35 Burst results for "Brian Lehrer"

Ryan Crocker, Former Ambassador to Afghanistan, Decries "Catastrophic" Withdrawal

Brian Lehrer

01:28 min | 1 year ago

Ryan Crocker, Former Ambassador to Afghanistan, Decries "Catastrophic" Withdrawal

Mayor De Blasio Announces 'Hometown Heroes' Ticker Tape Parade

Brian Lehrer

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Mayor De Blasio Announces 'Hometown Heroes' Ticker Tape Parade

"Amanda Blasio has announced a ticker tape parade through the Canyon of Heroes for next month to honor essential workers. That announcement apparently omitted funeral workers got them as reported. Ben Jaca says many of them feel the role they play throughout the pandemic has been overlooked. It seems as though people are still really uncomfortable talking about death and talking about the really stark scary things that happened last year when it came to these refrigerator trucks. And all the bodies literally piling up all around the city. City Hall spokesperson says they always planned on including funeral workers in the July 7th

Amanda Blasio Ben Jaca City Hall
U.S. and Iran Holding Talks Via Nuclear Deal Signatories

Brian Lehrer

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. and Iran Holding Talks Via Nuclear Deal Signatories

"Countries are doing their utmost to resurrect the Iran nuclear deal in the coming months. Talks open tomorrow with two other signatories to the accord, China and Russia. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports France is calling on Iran to show a constructive stents. Following a call with his Iranian counterpart over the weekend, French Foreign Minister Jeeva Julianne said in a statement that he's asked Iran to refrain from further violations of current nuclear commitments. The U. S. Will not take part directly and discussions Tuesday. But for the first time since the Trump administration pulled out of the Iran agreement in 2018 and reimpose sanctions, Ah U S delegation will be present. The 2015 accord lifted economic sanctions on Iran in return for restrictions on its nuclear program. The talks are intended to help identify steps necessary to return to full compliance with the nuclear deal. Iran says U. S sanctions must first be removed. Eleanor

Iran Eleanor Beardsley Jeeva Julianne Trump Administration NPR Russia France China U. Eleanor
Minneapolis police chief begins testifying in Derek Chauvin trial

Brian Lehrer

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Minneapolis police chief begins testifying in Derek Chauvin trial

"Or hearing from the Minneapolis police chief who's been quoted saying he believes George Floyd's death was murder. The prosecution is focusing on police Department training that show Vin has cited in defense of his actions during Floyd's arrest last year. During which the officer kept his knee on Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes earlier, the jury heard from the emergency room doctor who pronounced Floyd dead after trying to resuscitate him. Prosecutor Gerry Blackwell as Dr Bradford Longer felt if the paramedics who reported to the scene of Floyd's arrest Indicated they suspected a drug overdose or heart attack. There was no report that, for example, the patient complained of chest pain, or was clutching his chest at any point or having any other symptoms to suggest the heart attack that information was absent. The witness testified that based on the information he had at the time he believed that Floyd most likely died from asphyxiation. The other officers charged in connection with Floyd's death are expected to stand trial this summer. The White House

Floyd George Floyd Gerry Blackwell Dr Bradford Minneapolis VIN Police Department Heart Attack White House
What the Deal to Legalize Marijuana Means for New Yorkers

Brian Lehrer

01:53 min | 1 year ago

What the Deal to Legalize Marijuana Means for New Yorkers

"Cuomo reportedly struck a deal yesterday. To begin the process of legalizing recreational cannabis for adult use. In New York state proponents contend that opening the state up to legal weed will create an industry that will generate tens of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in tax revenue for the state. Yesterday's agreement specifically addresses the punishing toll that the uneven enforcement of low level marijuana offenses in the state has had on poor black and brown communities. It includes a provision to re invest millions in tax revenue generated from cannabis sales. Into these communities, and the state plans to set aside a portion of business licenses for people of color and women. Now, these plans have generally not produced the intended equity results. In other legal weed states. So can New York do better? What are the terms of the agreement? Why now? And when will you be able to walk into a store and buy some with me now on these questions, and more is Alice and Martin, co founder of Cannabis Wire, a news organization covering the cannabis industry nationally and globally she's been described as the queen of the we'd beat. And she's monitoring the legislative proceedings in Albany. Very closely. Hi, Alison. Welcome back to W. N Y. C. Hey, Brian. Thanks for having me. I always love coming back and let's start with that basic last question first, if this does pass next week. When can people walk into a store or I guess they'll be called dispensaries and buy marijuana products illegally. Well, you know, I don't have a crystal ball like anyone else. But I would say Ballpark at least a year, maybe two years. It takes time to get the market up and running. It takes that much time. Well, rulemaking. Of course, that's that's really the sort of sausage maker after bills passed, then you know a lot of lot of heads, get into the room and figure out sort of the nitty gritty details. Will there be any

Cuomo Cannabis Wire New York W. N Y. C. Hey Alice Martin Albany Alison Brian
CDC warns movie theaters are dangerous places to be if you are not vaccinated against Coronavirus

Brian Lehrer

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

CDC warns movie theaters are dangerous places to be if you are not vaccinated against Coronavirus

"Let me start here. Movie theaters We opened in New York City over the weekend. We've we did a call in on that for people who went back to the movies in the city. This weekend. They've been open many other places for a while with capacity limits. Is there any good data on covert spread and movie theaters? You know, there's plenty of data that shows that Cove. It does spread quite effectively and closed indoor settings. And so that is still technically considered a high risk setting. And I would say I would only recommend doing something like that unless he if you were fully vaccinated, and you know that the people that you were going whether fully vaccinated that I'm gonna always there on the conservative side here. But indoor activity has always been considered based on the data, high risk

New York City
New York City high school reopening plan coming next week

All Things Considered

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

New York City high school reopening plan coming next week

"Mayor De Blasio says he is aiming for public schools to reopen fully next fall. Wi sees Jessica Gould has more the era of hybrid learning could be over soon. Speaking on the Brian Lehrer show, the mayor said he envisions welcoming back all students in person in the fall. We will be fully open in September. There would be five day a week instruction for everyone. But de Blasio says some students may prefer learning virtually and the city plans to offer an all remote option as well. More immediately, he says, next week he'll be announcing a date for high schools to reopen to in person students. Hey, schools opened in October but shut again in November when Corona virus cases started to rise sharply. Elementary schools have been open since December. Middle schools reopened last

Mayor De Blasio Jessica Gould De Blasio Brian Lehrer
Ron Johnson Makes Senate Read 600-Page COVID Relief Bill Aloud

Brian Lehrer

01:37 min | 1 year ago

Ron Johnson Makes Senate Read 600-Page COVID Relief Bill Aloud

"Got to this morning's official debate on the coronavirus relief bill in the Senate Republican Senator Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, decided to make a show of his opposition to the bill by having the Senate clerks read out loud the entire 628 page thing. New York Times notes as a point of reference that the sixth Harry Potter book clocked in at 652 pages, and many of you know how thick that was, By the way, that was Harry Potter and the half Blood Prince. In case you were wondering Imagine reading the whole half blood Prince allowed without a break. The relief bill took 10 hours and 44 minutes at about the same length. Here's 44 seconds of what that was like. Section 27 oh five funding for grants for healthcare providers to promote mental health among their health Professional workforce section 27 06 funding for community based funding for local substance use. Disorder Services section 27 oh seven funding for community based funding for local behavior. Health needs section 27 away funding for the National child Traumatic Stress Network. Section 27 09 funding for Project Aware section 27 10 funding for you Suicide prevention section 27 11 funding for behavioral health, workforce, education and training. Section 27 12 funding for pediatric mental health care access section 27 13 funding for expansion grants for certified community behavioral health. on it went. The reading ended at just after two in the morning. Washington Time

Senator Ron Johnson Harry Potter Senate Wisconsin New York Times National Child Traumatic Stres Washington
Calls for Governor Cuomo to step down

Brian Lehrer

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Calls for Governor Cuomo to step down

"Small group of progressive activists and elected officials marched outside Governor Cuomo's office yesterday and called on him to resign. WN my sees George Joseph has more The protesters were outnumbered by the press, but they were passionate Amelia did. Cotton, a Queens Democratic district leader, says she made up her mind after hearing about the dubious nursing home death numbers and the harassment allegations. If I were in a workplace and I had those allegations, I'd be fired, and there's no reason that the governor of New York State should be held to a lower standard than anyone else. Most Democratic leaders haven't done the same. Instead, they've been asking for an independent investigation. Cuomo did not respond to W. N. Y C his request for

Governor Cuomo George Joseph Amelia Cotton New York Cuomo W. N.
New York Sues Amazon, Saying It Inadequately Protected NYC Workers From Covid-19

Brian Lehrer

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

New York Sues Amazon, Saying It Inadequately Protected NYC Workers From Covid-19

"New York's attorney general, is suing Amazon over the company's alleged mistreatment of workers during the pandemic. Attorney General Leticia James says the company failed to take adequate health and safety measures. To protect employees in New York, for example, by knowingly operating at Staten Island warehouse with dozens of workers who had the Corona virus and not notifying other workers who came into contact with them. James says the company also illegally fired employees who raised concerns. A spokesperson for Amazon says the lawsuit doesn't paint an accurate picture of the company's actions. It sued James's office last week, alleging that she is overstepping

Attorney General Leticia James Staten Island Warehouse New York Amazon James
Iran issues rare threat to develop nuclear weapon if "pushed"

Brian Lehrer

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Iran issues rare threat to develop nuclear weapon if "pushed"

"His country could push for a nuclear weapon if international sanctions remain in place. The remarks were carried today on state TV. And they mark a rare occasion that a government official says Iran could reverse its course on the nuclear program. A judge has Excuse me. A judge has

Iran
New York City Mayoral Candidates Unite To Stop "Superspreader" Ballot Petitioning

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

New York City Mayoral Candidates Unite To Stop "Superspreader" Ballot Petitioning

"New York City public advocate Germany. Williams and seven of the leading mayoral candidates are urging city and state leaders to suspend ballot petitioning under city and state law, candidates must gather thousands of eligible signatures to secure a spot on the June primary ballot on the Brian Lehrer Show. Mayor de Blasio said he thinks candidates need to do something to show grassroots support. There's lots of ways that could be done, potentially including online, so I very much would like to see. Change here because we're in the middle of pandemic, but I am not certain that something can do alone. DiBlasio says he thinks the change would need to be made at the state level.

Mayor De Blasio New York City Williams Germany Diblasio
South African Variant Of Covid mutations May Be Stealthier

Brian Lehrer

00:59 min | 1 year ago

South African Variant Of Covid mutations May Be Stealthier

"And let's start with some of this vaccines versus variants news you recently wrote. Madonna and Fizer Both said their vaccines were effective against new variants of the coronavirus discovered in Britain in South Africa, but they are slightly less protective. Against the variant in South Africa. Why might the South African variant B stealthier So the South African variant has some mutations that are very tricky. It has one in particular that's called the Forward four K that changes the shape off the spike protein a little bit That's the protein that the vaccines are using to generate an immune response. And so the idea is that if the shape of the protein has changed a little bit that the antibodies find it a little bit harder to latch on to the protein, so the vaccines are a little bit less effective. Good news, though, is that they are effective. I mean, these vaccines are so good, so much better than we need them to be that it's not really a big deal to lose a little bit of their

Fizer South Africa Madonna Britain
Black and Latino New Yorkers Trail White Residents in Vaccine Rollout, New York

Brian Lehrer

04:16 min | 1 year ago

Black and Latino New Yorkers Trail White Residents in Vaccine Rollout, New York

"Sharon W. N. Y. C. And since the earliest days of the pandemic, as you know, black and Latino people in New York City have died from covert 19 at twice the rate of White New Yorkers. Now is vaccines become available. Those communities that have been hit the hardest are not getting prioritized in a rollout system that seems to be giving an advantage to groups that skew whiter and wealthier. According to City data released over the weekend, three white residents received a covert 19 vaccine for every black or Latino person in the city. So more specifics. White people make up 32% of the city's population. Would have received 48% of vaccine doses. Well, Latino residents make up 29% of New York City residents, They comprise only 15% of vaccine takers. The black community accounts for a quarter of the city. But their vaccination wait is nearly 11%. The data is incomplete because a large portion of non city run vaccination sites and failed to report vaccinations by race, But public health experts say that this data that we have shows a definite and concerning trend that is being repeated in much of the country. With me now is City Council member Mark Levin. He chairs the council's Health committee and is calling on the city to make specific changes to its vaccine rollout. And we also have doctor who J. Blackstock. She has some of you know, from her appearances on this show and elsewhere, is an emergency medicine physician, founder and CEO of advancing Health Equity and Yahoonews Medical contributor. She has suggestions for the Biden Harris administration to fix an excellent equities in the distribution system. At the national level. Welcome back to WN my see both of you. Hi, Good morning. Brand. Thank you so much Frying and council member for listeners who did not hear the mayor's press conference on this over the weekend. Can you further elaborate on the data that was released? I know you and others. I've been calling for its release for weeks. Well, we We have an incomplete picture. Brian. I want to stress that we only got a piece of the data which illuminates inequality, but it does offer race and ethnicity breakdowns and you ran through them. White New Yorkers are getting vaccinated at triple the rate. Of African American Latino New Yorkers. Really, That's the discrepancy. That's even greater than some of the other covert inequality that we've been seeing in this crisis. But we're still lacking something really fundamental. We have no zip code level data. Which could compare the Upper East Side to the South Bronx, Um, another critical view of inequality. It's really perplexing that it hasn't been released yet. Because the day that the data is there. The city collects addresses on everyone in vaccinate, so we're still fighting for more transparency. It's not too soon. To get beyond hand breaking ringing and 0.2 solutions. We need to fix this. We need a new Web registration system that stop blocking out people who don't have tech savvy or English language skills. We need to stop. Of crowding out people in vaccination sites and low income neighborhoods who are competing against people generally white, middle and upper income people from all over the region. We can do that. By having prioritization and scheduling for local neighborhoods at their vaccine site. We need to change eligibility and away that fixes the era of committing so many critical groups like people who deliver food people who work in taxis in restaurants, nail salons, people who are who are incarcerated. And finally find we have toe get out of City facilities and go door to door. We have to be going door to door. Vaccinate. We actually can't deliver the vaccine door to door for people who are homebound. Other states are doing this and also simply to make appointments for people who are not able to Get onto a home computer. Let's go door to door with ipads and sign people up. This problem can be addressed and we need to not just talk about it. We need serious action. To reboot our equity strategy for

Sharon W. N. Y. C. J. Blackstock New York City Advancing Health Equity Yahoonews Medical Biden Harris Administration Frying And Council White New Yorkers Mark Levin Health Committee City Council South Bronx Brian
Amanda Gorman makes history as youngest inaugural poet

Brian Lehrer

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Amanda Gorman makes history as youngest inaugural poet

"It's interesting that Democrats choose to honor poets and Republicans aren't really into that. That aspect of the inauguration. I think it's really Really beautiful the way poets have been able to stitch together an American collective narrative through their poems. You know, in the past democratic inaugurations, I've remember my Angelou. Marry Angelo reciting that poem, and I think that was the first time that I was moved really internally moved by hearing her words and then, obviously Elizabeth Alexander. So I'm looking forward to today. I think s so many of us feel a five relief but also cautiously optimistic. I mean, we we do know that there are domestic terrorists of sort of threatened to ruin this day, so I think a lot of people want to get to 12 o'clock. And they want to get sort of. They want to savor the day but also get through the day. So it feels like a new administration is on followed footing. And here's maybe where the poetry and prose meat a little bit as reported in USA Today this morning. Amanda Gorman told the AP that she was not given specific instructions on what to write for the inaugural poem, but that she was encouraged to emphasize unity and hope. Over quote, denigrating anyone or declaring Ding Dong. The witch is dead over the departure of President Donald Trump. She's calling her inaugural poem The Hill we climb. Woman says she has been given five minutes to read. I believe the My Angelo poem also was five minutes prior to what she called the Confederate insurrection on January 6th. She had only written about 3.5 minutes worth, she told the AP. She said That day gave me a second wave of energy to finish the poem, adding that she will not refer directly to January 6 but will touch upon it. She said the capital mob did not upend the poem she had been working on because They didn't surprise her and quote the poem isn't blind. It isn't turning your back to the evidence of discord and division. So some

Marry Angelo Elizabeth Alexander Amanda Gorman President Donald Trump Angelo Poem AP Ding Dong USA
Capitol officer praised as a hero for handling of mob

Brian Lehrer

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Capitol officer praised as a hero for handling of mob

"Of alone Capitol police officer who happened to be black, now being described as a hero, letting rioters inside the Capitol chase him. As he chose his path strategically to draw them away from where members of the Senate were and toward a different room, where he had backups waiting.

Capitol Police Senate
Gynecologist on what is known about COVID-19 vaccines benefits, risks for pregnant women

Brian Lehrer

03:51 min | 1 year ago

Gynecologist on what is known about COVID-19 vaccines benefits, risks for pregnant women

"Lindsay and Randolph you're on w. N. Y. C with vaccine expert Dr Ruth Karen from Johns Hopkins. Hi, Lindsay. I thank you guys so much for having my call. Sure. Sure. No. I am currently 25 weeks pregnant and health care worker so I am eligible in my feet. Get the vaccine and actually have an appointment on Friday. You know there's super limited data on pregnant women getting the vaccine and so I was just curious as to your thoughts about pregnant women. Getting the vaccine on, but the potential risks and benefits are to that. Right. So, um, So thank you for that question. Lindsay, and I think it's I think it's a question that probably many people, and maybe many of the listeners here have, um, what I would say is that we, um, unfortunately, we don't yet have a lot of data from studies and pregnant women. For either of these vaccines. We do have some data. There were women in the trials who this trial's did not include pregnant women. But there were women who became pregnant and the course of the trials. Just a very small number for each trial on Bui have not seen any adverse outcomes from those, um, from those studies. Um, but again, those air very small numbers. Um, there is, um, you know, I'm sure that you've seen the statement from the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Um, which Is somewhat helpful and that it goes through some of the considerations. But at the end of the day says, Of course this is a decision between you and your, um, your health care provider. There is not evidence that M R and a can harm a pregnant woman or harm the fetus. We do not have that, Um, that kind of evidence. Um, and there is not Theoretical reason to think that these that this product would be harmful. There are side effects of these vaccines that pregnant women might particularly want to note and fever is something in particular. And I believe a cock has recommendations around pre medication for fever, You know, considerations around pre medication for fever, particularly In the case of pregnant women. Um I can tell you interestingly, of course, um, recommendations for pregnant women very in countries. So in the US, we have what's called this permissive recommendation. Um, the UK Great. Britain has recently changed its recommendations They initially recommended not using the vaccine and pregnant women. They're now saying that pregnant women Who are on the front lines because they're for example, because their healthcare workers should consider using the vaccine. Muchas we are saying in the U. S. And Israel. Pregnant women are being prioritized for vaccination on day. There are many pregnant women who are because of their risks that you know the risks of covert and pregnant women. Pregnant women are at greater risk. A serious disease from Cove it than non pregnant individuals. And so that is why that population is being prioritized in Israel right now. Um Boy, the visor of vaccine and likely will be the same for them. A daring A

Lindsay N. Y. C Dr Ruth Karen American College Of Obstetrics Johns Hopkins Randolph Fever BUI Britain UK U. Israel United States
New York City’s mayoral election needs an upgrade

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

New York City’s mayoral election needs an upgrade

"Democrats running for the office of New York City mayor. But some political analysts say the candidates haven't offered enough specifics about what direction they want to take the city in W NY sees Brian Lehrer show Daily News columnist Harry Siegel said few of the Democratic candidates have released detailed policies and plans including around crime, and the NYPD. The police need to be doing more Do they need to be doing Wes? We have the right number of police is this is this way too many Can we afford this? Given the massive budget shortfall. The city has that those are the sort of questions I want to hear these candidates engaging with now. The Democratic mayoral primary is on June 22nd

Harry Siegel Brian Lehrer New York City NY Nypd WES
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That you might want to share? That other families might pick up on and where everyone can stay warm and covert free gifts. Call Now to share your Christmas state plans at 646435 70 to 80 or you can tweet at Brian Lehrer. Are you one of those people who didn't get on a plane this year? If so, how did your family members take it when they wanted you to come? If that was the case, what sorts of conversations did you have? And how are you planning to do Christmas? Virtually give us some inspiration now. From people still trying to figure it out at the last minute by calling 646435 70 to 80 are there some listeners who are visiting family How did you justify it? What sort of precautions are you taking? Did you say isolate for 10 days and then drive 13 hours home without stopping in a public restroom. By the way, it's not what we're recommending. We're just curious 646435. 70 to 80. And what about Some of those of you with the day off tomorrow. Don't celebrate Christmas always heard the joke Growing up. What a juice. Go do on Christmas, go to the movies and then out for Chinese food because those restaurants were open on Christmas. Since we can't go to movie theaters and indoor dining is generally a bad idea right now. How you spending the day if you have it off, and you're not celebrating Christmas, you're invited to 646435 70 to 80. But mostly, this is a call in For people who do celebrate Christmas and for whom it's an important day and how you are navigating it. In this pandemic, and has it been tough with your family? If you decided not to show up or if you wanted to, and some other people have been uncomfortable. 646435 70 to 80 will take your calls. Right after this. In a.

Brian Lehrer
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer Show on W N Y C. I'm Brigid Bergin From the W N Y C and Gothamist newsroom filling in for Brian Lehrer, who is off today. He'll be back tomorrow. In the meantime, I'm broadcasting from my home in New York City. Coming up on the show. Today, We'll talk to Congressman Adriano S. Byatt from up in Upper Manhattan and the Bronx about the new bipartisan Corona virus relief package that is on the table in Congress. It's a compromise for Democrats to try to get something through before the end of the year, when many people will lose unemployment benefits. And later in the show. We'll talk to Professor Christopher End in from Colombia's Teachers College who have has ideas about how to improve remote learning, which most students, at least in the city are doing most of the time. And we'll take your calls on why you still love New York after such a tough year? But first, even if you're still focused on the latest big election, the races to run New York City are already well underway Next year, the city will elect a new mayor, controller, public advocate and two thirds of the City Council. These individuals are responsible for setting the policy and overseeing the administration of vital services from schools to sanitation, not to mention a multi billion dollar budget. These leaders will also be responsible for leading the city through the ongoing covert 19 pandemic and out of the fiscal, public health and racial and social justice crises that are left in its wake. That's all to say these elections are crucial. But even as the city saw record participation in the 2020 presidential contest, despite the pandemic, with supporters from both sides describing it is one of the most important election of our lifetime. The city often sees double digit drop off in voter turnout for these municipal elections would turnout rates declining consistently since 1989. So to start things off this morning, we are going to have a conversation about why the 2021 elections are so important. Joining me now to talk about how next year's elections will be unlike any other in the city's history, and what issues mattered most are Dr Christina Greer, an associate professor of political science at Fordham University. Politics editor at the Agrio, Co. Host of the podcast at they queue and why see and author of the book Black Ethics and Gloria Pez. Me. No Politics Reporter its Spectrum NEWS, New York one Welcome back to the Brian Lehrer Show to you both. Hi, Bridget. So I want to start with a little bit of context. Um, we've had all those conversations. We've all had those conversations with friends, family and colleagues who Feel really passionately about national politics and whatever the latest news is coming out of Washington, but Sometimes those same people may seem less engaged in local politics. So, Dr Greer, how do you convince people including your own students that these local elections matter? And on the flip side of that, why do you think some otherwise civically minded people sometimes just disengage locally. Right, Well, Bridget, I always try and tell my students to remember Tip O'Neill that all politics is local. And when we think about New York City and the billions of dollars that the mayor and the City Council are in charge of when we think about how we do education or policing or even environmental policy, all of this works together, and so there's always a lot of focus on the federal government. The President Congress Which, of course incredibly important, But so much of our day to day life has to do with our representatives right here in New York City, And so so many people have fatigue from the past 2020 presidential election. That seems like it's it's still going since the president has yet to conceive, But we have to sort of walk and chew gum at the same time because the New York City mayor's race and the races for the Manhattan district attorney are borrowed President's City Council members, roughly two thirds of the City Council is up for reelection. It's incredibly important that we pay attention to who these public servants are who these people are and what their vision is. What did they have to say about nature? How did they plan to, you know, work with a new police commissioner or a new school chancellor or representatives in Albany in the governor. All of these issues directly relate to us on a daily basis, so we have to keep our eye on the ball. Gloria passed me. No, I think we have, you know. Welcome to, uh, Brian Lehrer. Show you They're good morning, Bridget. Yeah, the wonders of working from home. Sorry about that. I hear you just fine. I hear Christina. Thank you for having me. Um I could not agree more. You put it perfectly at the beginning there describing how high the stakes. Are in this moment for our city For every single New Yorker. We are in a moment, unlike any other. We just simply cannot overstate the importance of these next couple of months as we begin to meet and hear from the candidates. Um, but also as the city really begins to recover and come out of this crisis that we have been in in the last few months. There are so many issues on the table, not just related to covert and everything. That it has affected but everything that was on the people before that everything Cristina mentioned housing, public education, transportation, um our relationship with state government and the federal government. We simply cannot take our eye off the ball for this one..

New York City City Council Brian Lehrer Dr Christina Greer Bridget Gloria Pez Congressman Adriano S. Byatt Congress Brigid Bergin Professor Christopher End Gothamist President Congress Which Upper Manhattan Bronx Washington Teachers College W N Y C president
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:56 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer Show on WNYC Wifey. Good morning. Again, everyone election may be over the pandemic is not Yesterday, the United States recorded over 100,000 new covert 19 cases in a single day. It was the first time that has happened, according to the covert tracking project. More than 50,000. People are currently hospitalized for the virus across the country. That includes more than 1000 in New Jersey. That hasn't been the case in a while, and it's an increased nationally of 64% since the beginning of last month. Deaths per day have increased by 21% in the last two weeks nationwide in New York Mayor De Blasio is also warning about concerning increases in all the metrics. The Washington Post Co ver tracker now puts the total number of deaths at 230,000. But the immediate concern is that hospitalizations and deaths are increasing, not decreasing right now, and the record number of new cases suggest things will continue to get worse as we know a certain percentage of cases. Eventually become serious. Back with us is Dr Lena when emergency physician and public health professor at George Washington University contributing columnist for The Washington Post, and former health commissioner of Baltimore, Doctor Wen, Welcome back to WN, I say hi Thank you, Brian. Always glad to join you. So what is 100,000 new code 19 cases in a single day for the first time mean? It means that we are surpassing all off our previous records, and there is no end in sight. What's different about this current surged this third surge if you will, from previous surges of them, it is all over the country. It's not just in the news in New York City area in the North East or across the sun belt, as we saw in June and July, we now have a firestorm off Koven 19 all across the U. S. And the rate of spread is accelerating. Last week we had for the first time within 14 days, we had one million new cases of covert 19 this week. We added 600,000 new cases in just one week. And we're seeing hospitalizations rise and we know what happens after that. True, which is that death will begin to rise to this surge is not going to stop on its own. It's individual actions. Really, What we need is federal action. But in the absence of that, it's the actions by state and local officials, also by individual actions that's going to make a difference. So let's talk about government action area on the precipice of Joe Biden being declared. President elect of the United States. If that were to come about what would change on day one of his administration as you understand. Well, I think that if if there were to be a new president declared, the work should begin immediately. It cannot wait until day one because by that time by the time January comes around, will have hundreds of thousands, potentially more Americans dead. And so I think the moment that aim a president elect Biden, let's say is declared. He should convene a task force to begin to do the work so that they're ready to go on day one. But that task force should also be delivering press conferences briefings every day, because, frankly, that's what the Trump Administration should have been doing all along. We should have been hearing from the city seen from Dr Fauci from Dr Brooks every single day on the state of the pandemic. On actions that people should be taking aware the problem. Hot spots are across the country. What the recommended policies should be that work can begin right now. And in the absence of leadership from the Trump administration, there is a a vast vacuum, and that vacuum has currently been filled by Misinformation, active disinformation and and if there were to be a new Biden administration, they have an obligation to step in and fill that vacuum. Let me ask you. About the Trump administration's approach, which as you say is, you know you're going to continue to at least January 20th and then maybe it's going to continue for more years. We don't know. The administration has focused on re opening the economy by letting covert 19 Spread more, They acknowledge it would spread more among they say, mostly young, healthy people so called herd immunity. Eventually, as the young weren't getting any more, and therefore the old would start not getting It anymore, or people with serious underlying conditions. And they say they're working on protecting vulnerable people in that scenario, like in nursing homes, and that the impact of More aggressive lockdowns of the economy. Starts to approach being Justus bad in terms of public health. As the virus itself. For you as a public health. Person. Is there anything to that in your opinion? This whole idea of her immunity is a tempting hypothesis. If it were true, it would be wonderful because it makes sense for all the reasons that you mentioned, except it's just it's defied. By science in order for us to reach that level of protection across the community. We need 60 to 80% of people to be infected that when you think about what that means for the American population and the death rate that we have, that means that we could be looking at two million Americans dead for us to reach that level of protection in the community. Also, we don't know that the protection is something that lasts in fact, all the evidence that we have suggests that the protection for Crown of ours may not last for more than several months or a year, so millions of people could have may have to die every year for this concept to occur, which is something that just is beyond the pale. I mean, this is something that's never been employed. In the history of humanity to use herd immunity through natural infection as a method for preventing from getting a virus. Actually, that is a worst case scenario. Having millions of people die every year. I also do think, though, that you bring up such an important point about this framing that President Trump and others have been using about somehow this is Probated or this is public health versus the economy. And I think this false choice is just what it is, which is false. It should not be framed as either we shut everything down or we let the virus run rampant without doing anything. There's actually a large middle ground about large middle ground is where almost all public health officials that I know Stand, which is we need to be employing mask wearing physical distancing, restricting endure crowded gatherings, targeted restrictions that actually allow our economy to come back and kids to be back in school. And how should we think about thes? Numbers of deaths that are taking place and I think it was over 1000 and one day for the first time in awhile yesterday or the day before, it's been averaging 700 per day. Through the summer. Now it's up to 800 per day over the last few weeks as cases and hospitalizations and deaths are rising again, But you know, every time I Talk about the current death rate on the show. I now get Comments on Twitter or wherever from people more on the trump approach side saying, Ah ha! But what about co morbidity ease? And I've seen this You know, in conservative media to where the argument is. Yeah. We're too concerned about deaths, because very few people who are otherwise. In good shape are dying from Cove in 19. The people who are dying are close to death anyway with serious underlying conditions. Because the research back that up So it is true that those who have underlying medical conditions and those for older tend to get more severely film and do represent the bulk of individuals who have succumbed to Koba 19. Just because somebody is older or has a chronic medical condition doesn't mean that they should die from Kobe 19 or any other cause. I mean, I've seen individuals who are trying to play down the seriousness of the virus say things like, well, why should it matter Because these are individuals for older or have have medical illnesses. If you look at what that means you're looking at a third of the U. S. Will have chronic underlying conditions or older and could predisposed to Copa 19. So are we saying that a third of Americans are some home disposable as a result of their having underlying issues..

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WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

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"One of them did the afterwards I forget who did? Which Caroline Kennedy and David Eisenhower s o. We're going to send one to you. But just this hour because this is just for Brian Lehrer Shell listeners today. So we have that going last hour. We have it going. This hour. The mayor is coming up in three minutes on the vaccination rollout plan and Mohr so we're not going to go on much more about this, but just to say thank you for your support all week. We have a pocket constitution for anybody who donates during the rest of the Brian Lehrer Show today. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for considering it at 888376 w N Y C 888376969 to or from the home page of WN y si dot or Brooke. Want to give us the last word for now? I I think my last Woodson Last word would simply be that, Uh, when you talk about any amount, I know that you mean it because thie The fact that someone becomes a member is Extremely important by itself, because it helps us create the public square that the station is that particularly your show is it gives us a place to share and that means we need a lot of people there, populating it, bringing their ideas bringing their experiences so Become a member call end but also please commit yourself to the station in any amount. Brooke. Thanks and everybody. Thanks 888376. W N Y.

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WNYC 93.9 FM

08:16 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's Brian Lehrer Show on W N Y C. Good morning again, everyone and now we turn back to voting. Nearly 28 million people have already voted as of Saturday, six times the amount of votes cast this time during the 2016 election, according to the U. S elections Project run by the University of Florida. But President Trump keeps refusing to say simply that he will respect the election results. If he loses and peacefully turn over power. That would be unique. But election related violence wouldn't as the New Yorker writer and Columbia University journalism school professor Jelani Cobb points out in the New Yorker. Jelani is the author of the Substance of Hope. Barack Obama and the paradox of progress, and he has a new documentary called whose Vote Counts made in collaboration with the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. That will air on PBS on Frontline tomorrow night. So thanks for sometime today, Jelani. Welcome back to WN, my say. Making and let's start with the documentary. You take us back to a particular Democratic primary from before Biden was the nominee and Justus. The pandemic was beginning the Wisconsin primary. Could you remind us why you revisit that election? I mean, I think that we when the Corona virus emerged, we were already in the midst of working on this documentary, and it quickly became a parent. But The storyline of voter suppression and the traditional mechanisms that we knew it, you know that have emerged in the years of seven years since the sub beholder case of Supreme Court decision. Really hobbled the voting rights Act. Uh, that wasn't going to be part of the story, and another part of it was going to be the way in which the pandemic itself became a factor and voter suppression. So on April 7th when we saw the primary like everyone else do You know other states? We're pulling back rescheduling, postponing coming up with whatever mechanism of accommodation they could find. To grapple with the fact that it was really dangerous for people to come out in public or to be engaged in any kind of interaction that would Be required to cast a ballot. Wisconsin with the opposite direction. Not only did they hold in person election, but the Republican Party they're fought on went to court successfully on my nads to force. The electorate to come out in person and vote on April 7th on and so those horrific images we saw lines that were blocks and blocks long. And people were standing all that time hours online just to go into a situation that was dangerous and its own right to cast their ballots. Those were disappearing and we realized that this was we were looking at something that had potentially had big implications for the coming presidential election. So what do you think? The lessons are from Wisconsin that Khun still be applied today for the election That's in progress to minimize any attempts at voter suppression from being successful. Well, One of the things that happened in April was that we were roughly a month into the pandemic. We didn't know all that was going on. He didn't know the lay of the land. The Democratic Party chair who Ben Wikler will be interview in the film. Talk about watching the newscasts and realizing a month before everything shut down on more than a month. Before that, this was going to be a big thing, and I was going to be a real serious problem for the United States, and he started pushing the Democratic Party and Wisconsin side pushing for absentee ballots, then Leslie, We're way ahead of the curve in terms of dealing with the covert crisis. So now we've seen a lot of the same, You know, people saying Request your absentee ballots. You know, on Instagram on my instagram account, I was just scrolling through and all of a sudden I got a message that says, click this link to request an absentee ballot and so on on and now they're also pushing people to say. If you haven't already mailed in your ballot. Actually, you do so want to get in with as much lead time as possible on also come up with your early voting plan, if that's going to be the way that you approach it on, so I think that that's been AA lot of what we've seen. One of the other things I think is really crucial. And can't be emphasised enough is for people to be really meticulous and detail oriented in filling out their ballots, because there are you know, every year in every election that balance that have not counted. Because they did so without correctly or they didn't place it within the envelope away that it was supposed to be, or didn't sign the ballot, which is one of the big things or find the envelope, which is one of the big things that happens. So you want to be able to make sure that you have all of those things taken care of before you put your ballot back in the mail or drop it back off in the drop box. Or take it to your local election center, and I gather I haven't seen the documentary yet, but I gather that part of it is not just about the role today of absentee and mail in ballots but kind of a historic role. And people may know you as a journalist because they read you in The New Yorker and your journalism professor, But you're also Historian used to be a history professor. I know that at Emory and elsewhere. So what would you like to take us back to in history with respect to absentee or mail and voting? Yeah, sure. So this is your correct. This is a historic issue. A historic concerned we'll have one quick correction was is that my colleagues at Spelman College would kill me. Professor expelled. Which is a fine institution, where have lots of friends and colleagues But I thought at Stahlman, but the the real Central kind of point here I think is you conceive early is 1981. You're starting to see the ideas around absentee balloting and being used and the language of voter fraud being used as a mechanism to suppress votes. And that came in the person of Jeff Sessions, who was then the U. S attorney in Alabama and prosecuted Albert Turner, who was a former Activists with marched on the Edmund Pettus Bridge with John Lewis to fight for the Voting Rights Act in the first place, and they were prosecuted for helping people fill out absentee ballots. African Americans Helping them fill out absentee ballots and helping them get the mail on DH. This was construed as voter fraud. They were acquitted on all these charges. But that was the earliest instance that we saw that this specific tactic was being used and Of course, the rhetoric around voter fraud alleged voter fraud has continued and really grown exponentially since then. Oh, and you know, people have used the idea that they're fraudulent ballots that you were here in the president's rhetoric a lot as a means of saying that we should not use male and absentee ballots and have also say There is of just glancingly little evidence that this is actually the case. Let me just cite one of your recent New Yorker articles, also for a chilling piece of history, you're out of the United States is considered one of the most stable democracies in the world. But it has a long, mostly forgotten history of election related violence. What were Yu, referring to Oh, yeah, So there's a history to nix it, but people have kind of Segregated Forgive the pun segregated the history of electoral violence to black people..

Wisconsin professor United States Jelani Brian Lehrer University of Florida Columbia University Graduate S Jelani Cobb President Trump Republican Party Democratic Party Barack Obama Columbia University
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's Brian Lehrer Show on W N Y C. Good morning, everyone So there's a lot we could say about day one of the Republican convention. You probably already heard a lot of other people say a lot of things. I'm going to start. On a fundamental contradiction that I heard about the idea of freedom. From a president who runs flagrantly with authoritarians allies when they are in his corner and authoritarian tricks. There was this Authoritarians classic from early in the day. When he spoke to convention delegates in Charlotte. The only way we're gonna lose this election is if the election is rigged to remember that the only way he can lose the election is if it's rigged, setting himself up for claiming a lost election is wig. Whether it is or not now, as it happens, and I don't know if you know this story. That's exactly what democracy watchers think. The president of Turkey recipe Erdogan did after losing around of local elections there last year. As Yasha Monk writes in the Atlantic, the Atlantic quote. After using his control over most of the country's media to spread the insane conspiracy theory that a powerless opposition had somehow been able to falsify the outcome of the election. Erdogan went on to use his control over the country's judiciary to cancel its result, unquote But maybe you saw the recorded bit. From the convention last night in which Trump was talking with Americans who had been held hostage in foreign lands. It was mostly about how he helped get them out. Oh, and one of them was pastor Andrew Bronson. Now for the leaders of some of those countries, Trump had only disdain, but when it came To Brunton, who was held in Turkey by Erdogan, one of Trump's authoritarian allies, who canceled that local election that isthe party lost. Trump said this right to pastor Bronson's face. I have to say that to me, President Erdogan was very good. And I know that had you scheduled for a long time and you are a very innocent person. And he ultimately after we had a few conversations, he agreed, So we appreciate that. Wrench and look kind of weirded out, and they moved on. Trump makes common cause with Edwin and Putin and Brazil's both so narrow and then Nikki Haley goes on in prime time and promotes trump like this. It was an honor of a lifetime to serve as the United States ambassador to the United Nations. Now the U. N is not for the faint of heart. It's a place where dictators, murderers and thieves denounce America. And then put their hands out and demand that we pay their bills. President Trump put an end to all of that. With his leadership. We did what Barack Obama and Joe Biden refused to do. We stood up for America and we stood against our enemies. Stood against our enemies, which apparently doesn't include authoritarians who Trump sees as his friends Nikki Haley last night and they brought on Cuban American businessman Maximo Alvarez, who was willing to insinuate that show Biden and his Catholic faith.

President Trump President Erdogan America Nikki Haley president Brian Lehrer Joe Biden Charlotte Barack Obama pastor Bronson Andrew Bronson Yasha Monk Atlantic Maximo Alvarez Turkey United States ambassador United Nations Brunton Brazil
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:05 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer on WNYC the New York state legislators among those that are beginning to act on police reforms that have been stuck in the political mind for a long time the measures rising in Albany right now include a ban on chokeholds by police the repeat of the the repeal I should say of the law known as fifty eight which keeps police officers disciplinary records sealed and more with us now New York State Senate majority leader Andrea Stewart cousins her own district covers much of Westchester senator Stewart cousins always a pleasure welcome back to W. NYC thank you so much Brian it's always good to be with you and and I really appreciate the way you handle all of these topical issues with so many extraordinary gas so thank you for letting me be among them thank you so much and I'll say extraordinary colors which we certainly heard great uncles are absolutely in the last segment let's start with the bill that passed both houses of the legislature yesterday I see call the Eric garner anti chokehold that what would the law DO well this will make it very very clear that choke holds are are not permissible and if you are you know using a chokehold in order to to subdue someone that you you know that you feel is that a suspect and so on it's not acceptable so it's basically clarifying the use of the show cold when they are prohibited as well as criminalizing the you could use it so cold when it results in the death of a person by a police officer so it will now be a class C. felony I which it will give you a minimum of three and a half years and up to fifteen years so I think it's important one of the things that that the what we will be doing in the next three days is really again clarifying in many ways what's acceptable and what is not acceptable in police state police had had the ability in many ways to construct their own rules and they have been able to sort of navigate in their own circle circumstances in the way they feel is right so whether it's the chokehold whether it is repealing fifty a which we will do today whether it is medical attention while it somebody's been in custody whether it's the the the use of weapons reporting so if you're discharging a weapon with you you've hurt someone or not it must be reported so it's it's an oh by the way if someone like that seventeen year old girl that was recording what happened tragically to George Floyd was was maybe in New York and maybe someone didn't appreciate that she was recording it is now clear that the people have a right to record and we are not only doing that but Afghan or state police now to have body cameras so this is really I think trying to create that kind of transparency the track kind of accountability and and just rules that will prevent some of what you know I guess has been confusion at all so I think it will be a step towards trying to regain trust with communities if the specific communities of color tell me more about right to record are there circumstances under current law where if somebody is recording a police encounter that the police have the right to tell them to stop I haven't you know Bedlam I think that is the issue we have seen in a lot of different circumstances where somebody will say oh give me that phone or you know take the phone from her though so what I did there it was silent in terms of what happened so begin this policy which broke again a path fifty ninety three yesterday said that that the bill will this law means that you have an affirmative right to actually record that whatever is happening with police as a stand by I you know this as as a bystander rather so I think people are doing things some people with some some police reacted fine I would you saw what happened with the the torchlight situation means as they seem to be absolutely no concerned at all that this guy was actually killing someone over in the ninth minute minute period and people are recording button here in New York we now are telling you specifically do not bother anybody who is recording you it is not allowed to sell at very least it's an affirmation of what's already somebody's right exactly the United States what about you just talked about the the bystanders I see they're doing this in Minnesota now do you have in the New York State Legislature anything that would make it a crime to not intervene as a police officer if you see a fellow officer committing what appears to be a criminal act as in the case of their children and George Floyd here and now not among the bill that we are passing right now but it is certainly something that that I believe you know you would have faith in human nature that you would not do that but I think it waited we kind of get it back is the the medical attention while in custody so the way it works now I guess you know we see the theme that if somebody is saying I can't breathe either I'm going to you know let die need I need something diabetic or whatever it does not seem that there is any particular attention paid to that so we are getting at that somewhat with what we call the medical attention while in custody battle and you know just this I said to the officer has a responsibility to help the human being who is in distress I'm not saying a minor ailment or whatever but if someone is telling you look on mathematics I'm going into attack I need to be able to to get my medicine you do not have the right to safely with this person problem results in death you do not have the right anymore to just say oh well you know I didn't believe them all well I don't think so you know I I I did so I think we sort of getting it back but you know some of these things and I think all of us would agree some of these things would you would think be human nature you would think people would have a response that would be different from unfortunately a lot of the callousness that we've seen over you know the inferred for communities of color over generations but certainly now the whole whole world is seeing and how many instances so we want to make sure that that bad cop are exposed and flagged and and you know taken away from a position of responsibility that they have to protect and serve it because we want good cop to be able to be good cops and you know one of my police commissioner then an offering with a you know the only thing that allows for bad cop or good cop so we want to make sure that that good cops are allowed to be good that they are doing things that community wants them to do and we need the community you know need for them to go and in the bad cops go away and the other thing of course on the the civilian side we yesterday the nine one one full of reporting bell fellow that Mister Cooper and miss Cooper and and you know this this this calling nine one one because if you see somebody you're uncomfortable with you know a black person a brown person creating emergency I that's not acceptable either that incident in central park two weeks ago and the watcher a white woman called the police on a black man bird watching and asked her to put her dog on a leash as the law requires in the park and she called nine one one instead a black man was threatening her life fifty one five yes we have to talk listeners we can take a few phone calls for the.

Brian Lehrer New York
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Who were serving a felony your personal servants public employees first responders public healthcare workers but also people served up a lot other ways and to me they're all we value and we miss and we honor and we honor their families and so I came to the conclusion that even though we saw some progress in Washington in terms of including in the stimulus support for the families of first responders who were lost we did not see the kind of consistent support that these families would need so I said I want to see the state legislature provide full line of duty death benefits for any city worker died because of cold air during this crisis Mr mayor thank you as always I hope you have a safe Memorial Day weekend any observances that you're planning personally what we're going to figure that out but again like so many new Yorkers can be low key and very local and keep it simple and and with a real sense of remembering why Memorial Day exists honoring those who served us and gave their lives for us talking next week thanks a lot thank you Brian Brian Lehrer of WNYC more to come next time on the New Yorker radio hour would you volunteer to be infected with the coronavirus to test the potential vaccine many of the people that I have seen volunteered to be a subject in human challenge trials seem to think that they are low risk we know so little about this virus other than that it can be lethal the ethics of human challenge trials.

Washington Brian Brian Lehrer
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer on WNYC and we'll get to our next segment shortly but I need to ask you something that's important for the station we are in a miniature W. NYC spring membership drive today and it's a paradox because it's a miniature drive under maxed out circumstances usually this time of year we go on a little bit of a pause as Memorial Day is approaching as summer is approaching and we do a nine day annual membership drive to help fund the work that we do here is a not for profit news organization we depend on memberships as you probably know but this year we're in a paradoxical situation like a lot of other news organizations we have lost revenue from some of our funders who can't do that right now and at the same time we have incurred big extra expenses like buying and installing all this extra equipment so that they're showing all the other shows can originate from our homes and I'm told that they're doing physical work down at the office to make it safe for the new realities when people start to go back so we have declining revenues and increasing expenses so here's the paradox we don't feel comfortable doing a regular nine day membership drive continuing coverage is just too important right now and we are just not going to interrupt regular programming for nine days as we usually do it just feels inappropriate to us so we're doing a three day membership drive instead of a nine day one today's date too so thank you first of all to all of you who have donated so far but this miniature drive with maximal importance ends tomorrow seems like we just began we did just began in seems like we're about to end we are there to and maybe this is the last moment that you happened to be listening before it ends so thank you so much in advance for.

Brian Lehrer NYC
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:24 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer on WNYC does this sound familiar so it's fun to play a little game name that bird dedicated birders probably no that was a chimney swift but maybe you're noticing more birds on your solitary walks in the park or bird calls out your windows and are curious what they are with things so quiet other life this is the height of the spring migration when all the east coast birds that flew south for the winter head north and their path takes them right through this area so there are more birds around and more burgers and since many of us are confined to walks around our neighborhoods or just to the views from the windows birds are a great way to widen our horizons without going far so whether you to awaken by that bird at four thirty in the morning or I have heard but never spotted a certain bird on your daily walk we're joined now by expert birder heather wolf for a round of name that bird and even imitate that bird now here's what we're hoping for if any of you want to call up and do this call and do your best to imitate that bird call that you can identify and she will help out and give us some info on how to take up this hobby she will do that too even while social distancing of course if you have a good recording that will work too but what is it that you don't quite know what it is sound like call up and do your best at six four six four three five seventy to eighty six four six four three five seventy to eighty heather Wolfe is a web developer for the Cornell lab of ornithology and it's easy bird project and the author of burning out the bridge in search of every bird on the Brooklyn waterfront hello welcome to WNYC thank you so much Brian thanks for having me so let's start with this one on Earth Day April twenty second we did a wild life out the window call in in a burner Sylvia in Manhattan called in and shared this I live near a park in the spring time there are many birds nesting there including the Carolina rant which is a tiny bird that has a really big song I thought of to give the guilty killed and there's one nesting right outside my window near Broadway and I can't believe it it's just like every morning when I wake up and I heard this little bird thanks it really transports me so heather I believe that was the first time we ever had a caller to the show do a bird call to connect you can kill you concur with that identification I do and and how lucky to have that species nesting right outside your window in New York City that is that is amazing do you have a favorite bird song you like to imitate I do and it's of the bird song of my favorite bird which is called the white throated sparrow and it is in town right now it's here most of the year really even in the winter but it's going to be gone in June July and August and it sounds like this it goes a little bit like that that's great and it's it's so appropriate burgers have really taken to tweeting haha and this time of year the pictures of once in a lifetime spotting come fast and furious every year at this time so you tweeted a picture of a female red winged blackbird yesterday quote at the moment she was being serenaded by a male I'm quote so we're going to hear a little of that song so is that a rare sighting in these parks it's a great song yeah it's a beautiful song it's not a rare sighting but the thing that's rare about it for me is in my my burden patch were a bird regularly several times a week those birds appear that they're going to be breeding and nesting in that park so when the mail was serenading that female that is the first time I'd ever seen that in Brooklyn Bridge park so I I think with a lot less foot traffic in the times were in a lot of different name new species will be nesting in places that they have not before and is it true that the female red winged blackbird has neither red wings nor is it black that is one of those is not true so D. the red wings on the red winged blackbird are actually called apple laser kind of in the shoulder region which is that would be analogous to our shoulders and the female has a muted version of that if you do see the female spread our wings and and have some binoculars are very close you might notice a light red wash on the shoulders but the bird is more very dark brown with a lot of streaking and does look very different from the mail but the big clue on I doing that as a female red winged blackbird would be the size and shape in general is the same as the mail and it has a very pointy bill which is the same as the male about the com we have a lot of people lined up who have bird calls that they've heard around here that they want you to identify happy you will find that I hope so okay I'll try my best I don't know is an acceptable answer but let's see how well we can do rotted in Westchester you're on W. NYC hi Robert hello there well okay I'm gonna give it a shot I'll try it and then you see if you can guess what it is here we go well the curricula yeah that that was it you know that birth okay gosh that's a great invitation but I'm I'm I'm stumped on that one let's say are a little more time doing another yeah I don't know it yeah that was it right away yeah it could be crozier Gaulish arm yeah I'm I'm taking some kind of a goal or a crow all right let's try it I don't I cannot do that the species let's try someone else Tracy in Brooklyn you're on W. NYC hi Tracy hi thank you Brian I love your show I think that's the white throated sparrow you said at the beginning yeah exactly well well what's interesting about that it didn't have as many notes as when I sang it but sometimes they'll be starting the song and they don't finish it so that's exactly what that is David David in Manhattan you have a very call right I do thanks for taking the call my mother would be embarrassed to me asking this question because she was a great burger and I know this is a very common very but it is something like he repeated several times you did not know that bird is a minor will manage amazing I can't improve the upper that's a northern cardinal a northern cardinal great thank you I'll be reading the oil on the side which is one more time David related that was great that was really great now I feel like I hear that northern cardinal in the middle of the night a lot is that a thing on my imagining it I have not heard the cardinal night it's quite possible but it's definitely one of the most vocal birds around the city streets I hear more American robin and mocking bird in the evening but you never know birds are always surprising us is there one that I think especially in the earlier spring like around April does come out even at like two thirty in the morning you might hear birds singing yes that's the northern mockingbird and that's the bird it imitates of a lot of different birds calls and songs so for example it will sing the northern cardinal song but then it will switch and what happens if it doesn't find a mate it's gonna sing at night just desperately trying to attract a mate so you don't really if you want to get any sleep you don't want to be next to a note northern mockingbird that has not found a mate in the middle of summer you have answered a question that I've had ever since I moved to Manhattan W. N. Y. C.'s planning editor and resident Berger Kade Hinds recorded this in Central Park yesterday can.

Brian Lehrer
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone and we begin today we're not that many people are going anymore the New York City Subway governor Cuomo's new policy of closing the entire subway system overnight which he says is to disinfect everything every day now has two nights under its spell even with ridership down by an estimated ninety percent the implications are huge for the essential workers who have no safer way to get to and from their jobs and the implications are huge for homeless people who had been taking refuge there in fact advocates for the homeless assert that kicking homeless people out is the real reason for the governor's policy so how's it going we're happy to have with us the interim head of New York City transit Sarah Feinberg server really nice of you to come on with us after what I'm sure have been too long night welcome back to W. NYC great to be with you and with two nights of this now what would you say you're accomplishing that will matter to people still riding the trains well I think that the number one thing we're accomplishing which is what we set out to do as we are getting all of those cars that are in service all these train cars that are in service cleaned and disinfected so we know that we did a pretty good job the first night a really good job we know that we cleaned I think we probably cleaned everything and I think we cleaned some cars more than once last night we cleaned everything and again some cars more than once and so that's that's the priority to make sure that all of our central workers you're using the subway system right now that all of our work force it's in the system working is safe and so I'm really grateful to the work force for how they stepped up and and been able to do this because it's a massive logistical task and and they're they're absolutely knocking out of the park he just said that some of the subway because we're clean more than once on the same night I so you say that yesterday two of that night one regarding the you know some of the subway cars being cleaned twice what's the point of cleaning them twice if no one has written them yet first of all to be clear where we're cleaning over the cleaning twenty four hours a day that we're doing at a big push overnight when when the when we have the advantage of having no one in the system so we're able to make that kind of progress overnight but we're out there cleaning all day during the day if we only could clean from one to five AM we wouldn't be able to get everything so we are cleaning twenty four seven and and the point of cleaning the cars more than one says it's it's more logistically difficult to make sure that you only clean the car one time you know because it's a train comes in and it was cleaned twelve hours ago we're not gonna not clean it right so we're just going to make sure that we're cleaning as much as we can with the forces that we've got which means we're probably having some cars more than one our reporters from WNYC and Gothamist throughout covering this at the Coney Island stop Tuesday night said they thought trains pulling in workers spraying them with cleaning solution and wiping them down nothing new or extraordinary to their and then the train leaves are you saying it was more than might have met there I he offered well they were it is hard I know they're only in one or two stops so there's there's a lot going on across the system so certainly in some places where we are spraying and wiping but actually we've got huge teams of people out there who are spraying and wiping and sweeping and mopping and and waiting again and disinfecting and the other thing that does discount carrier offers us the ability to do is to test a lot of new products and dispensers and tools so the other thing we're trying to perfect and that's in the time period is you know what are the products that are most effective and easiest to use so if I can you know if I can give our cleaners you know a backpack dispenser that sprays that doesn't require people to you know stand at many hours bending over standing up ending over standing up that that's great it means it's more efficient it's easier on the work force yes there were also we're doing a lot of that as well sounds like you're folks may not have seen that on Tuesday night but that's also happening all over the system M. one wouldn't this be like testing for the virus that's so daunting in its own way like if a person test negative for the virus all you know is there negative at that moment the next day if they've gone into a crowd you don't know their status again so for the trains let's say you have a disinfected subway car at the end of the line and Kohli Coney Island but by the time the train in rush hour against Avenue they parkway or Jay street MetroTech what is a writer really no right what what the writer knows is that we are cleaning the cars as well as we can as often as we can twenty four hours a day and so look in order to make sure that no germ ever landed on a subway car and stayed there we'd have to you know we have tens of thousands of people just constantly wiping down every poll so so I don't think we could ever I don't think we could ever get there but you know look cleaning the cars as often as possible and disinfecting them it's certainly better than not doing it we're doing it as often as we can and yet that still will lead to a lot of uncertainty I guess that's what I've heard some people wonder if it's worth the extremists balancing the inconvenience of the riders of shutting down the system from one PM to five AM those writers who do need to use mass transit overnight I I know you're offering alternatives but is it is it worth it if the uncertainty just flips right back by you know six o'clock in the morning we're in the middle of a pandemic and and I think we have to do everything we can possibly do to keep people safe outlook I don't want this to be a permanent checked out I think nobody does we want to get to the other side of this pandemic and and then service will come back I think we owe it to our riders into our work force you everything we can to keep the system safe look at you know people get into this line of work they come work at places like the MTA because they want people to take public transportation right they they want to offer those kinds of resources to people they believe in the system and and that certainly goes goes for myself so I want people writing the system I want a twenty four hour system but my priority is keeping people safe and then.

governor Cuomo Brian Lehrer New York
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming up on tomorrow's Brian Lehrer show will have gene Sperling who is director of the national economic council under both president Obama and president Clinton and it's got a new book called economic dignity with his take on what economic policy should be in response to covert nineteen and will have Victor police commissioner of the New York City mayor's office for people with disabilities on the special challenges for them during the covered nineteen pandemic and how the city is responding that and more on tomorrow's primicia if you believe democracy requires a free press your station is W. NYC ninety three point nine FM and AM eight twenty NPR news and the New York conversation on WNYC and one more thing about something we can do on the air tomorrow before we go to our next segment we're going to launch a series of Wednesday evening broadcasts that I'll be hosting beginning tomorrow night at eight called for graduations and weddings why for graduations and wedding because we are now in graduation and wedding season right and while you can graduate from high school or college or grad school this year and you can get married you cannot have commencement exercises or a wedding reception at least in any of the ways we usually do that's why we're gonna stage for graduations and wedding on the radio that you can participate in to celebrate your big day or that of a loved one we have some great commencement speakers lined up for the ones in may including former U. S. poet laureate Tracy K. Smith former presidential candidate Andrew Yang and others the first graduation again is tomorrow night at eight o'clock when our speaker will be emergency room physician Dr Craig Spencer most well known for having traveled from New York to Africa a few years ago to help with the a ball out breaking he himself got a bola and survived Ebola show he will talk and give a five to ten minute commencement address that's all and then we'll have a call in on ideas in his speech and for graduates who plan to go into medicine or anything and healthcare will ask what do you want to do with your life and how do you see a place in the world so this is been a long program note I know but we're excited about offering you this new way to do some things on the radio that we can't do in person during such chel distancing for graduations and weddings and one final thing about this if you know anyone graduating from medical school or nursing school or with any major related to the health sciences please let them know and we will welcome their calls your calls if it's you congratulate you and talk about the world of health care that you're entering and what you want to do with your life and I mean people graduating with any related major yes med school yes nursing school but also if you're about to become a physical or occupational therapist or a pharmacist or a nutritionist or dietitian or biomedical engineer or an MRI technician or a dental hygienist you get the idea so if it's you or tell anyone you know graduating this year deprived of commencement ceremonies and going into any healthcare field we're gonna invite your phone calls their phone calls tomorrow night at eight to say what you're doing on for graduations and wedding episode one again tomorrow night at eight here on W. NYC okay did you know that today is building service workers appreciation day let's take a moment to thank the essential workers who keep the big and even many smaller apartment buildings going office buildings to and who are on the front lines of maintaining our homes now that or homes are in many people's cases are schools and offices and those sparsely populated office buildings to if you're lucky enough to be working from home you are therefore unlike the doormen and women the porters cleaners and other staff members traveling to and from their work right and.

gene Sperling director president Brian Lehrer Obama
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:31 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of any university community or you can tweet at Brian Lehrer and with me now to talk about the hopes of brown and Purdue and others and to help take your calls is Lilah Burke reporter at inside higher ed well welcome to WNYC thanks for doing this thank you so much for having me how common would you say the determined attitudes of the presidents of brown and could do all nationally at this moment I would say that it's obvious that you know with making the media rounds and everything else the presence of brown could you are have you taking a more aggressive stance but with the college presidents that I've talked to you I mean everyone wants to open in person if you think about it that's really what colleges are many colleges that you know operate campuses you know sort of trying to do and there's a lot of fear I think about it there is an online semester in the fall what students are going to think about that students are we seeing many students don't really enjoy learning online in this way and there have been you know a person's right students are asking for discounts on that some colleges where they're learning online actually they're learning online everywhere but you can search for strong you know this is not really the education that I want the education that I paid for and another sort of in a container only a few institutions not every institution has that level of discontent among its students but yeah because president really do want to open in person they're worried about tuition or worried about having you know you know I think we're cooking a Parkinson's which is that if colleges don't we open in the fall there could be many colleges you know that could be especially smaller colleges that could be sort of the end of them I think that's an opinion that sort of widely held the question is just is saving them worth the risk and if it is an unsafe situation and some universities have announced plans to reopen if it is deemed safe for depending on guidance from state and federal authorities you know I spoke to a produce who I happen to know yesterday who despite Daniel's making the media rounds and being this national we wanna open guy the this protuberance said to me it's been made clear to the families that they are still determining if they can do it so are any universities or colleges out there right now saying we are opening in person no matter what no I would say no you know if you look closely at what college presidents are saying what they're expecting to students this is an intent to reopen this is saying you know we this is what we want and threw it away you know it's sort of this is what everyone wants so the statement isn't that meaningful in that way but Hey every college is looking at contingency plans for you know maybe we'll have a semester with students on campus but there's going to be changes is going to be no sports everything can get their own dorm room something like that they're also looking at contingency plans for if it is truly a free first precancerous turned earth I'm sorry for students return I mean I think college presidents you know it knowledge of it a lot of this is out of their control you know they cannot determine what the public health landscape looks like in the fall and they also can't determine what their governors and lawmakers are going to decide on the full you know a college can say we plan to re open if you're governor says you know institute some restrictions it doesn't matter what the college says you know that's the loss okay I think because prisons are very aware of this uncertainty and and tension between them in Flatbush you're on W. NYC hi Dan Hey good morning Brian so yeah I'm a Brooklyn college student on the fifty dollar G. major I'm hopefully gonna be finishing next year and you know I would like nothing more than to be able to go back in person in the fall but I know that that's just not realistic I think we're going to be hit with like a second and possibly third wave of outbreaks that might be worse than the first I I think that we have to be prepared for that and believe me like this you know we think we switched online classes that it's no one's fault no certainly no professors fault because who could have foreseen that's but that's a learning experience has been anemic rate like it's really hard to stay engaged at least for me personally between the stress of the situation and emotionally and they disconnected them from disjointed mess of learning online I also just wanted to note that my girlfriend is an adjunct professor at Parkins and she is teaching online classes but they are extremely sparsely attended because of student protests they wanted to wish and refined and so they're just not showing up to online classes and I have my own opinions on that I don't know how exactly to feel about that but this is a real problem but I think that the you know the student community and faculty half the just you know get our heads around the fact that this is not going to go away in the fall and that's not just for New York I think that the entire country and beyond is planned for second and third way is when we have to emotionally and logistically after that Dan thank you so much for weighing in and helping us to report this story really please call us again and Lila from inside higher ed have you heard that Parsons type story before our students at other institutions or if you could even confirm that one demanding tuition refunds because of online rather than in person learning yes that is happening I had heard about the person's example but there are sort of protests and and you know the sort of tuition strike happening I know you Chicago was a notable example university of Chicago and students at other institutions are are are looking at lawsuits in order to you need to get some money back it's important to note that many colleges are not all have you know for students who were living on campus have given back you know a pro rated women board refunds so many rumors right because they're not living there but in general not tuition because they're still going to get those credits yes so colleges at this point or not I have not been giving tuition discounts for the semester that is currently ending though that is something strange is that they want to colleges would say you know you work are paying for the credits and those credits add up to a degree in the value of that degree has not diminished and here we are not going to you know pro rate your tuition or whether that will happen in the fall if there is an online learning situation sort of yet to be seen I think it will sort of depend on you know if there is some early adopters of something like that and the other colleges fall will follow but right now they're sort of holding the line to speak John in Yonkers you're on W. NYC with Lilah Burke from inside higher ed as we talk about whether and how colleges will open in person in the fall hi John hi Brian good morning I'm here with my brother in law who's sixty four years old was a cafeteria worker at a college now he needs these college students every day a couple hundred out face to face and what do you do in that case it's like so much I gone back to work as a death sentence what are colleges saying lilac that they will do about dining halls and about older faculty and staff well it really depends on the institution I mean at this point a lot of colleges you know their their dining staff there to studio staff well in some cases they are being you know they have sort of been total to go home and and they are being paid in many cases they've been laid off or in cases where you know they usually don't work with the summer they've been sort of let go early and they're sort of a question about whether they will be invited back in the fall the colleges I think as far as dining are looking at continuing what they have now for students who remain on campus and many colleges have a lot of students who you know really have nowhere else to go maybe to formerly homeless maybe they have a documented abuse history with their family to stay on campus and in many of those cases students are getting mail through the sort of grabbing go system and dining hall so you know they they go to a dining hall the pick up at a pre packaged meal name can he get back to their dorm room of their apartment to eat as far as older faculty and staff I mean I think it is different with faculty and with staff faculty might have an easier time yeah being sort of working from home being online it really depends on the institution you know I've I've seeing that colleges where they have sort of said faculty you know will have to return and it doesn't really matter if you're uncomfortable you know we will be focusing on social distancing and focusing on P. B. E. and we will be at personal protective equipment and we will be making sure you're safe but you know if you want to be paid you kind of have to show up and then other colleges I spoke with the president of William Jewell college in a very they're saying they're not you know with their plan to reopen in person in the fall they're not asking you're not forcing any faculty or students to come on to campus that faculty will have the option to continue teaching online as they have been and even though their their students are on campus and maybe they can call the lecture after students actually down there in person to watch that lecture and that student who might not want to attend in person classes because you know what we think of students is eighteen to twenty two but that's not always true and or students who might have underlying health conditions so they might not want to return to classes and making the option to continuing our classes online option for them so I think it really depends on the institution something I would say just because I mentioned that students were on campus now I mean students who you know might have difficult home situations or might not have another home to go to you know they are sort of concerned about what's going to happen over the summer it's not entirely clear at every institution whether they will be allowed to stay over the summer and then also just what life is going to look like for them in the fall will they be allowed to if colleges don't re open you know if there is a stay at home on my learning situation whether those students will be able to stay on campus or not in about staying on campus and about the dorms in general you mentioned before that some schools are going to have single rooms only or at least they're thinking of that no roommates but you know it's common knowledge that the outbreak is most concentrated in three kinds of places nursing homes or other long term care facilities jails or prisons and meat processing plants why would college dorms with the density there even one person per room not become the epicentre number four I mean that is a certainly certainly possible you know I'm not a an epidemiologist so I can't really you know after dinner the risk in that situation but I think colleges are are when they're talking about this are sort of assuming that the the situation a public health situation how far the disease has spread is is much better in in the fall and then also they will have access to testing contact tracing things like that I know some universities are looking at apps to sort of trees where students are going and who they're coming into contact with those things aren't guaranteed colleges don't have those things right now but they're looking into it you know with everything like this the little colleges are looking at and we're sort of getting a look at what is potentially on the table I spoke to a president of a college in Atlantic city who you know they don't have the inventory to put put students in their own dorms right now but they're looking at options and putting them in you know if you know housing for example that would be empty I know.

Brian Lehrer reporter brown Purdue Lilah Burke WNYC
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:24 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone today we will look at the second coronavirus case here in New York and the communities it is having an impact on combined with a very aggressive measures that China took in Wuhan that suggests how widespread quarantines and other behavior changes around here could potentially become with the Supreme Court hearing another abortion restriction case today will also talk to Katherine Stewart who has a new book about what she calls Christian nationalism in the trump era in the U. S. including how Attorney General William Barr is trying to insert it more into the justice system will start and end the show today with reactions to the absolutely shocking super Tuesday results the Joe Biden search that nobody predicted and the people would have thought was impossible just a week ago after Bernie Sanders one Nevada so convincingly and biting kind of limping along in all of the first three states will discuss super Tuesday with the Massachusetts based reporter right now and a California based one later to bill Smith will give Jimmy all the extra hour of sleep out there west coast time to recover a little before he comes on one of the most surprising super Tuesday results and one of the most disappointing for some Democrats was that Elizabeth Warren came in third in her home state of Massachusetts she got just twenty one percent of the vote there to Bernie Sanders twenty six and Joe Biden's unexpected rise to first place there Biden got thirty three percent part of his national resurgence according to exit polls Biden one among moderates black voters and voters over fifty and Massachusetts looking nationally Warren met the threshold of fifteen percent of the vote needed to gain any delegates in each state in just five of the fourteen super Tuesday states as of the latest count we'll talk now to Jess Bidgood Boston globe national politics reporter she's in Michigan where one receive the results last night and where I'm told Bernie Sanders this morning to Michigan is one of six states that vote next week I just thanks very much for coming on we're in Michigan are you thanks for having me on in Detroit Laura wood before it took the stage last night really before any of the results started coming in so I wanna play a clip of senator Warren from after the South Carolina results came in obviously a big button when there and and then I'll ask you to compare to whatever she said last night here's one on Saturday after referring to the trump presidency as a crisis this crisis demands more than a former vice president who is so eager to cut deals with Mitch McConnell and the Republicans that hill trade good ideas for bad ones and this crisis demands more than a senator who has good ideas but whose thirty year track record shows he consistently calls for things that failed to get done and consistently opposing things that never the last he fails to start school that was Saturday night one was trying to thread the needle there obviously between Sanders and Biden did she make similar statements last night when she spoke last night she she took should I say I think that you took the vehicle for results came in and before polls even closed in most of the country so her in less light actually did not feel very connected with super Tuesday and that may have been intentional of course she is a fairly standard stump speech in front of us very excited crowd of about two thousand people I will say but she did make a few comments that she doesn't usually think on her account news comments concern to this squishy and hard to define issue of electability that has become I think something that she's always struggled she does struggle to put concerns about that that it's a concept certainly that can privilege management and data a male candidates over over female ones but she said what I see happening is a lot of folks trying to turn voting into some kind of strategy she said pundits friends neighbors are all saying you have to second guess yourself she added that pundits have gotten it wrong over and over and urged her supporters to cast a vote that will make you cry out and then it she told the crowd why she was still running for president she said I'm in this race because I believe I will make the best president of the United States and from there she kind of went into this stuff he talks about it every step she makes her background her policies those kinds of things so those are really the only words we've heard from Elizabeth Warren since the end of voting she has not yet made a public statement about last night's results and I've just gotten word from some of her age that she's talking with her team about assisting the path forward but we don't know anything more than that at this point listeners we can take any questions or comments you have about any super Tuesday result at two one two four three three W. NYC two one two four three three nine six nine two we'll take those calls with Jess Bidgood from The Boston Globe right now and we'll have another super Tuesday at the end of the show that's going to be more west coast oriented but we'll be able to talk about anything nationally then as well but for now two one two four three three W. NYC two one two four three three nine six nine two just one thing you just said there is really huge for Elizabeth wind and not to her advantage it's that everybody this year feels they have to be a pundit and not necessarily vote for who they like the **** who they think would be the best president but who they think will be the most likely to be trump in November and I imagine that's working very much to the detriment of Elizabeth wind it might come out fairly differently if people were just voting their preference yes absolutely and this is an issue that she started to take on more directly I would say in about January but she's getting a lot of questions from voters on the trail about people who knew they had people in their lives what's the what's the foreign origin could win and where that's going to vote for someone else and she tried to make the case to voters at that time that they had to that they should go with their heart she she started rolling out this catch phrase hope over fear but I not clear to me that she was able to make that case as actively enough in an environment where as as you say every voter kind of decided that they needed to be a pundit and voters around the country are making their decisions based on their assumptions about what voters in future state might choose or might not want to Q. you know which candidate can I strengthen who I think will then have a good shot of doing well in super Tuesday those are the kinds of questions that voters have been asking themselves and that came that that that can that that made it tricky for for a lot of candidates who who announced presidential runs and and and are you know no longer no longer running and it and it also is making it tricky for for candidates like Warren who are still in the race in the new York times today one of the article says once most ardent supporters said she was unable to overcome the extra hurdles for women running for president the attributed her weak support among non college educated voters to the same sort of biased sees that a bit that badly damaged Hillary Clinton in the twenty sixteen general election against Donald Trump are you hearing the same thing I hear that often yes Elizabeth Warren draws a lot of women it to her advantage and I've spoken with hundreds of them over over the past month and I hear a lot particularly as warrants polling lead began to slip women will say to me I just don't want to see what happened to her or to Hillary happened to her in in their minds they watched a very qualified female presidential candidate who's to president trump and and and that was crashing and I think they are feeling some of that same disappointment about watching a candidate that they believed deeply into that they feel is utterly qualified seating and and and and I did too I think for some of her female supporters particularly this feels like a very crushing moment the exit poll number I saw said one only one a third of her core demographic in her home state white college educated women only a third in Massachusetts of white college educated women have you seen any breakdown on where the other two thirds of those Massachusetts voters want so Massachusetts is is there is no way around it this is a this is a very very tough or salt for Elizabeth Warren even that just a few days ago it seems like it was a two way race for best use that's between her and Bernie Sanders and and and her supporters of her endorsers had been saying in recent days there is no such thing as a must win state they had been they had been kind of predicting their guys might do well because he did very well there in the twenty sixteen primary but I think Biden's surge in Massachusetts took a lot of people by surprise and to me that makes Massachusetts kind of an interesting lad if you will for how our narratives and the power of a small bench him when we hold the doctor Grove and second university and and W. B. easy cheesy Paul Bassett she sets out last Wednesday to Friday I think that whole sided with wave heights warrant Warren and Sanders I have a neighborhood about eleven percent while they were out at twenty two percent for ward twenty four percent for Sanders and I I think what happened in that time is that by the big win in South Carolina showed voters in Massachusetts and around the country give them a reason to say okay this campaign has had some large breasts woman has stabilized we know by then we we see him as someone who could beat trump and I think it gave them kind of a reason to feel comfortable voting for a campaign that has not always made people feel that way and I think that's a big part of where his Massachusetts surge came from and it shows just how powerful this resistance and just how willing to to to change their minds voters have been I've seen data that says that that among voters who made up their mind it's just the past few days I didn't did very well among voters who made up their mind a little bit earlier Sanders did well so Biden has ruled really had had I had a question commented that perhaps just the right moment after a campaign that we're we never guaranteed that that this is going to happen perhaps here's a question from a listener writing on Twitter the question is what is you guessed think about the idea that wanted to staying in to help Bernie at the convention I think there are many reasons that she could do if if if she decides to stay in the there are many reasons that that that she might or might not do so as I said we we know that she's talking to her aides to day and assessing her path forward and if he were to stay in until the convention she would have she she would have a certain number of pledged delegates and if you stay in until the convention you have or you have a little bit more say as more power over where your delegates might go I think the question for her team is going to be can she amassed enough delegates that that is a a useful thing to to to have or is it better at this point to to to let it go and those those are the kinds of discussions I imagine they will be they they they will be having two days stay as they think about the path forward another thing that that I think could potentially be interesting for her warrant if she does stay in there's a prospect that just a week or so from now she would stand on the debate stage potentially with only Biden and Sanders the smallest debate to Jacksonville number one then of course if Bloomberg stays in the race that would be her and three men that could be an interesting moment for her so I'm curious if if the possibility of this debate is going to factor in and also their calculations of of how you know whether or not to stay in and how much longer to stay and and and and what they what they what they want to do I think in the race that's a very interesting prospect that you just raise that if Bloomberg drops out which many people think he's going to then the televised debate next week could just be Sanders and by then and Warren match and if it was that from the beginning but it could be you know she's she's got a lot of delegates.

New York China Wuhan Brian Lehrer
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer on WNYC and we're gonna segue from that last thought about Hamilton to call and we have time for two short Collins to end of twenty nineteen and this decade on a program in the first of them is going to be for you to real quickly will do a lot of short calls celebrate or should the best stuff that you watched read or listen to in twenty nineteen just from twenty nineteen two one two four three three W. NYC four three three nine six nine two maybe so president Obama's lists that he released the other day that have been making their ways around the media his lists fell pretty squarely in the pop culture's like guys from flea bag to the author Sally Rooney to the new little women movie and the new film version of just mercy based on the Bryan Stevenson book so give us a call and tell us the best movie you saw or the best TV series that you binged on or the best book that you read in twenty nineteen any of those cultural content categories pick one try to keep it to things that came out in twenty nineteen though two one two four three three W. NYC two one two four three three nine six nine two well you call it calls are coming in a little more sample of the Obama book lists which has everything from novels to historical and political non fiction two books written by Brian Lehrer show guests like he cited the yellow house a memoir by Serra broom normal people by the young Irish author Seri picture Sally running as a mention the heart beat of wounded knee native America from eighteen ninety to the present by David Troyer saying nothing the true story of murder in memory in Northern Ireland by Patrick Gratton chief the sixth man a memoir by under it with dollar we had him on the show for that speaking of sports trick mirror reflections on self delusion by New Yorker writer Gina Tolentino big favor of so many people this year who I know call in now and share what you read and loved in twenty nineteen or watched and loved on TV or watched in love in a big city in a big theater on a big screen two one two four three three W..

Brian Lehrer Hamilton Collins Obama Sally Rooney W. NYC America David Troyer murder Northern Ireland president Bryan Stevenson Patrick Gratton writer Gina Tolentino
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:10 min | 3 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now introduce the Brian Lehrer show fast to challenge we are challenging ourselves here the Brian Lehrer show and challenging you if you want to take part to see how low we can go on single use plastic for the next one week between right now and next Friday morning we will be doing at least one segment a day next week on climate related issues as part of a national project call covering climate now and plastic production is increasing contributor to greenhouse gas emissions so here's what we're inviting you to do simply notice track reduce or quit your use of single use plastic now you don't have to be perfect and this is not to shame anyone or for anyone to claim purity and virtue over anyone else the idea is three things number one just notice how much single use plastic you bye and get rid of keep a log number to reduce to the extent that you can then number three take a picture of something during the week that shows a success or struggle in your plastic challenge effort and posted to Instagram or Twitter just use the hashtag plastic challenge that singular plastic plastic challenge to Twitter Instagram with your image you might take a picture of things like the non plastic cutlery keep at your desk the bridge the refilling your reusable coffee Cup your W. NYC eco towed or other clothes shopping bag in action the log you've kept of all the plastic you views or avoided using during next week the pile of discarded this should be grateful for that the pile of discarded single use plastic that you've capped just to see how big it gets what about the glass jar you take to the ball good store or to show your struggle. because we know it's a struggle maybe something like the single use plastic you simply can't do without I already have something in mind in that category for me or maybe you just couldn't figure out how to replace and you know I'm not claiming to be any kind of holier than thou person myself on this I definitely use my share of single use plastic and I'm gonna be right there with you in this plastic challenge observing my own behavior and logging what I can easily change what it takes more effort to change and maybe some things I decide I'm not ready or able to change right now and we're inviting you to do that too again do any of these three things number one just notice how much single use plastic you buy and then get rid of just keep a log if that's all you do that's great number to reduce to the extent you can then number three take a picture of something during the week that shows a success or a struggle in your plastic challenge effort and posted to Instagram or Twitter use the hashtag plastic challenge all right so we help a lot of you will participate I think keeping a log of a single use plastic consumption for one week will be powerful in and of itself so even if that's all you do that would be great hash tag plastic challenge and to help us get us going on this. and to talk about why it matters we're joined now by Judith and founder of the beyond plastics environmental campaign under president Obama she was the EPA administrator for what they call region to which is New York and New Jersey Porter Rico and the U. S. Virgin Islands and eight tribal nations she was previously the deputy environment commissioner for New York state and she is also a senior fellow at the center for advanced political action at Bennington college in Vermont where she's engaging students in conjunction with the beyond plastics campaign soldiers so nice of you to help us with this welcome to W. NYC thanks Brian it's a real treat to be here and thanks for focusing on this and listeners if you want to throw in a quick question or two to Judy thank about plastic in a particular single use plastic. either how to reduce or something about the overall environmental impact two one two four three three W. NYC two one two four three three nine six nine two we just have a little time for that today but you're just gonna come back next week at the end of the of the challenge so here's a stat I've seen you refer to half of all the plastic ever made was made since two thousand five do I have that right yeah that's correct this is a contemporary challenge and what I also think a lot of people don't realize is nine million metric tons of plastic enter the ocean every year so this is an ocean issue we can solve the climate crisis without addressing plastic pollution and it's it's relatively recent and the trend is not looking good we're looking at a tremendous increase in plastic production unless things change what are the growth items in plastic manufacturing and pollution in recent years so historically plastic with me to buy oil and chemicals and what we're seeing now is plastic is made still with chemicals but now a by product of hydro fracking it's called F. thing which is a waste product when fracking occurs in there are multiple proposals to build what's called ethylene cracker plants where this ethane will be heated to high temperature and will be used as a building block for single use plastic packaging making it even cheaper I realize I left that one little piece of the plastic challenge which is when new poster photos to Instagram or Twitter using the hash tag plastic challenge also Ted us so that's just you know at Brian Lehrer if you can remember to do that when you post post your photos you have a term the plastics try factor yes I assume that trust factor is not about. adding on horses it's betting on the planet so the plastic tray factor we have a model built that we're encouraging local governments to adopt which bands poly styrene or styrofoam which New York City has already done yeah Hey Brad lander in the New York City Council the second part of the tri factor bands plastic bags and puts a fee on paper which the state of New York is adopted but not New Jersey and the third element is plastic straws only upon request so those are kind of the low hanging fruit things and I totally applied your plastic initiative NYC and encourage everyone to participate but if you don't mind I want to add a fourth item which is taking political action we are well past the time when the individual action is going to make a big enough to end so I totally encourage for instance people to bring reusable water bottles when they want to hydrate but one million plastic water bottles are used around the world purchased around the world every minute one million every minute so we also need laws on the books and programs that require a reduction in plastic I totally get that and I totally agree in fact folks if you see the introductory video that I think is up now on Instagram I put it in the context of exactly that individual action is not going to do it because there aren't enough of us who were going to do it to the necessary extent voluntarily but I see it as modeling yes and and letting people know that there are alternatives I mean I also I'm pretty careful about trying to avoid plastic but any trip to a modern supermarket you're just surrounded by plastic and it's it's hard to avoid in some instances to that point we have list. in Westchester I think Liz you're on W. M. I say hi hi yes to that point how you buy. point I shop at whole foods who is meant to be one of the most eco friendly supermarkets around. I cannot afford councils like how to avoid you know message impact while you can but it's super hard of leading a very busy life to avoid and if anything this package the classic I've even started using the match what you expected ship on toxic anti I believe the whole foods especially should. I know maybe they how to program the monthly thing giving away for free because I think I did use the number of people do it use a plastic box but it it's the pre packaged stuff that really bothers me. into Florida yeah. sure kinda so contact whole foods and tell him you don't want to buy so much product with so much plastic it's also not good for your health a lot of plasticizers will leach into your food and beverage especially if you heat it up and also look at supporting local laws that would address this I mean I I want to share with folks that it's not your fault that you're surrounded by plastic the plastic industry sold us a bill of goods saying that we can recycle all this plastic when in fact even when markets were stronger only nine percent of plastics worldwide have been recycled so the single most important thing we can do it the two important things we can do one is by less plastics in second get involved politically even at the very local level to support laws that reduce plastic pollution I was gonna ask you about that recycling I've been reading you on this topic and you you you only want numbers one two and five plastics to be taken in for recycling why those are not the others because those are the only ones that we even have a fighting chance of getting recycled and what of those button number number one is like it's mostly rigid plastic so think of it that way plastic water bottles detergent containers a lot of this the thin plastic film plastic bags there they're really not recycled and unfortunately lots a local governments say put all your plastics in the recycling bin and historically most of it was never recycled so if you flip the container over to the bottom you see these teeny tiny little numbers if you see one two or five put it in your recycling bin if you don't if it's another number don't put it in the recycling bin because it actually contaminates the load Liz Lisa in queen John W. NYC highly so hi Brian thank you so much for taking my call a really. love you and you shall. so I think the elephant in the room is Amazon I mean seriously myself included people just don't want to have the discomfort of going to the store and shopping anymore and the amount of plastic that comes with everything I order from Amazon and just you know the sometimes you order something and they'll send you like just a couple you can't order something what you ordered in bulk so now you've got you know five versions of plastic container died on right and an excellent job in just because we're almost out of time already but how do you get away from that packaging Amazon or other delivery services yeah it's not just Amazon but they're a big offender they've shifted a lot to single use plastic this is an area where there oughta be a law individual consumers writing to Amazon is really not having an impact and so we need the federal government when we act on this but we need a New York state bill that requires Amazon to either take their packaging back for re use or recycle or at.

Brian Lehrer one week two one two four three three W nine million metric tons nine percent
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:33 min | 3 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone tonight democratic presidential climate change forum on CNN is now being framed by a real life disaster that many scientists are saying can probably be linked to the warming earth and that of course is hurricane Dorian for one thing according to The New York Times this pattern where hurricane strolls in one place for hours like Dorian did over the Bahamas that's a sign of climate change will explain why about that and more as we open the program today with three short interviews about the Dorian emergency and the larger climate change crisis with us first is New York times Miami bureau chief. from this day currently covering Dorian Patricia thanks so much for some time on an intensely moving assignment K. for you obviously welcome to W. NYC thanks for having me and first things first we've all been hearing about the devastation in the Bahamas what can people here do if they want to help in some way. well there is a robust Bahamian community in South Florida out that has organized to send donations and there haven't figured out quite how to get them yet they've got various planes ready to go but you know they they need to be cleared for landing and people have really turned out to to offer all the help that they can you know what a lot of organizations like the red cross and other NGOs will tell you is that cash helps them you know just just money donations to be flexible with what the needs are but what I've heard from people who have already flown over the Bahamas and as a liver some supplies is that you know everything you can think of starting with water and other basic necessities including hygiene products are are very necessary right now. then after devastating the Bahamas Dorian is now causing hundreds of thousands of evacuations to be ordered maybe it's more than a million people you know better than I do from coastal communities in parts of Florida up to the Carolinas what's the extent of the movement of people in the U. S. now. in Florida V. evacuations were limited to some vulnerable a beach front communities they learned from these accusations a couple of years ago in hurricane Irma where many more people moved that that was not the wisest course of action for a storm like this that moves from south to north and effects such a broad swath of the state because then people are left on the roads and don't know really where to go well the storm is sort of following them so here the evacuations were for what some official side were miles not hundreds of miles where some people just were asked to move inland to be away from the storm surge there are more about evacuations right now in not in Georgia and the Carolinas because the storm track has appeared to move slightly closer to the northern Georgia and and South Carolina coast still perhaps not land fall but as we know storms hi does not have to cross into land for the storm surge to be dangerous your article today is a heart wrenching description of some of the specific challenges of getting elderly people in nursing homes and assisted living facilities to safety what's the big picture of that. this was another lesson from past storms where you know sort has a large retiree preparation population and they wanted to make sure that didn't have a repeat of sweltering conditions of the power went out for some of these people that proved to be deadly during her can hear about twelve people died and recently for workers from the nursing home where were charged because those deaths were deemed homicides this time they have made sure that places have better up power generators and and backed up but they had to evacuate some some places that we're just in danger of flooding that there's a lot of communities in northeast Florida especially Jacksonville and Saint Augustine that flooded in past storms even when the storm did not hit them directly those plans were put into place and according to the state people got out as needed and and hopefully the storm would be as bad as as it could have been and and my despair all there was the tragedy of a dozen people who died two years ago during Irma in a nursing home lost all its air conditioning in a power outage I mean this is you know not Florida's first rodeo when it comes to hurricanes and neither was Irma would they have the systems down Pat by now. you know on the one hand you would think that Florida is perhaps the best prepared state because we do get so many hurricanes on the other hand every emergency manager will tell you that every storm is different and that they learn something each time and so my did require new regulations and the state law setting higher and marched at more strict standards for what the power back up had to be at nursing homes especially including that they have to keep comfortable temperatures for people who are who are really vulnerable to the heat I think some of those regulations were first tested last year during hurricane Michael which hit the panhandle but a lot of places still don't have all the equipment in place that they should especially nursing homes which tend to be larger are still you know it takes awhile for them to make these investments to over there for structure and so I think that's going to be an ongoing process for the state so now the climate change angle and I know.

Brian Lehrer two years one hand