for all and it literally seems to change hourly a lot of the time we have not been through anything like this and people are fearful they're anxious they're confused they have every right to be and I think it's really important that people at places like your show to turn to for accurate information and you know a real dialogue I really want to emphasize the people as a lot of anxiety and fear out there first of all listen to the actual official sources of information I can give you facts for example there was a a ridiculous rumor yesterday that all of Manhattan to begin quarantine that's patently false people want to get the truth can go to our website and why C. dot gov slash corona viruses can go look at can call three one one to get updates we also have a text which I'll get that for you right now what's the number people can tax to get regular updates texted to them they can watch obviously the the city hall a Twitter feed them and the author magazine management are constantly putting out the first information so anyone wants those text alerts and tens of thousands of new Yorkers have signed up for them you text the word covert C. O. V. I. D. again C. O. V. I. D. to six nine two six nine two and you'll get those sent to you and the last thing Brian which is to people's feelings and emotions which are real that anyone who's really feeling worried or anxious besides trying to get good usable information if you just feel you know worried depressed confused in a way you want to talk to someone professional any New Yorker can call our helpline eight eight eight NYC well again eight eight eight NYC well W. E..

Brian Lehrer
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:24 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone today we will look at the second coronavirus case here in New York and the communities it is having an impact on combined with a very aggressive measures that China took in Wuhan that suggests how widespread quarantines and other behavior changes around here could potentially become with the Supreme Court hearing another abortion restriction case today will also talk to Katherine Stewart who has a new book about what she calls Christian nationalism in the trump era in the U. S. including how Attorney General William Barr is trying to insert it more into the justice system will start and end the show today with reactions to the absolutely shocking super Tuesday results the Joe Biden search that nobody predicted and the people would have thought was impossible just a week ago after Bernie Sanders one Nevada so convincingly and biting kind of limping along in all of the first three states will discuss super Tuesday with the Massachusetts based reporter right now and a California based one later to bill Smith will give Jimmy all the extra hour of sleep out there west coast time to recover a little before he comes on one of the most surprising super Tuesday results and one of the most disappointing for some Democrats was that Elizabeth Warren came in third in her home state of Massachusetts she got just twenty one percent of the vote there to Bernie Sanders twenty six and Joe Biden's unexpected rise to first place there Biden got thirty three percent part of his national resurgence according to exit polls Biden one among moderates black voters and voters over fifty and Massachusetts looking nationally Warren met the threshold of fifteen percent of the vote needed to gain any delegates in each state in just five of the fourteen super Tuesday states as of the latest count we'll talk now to Jess Bidgood Boston globe national politics reporter she's in Michigan where one receive the results last night and where I'm told Bernie Sanders this morning to Michigan is one of six states that vote next week I just thanks very much for coming on we're in Michigan are you thanks for having me on in Detroit Laura wood before it took the stage last night really before any of the results started coming in so I wanna play a clip of senator Warren from after the South Carolina results came in obviously a big button when there and and then I'll ask you to compare to whatever she said last night here's one on Saturday after referring to the trump presidency as a crisis this crisis demands more than a former vice president who is so eager to cut deals with Mitch McConnell and the Republicans that hill trade good ideas for bad ones and this crisis demands more than a senator who has good ideas but whose thirty year track record shows he consistently calls for things that failed to get done and consistently opposing things that never the last he fails to start school that was Saturday night one was trying to thread the needle there obviously between Sanders and Biden did she make similar statements last night when she spoke last night she she took should I say I think that you took the vehicle for results came in and before polls even closed in most of the country so her in less light actually did not feel very connected with super Tuesday and that may have been intentional of course she is a fairly standard stump speech in front of us very excited crowd of about two thousand people I will say but she did make a few comments that she doesn't usually think on her account news comments concern to this squishy and hard to define issue of electability that has become I think something that she's always struggled she does struggle to put concerns about that that it's a concept certainly that can privilege management and data a male candidates over over female ones but she said what I see happening is a lot of folks trying to turn voting into some kind of strategy she said pundits friends neighbors are all saying you have to second guess yourself she added that pundits have gotten it wrong over and over and urged her supporters to cast a vote that will make you cry out and then it she told the crowd why she was still running for president she said I'm in this race because I believe I will make the best president of the United States and from there she kind of went into this stuff he talks about it every step she makes her background her policies those kinds of things so those are really the only words we've heard from Elizabeth Warren since the end of voting she has not yet made a public statement about last night's results and I've just gotten word from some of her age that she's talking with her team about assisting the path forward but we don't know anything more than that at this point listeners we can take any questions or comments you have about any super Tuesday result at two one two four three three W. NYC two one two four three three nine six nine two we'll take those calls with Jess Bidgood from The Boston Globe right now and we'll have another super Tuesday at the end of the show that's going to be more west coast oriented but we'll be able to talk about anything nationally then as well but for now two one two four three three W. NYC two one two four three three nine six nine two just one thing you just said there is really huge for Elizabeth wind and not to her advantage it's that everybody this year feels they have to be a pundit and not necessarily vote for who they like the **** who they think would be the best president but who they think will be the most likely to be trump in November and I imagine that's working very much to the detriment of Elizabeth wind it might come out fairly differently if people were just voting their preference yes absolutely and this is an issue that she started to take on more directly I would say in about January but she's getting a lot of questions from voters on the trail about people who knew they had people in their lives what's the what's the foreign origin could win and where that's going to vote for someone else and she tried to make the case to voters at that time that they had to that they should go with their heart she she started rolling out this catch phrase hope over fear but I not clear to me that she was able to make that case as actively enough in an environment where as as you say every voter kind of decided that they needed to be a pundit and voters around the country are making their decisions based on their assumptions about what voters in future state might choose or might not want to Q. you know which candidate can I strengthen who I think will then have a good shot of doing well in super Tuesday those are the kinds of questions that voters have been asking themselves and that came that that that can that that made it tricky for for a lot of candidates who who announced presidential runs and and and are you know no longer no longer running and it and it also is making it tricky for for candidates like Warren who are still in the race in the new York times today one of the article says once most ardent supporters said she was unable to overcome the extra hurdles for women running for president the attributed her weak support among non college educated voters to the same sort of biased sees that a bit that badly damaged Hillary Clinton in the twenty sixteen general election against Donald Trump are you hearing the same thing I hear that often yes Elizabeth Warren draws a lot of women it to her advantage and I've spoken with hundreds of them over over the past month and I hear a lot particularly as warrants polling lead began to slip women will say to me I just don't want to see what happened to her or to Hillary happened to her in in their minds they watched a very qualified female presidential candidate who's to president trump and and and that was crashing and I think they are feeling some of that same disappointment about watching a candidate that they believed deeply into that they feel is utterly qualified seating and and and and I did too I think for some of her female supporters particularly this feels like a very crushing moment the exit poll number I saw said one only one a third of her core demographic in her home state white college educated women only a third in Massachusetts of white college educated women have you seen any breakdown on where the other two thirds of those Massachusetts voters want so Massachusetts is is there is no way around it this is a this is a very very tough or salt for Elizabeth Warren even that just a few days ago it seems like it was a two way race for best use that's between her and Bernie Sanders and and and her supporters of her endorsers had been saying in recent days there is no such thing as a must win state they had been they had been kind of predicting their guys might do well because he did very well there in the twenty sixteen primary but I think Biden's surge in Massachusetts took a lot of people by surprise and to me that makes Massachusetts kind of an interesting lad if you will for how our narratives and the power of a small bench him when we hold the doctor Grove and second university and and W. B. easy cheesy Paul Bassett she sets out last Wednesday to Friday I think that whole sided with wave heights warrant Warren and Sanders I have a neighborhood about eleven percent while they were out at twenty two percent for ward twenty four percent for Sanders and I I think what happened in that time is that by the big win in South Carolina showed voters in Massachusetts and around the country give them a reason to say okay this campaign has had some large breasts woman has stabilized we know by then we we see him as someone who could beat trump and I think it gave them kind of a reason to feel comfortable voting for a campaign that has not always made people feel that way and I think that's a big part of where his Massachusetts surge came from and it shows just how powerful this resistance and just how willing to to to change their minds voters have been I've seen data that says that that among voters who made up their mind it's just the past few days I didn't did very well among voters who made up their mind a little bit earlier Sanders did well so Biden has ruled really had had I had a question commented that perhaps just the right moment after a campaign that we're we never guaranteed that that this is going to happen perhaps here's a question from a listener writing on Twitter the question is what is you guessed think about the idea that wanted to staying in to help Bernie at the convention I think there are many reasons that she could do if if if she decides to stay in the there are many reasons that that that she might or might not do so as I said we we know that she's talking to her aides to day and assessing her path forward and if he were to stay in until the convention she would have she she would have a certain number of pledged delegates and if you stay in until the convention you have or you have a little bit more say as more power over where your delegates might go I think the question for her team is going to be can she amassed enough delegates that that is a a useful thing to to to have or is it better at this point to to to let it go and those those are the kinds of discussions I imagine they will be they they they will be having two days stay as they think about the path forward another thing that that I think could potentially be interesting for her warrant if she does stay in there's a prospect that just a week or so from now she would stand on the debate stage potentially with only Biden and Sanders the smallest debate to Jacksonville number one then of course if Bloomberg stays in the race that would be her and three men that could be an interesting moment for her so I'm curious if if the possibility of this debate is going to factor in and also their calculations of of how you know whether or not to stay in and how much longer to stay and and and and what they what they what they want to do I think in the race that's a very interesting prospect that you just raise that if Bloomberg drops out which many people think he's going to then the televised debate next week could just be Sanders and by then and Warren match and if it was that from the beginning but it could be you know she's she's got a lot of delegates.

New York China Wuhan Brian Lehrer
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show and if you would like to see good morning everyone and we begin as we usually do on Fridays with our weekly ask the mayor said when my questions and yours for mayor bill de Blasio at two one two four three three W. N. Y. C. two one two four three three nine six nine two or you can treat a question just use the hashtag asked the mayor good morning Mister mayor welcome back to W. NYC good morning Brian so you gave your state of the city address yesterday and the big room with a big well natural history and titled it save our city will you give us because most people didn't hear it the essence of what you think still needs to be saved after six years of your administration yeah and Brian this comes from talking to new Yorkers all over the city is seventy town hall meetings all across the five boroughs in so many other conversations and I think what people are feeling right now is very anxious about the future of the city because it's become so on affordable because are worried about being displaced and not able to stay in their own neighborhood because they see small businesses a lot of closing all the time they see vacant storefronts there's a tremendous sense of anxiety about whether this is still going to be a place for everyone and a livable affordable place or not you know in the speech I said look we we overcame huge crises in the past once upon a time people were fleeing the city because it wasn't safe and that was dominant as as idea and a concern for decades and we became a much safer city we became a city with a very strong economy a lot more jobs as a lot of things I'm very proud of is best in the last six years but I was trying to be blunt about there's a new and different kind of crisis that we're facing which is all about affordability and whether our neighborhoods will still be places for us you know whether this is a I quoted the the concept this land is your land from the famous song you know what that new Yorkers are basically saying to me all over we don't know if we're going to be the last generation or family able to live here and so what I propose yesterday was a series of very different approaches we've tried a lot of things and I can tell you a lot of things that help people to live here and afford to be here fifteen dollar minimum wage and a huge affordable housing plan and you know rain freezes free lawyers to stop evictions we've done all sorts of things but I'm being very honest having done the mall it's not enough for them to go to the next level so for example passing laws that will protect millions of tenants who right now do not have protections to stop rent gouging by the landlords huge rate increases on the topic unfair objections we need to do that we need to create community land trusts that one sure that public.

Brian Lehrer
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone on a day when the Senate will take its final impeachment trial vote I always Democratic Party may or may not finally released its full caucus results and there is a state of the union address to react to or tear up your own copy if you want to follow speaker policies lead our first guest today is relevant to all these things New York senator Kirsten Gillibrand is a juror in the impeachment trial was a candidate in the presidential race and was in the joint session of Congress for the speech thanks for coming on such a consequential day senator welcome back to W. NYC thanks so much for having me is the state of the union in twenty five seconds from the start of the president's speech and will invite you to react our borders are secure our families are flourishing our values are renewed our pride is restored and for all of these reasons I say to the people of our great country and to the members of Congress this state of our union is stronger than ever before shows senator Joe brand is the state of our union stronger than ever before I would not have given him such high marks I thought he unfortunately he lied a lot during the speech she told a lot of things to the American people that simply weren't true stuff about the economy stuff about people who have come off food stamps stuff about energy independence stuff about pre existing conditions it was really a very defensive speech and it seem to me to be much more of a campaign rally take speech then a proper state of the union I was deeply offended when he gave the medal of honor to Rush Limbaugh I thought that was very inappropriate and I really didn't like how he treated immigrants I thought that was extremely defensive and then just he made a lot of statements that just weren't true we fact checked a bunch of stuff last night and at least five or six claims were just through the fall and we could such at the president's claims all day and the news programs on the station are doing it to suffice to say for the moment that he took credit for many things in the economy and claim they were reversals from president Obama when really they're continuations of the exact same trends that have been under way for a decade but let.

Senate Democratic Party senator Kirsten Gillibrand Congress senator president senator Joe brand Obama Brian Lehrer New York Limbaugh
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone tonight democratic presidential climate change forum on CNN is now being framed by a real life disaster that many scientists are saying can probably be linked to the warming earth and that of course is hurricane Dorian for one thing according to The New York Times this pattern where hurricane strolls in one place for hours like Dorian did over the Bahamas that's a sign of climate change will explain why about that and more as we open the program today with three short interviews about the Dorian emergency and the larger climate change crisis with us first is New York times Miami bureau chief. from this day currently covering Dorian Patricia thanks so much for some time on an intensely moving assignment K. for you obviously welcome to W. NYC thanks for having me and first things first we've all been hearing about the devastation in the Bahamas what can people here do if they want to help in some way. well there is a robust Bahamian community in South Florida out that has organized to send donations and there haven't figured out quite how to get them yet they've got various planes ready to go but you know they they need to be cleared for landing and people have really turned out to to offer all the help that they can you know what a lot of organizations like the red cross and other NGOs will tell you is that cash helps them you know just just money donations to be flexible with what the needs are but what I've heard from people who have already flown over the Bahamas and as a liver some supplies is that you know everything you can think of starting with water and other basic necessities including hygiene products are are very necessary right now. then after devastating the Bahamas Dorian is now causing hundreds of thousands of evacuations to be ordered maybe it's more than a million people you know better than I do from coastal communities in parts of Florida up to the Carolinas what's the extent of the movement of people in the U. S. now. in Florida V. evacuations were limited to some vulnerable a beach front communities they learned from these accusations a couple of years ago in hurricane Irma where many more people moved that that was not the wisest course of action for a storm like this that moves from south to north and effects such a broad swath of the state because then people are left on the roads and don't know really where to go well the storm is sort of following them so here the evacuations were for what some official side were miles not hundreds of miles where some people just were asked to move inland to be away from the storm surge there are more about evacuations right now in not in Georgia and the Carolinas because the storm track has appeared to move slightly closer to the northern Georgia and and South Carolina coast still perhaps not land fall but as we know storms hi does not have to cross into land for the storm surge to be dangerous your article today is a heart wrenching description of some of the specific challenges of getting elderly people in nursing homes and assisted living facilities to safety what's the big picture of that. this was another lesson from past storms where you know sort has a large retiree preparation population and they wanted to make sure that didn't have a repeat of sweltering conditions of the power went out for some of these people that proved to be deadly during her can hear about twelve people died and recently for workers from the nursing home where were charged because those deaths were deemed homicides this time they have made sure that places have better up power generators and and backed up but they had to evacuate some some places that we're just in danger of flooding that there's a lot of communities in northeast Florida especially Jacksonville and Saint Augustine that flooded in past storms even when the storm did not hit them directly those plans were put into place and according to the state people got out as needed and and hopefully the storm would be as bad as as it could have been and and my despair all there was the tragedy of a dozen people who died two years ago during Irma in a nursing home lost all its air conditioning in a power outage I mean this is you know not Florida's first rodeo when it comes to hurricanes and neither was Irma would they have the systems down Pat by now. you know on the one hand you would think that Florida is perhaps the best prepared state because we do get so many hurricanes on the other hand every emergency manager will tell you that every storm is different and that they learn something each time and so my did require new regulations and the state law setting higher and marched at more strict standards for what the power back up had to be at nursing homes especially including that they have to keep comfortable temperatures for people who are who are really vulnerable to the heat I think some of those regulations were first tested last year during hurricane Michael which hit the panhandle but a lot of places still don't have all the equipment in place that they should especially nursing homes which tend to be larger are still you know it takes awhile for them to make these investments to over there for structure and so I think that's going to be an ongoing process for the state so now the climate change angle and I know.

Brian Lehrer two years one hand
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There's the Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone and here's one central thing to know about the firing of police officer Daniel Pantaleo yesterday he was fired by NYPD commissioner James o'neill not for applying a band show cold to Eric garner throughout but for continuing to apply it after garner was effectively subdued NYPD court ruled that while certainly not preferable that old was acceptable during that brief moment in time because the risk of falling through the window was so high but that eggs engine circumstance no longer existed the court found one officer Pantaleo Mister Garnham moved to the ground o'neill so later this hour we will play an extended excerpt of commissioner o'neill statement announcing the firing of officer Pantaleo you've been hearing brief sound bites elsewhere we will give you commissioner o'neill's complete ration out in his own words a luxury of our long format including what the famous video of the incident looked like to him and commission on deals gone agonize grappling with both sides so that's coming up first though with all the headline grabbers that have been in the news the last few days you may have missed this story which we could say is shocking in its simplicity a US appeals court on Thursday ruled that migrant children detained by the U. S. government must be given soap dry clothes and clean bedding sure say that again because it doesn't sound like a matter for federal court it's true a US appeals court on Thursday ruled that migrant children detained by the US government must be given so dry clothes in clean betting and yes I guess your tax dollars paid for the trump administration's argument that the law does not require migrant children detained by the US government to be given so dry clothes and clean betting but that appeal was rejected we'll see I guess if they decide to ask the United States Supreme Court to declare soap would detain children a discretionary amenity my first guest today would have something to say about that he is US senator Jeff Merkley of Oregon because he serves out west in the state not call California senator Merkley is not so well known around here but among other things that may jog your memory about who he is I'm Sarah Merkley co authored the vocal rule after the two thousand eight financial crisis remember that the vocal rule which prohibits banks from making some of the kinds of high risk investments that help bring on the crisis and bring down the economy interestingly Merkley if I've got my history right hell confinement or deny it also voted against confirmation of Obama nominee Ben Bernanke for federal reserve board chairman because he thought Bernanke was too easy on the banks before the crisis became full blown we'll see what he thinks today maybe some of you saw The New York Times website has a front page story today about the too big to fail banks wanting to ease the rules again right now for how much they need to keep in cash reserves for back up if they're bubbles burst again Jeff Merkley was the only U. S. senator to support Bernie Sanders for the democratic presidential nomination in twenty sixteen Merkley may be the only Democrat in the entire U. S. Senate to consider running for president in twenty twenty but the site to seek reelection instead okay maybe that's an exaggeration he filibustered the Supreme Court nomination of Neil Gorsuch for fifteen hours on the Senate floor and it was a video of Merkley added child detention center in Brownsville Texas that went viral in June of last year and help put the issue of family separation in the center of the American conversation did you ever watch this moment where he interacts with the police officer there who is not letting him man to inspect the facility I'm a US.

Brian Lehrer fifteen hours
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:52 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's the Brian Lehrer show on WNYC fee angry at Bernstein, filling in for Brian Lehrer with us, now, one of the founders of black lives matter at Lisa Garza. She's also a founder and principal of the think tank and activist group called the black futures lab. She's the director of strategy and partnerships at the national domestic workers, alliance and a founder of supermajority a clearinghouse for women's activism. Maybe you saw her up, Ed in the New York Times this week called, dear candidates, here is what black people want, which was pegged to the release on Tuesday of a extremely large survey called the black census project. Thank you for joining us. Lisa garza. Glad you're on WNYC today. Thank you so much for having me. So tell us about the black census project. What, what was the project looking to do? Sure. Well, the black of project was really geared towards doing a number of different things. The first thing that we wanted to make sure to do is to start the path of making black people powerful in politics, what we know is that black communities are incredibly diverse. But yet, the ways in which communities are engaged, politically doesn't actually take advantage about level of diversity, what we are concerned about is making sure that black voices black concerns and black experiences get represented at the state level at the federal level, and what we did to that end was we set out to talk to as many black people as we possibly could about what we are experiencing in the economy in democracy, and in our society, and we have a black communities, very simple question, which is what is it that you wanna see for your future? We talked to black people who lived in rural and urban areas. We talked to liberal. In conservative black communities. We even have to black people who are currently, and formerly incarcerated. And what we found was really incredible. Most of the people that we talked to said that they really had never been asked these types of questions about their experiences. They had not been asked what they want to see out of their democracy. They not been asked what they wanna see in terms of changes to the economy, if we were to project forward, I would say that's a pretty dangerous proposition for the twenty twenty elections. Black people are the most consistent base of the Democratic Party. And yet, the majority of people that we talked to said that they feel very strongly that politicians don't care about them or their experiences and that instead, they care more about big business. And so these are things to consider for candidates and their campaigns. How do you engage communities? In such a way that they can be activated motivated, and energized in the twenty twenty election so that we can change what's happening in the White House. So let's unpack some of that I am curious though just for starters. Your sample size, was thirty one thousand which is he entry? How did you go about getting that all that data? We are really proud of our methodology actually, we intentionally surveyed communities that are often left out of traditional polls, the way that we did, it was that we utilize both online and offline strategies. Online. We partnered with organizations that have huge following that our civil rights organizations like color of change, or black, who have millions of members that join them online to figure out how they can address the problems that they face in their communities, so partnering with those types of organizations allowed us to reach a wide swath of black communities, but we also know that not everybody person is online, and that actually there are barriers for many black communities tax us, the internet. So what we did with Bill partnerships with more than thirty grassroots black led organizations across the nation and twenty eight states and we help to ensure that they. Were able to not only administer the survey at self but we also train those organizations in the art and the science of community organizing and what we were able to accomplish this together more than half of our survey responses in that way, we partnered with organizations, specifically that are rooted in and have deep relationships with some of the communities, under the umbrella of black communities, that are traditionally left out of conversations. We partnered with organizations that work with currently incarcerated people. We partnered with organizations that work with black people who are lesbian gay, bisexual transgender gender. Non conforming. We worked with organizations that were rooted in black communities that were liberal and black communities that were conservative again. We didn't have a dog in the race about what people's politics were, we really wanted to better understand when we're talking about black. Communities. What are the issues that black communities care about, and what a black communities wanna see, for our future, and that's how we were able to reach more than thirty one thousand people that is an impressive number. So, so let's talk about unpacking some of the data that you found. And it's pretty sobering you, you were just alluding to this. But the poll revealed eighty four percent said politicians care about rich people. A lot seventy seven percent said politicians care about white people, a lot just four percent said they care about black people. A lot in three percent, said poor people a lot. So I guess, you know, those are some pretty sobering numbers. I mean, other than the question about sort of the Raisch, the race question of the rich poor question. Is that different from a population sort of Representative of the whole population of the US? Is that significantly more pessimist? Well, I think it's a question of pessimism inside of the most consistent base of the Democratic Party. I think what we're finding in this period is that people are not only cynical about politics, but they are cynical about their government Representative serving them as opposed to serving the wealthy incorporations. And that is something that turns people away from politics and frankly turns people away from participating when people feel like they are up against Goliath. There's not really much incentive for them to show up to the polls. Now what we know about black communities is that it's a little bit different. Black communities tend to be very pragmatic as it relates to elections, and impresses, where there aren't deliberate efforts to keep what people away from the polls, and we should talk about that. You know, black folks are turning out. However, I think what we find and this is true, not just about black communities, but voters across the board is that we have low participation in elections and low participation in elections, has a lot to do with people feeling like change doesn't happen on that level, where in a different kind of situation right now where certainly in twenty sixteen the United States allowed a person into the White House who is changing the rules in ways that are also supporting the limiting of people's participation. While also turning up the heat on some of the issues that are impacting our most vulnerable communities and black communities are no exception there. There are a lot of efforts that are gearing up right now to change what's happening in the White House in twenty twenty and those efforts cannot be successful, if they do not have a clear and strategic plan to keep black voters engaged motivated and activated. And to expand the number of black people who go to the polls. This is really what this survey helps to eliminate are the issues that keep people from believing that change is possible, government level, the issues that are impacting black communities lives every single day, and how their lives are being impacted, and it actually is a window for candidates, and their campaigns and current and perspective, elected officials to better understand what black communities that we serve eight. At least want to see done about the. Problems that exist in our communities. So I would say that the black, census project is really a gift, it's a gift to people who are trying to save our democracy, and it's a gift to people who are seeking to represent us inside of our democracy. And we really hope that candidates, their campaigns and other efforts that are attempting to figure out how to change the balance of power in twenty twenty are really paying attention to the results of this report. My guest is Lisa Garza. She is the founder and a principle of the think tank and activist group called the black futures lab and the author of a recent op Ed deer candidates, here is what black people want. So if you have a question or a comment on that, please give us a call at two one two, four three three WNYC two one two four three nine six nine to with your calls for at least the Garza. So one of the things that you talk about in Europe. Ed piece is about. Sort of the, the ritual, every year of candidates going to have fried chicken in Harlem with hot sauce. You didn't mention this. But there's almost always a stop at Sylvia's and how frustrating that is sort of that sort of gesture, but the sort of meaning in the dialogue stops there, so talked a little bit. And I presume you're talking now to the democratic field. What is it that you would like to see from the candidates? Well, one of the things that we should just be super clear about is exactly what you said, Sylvia's is a great restaurant. So let's just be clear about that food is incredible. But that can't be the totality of engagement, the candidates, do with black communities. And I believe that Sylvia's and others would probably agree with that this isn't an indictment on food. It's an indictment on the ways in which candidates, and their campaigns shortchange black communities by engaging symbolically rather than substantively, many, people might be surprised to know that there are black people that don't even like fried chicken. As a result, you're going to have to do a little bit more in order to capture votes. One of the things that is important for us to communicate to candidates and their campaigns. When you use these types of symbols that in some ways, draw on stereotypes about our communities. It makes it clear to buck communities that not only do you not have a relationship with us. But you may or may not be interested in developing a deeper, one candidates and campaigns should engage communities in the ways that we exist and anybody who's ever been to a black person's household during the holiday season. Nossa black communities are incredibly complex. We have, you know, our boozy cousin. Right. We have our cousin from the hood of we have our black power goal. Right. We have our church going grandmother. And so the reality is, if you wanna engage a black family, you've got engaged black family. You've got to go. Oh, to number of different places where black people are you have to be able to be fluent in the experiences that black people are having whether it's healthcare, and particularly when you go into the south, you need to be able to talk about how you're going to expand programs like Medicaid and Medicare, you need to be able to talk about the, the racial dynamics that exist in, you know, keeping money from expanding programs that disproportionately help black communities in particular, have access to healthcare, you've got a dress not only student debt, but you have to address the cost of college, you've gotta understand that most black families in this country, make at least ten thousand dollars less than the cost of one year of a four year. Public college, you've got to be able to address those issues and unfortunately, fried chicken and hot sauce won't get you there. What will get you? There are. Town halls and other meaningful. Avenues of engagement where you are asking black people. What it is that we are experiencing where you are listening to those experiences where you're listening to the idea that we have for solutions and where you're putting policy solutions forward that not only address the issue itself, but address the impact of structural racism on those issues so that black people can benefit from the changes that you're proposing in the first place. Let's take some calls listeners and black listeners in particular. We invite you to talk to at least Garza a black lives, matter founder and now leading groups, including the black futures lab, which has just published. It's black census project. A survey of thirty one thousand people tweet at Brian Lehrer or call us at two one two, four three three WNYC, two one two four three three nine six nine. To maybe you want to answer one of the black census questions, like what are your top priorities for the next president? Or how can you feel?.

Lisa Garza founder Brian Lehrer White House WNYC Sylvia founder and principal Democratic Party United States New York Times Ed director of strategy Harlem Europe Bernstein Bill government Representative Representative
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You. Could get the Brian Lehrer mug coffee mug. And then we throw in the fair trade coffee. So or whatever gift you choose. You also get the coffee, and so it's a great incentive if the programming isn't. And you know, I've said here and past pledge drives that we really don't care how little money you donate the point of this membership organization that's trying to be community radio. Is that everybody who listens on the radio listen to on a regular basis donates a little bit. We don't want to be accountable to just a few people with deeper pockets. We really want this to be a community organization in its structure, and it's funding. And that's why the programming comes out the way it does. And so there's no minimum on membership anything that you choose to voluntarily donate. Makes you a member of WNYC. It's just like that. And this thank you gift for this morning is consistent with that. Idea. So any donation no matter how small we will send you this twelve ounce can of WNYC bland, which I don't know what that means. But it's gotta be good coffee from the Brooklyn roasting company, any donation at all and one thing that you might want to do is match it with the Brian Lehrer show mug, which we'll also send you, you know, coffee mug get it for a ninety one dollar donation to the station or the quarter a day club. Because if you were to donate a quarter a day to WNYC magin that's lot any radio where you just had to put in a quarter in that was your your pay to listen to WNYC for the course of a full day. You wouldn't think much about it? Right. It's a quarter. Put it in a slot yet. I got my. So we're stabbing we hereby established today the quarter a day club for supporting WNYC and that adds up to.

Brian Lehrer WNYC Brooklyn ninety one dollar twelve ounce
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's the Brian Lehrer show on WNYC. Good morning, again, everyone many poor people today than a month ago. No the name and face of Arizona, Senator Jeff flake for better or for worse or for tortured ambivalence. Of course, this came as a result of when California professor Christine Blasi Ford delivered her allegations of sexual assault against the now supreme court Justice spread Cavanaugh flake was the sole Republican defector on the judiciary committee to call for the FBI to investigate. But the next week voted to confirm flake confirmed later that in the end he was always planning to likely vote for bread cavenaugh, but the nation needed a bipartisan pause in his opinion, regardless the call still made him a household name. And a short lived hero for Democrats. My next guest this American life producers Zoe chase had been accompanying the Senator in the days before and really the weeks before and sometime after that historic decision originally, not thinking. She was doing a cavenaugh story, and she chronicle those moments for powerful and thoughtful episode of this American life that some of you have heard called the unhappy deciders. Hi, Zoe, welcome to WNYC today. Thanks so much for having me, Brian. It's exciting. So you thought you were following Jeff flake for a different story before this nomination fight exploded. Well, I I don't know ABC. I would put it exactly that way. It's more than I thought I was done with Jeff flake before the nomination fight exploded because they had done this this this long story for this American life about Jeff flake trying to get a deal done, you know, the basically legal status for undocumented immigrants, and it's really hard to do a deal like that around immigration reform when you're a Republican running for office. He is not a Republican running for office. He's just a Republican who's retired from the Senate. So he thought he could do a bipartisan deal turns out he could not this is not a moment for bipartisanship, then this cavenaugh thing. So then do that story that's three areas. Then this cavenaugh thing heats up, and I see the Jeff flake is in the middle of it. And he's looking as as you pointed out as tortured Lee ambivalent as he always is. And I called them and said, hey, can I hang out with you figure this out? And that's why the title for the piece. The happy the I'm sorry. The unhappy deciders, right? Yeah. Exactly. He was not happy about having to to make this decision. And when I called him, and we talked before I went down there just to see if if there was a piece to do if he was truly undecided. He truly was I believe he really was in that he had a limited amount of time to make up his mind, and he did that kind of in front of the whole country. Here's just twelve seconds from your episode of flake agonizing over the cavenaugh decision. Debate staff.

Senator Jeff flake WNYC Zoe chase Brian Lehrer Christine Blasi Ford Arizona FBI California Senator assault ABC professor Senate Lee twelve seconds
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian lehrer on wnyc so are democrats counting their proverbial chickens before they hatch in counting on a blue wave to wrest control of the house and maybe even the senate in november that's what jonathan alter suggest in his most recent daily beast column he warns that republican money and a search for progressively pure candidates and democratic primaries could backfire and he uses the cynthia nixon primary challenge of the more centrist andrew cuomo as a prime example even though it's not a congressional race and he joins me now jonathan who's written two books about president obama among other things welcome back to wnyc thanks very much brian democrats with their head screwed on right or reviving an old ethic party and country over personal preference tell me why you think cynthia nixon's candidacy is quote screwing well first of all i think she has the perfect way to ron and i i think she is arguably doing some some good things in pushing andrew cuomo to the left so that's that's been interesting and people have a perfect right to vote for her my concern is what they do with their support for her and what that support in terms of time and money means because you could argue that every dollar that goes to a a primary fight like that especially one with a lot of publicity is one less dollar that would go to elect a.

Brian lehrer senate andrew cuomo obama brian democrats ron cynthia nixon jonathan president
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian lehrer on wnyc and maybe you like many people were surprised to look at the new york times on tuesday and see an op ed piece by a retired supreme court justice calling for the repeal of the second amendment that doesn't happen every day so we called the new york times and asked can we get stevens on our show to talk about his call for the repeal of the second amendment and the answer sort of was yes justice stevens wouldn't do it but coincidentally new york times columnist brad stevens no relation different spelling also wrote a recent column calling for the repeal of the second amendment and he is our next guest now some of you know brad stevens is one of the times conservative columnists he had long been with the wall street journal editorial page but his mix of us is unique to him he's a nevertrumper also whenever putin are but he also wrote a pro john bolton colin the other day and a pro mike pompeo column a few days before that endorsing trump's hawkish new security team and yes he's a conservative who calls for repeal of the second amendment brad stevens joins us now thanks so much for coming on you're a pretty real stevenson my book your article actually goes much deeper than justice stevens one does but i think you injustice stevens agree on the premise that the second amendment is a relic of the eighteenth century can you start there to make your case.

Brian lehrer the new york times brad stevens putin mike pompeo trump york times wall street journal john bolton