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36 Burst results for "Brian Lehrer"

Carl Reiner, actor, comic and 'Dick van Dyke Show' creator, dies at 98

Brian Lehrer

00:39 sec | 1 d ago

Carl Reiner, actor, comic and 'Dick van Dyke Show' creator, dies at 98

"And legendary comic actor and writer Carl Reiner has died. Reiner was among the writers on Sid Caesar's legendary show of shows in the fifties. Along with Mel Brooks and Woody Allen. He gained famous the creator of the Dick Van Dyke Show, and as the Straight Man to Mel Brooks is 2000 year old man character. He directed the films Oh God, starring George Burns and John Denver. All of me with Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin and the 1970 copy of comedy Where's Papa? He also authored several books, including Enter Laughing, An autobiographical novel and My Anecdotal Life. A memoir. Rocks native Carl Reiner was 98

Carl Reiner Mel Brooks Woody Allen Dick Van Dyke Show Sid Caesar Lily Tomlin Steve Martin John Denver George Burns Writer
Fresh update on "brian lehrer" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:12 sec | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "brian lehrer" discussed on Morning Edition

"Mean talking. It also means listening. It's a challenge to allow different points of view to be heard and still keep a strong grip on the truth. We do our research. If we here lies masquerading his opinion. We have to call that out. Brian Lehrer Show weekdays 10 a.m. to noon on 93.9 FM and am 20 WN. On.

Brian Lehrer
What Is a Jobs Guarantee—and Can It Work?

Brian Lehrer

07:19 min | 1 d ago

What Is a Jobs Guarantee—and Can It Work?

"Is spreading because of a virus. My next guest says Unemployment can spread like a virus. And she's got a solution of federal jobs guarantee. Many economists consider unemployment natural, unavoidable, even necessary to a certain degree. For the economy to function. But Pavlina Channa, who specializes in what's known as Modern monetary theory, disagrees the virus theory well as economic downturns. Cause layoffs. The recently unemployed have less money to spend, leading to a second wave of unemployment in the industries, they could no longer support. But what if the government could guarantee a living wage stop to any American Who wants one. It's an economic policy idea that some of you may know has gained traction not only as Corona virus unemployment has spread, but from well known progressive political figures recently before this, Bernie Sanders Alexandria, Ocasio Cortez. Cory Booker have back versions of this idea, or at least believe it should be considered as a response to Income inequality in America generally and toe automation and toe. Other things that cause structural unemployment. It's part of the green new deal the federal jobs guarantee. So joining us now is Bard College economics professor Pavlina Chan of Ah, Who's got a new book called the Case for a job guarantee. Professor Chernova? Welcome to WNYC. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me, Brian. Good morning. Let's start in the present because you wrote this book before the pandemic when official unemployment was down around 3%. Now comes this historically weird emergency where the economy shuts down voluntarily, and tens of millions of people lose their jobs all at once. The government responds with a patchwork of enhanced unemployment benefits and pay cheque loans to employ yours intended to keep A lot of that money passing through to some workers, plus the other kinds of pre existing government aid, like Medicaid and food stamps and more with the guaranteed job program, replace all of that. Under current circumstances. No, it will not replace. Any other measures measures that that might might be be considered considered necessary, necessary, But But it it is is The The most most straightforward straightforward solution solution to to providing providing jobs jobs for for people people who who need need it. it. I I mean, mean, in in the the current current crisis, crisis, we should have focused on protecting jobs. And preventing the layoffs that would have made the task of dealing with this avalanche of layoff much easier. I think we can look to some countries in Europe who have used again the public purse government budgets. To essentially guarantee a payroll for folks whose jobs are threatened from Cove. It's so unemployment rates did spike in some of those countries, but not nearly as much as they did in the United States. So Onda budget that we pass the cares act was so large, it was enough to pay the entire wage bill in the U. S economy for three straight months. So we could have protected Lee off jobs. We could have prevented layoffs, but the damage is done and unemployment. As I argue in the book is it's kind of a perennial teacher and the economy. So the way to inoculate against that is just to create jobs directly. How much would the living wage B? And a guaranteed federal jobs program. The proposal in my book is for $15 an hour, and that is really to help with the fight for 15 of that has You know, has had captured the interest and policymakers with the state level, but it might be, But 15 will not be enough sooner. You know very, very recently, so in in in a truck Order rather so maybe 17. But this is a policy. This is a policy question. The point here is to ensure that it's a living wage floor and that no person Works in a poverty paying jobs with a firm. A living wage for the economy as a whole. The minimum wages you know, is 7 25 and it is not a living wage is poverty paying wage, so it represents about a doubling of the minimum wage. Significantly elevated the floor. Yes, And that's the federal minimum wage, which might be shocking to some of our listeners since the minimum wage. Around here is $15 an hour, but federally and therefore in some states that don't have the same politics, say New York and New Jersey. It's still down around that poverty wage. As you know. Other progressives proposed what they call a universal basic income rather than a guaranteed job. Andrew Gang, for example. Ran for president on $1000 a month Universal basic income proposal, But I don't believe there is a work requirement, just the money as a universal basic income. Sent to every American Do you argue that a guaranteed job solves the same problem, but in a different way? No, I think the job guarantee souls more problems. So $1000 a month. While very nice doesn't really lift people out of poverty. It helps But the job guarantee guarantees a living wage. And so when a person needs work, and they go into the unemployment office, which by the way is called the American job Center. They can find a lot of other assistance that they can't find a job. And that's what the job he does. It insures that there's a public service. Hollis option employment options for those who need work, and we know from basic income experiments that people who even get the income assistance still looking for jobs. So the problem with the job guarantee salt is this. Basically cruel game of musical chairs that people play in the labor market, and they're looking for four jobs, but they're not enough employment opportunities for all, even in the best of times. Forget about Cove it even when the economy is humming near full employment. We're still talking about millions and millions who don't have employment and The unemployment problem is there It's as you were saying in the introduction, ending a lot of social health, economic cost. It's paid for innocent and so we can do things better. By using the public purse to employ the unemployed. But I want to say that it's not. It's not a week requirement. The job guarantee doesn't provide a requirement for the benefits that people might be receiving. It's an additional program so You could have the choice of getting unemployment insurance and the various other income assistance provided out there. But if we gave people one more choice To pick up a living wage job offer. Then that provides stronger economic security.

Government Pavlina Channa American Job Center Cory Booker Bard College Pavlina Chan Professor Chernova Europe New York Bernie Sanders Alexandria United States New Jersey Brian Official LEE Professor Ocasio Cortez
New York City Marathon — the world's largest — announces cancellation

Brian Lehrer

00:27 sec | Last week

New York City Marathon — the world's largest — announces cancellation

"And the twenty twenty New York City marathon has been cancelled due to the pandemic organizer's announced the decision this morning to scrap the race the largest marathon in the world organizers will contact registered runners by July fifteenth with cancellation options they can get a refund on their entry fee or defer to any of the next three New York City marathons despite the declining number of cases of the corona virus in New York health officials are concerned about a second wave returning

New York City
Many European Countries Begin Reopening Borders to Each Other

Brian Lehrer

00:30 sec | 2 weeks ago

Many European Countries Begin Reopening Borders to Each Other

"Many European countries are re opening borders to each other after three months of pandemic closures restoring freedom of movement that was interrupted abruptly in March the continent is still mostly close to Americans Asians and other international tourist border checks were dropped overnight in Germany France and elsewhere nearly two weeks after Italy opened its borders other EU countries and a few non EU nations such as Switzerland are expected to start opening to international visitors until at least next month

Germany France Italy Switzerland EU
Coronavirus spread by asymptomatic people 'appears to be rare,' WHO official says

Brian Lehrer

02:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Coronavirus spread by asymptomatic people 'appears to be rare,' WHO official says

"Development the World Health Organization said yesterday that spread from a symptomatic individuals is very rare but this morning in case you haven't heard yet they walked it back so joining me now to discuss areas covered nineteen news is doctor Ashman Bresson epidemiologist at Columbia University and CEO of fountain house a community based mental and public health organization doctor son welcome back to WNYC thank you for joining us again hi Brian thanks for having can you clear up first to the best of your ability there's a symptomatic spread confusion that the WHL seems to have slowed I think our believe previously was you don't have to be symptomatic to spread the virus then yesterday they said no that's not really true then this morning they walked that back do you ever handle yet on what's going on here yeah it's an unfortunate miscommunication on the part of W. H. O. and it just goes to show you how important really clear actionable information is during a crisis and during a pandemic I think what's clear is that W. H. O. was leaning on a limited set of studies that mainly from China but a few of their quote unquote member states which basically showed that the most severely ill people symptomatic people were the ones meeting most of ours which makes perfect sense because if you're more severely ill you've got more of the virus circulating in your body and you're more prone to shed that virus in your in your respiratory secretions in your mucous membranes and all that so there's part of that that's correct but what where they cared even making a somewhat maybe overstating her or making a more definitive statement than they should have talking about something absolutely and really what they were saying is a relic what they were saying is what they should have said something like you know symptomatic people the more severely ill are more likely to transmit that doesn't mean that a symptomatic increase symptomatic people do not transmit and you know for example pre symptomatic transmission and one study in Singapore was forty eight percent pre symptomatic transmission and one study in China with sixty three percent so either the individual studies that the W. show really just doesn't have enough data to be making statements like that came to the sowing confusion and I think that's why you saw them walk it back this

World Health Organization Columbia University CEO Wnyc W. H. O. China Singapore Ashman Bresson Brian
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:05 min | 3 weeks ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer on WNYC the New York state legislators among those that are beginning to act on police reforms that have been stuck in the political mind for a long time the measures rising in Albany right now include a ban on chokeholds by police the repeat of the the repeal I should say of the law known as fifty eight which keeps police officers disciplinary records sealed and more with us now New York State Senate majority leader Andrea Stewart cousins her own district covers much of Westchester senator Stewart cousins always a pleasure welcome back to W. NYC thank you so much Brian it's always good to be with you and and I really appreciate the way you handle all of these topical issues with so many extraordinary gas so thank you for letting me be among them thank you so much and I'll say extraordinary colors which we certainly heard great uncles are absolutely in the last segment let's start with the bill that passed both houses of the legislature yesterday I see call the Eric garner anti chokehold that what would the law DO well this will make it very very clear that choke holds are are not permissible and if you are you know using a chokehold in order to to subdue someone that you you know that you feel is that a suspect and so on it's not acceptable so it's basically clarifying the use of the show cold when they are prohibited as well as criminalizing the you could use it so cold when it results in the death of a person by a police officer so it will now be a class C. felony I which it will give you a minimum of three and a half years and up to fifteen years so I think it's important one of the things that that the what we will be doing in the next three days is really again clarifying in many ways what's acceptable and what is not acceptable in police state police had had the ability in many ways to construct their own rules and they have been able to sort of navigate in their own circle circumstances in the way they feel is right so whether it's the chokehold whether it is repealing fifty a which we will do today whether it is medical attention while it somebody's been in custody whether it's the the the use of weapons reporting so if you're discharging a weapon with you you've hurt someone or not it must be reported so it's it's an oh by the way if someone like that seventeen year old girl that was recording what happened tragically to George Floyd was was maybe in New York and maybe someone didn't appreciate that she was recording it is now clear that the people have a right to record and we are not only doing that but Afghan or state police now to have body cameras so this is really I think trying to create that kind of transparency the track kind of accountability and and just rules that will prevent some of what you know I guess has been confusion at all so I think it will be a step towards trying to regain trust with communities if the specific communities of color tell me more about right to record are there circumstances under current law where if somebody is recording a police encounter that the police have the right to tell them to stop I haven't you know Bedlam I think that is the issue we have seen in a lot of different circumstances where somebody will say oh give me that phone or you know take the phone from her though so what I did there it was silent in terms of what happened so begin this policy which broke again a path fifty ninety three yesterday said that that the bill will this law means that you have an affirmative right to actually record that whatever is happening with police as a stand by I you know this as as a bystander rather so I think people are doing things some people with some some police reacted fine I would you saw what happened with the the torchlight situation means as they seem to be absolutely no concerned at all that this guy was actually killing someone over in the ninth minute minute period and people are recording button here in New York we now are telling you specifically do not bother anybody who is recording you it is not allowed to sell at very least it's an affirmation of what's already somebody's right exactly the United States what about you just talked about the the bystanders I see they're doing this in Minnesota now do you have in the New York State Legislature anything that would make it a crime to not intervene as a police officer if you see a fellow officer committing what appears to be a criminal act as in the case of their children and George Floyd here and now not among the bill that we are passing right now but it is certainly something that that I believe you know you would have faith in human nature that you would not do that but I think it waited we kind of get it back is the the medical attention while in custody so the way it works now I guess you know we see the theme that if somebody is saying I can't breathe either I'm going to you know let die need I need something diabetic or whatever it does not seem that there is any particular attention paid to that so we are getting at that somewhat with what we call the medical attention while in custody battle and you know just this I said to the officer has a responsibility to help the human being who is in distress I'm not saying a minor ailment or whatever but if someone is telling you look on mathematics I'm going into attack I need to be able to to get my medicine you do not have the right to safely with this person problem results in death you do not have the right anymore to just say oh well you know I didn't believe them all well I don't think so you know I I I did so I think we sort of getting it back but you know some of these things and I think all of us would agree some of these things would you would think be human nature you would think people would have a response that would be different from unfortunately a lot of the callousness that we've seen over you know the inferred for communities of color over generations but certainly now the whole whole world is seeing and how many instances so we want to make sure that that bad cop are exposed and flagged and and you know taken away from a position of responsibility that they have to protect and serve it because we want good cop to be able to be good cops and you know one of my police commissioner then an offering with a you know the only thing that allows for bad cop or good cop so we want to make sure that that good cops are allowed to be good that they are doing things that community wants them to do and we need the community you know need for them to go and in the bad cops go away and the other thing of course on the the civilian side we yesterday the nine one one full of reporting bell fellow that Mister Cooper and miss Cooper and and you know this this this calling nine one one because if you see somebody you're uncomfortable with you know a black person a brown person creating emergency I that's not acceptable either that incident in central park two weeks ago and the watcher a white woman called the police on a black man bird watching and asked her to put her dog on a leash as the law requires in the park and she called nine one one instead a black man was threatening her life fifty one five yes we have to talk listeners we can take a few phone calls for the.

Brian Lehrer New York
Ex-NY subway boss named to head London transit system

Brian Lehrer

00:27 sec | Last month

Ex-NY subway boss named to head London transit system

"Former New York City transit president Andy Byford has a new job Byford will be the new commissioner of the transport for London that city's mayor city con confirm the appointment Byford was widely credited with improving subway performance but he reportedly clashed with governor Cuomo over the cost of overhauling the transit system transit advocates and officials praised his results and charismatic personality Byford resigned in January saying that the agency's reorganization would greatly reduce

Andy Byford Commissioner London Governor Cuomo New York City President Trump
Jimmy Cobb, 'Kind of Blue' drummer for Miles Davis, dies

Brian Lehrer

00:32 sec | Last month

Jimmy Cobb, 'Kind of Blue' drummer for Miles Davis, dies

"The last surviving musician featured on Miles Davis groundbreaking album kind of blue has died at the age of ninety one percussionist Jimmy Cobb died yesterday at his New York City home according to a Facebook post from his wife the calls was lung cancer ward in Washington DC Cobb began playing with Davis's jazz combo in nineteen fifty eight the year before they recorded kind of blue nineteen fifty nine album also featured legends cannonball Adderley and John Coltrane and with more than four million copies sold it is the best selling jazz album of

Miles Davis Jimmy Cobb John Coltrane New York City Facebook Washington Cannonball Adderley
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | Last month

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer on WNYC and we'll get to our next segment shortly but I need to ask you something that's important for the station we are in a miniature W. NYC spring membership drive today and it's a paradox because it's a miniature drive under maxed out circumstances usually this time of year we go on a little bit of a pause as Memorial Day is approaching as summer is approaching and we do a nine day annual membership drive to help fund the work that we do here is a not for profit news organization we depend on memberships as you probably know but this year we're in a paradoxical situation like a lot of other news organizations we have lost revenue from some of our funders who can't do that right now and at the same time we have incurred big extra expenses like buying and installing all this extra equipment so that they're showing all the other shows can originate from our homes and I'm told that they're doing physical work down at the office to make it safe for the new realities when people start to go back so we have declining revenues and increasing expenses so here's the paradox we don't feel comfortable doing a regular nine day membership drive continuing coverage is just too important right now and we are just not going to interrupt regular programming for nine days as we usually do it just feels inappropriate to us so we're doing a three day membership drive instead of a nine day one today's date too so thank you first of all to all of you who have donated so far but this miniature drive with maximal importance ends tomorrow seems like we just began we did just began in seems like we're about to end we are there to and maybe this is the last moment that you happened to be listening before it ends so thank you so much in advance for.

Brian Lehrer NYC
Effects On Coronavirus On People With Disabilities

Brian Lehrer

12:44 min | 2 months ago

Effects On Coronavirus On People With Disabilities

"The crown of lockdown police say the whole word the coronavirus lockdown and the virus itself present special challenges for people with various kinds of disabilities it may also present some new opportunities such as greater acceptance of working or studying from home but depending on the kind of disability someone has shopping transportation unemployment the ability to get needed healthcare workers to come into your home lots of different things require navigating corona world in new ways with us now to talk about his work and to take calls with your experiences from anyone with any kind of disability is Victor Crowley C. commissioner of the New York City mayor's office for people with disabilities commissioner of police you thanks so much for coming on today welcome to WNYC thank you Brian it's a pleasure to be here would you like to introduce yourself to our listeners a little bit first before we get into people's lives and the issues because I see you've described yourself as a person with a self disclosed disability so would you say how you describe that and then basically what your mission is as commissioner of the people with disabilities office sure I am a person with a disability I am in a wheelchair I was injured in a mountain bicycle accident when I was twenty two years old and it absolutely turn my life around I was a plumber before I was injured and trying to navigate that world and trying to figure out what's next in my life going back to school realizing that education was the key to moving forward to employment was it was important to me and I accepted the disabled world the first through adaptive sports of competing in the Paralympic Games in nineteen ninety eight in Nagano Japan and then eventually working my way through nonprofit organizations and and landing a job with the parts department and eventually is the commissioner of the mayor's office with people with disabilities yeah in twenty twelve so what is our office do you our office is around to ensure that everything the city has to offer is equal to people with disabilities so for looking after our streetscape to ensure that it's acceptable for people disabilities we're looking at our parks department our cultural institutions to ensure that people with disabilities are represented not only in visiting the places but also adds August so we want to make sure that everything the city offers is acceptable to people with disabilities so listeners we'd like to invite anyone with any kind of disability to call in to talk to Victor Crowley C. commissioner of the mayor's office for people with disabilities especially about ways the coronavirus era is changing things for you that's the topic for this call in or anything you think public policy should address in that respect six four six four three five seventy to eighty six four six four three five seventy to eighty help us report this story how was the corona virus you know changing things for you or someone you know with any kind of disability and what could the commissioner's office for people with disabilities stand to know about your experience that may help them have the best city government response six four six four three five seventy to eighty six four six four three five seventy to eighty if you want to talk about yourself or someone you know will help us report the story commissioner office said you might want to talk about how people with disabilities lives are going to change after call of it including how society has changed with work from home and study from home distance learning what are you thinking about those changes in terms of challenges or maybe even opportunities absolutely challenges across the board and all of them but this this certainly presents a unique opportunity to change the way that employment education recreation and health care costs are delivered so if we talk about accommodations in the workplace and as we move forward in diving into what the future of work is going to look like we have to insure that it's acceptable and they have those accommodation for people disabilities it can be anything from a screen reader to changing a person's schedule and the list goes on and what we heard in the past is that we can't work from home because it's it's not doable but since the coronavirus come came and is with us right now everybody's working from home and understanding that it is a possibility is certainly a bright spot for people disability because we've been doing this for so long we've asked for these accommodations and have not necessarily receive that now we are concerned about the us add that second we started a program called NYC at work it's a public private partnership to ensure that we employ people with disabilities now the opportunity is that we can go online we can work but not everyone has access to some of these effective communication devices or computers or cell phones and all that because people disabilities within poverty so we really need to be able to employ people so they can get the resources they need so they can prosper in work remote education we've certainly seen this change department of education has gone from a school based model now to virtually online and a matter of a matter of days and making sure that we provide the effective equipment for people with disabilities disabilities such as iPads and then making sure that our systems are accessible making sure that the E. learning platforms are accessible to people for kids with disabilities I think that that is really important meaning that you can read TD asset they have captioning and that my wife is a physical therapist and right now she is working from home providing physical therapy to some of those kids that actually need it and what is telehealth look like and telehealth is if we hear of everything that happened during the corona virus this is changing the landscape of that but we need access to that equipment to ensure that happens as well but as recreation from whole look like other departments of parks and recreation is put together a video encouraging people to work out if you have a disability and what types of exercise programs you can have this long with the New York road runners club and Achilles track club I mean these are things that are based here in New York and we want to keep people of state active so technology can certainly drive this but being employed as an important part of it Sam in Inglewood you're on W. NYC with Victor Crowley C. from the New York City mayor's office for people with disabilities hi Sam hi thank you so I mean New Jersey I used to work for twenty five plus years in New York City so my question is kind of a a global one we fought very hard here in New Jersey to make sure that the at those are intellectually disabled on the severe and many of whom were ours are in larger facilities the so called developmental centers got tested for covert nineteen as well as all the staff it seems to me and to us looking trying to find data from other states and cities that are those who were disabled particularly particularly severe and are are sitting ducks in a lot of different ways we think the state cared in New Jersey but we still have to push it very very hard to get our folks properly taken care of so I'm just wondering what what if anything you might have to say about how we as a society protect those who were severely disabled particularly intellectually but in other ways too in the in Europe coke at nineteen I'm so glad you brought this up Sam because there's so much focus on nursing homes in particular we know what's been happening there and it's hot horrific but there are other kinds of group living situations that involve people with particular needs and that presumably would also make them vulnerable so commissioner how about that yes very it's it's a big concern and people with disabilities were concerned about this as soon as Copeland had now I've gotten calls from advocates say we to make sure that healthcare but held home health care workers and personal care attendants are essential workers we need to make sure that they're protected and that was a balance at first because we needed to make sure that the front line workers at the hospital had all the protective equipment that they needed to add once we were solid with them we were able to secure a protective equipment for people with disabilities and we were able to take them delivered them to our service providers you therefore sent into healthcare workers and people with disabilities and making sure that that happens because the reality is if health care workers come into a home and get a person with a disability second they flood the hospitals that's a problem so we want to see that so once we were able to you secure protective equipment such as masks and gloves we we've delivered over a hundred thousand of them already and we're continuing to keep a list of that but we don't do this in a bubble right we like to think we know everything but the important part is to be really kidnapped what the disabled community we hold a weekly call so I understand what the concerns are with the community and we have hundreds of people on those calls because we give them updates will will we bring in people from other agencies to talk about the issues that are happening so everyone stays informed along with our website me and make sure the website has all the content on there and it's not just about a website that has information you have to make sure that that the information is accessible to the PDF's of the video to social media all of that is a constant reminder of acceptability because people with disabilities have different needs so it's delivering equipment to the people that need it and it's also making sure that the the way that we deliver things are accessible Gardner in Manhattan you're on W. NYC with commissioner Causey hi Gardner hi there Brian great to be on the call of the you guys are doing the show the segment thanks so I have to read them grow which is the neurological disorder that leads to a lot of like motor and vocal tics as we call them the most well known stereotype is people cursing uncontrollably which actually only about ten percent of people actually do with threats and I'm just curious because you know Mike that currently is a pretty loud throat clearing sniffing which any normal time you know there's a lot of anxiety and other people so I'm not taking the subway or anything right now but I just wonder what the city can be doing to acknowledge disabilities like that they're not as identifiable in public but the keeper could do with a lot of you know hostility which I've been saying basically my whole life in a place like New York you probably need to call in to radio shows more because you haven't done it once during this call but I but but I get it commissioner if you're yeah your point is that if your tech is a lot of throat clearing and people are gonna think you have the virus and you're gonna get stigmatized everywhere you go right oh yeah oh yeah and I felt that my whole life with you know point flu it's just people being worried worried about you know being second there's there's no amount of cover my mouth if you do that you know can can quell the you know the hostility of the negative person unfortunately yeah and you raise the consciousness of people just by saying that commissioner anything to add to that briefly

New York City calls on doctors to watch for children with syndrome possibly associated with COVID-19

Brian Lehrer

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

New York City calls on doctors to watch for children with syndrome possibly associated with COVID-19

"Local health officials and researchers are investigating whether covert nineteen can trigger a rare pediatric illness W. in my sis Fred mogul reports in an alert released late last night the city health department asked doctors to keep an eye out for symptoms associated with what they're calling multi system inflammatory syndrome potentially associated with COPD nineteen they've identified fifteen children ages two to fifteen in hospitals around the city with the syndrome which appears to be mainly caused by inflamed blood vessels some but not all of these children tested positive for the coronavirus five have needed treatment with the ventilators but none have died similar reports of the rare and mysterious syndrome have emerged recently in Europe symptoms can include a persistent fever and a rash vomiting or

Copd Fever Vomiting Fred Mogul Europe
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:31 min | 2 months ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming up on tomorrow's Brian Lehrer show will have gene Sperling who is director of the national economic council under both president Obama and president Clinton and it's got a new book called economic dignity with his take on what economic policy should be in response to covert nineteen and will have Victor police commissioner of the New York City mayor's office for people with disabilities on the special challenges for them during the covered nineteen pandemic and how the city is responding that and more on tomorrow's primicia if you believe democracy requires a free press your station is W. NYC ninety three point nine FM and AM eight twenty NPR news and the New York conversation on WNYC and one more thing about something we can do on the air tomorrow before we go to our next segment we're going to launch a series of Wednesday evening broadcasts that I'll be hosting beginning tomorrow night at eight called for graduations and weddings why for graduations and wedding because we are now in graduation and wedding season right and while you can graduate from high school or college or grad school this year and you can get married you cannot have commencement exercises or a wedding reception at least in any of the ways we usually do that's why we're gonna stage for graduations and wedding on the radio that you can participate in to celebrate your big day or that of a loved one we have some great commencement speakers lined up for the ones in may including former U. S. poet laureate Tracy K. Smith former presidential candidate Andrew Yang and others the first graduation again is tomorrow night at eight o'clock when our speaker will be emergency room physician Dr Craig Spencer most well known for having traveled from New York to Africa a few years ago to help with the a ball out breaking he himself got a bola and survived Ebola show he will talk and give a five to ten minute commencement address that's all and then we'll have a call in on ideas in his speech and for graduates who plan to go into medicine or anything and healthcare will ask what do you want to do with your life and how do you see a place in the world so this is been a long program note I know but we're excited about offering you this new way to do some things on the radio that we can't do in person during such chel distancing for graduations and weddings and one final thing about this if you know anyone graduating from medical school or nursing school or with any major related to the health sciences please let them know and we will welcome their calls your calls if it's you congratulate you and talk about the world of health care that you're entering and what you want to do with your life and I mean people graduating with any related major yes med school yes nursing school but also if you're about to become a physical or occupational therapist or a pharmacist or a nutritionist or dietitian or biomedical engineer or an MRI technician or a dental hygienist you get the idea so if it's you or tell anyone you know graduating this year deprived of commencement ceremonies and going into any healthcare field we're gonna invite your phone calls their phone calls tomorrow night at eight to say what you're doing on for graduations and wedding episode one again tomorrow night at eight here on W. NYC okay did you know that today is building service workers appreciation day let's take a moment to thank the essential workers who keep the big and even many smaller apartment buildings going office buildings to and who are on the front lines of maintaining our homes now that or homes are in many people's cases are schools and offices and those sparsely populated office buildings to if you're lucky enough to be working from home you are therefore unlike the doormen and women the porters cleaners and other staff members traveling to and from their work right and.

gene Sperling director president Brian Lehrer Obama
20% of New York City May Have Already Had Coronavirus, Antibody Tests Show

Brian Lehrer

02:22 min | 2 months ago

20% of New York City May Have Already Had Coronavirus, Antibody Tests Show

"Over the weekend governor Cuomo released new numbers that indicate the pervasiveness and disparate impact of coronavirus in New York as new cases of the virus continued to be stubbornly high even if lower than before even if the weather outside this weekend felt on threatening these particular numbers are for positive antibody tests in New York City that is the percentage of people who have been exposed to and are now recovered from presumably the virus they're they're really high in this pretty random sample overall twenty percent of the antibody tests were positive so if the sample is accurate it indicates that twenty percent or one out of every five people in New York City has already have the virus many don't even know it many more people will still get sick no doubt the disparities as revealed in the sample are defined by the Latino one let next population and the Bronx the Bronx had the highest rate of positive tests not even close twenty eight percent of those people sample that's so much higher than all the other boroughs which were all bunched up around ten points lower Brooklyn and Staten Island nineteen percent queens eighteen percent and Manhattan seventeen percent but again the Bronx twenty eight percent positive antibody test and similarly to the Bronx right next people work in their own category of being hard hit twenty five percent followed by black seventeen percent Asians at eleven percent and whites at seven percent so at the extremes twenty five percent of what next new Yorkers just seven percent of whites in New York City or getting the virus if the sample by the state is accurate some of the numbers to know today the governor is also ordering hospitals to seek more specific demographic information on each new hospitalized patient because the infection rates remain too high and they want to get it as precise as they can to fight it as precisely as they can but this is not over by a long

New York New York City Brooklyn Staten Island Governor Cuomo Manhattan Bronx
Trump to pause immigrant visas for 60 days over coronavirus

Brian Lehrer

08:31 min | 2 months ago

Trump to pause immigrant visas for 60 days over coronavirus

"I want people that are in this country I want our citizens to get jobs I don't want them to have competition we have a very on usual situation and it is an unusual situation but we also know that the trump agenda has always been to reduce legal as well as illegal immigration so is covert unemployment and excuse that he's hitchhiking campaign item onto or legitimate because we do have this unemployment spike not barred by the way on any guest workers who the country is allowing in to help with the food supply reportedly farmers and agriculture business organizations exploded in anger that's the way the times put it exploded in anger at the prospect that guest workers would also be banned in fact the New York times headline on this today is trump backs away from a broad ban on immigration but many will still feel the effect of restrictions and you know this is just the latest coronavirus development to hit immigrants harder than many other people notably many immigrants who have been working here and paying taxes here will not be eligible for some of the relief programs another development this week that you may not have heard about is that the Supreme Court may take changing conditions from the corona virus into account in the so called daca case it is now considering involving young immigrants brought here as kids by their parents who grew up American but undocumented with me now this site bridge wani she was New York city's first immigration commissioner under mayor Bloomberg after the people of the city created that position in the two thousand one referendum she is now founder and president of the group called new American leaders which supports immigrant political activity and she is the author of people like us the new wave of candidates knocking at the marker sees door published in twenty eighteen and once upon a time she was a founder of south Asian youth action in Elmhurst queens now an epicenter of coronavirus infections and deaths are ironically thanks for coming on so you're welcome back to W. NYC thanks for having me Bryant creek hearing voices let me get right to the president's argument you heard the clip and on its face a lot of people might say this makes sense if we've gone from three percent unemployment two thirteen percent unemployment overnight because of the public health crisis maybe the next sixty days are not the time to be taking in more people who will want to find work regardless of any other immigration politics what's your reaction welcome and thank you summarized it very well I'd say more forcefully that this is part of the administration's connect textbook case of white supremacy they do three things racialized everything throw red meat to a base that is predominantly white and in teaching capricious and arbitrary announcement and while we could fact check those and problem the ties with sixty days actually means at the end of the day and she said in a New York times headline the intention and the intended impact is already there creating chaos and fear among immigrant communities who I'm not following every single tweet an announcement at the president and are already struggling with economic fragility and with the loss of life into the intended impact is clear regardless of whether it makes any sense or not and regardless of where he lands on this final executive order the times headline trump's trump backs away from a broad ban on immigration but many will still feel affected restrictions what parts does that refer to that he backed away from my mention the guest workers who work mostly in agriculture anyone else well it's hard to say because it's hard to know what he intended and it's also this announcement that we should close our borders seems inconsistent with the idea that we should we open our state so what is it should we be opening up our economy and returning to court and court normal or should we be closing our borders and protecting ourselves and then the other point I would make is that there isn't an intentionality around in and we do this in New York as well that we create a separation between Americans and immigrants your Christian immigrants when these groups are overlapping you know there are plenty of Americans naturalized citizens who are immigrants and plenty of new Yorkers who are immigrants so as a direct answer to your question is it's hard to say because we don't know what his intention was who was he intending to cover and then the last point I just want to make on the sixty days and in the process of getting approved for a green card is pretty long process to temporarily halting green card approvals for sixty days for the average person applying for a green card it's not necessarily a meaningful amount of time because it's usually a long arc as someone who's actually been through the process I can tell you that sixty days is a pretty inconsequential amount and it just speaks to the fact that it's very arbitrary what he's saying so does that mean that this is more political theater than actual impact on potential immigrants live yeah I feel that he he feels backed into a corner and we are watching the unemployment numbers grow the economy continue to suffer and he's pulling anything that he can possibly pull on to ensure that there's a victory in November I think you know there's been a pattern of behavior on his part that indicates not just it's not just about and that winning an election but it's also about self preservation who will be most affected by this what I want and not be found guilty of doing the same thing that I see some of our leaders to write and to separate immigrants from Americans or immigrants in New York I said many of us are suffering whether that's an emotional loss because of a loved one our economic loss and but the impact I themed is going to be the greatest on those who are most vulnerable and most vulnerable because of their immigration status and most vulnerable because they just don't have some of us have financial security or you know back backups that we can rely on and the most vulnerable in our society with their immigrant or not don't have that and that's where I think we're going to see them the most suffering you see let me ask you to clarify the connection because insurance direction is specifically on getting green cards or permanent residency status for the next sixty days I think some of the most vulnerable you're talking about undocumented immigrants who were not up for green card status based on their status and and some others who are not green card applicants right now so what is that broader effect you're trying to describe what so for example let's talk about someone who may be looking to adjust their status right so might be someone who has a work permit who has applied for a green card and again I just want to be clear that we're not exactly sure what what is entailed in this executive order but an example might be someone who is employed on a work visa and who is leading to adjust their status from being what's called an H. one B. worker to a green card holder into maybe there'll be a temporary halt on that it could be someone let's see who's a daca recipient who may who you know may have been undocumented has doctor now possibly got married to someone who is a citizen might be in line for a green card so but it could also be someone who lives outside of the United States see for example I applied for an adjustment of status for my mother and my mother might be waiting in another country for a green card approval and that will get to meet too it's a wide range of people and I want to be very clear that I'm not saying all of those people will be affected but those are examples of the type of people who might be

New York - NYPD Issues 60 Summonses At "Anti-Lockdown" Party In Brooklyn

Brian Lehrer

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

New York - NYPD Issues 60 Summonses At "Anti-Lockdown" Party In Brooklyn

"But I read about something that happened this weekend in Brooklyn a so called anti lockdown party that the NYPD issued sixty summonses sat on Saturday as reported on Gothamist people busted up a party of dozens of people at a Canarsie barber shop Saturday night issuing those sixty summonses and arresting two people on gun possession charges one alleged party goer told the New York Post we are pioneering the anti lock

Brooklyn Nypd New York Post Canarsie
Catch tonight's pink moon, 2020's largest supermoon

Brian Lehrer

00:25 sec | 3 months ago

Catch tonight's pink moon, 2020's largest supermoon

"And sky gazers can catch a glimpse of the biggest supermoon of the year tonight's NASA's calling it the pink moon in tribute to the spring blossoms of the north American wildflower flocks other names for it include the sprouting glass room the egg moon the fish moon and the Passover moon the moon will reach elimination at ten thirty five if you missed it tonight the next supermoon

Nasa
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:01 min | 3 months ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer on WNYC and it's weak line of remote learning for all New York City public schools and it's been starting up pretty much for all the schools in the greater New York area here in the city we have the biggest school district in the nation in normal times if you don't know the stats eighteen hundred separate schools serve one point one million students just to keep the sheer magnitude of this tectonic shift to distant learning distance learning as a reference point at the beginning with so many students having their life in education thrown into limbo we know this will be one of the harder new realities to adapt to for students for parents for educators so we will be following this closely in the coming weeks and months and W. NYC is teaming up with the education news organization Chalkbeat to cover it with the latest news now and to tell you how you can help report this story because they are asking for your help for the sake of improving everyone's experience I am joined by WNYC host and reporter should meet about shoe and Chalkbeat reporter covering public schools Lima I mean Sinead and Ranma hi thanks for coming on this morning hi thanks for having us and I want to start before we get into these issues by technology in the death of Mr Xander romaine and I hope I'm saying her name right the principle of Brooklyn democracy academy in Brownsville who died because of complications due to the coronavirus she was thirty six years old do either of you have anything to share about principle remains impact in her community yes so my colleague Alex reported on this actually a couple nights ago and you know we heard from as far as her legacy as a principal I think mostly what we heard was that she you know devoted her entire life to the school and she was really dedicated from all accounts to sort of making the school a fabric a part of the fabric of the community in Brownsville and that you know it was remarkable we also got emails in yesterday okay and people were sort of saying the same thing that she made it a point to get to know all of our students she really worked hard to try to make the school which was a transfer school first it is who are over age and under credited to try to make it so that it was a tailored experience almost for everybody who went there and so it seems that she stood out as a principal from all accounts that we heard now to me that you want to tell our listeners how you and Chalkbeat are asking them to participate I know you've got a big crowd sourcing project going just starting obviously with respect to the distance learning era and maybe we can get some calls going that it to the point of what you want to hear so what do you tell people what your project is and how they can best contribute sure WNYC and Gothamist have paired up with Chalkbeat we decided to work together to document this huge shift in the way that education is being practiced here in the New York area this is such an unprecedented time to be teaching to be learning and there's really no one better position to document this moment than the people who are doing the teaching and the people who are doing the learning and of course their families who are inevitably affected by this so there's lots of talk about remote learning right now but we really want to hear from from students from the teenagers who are being affected by it we wanna hear from the teachers who are having to shift the way that they delivered their lessons to students and we also are welcoming comments from parents because this is actually touching their lives a lot too we have a short survey that we work together to to put out and reporters from Chalkbeat are looking at it reporters from WNYC and Gothamist or looking at it and it just has a number of questions you can select whether you're a.

Brian Lehrer
New York's health care workers await medical supplies promised by FEMA

Morning Edition

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

New York's health care workers await medical supplies promised by FEMA

"Health care workers in New York say they have yet to receive protective gear from the federal government despite shortages this after FEMA said it's distributing face masks from the national stockpile speaking on the Brian Lehrer show Lisa bomb a representative for the New York state nurses association says they have not seen the supplies they are certainly not in the hands of healthcare workers so I don't know what they shipped with the same man who they talking about certain plants and they talk about ten ninety five respirators we don't know officials are also calling on president trump to enforce the defense production act to force manufacturers to prioritize making the masks

New York Federal Government Fema Brian Lehrer Representative Nurses Association Lisa Bomb President Trump
Exclusive Interview With Susan Page On Coronavirus Response

Brian Lehrer

07:00 min | 3 months ago

Exclusive Interview With Susan Page On Coronavirus Response

"Susan page Washington bureau chief for USA today hi Susan welcome back to WNYC Hey Brian it's good to be with you so let me just dive right into the central life and death question right now which is how much can private industry on its own ramp up production of masks dental laters and other life saving medical equipment president trump keeps resisting calls from New York and even elsewhere I'm seeing other governors Democrat and Republican who have the most dire shortage shortages who want him to intervene with industry to order more production under the defense production act the president last night said he's trying to avoid the heavy hand of government what's his policy at this point and have you seen good answers from economists around or anything else anyone else as to whether the profit motive is enough to get companies to do what's needed well there are there a couple things that invoking the defense production act would do it would allow the government to coordinate this for one thing one thing we're hearing from some businesses is that they are a little antsy about what exactly they could do to be most helpful even if they want to be helpful R. so under this under this law the federal government could say make this not that the other thing that the law would allow the federal government to do is to decide where Skepta scarce resources grow so you could direct it to places like New York and California and Washington state that have been the hardest hit as opposed to this competition that we heard governors talking about yesterday on the Sunday shows where they're bidding against one another resources and then the resources may not necessarily go to the place that needs the most so these are the reasons I think some officials have encouraged the president to invoke this law and R. I think surprised that he has been really didn't catch on Friday the president told us that he had done it but it turned out that what he was referring to was simply a bureaucratic step of invoking the law not actually using the powers that the law would give him do you have a sense what his actual resistance is is it just the usual Republican reluctance to use government to tell business what to do is it the fact that when you come right down to it the states that are the hardest hit have so far been blue states New York California and Washington although I understand Louisiana is getting into that territory to what is it why doesn't he just do it so there's it's hard to you know I wouldn't pretend to know be inside the president's mind on what is exact motivations he does talk about the heavy hand of government he has railed against socialism he's accused Democrats of being socialist has been one of the themes that we've heard from him in that presidential campaign already some people also speculate that he is concerned that if he does this step which is a dramatic step he then owns the crisis in a bigger way and will be held more responsible than he would be otherwise when there are shortages of these desperately needed supplies the president's head of FEMA the Federal Emergency Management Agency had a hard time and one of the news conferences over the weekend saying where's the maths from the national stockpile that does exist are growing and even the president who is famously vague on things like this self got into the act of questioning and here's that excerpt but we've asks start coming in that they're they're they're out there now so again we want to match we want to get out of the middle I think like so we're trying to match supplies with the man so that's what we're doing right now it's happening today it's they can they can expect that that is the matching supply demand it is there's a range of request across the country and we try to match those again supply demand every day so I think that was Saturday do we know anymore today about the matching of supply and demand of the actual distribution after the match on paper well we know that the FEMA director on yesterday on CNN I couldn't even give a rough estimate of how many Maska been sent and I think this is one of the things that alarms Americans when they see this it doesn't seem like a system that is being run very well and we don't have we don't have details on what they've done and how they've done it where or how many massive inset infant places like New York in California Washington Louisiana can expect to have enough mass not to have these extraordinary situations where healthcare professionals are talking about making their own masks or trying to sterilize use mass to use again it's so odd extraordinary to think of a country like the United States a wealthy country ought to be in this situation the truck nobody ever thought we would be in this situation except when the president says that then there's a comeback to that which is that there are people who thought we could be in this situation there was a pandemic preparedness report they've been Manny and there were warnings that the U. S. was not ready for something like this that experts knew could potentially occur yes that's true and there were both you know agencies looking over the long haul warning about this including an office in the national security council that president Obama created and president trump dismantled and there also early warning signs from China in January and February that should have served as an early warning system odd that those warnings were generally not heeded by the federal government and that left us with weeks of time squandered there could have been used to address some of these concerns in our previous segment with the borough presidents here in New York we had a question about a rent freeze and congresswoman Alexander Kasser Cortez has been talking about this and we have a quick follow up question from a listener on Twitter who writes are there any national efforts to put a temporary freeze on commercial and residential rent and mortgage payments property taxes water and sewer did the president announced anything like this no and I I heard the congresswoman talk about that yesterday as well but ice I've heard of no serious proposals in Washington to do something that now that the bill that the relief bill that is now being cobbled

Susan USA Washington Bureau Chief Wnyc
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:03 min | 3 months ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone as our world continues to change in this way that was unimaginable just a few weeks ago even just a few days ago I mean the world changed a lot yesterday afternoon with all the different closures and other announcements so we're all living to various degrees in a state of shock this morning and I just wanted to acknowledge that because I guess it's probably best to just say that out loud to each other to help us face whatever each of us is facing with us and to help us get through this together as a city as a country as a world I hope everybody listening right now has a good private support system we will keep trying to be part of your public support system and do our best to provide information and community but not everything is different and we began as usual on Fridays with our weekly ask the mayor segment my questions and yours for mayor bill de Blasio two one two four three three W. NYC two one two four three three one nine six nine two if you want to call in or you can tweet a question just use the hashtag ask the mayor Mister mayor welcome back to W. NYC thank you very much Brian brown I want to thank you for what you just said I think it's really really important that we have knowledge the shock for all and it literally seems to change hourly a lot of the time we have not been through anything like this and people are fearful they're anxious they're confused they have every right to be and I think it's really important that people at places like your show to turn to for accurate information and you know a real dialogue I really want to emphasize the people as a lot of anxiety and fear out there first of all listen to the actual official sources of information I can give you facts for example there was a a ridiculous rumor yesterday that all of Manhattan to begin quarantine that's patently false people want to get the truth can go to our website and why C. dot gov slash corona viruses can go look at can call three one one to get updates we also have a text which I'll get that for you right now what's the number people can tax to get regular updates texted to them they can watch obviously the the city hall a Twitter feed them and the author magazine management are constantly putting out the first information so anyone wants those text alerts and tens of thousands of new Yorkers have signed up for them you text the word covert C. O. V. I. D. again C. O. V. I. D. to six nine two six nine two and you'll get those sent to you and the last thing Brian which is to people's feelings and emotions which are real that anyone who's really feeling worried or anxious besides trying to get good usable information if you just feel you know worried depressed confused in a way you want to talk to someone professional any New Yorker can call our helpline eight eight eight NYC well again eight eight eight NYC well W. E..

Brian Lehrer
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:24 min | 4 months ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone today we will look at the second coronavirus case here in New York and the communities it is having an impact on combined with a very aggressive measures that China took in Wuhan that suggests how widespread quarantines and other behavior changes around here could potentially become with the Supreme Court hearing another abortion restriction case today will also talk to Katherine Stewart who has a new book about what she calls Christian nationalism in the trump era in the U. S. including how Attorney General William Barr is trying to insert it more into the justice system will start and end the show today with reactions to the absolutely shocking super Tuesday results the Joe Biden search that nobody predicted and the people would have thought was impossible just a week ago after Bernie Sanders one Nevada so convincingly and biting kind of limping along in all of the first three states will discuss super Tuesday with the Massachusetts based reporter right now and a California based one later to bill Smith will give Jimmy all the extra hour of sleep out there west coast time to recover a little before he comes on one of the most surprising super Tuesday results and one of the most disappointing for some Democrats was that Elizabeth Warren came in third in her home state of Massachusetts she got just twenty one percent of the vote there to Bernie Sanders twenty six and Joe Biden's unexpected rise to first place there Biden got thirty three percent part of his national resurgence according to exit polls Biden one among moderates black voters and voters over fifty and Massachusetts looking nationally Warren met the threshold of fifteen percent of the vote needed to gain any delegates in each state in just five of the fourteen super Tuesday states as of the latest count we'll talk now to Jess Bidgood Boston globe national politics reporter she's in Michigan where one receive the results last night and where I'm told Bernie Sanders this morning to Michigan is one of six states that vote next week I just thanks very much for coming on we're in Michigan are you thanks for having me on in Detroit Laura wood before it took the stage last night really before any of the results started coming in so I wanna play a clip of senator Warren from after the South Carolina results came in obviously a big button when there and and then I'll ask you to compare to whatever she said last night here's one on Saturday after referring to the trump presidency as a crisis this crisis demands more than a former vice president who is so eager to cut deals with Mitch McConnell and the Republicans that hill trade good ideas for bad ones and this crisis demands more than a senator who has good ideas but whose thirty year track record shows he consistently calls for things that failed to get done and consistently opposing things that never the last he fails to start school that was Saturday night one was trying to thread the needle there obviously between Sanders and Biden did she make similar statements last night when she spoke last night she she took should I say I think that you took the vehicle for results came in and before polls even closed in most of the country so her in less light actually did not feel very connected with super Tuesday and that may have been intentional of course she is a fairly standard stump speech in front of us very excited crowd of about two thousand people I will say but she did make a few comments that she doesn't usually think on her account news comments concern to this squishy and hard to define issue of electability that has become I think something that she's always struggled she does struggle to put concerns about that that it's a concept certainly that can privilege management and data a male candidates over over female ones but she said what I see happening is a lot of folks trying to turn voting into some kind of strategy she said pundits friends neighbors are all saying you have to second guess yourself she added that pundits have gotten it wrong over and over and urged her supporters to cast a vote that will make you cry out and then it she told the crowd why she was still running for president she said I'm in this race because I believe I will make the best president of the United States and from there she kind of went into this stuff he talks about it every step she makes her background her policies those kinds of things so those are really the only words we've heard from Elizabeth Warren since the end of voting she has not yet made a public statement about last night's results and I've just gotten word from some of her age that she's talking with her team about assisting the path forward but we don't know anything more than that at this point listeners we can take any questions or comments you have about any super Tuesday result at two one two four three three W. NYC two one two four three three nine six nine two we'll take those calls with Jess Bidgood from The Boston Globe right now and we'll have another super Tuesday at the end of the show that's going to be more west coast oriented but we'll be able to talk about anything nationally then as well but for now two one two four three three W. NYC two one two four three three nine six nine two just one thing you just said there is really huge for Elizabeth wind and not to her advantage it's that everybody this year feels they have to be a pundit and not necessarily vote for who they like the **** who they think would be the best president but who they think will be the most likely to be trump in November and I imagine that's working very much to the detriment of Elizabeth wind it might come out fairly differently if people were just voting their preference yes absolutely and this is an issue that she started to take on more directly I would say in about January but she's getting a lot of questions from voters on the trail about people who knew they had people in their lives what's the what's the foreign origin could win and where that's going to vote for someone else and she tried to make the case to voters at that time that they had to that they should go with their heart she she started rolling out this catch phrase hope over fear but I not clear to me that she was able to make that case as actively enough in an environment where as as you say every voter kind of decided that they needed to be a pundit and voters around the country are making their decisions based on their assumptions about what voters in future state might choose or might not want to Q. you know which candidate can I strengthen who I think will then have a good shot of doing well in super Tuesday those are the kinds of questions that voters have been asking themselves and that came that that that can that that made it tricky for for a lot of candidates who who announced presidential runs and and and are you know no longer no longer running and it and it also is making it tricky for for candidates like Warren who are still in the race in the new York times today one of the article says once most ardent supporters said she was unable to overcome the extra hurdles for women running for president the attributed her weak support among non college educated voters to the same sort of biased sees that a bit that badly damaged Hillary Clinton in the twenty sixteen general election against Donald Trump are you hearing the same thing I hear that often yes Elizabeth Warren draws a lot of women it to her advantage and I've spoken with hundreds of them over over the past month and I hear a lot particularly as warrants polling lead began to slip women will say to me I just don't want to see what happened to her or to Hillary happened to her in in their minds they watched a very qualified female presidential candidate who's to president trump and and and that was crashing and I think they are feeling some of that same disappointment about watching a candidate that they believed deeply into that they feel is utterly qualified seating and and and and I did too I think for some of her female supporters particularly this feels like a very crushing moment the exit poll number I saw said one only one a third of her core demographic in her home state white college educated women only a third in Massachusetts of white college educated women have you seen any breakdown on where the other two thirds of those Massachusetts voters want so Massachusetts is is there is no way around it this is a this is a very very tough or salt for Elizabeth Warren even that just a few days ago it seems like it was a two way race for best use that's between her and Bernie Sanders and and and her supporters of her endorsers had been saying in recent days there is no such thing as a must win state they had been they had been kind of predicting their guys might do well because he did very well there in the twenty sixteen primary but I think Biden's surge in Massachusetts took a lot of people by surprise and to me that makes Massachusetts kind of an interesting lad if you will for how our narratives and the power of a small bench him when we hold the doctor Grove and second university and and W. B. easy cheesy Paul Bassett she sets out last Wednesday to Friday I think that whole sided with wave heights warrant Warren and Sanders I have a neighborhood about eleven percent while they were out at twenty two percent for ward twenty four percent for Sanders and I I think what happened in that time is that by the big win in South Carolina showed voters in Massachusetts and around the country give them a reason to say okay this campaign has had some large breasts woman has stabilized we know by then we we see him as someone who could beat trump and I think it gave them kind of a reason to feel comfortable voting for a campaign that has not always made people feel that way and I think that's a big part of where his Massachusetts surge came from and it shows just how powerful this resistance and just how willing to to to change their minds voters have been I've seen data that says that that among voters who made up their mind it's just the past few days I didn't did very well among voters who made up their mind a little bit earlier Sanders did well so Biden has ruled really had had I had a question commented that perhaps just the right moment after a campaign that we're we never guaranteed that that this is going to happen perhaps here's a question from a listener writing on Twitter the question is what is you guessed think about the idea that wanted to staying in to help Bernie at the convention I think there are many reasons that she could do if if if she decides to stay in the there are many reasons that that that she might or might not do so as I said we we know that she's talking to her aides to day and assessing her path forward and if he were to stay in until the convention she would have she she would have a certain number of pledged delegates and if you stay in until the convention you have or you have a little bit more say as more power over where your delegates might go I think the question for her team is going to be can she amassed enough delegates that that is a a useful thing to to to have or is it better at this point to to to let it go and those those are the kinds of discussions I imagine they will be they they they will be having two days stay as they think about the path forward another thing that that I think could potentially be interesting for her warrant if she does stay in there's a prospect that just a week or so from now she would stand on the debate stage potentially with only Biden and Sanders the smallest debate to Jacksonville number one then of course if Bloomberg stays in the race that would be her and three men that could be an interesting moment for her so I'm curious if if the possibility of this debate is going to factor in and also their calculations of of how you know whether or not to stay in and how much longer to stay and and and and what they what they what they want to do I think in the race that's a very interesting prospect that you just raise that if Bloomberg drops out which many people think he's going to then the televised debate next week could just be Sanders and by then and Warren match and if it was that from the beginning but it could be you know she's she's got a lot of delegates.

New York China Wuhan Brian Lehrer
Testimony alleging past Weinstein sexual assaults bolstered difficult case

Brian Lehrer

09:34 min | 4 months ago

Testimony alleging past Weinstein sexual assaults bolstered difficult case

"Harvey Weinstein is now a convicted rapist we can talk about the various counts that the jury found him guilty or not guilty on yesterday but in plain English Harvey Weinstein is now a convicted rapist also in plain English my next guest former New York sex crimes prosecutor Jane manning is quoted in The Washington Post today saying this is one of those days when the whole world changes let's talk about how with me now is Jane manning director of advocacy for the group women's justice now which campaigns for better prosecution and prevention of violent crimes against women and provides direct services to survivors as they navigate the criminal justice system she helped lead successful campaigns to repeal New York statute of limitations on rape cases and to criminalize strangulation attacks Jane thank you so much for joining us thank you so much frame how much do you think one man being convicted of crimes yesterday is the story and how much do you really think the whole world changed well this one story will have huge ripple effects for the whole world it tells survivors that there is hope for justice it tells sexual predators that no one is above the law and it tells prosecutors that if you're brave and you take difficult challenging cases to trial you may be able to succeed a New York times op ed today says that Mr Weinstein sixty seven that that he even stood trial was a remarkable anomaly a vast majority of sexual assault cases never reach the court now but this outcome is not an end point while there may never be another prosecution quite like the one of Mr Weinstein the article says increasingly we'll see others that resemble it and so my question is if you agree with that what kinds of trials may get brought that may not have were it not for this case it's such a great question and the answer I think is that's up to all of us it's up to prosecutors who make those decisions dated day whether to turn down cases of rape unless they're a slam dunk win which happens in all too many DA's offices but it's also up to the rest of us in our communities because DJs are elected locally and it's up to us in our communities to sound off and make sure the candidates for district attorney and incumbent district attorneys understand that fair and vigorous prosecution of rape is something that the community holds to be important here's Gloria Allred speaking yesterday the lawyer or one of the lawyers for the accusers in this case it's no longer business as usual in the United States this is the age of empowerment of women and you can intimidate them anymore because women will not be silenced they will speak up they will have their voice they will stand up and be subjected to your small army of defense attorneys cross examining them attempting to discredit them two million eight them shame them and they will still stand in their truth so Harvey Weinstein this just this has been a long time coming but it's finally here attorney Gloria Allred yesterday and she's a lawyer but she wasn't speaking just legally is there or in technical legal terms I think she was talking about cultural change yes she was and I'm so glad that she anchored her comments around the survivors who testified in who spoke out because to the extent that this verdict offers us a chance at broad social change and and the only chance that depends on what we do with it but we all have that chance to the women who spoke out about Harvey Weinstein and especially the women who testified in court the two who received convictions and the many women who didn't receive a conviction including Annabella Sciorra and can I say something about her case she testified in this case as somebody who is also a victim of Harvey Weinstein but I guess because the statute of limitations laws could not that case could not be prosecuted right that case could not be prosecuted and moreover the counts that depended on Annabella sh your as testimony as a predicate offence of preceding offense those were counts of the jury felt him not guilty on and a lot of people will wonder what does that mean that the jury didn't believe Annabel sure are and I just want to say it doesn't necessarily mean that many observers felt that Annabella sh your was extremely credible and probably the most corroborated of all the witnesses who testified and the jury's verdict might have had something to do with hello how many years back the case stretched one of the first questions was about the statute of limitations and Annabel sure his case and that might have been their concern it doesn't mean that they didn't believe her but what I want people to know is that her testimony mattered it supported the accounts of Mimi Haleyi and Jessica man and after I heard the verdict yesterday I spent a lot of time thinking about Annabel shura and I was worried and I thought maybe she felt a sense that the jury didn't believe her and and then I read her quote and here's what she said she said my testimony was painful but necessary I spoke for myself and with the strength of the eighty plus victims of Harvey Weinstein in my heart and when I heard those words Brian it's filled my heart and I knew that at all sure it was going to be okay but on the chance that like a good New Yorker she listens to the Brian Lehrer show I I didn't want to say this to Annabella I wanted to say would you also keeping your heart my thanks and the thanks of a multitude of people who believe you and honor you your testimony mattered and it made a difference how much do you thing believing women that phrase that we've heard so much kind of flipped from where generally has been historically injuries they have to believe the accounts of what happened that Harvey Weinstein denied and they had to believe them even in light of some of the narrative which would have prevented cases like this from being brought in the past as I understand it that they kept in touch with him that there was consensual sex after the non consensual sex that in one case a woman who change phone numbers one of the accusers even gave him her new phone phone number these would have been things in the past that would have let juries to disbelief what changed I think the jury in this case worked really hard they had testimony read back they took days to deliberate and I think that ultimately they were persuaded by the evidence that showed that one of the victims many have late was financially dependent on her relationship with Harvey Weinstein she needed to keep on good terms with him in order for her career to keep going the other victim Jessica man had a situation that was more complicated she was in a relationship with him and relationship violence is something that can be very hard to understand but it's very real and I think the fact that the clearly the jury took their time with that case as well and ultimately they didn't convict him of rape in the first degree they convicted him of rape in the third degree which I think reflects what we want jurors to do they listen they fought they struggled and I think they ultimately reached a verdict that showed careful reflection and attention to the evidence which you as a former prosecutor talk to the difference between first degree and third degree rape so he was convicted on third degree rape which as I understand it involves in the sale and having sex with someone without their consent where as first degree rape requires forcible compulsion be proof what's the difference between forcible and without their consent yeah so forcible compulsion first degree rape requires what the law describes as for sufficient to overcome lack of consent there is a sense of being physically over powered by the person and Jessica man did describe a situation in which she was physically over powered by Harvey Weinstein and the jury I think had legally sufficient evidence to convict on account if they had chosen to do so but they didn't they convicted of rape in the third degree and that refers to a situation where the the victim makes it clear that she's not consenting and the perpetrator goes ahead without her consent it's a it's a lower level of physical force that's required that's what the jury felt was supported by

Harvey Weinstein
Lead intel agency pushes back on reports Russia is aiding Trump

Brian Lehrer

07:17 min | 4 months ago

Lead intel agency pushes back on reports Russia is aiding Trump

"Congressman Maloney is a member of the house intelligence committee that means he was also in the room last week for the briefing in which the committee was reportedly told that Russia is out to help Donald Trump win the presidency again congressman we always appreciate your time thanks for coming on today my pleasure I know that was a classified briefing last week and there are things you can't say what can you tell us about what the trump administration's election security official Selby Shelby Pearson told the committee well I can't speak in detail about what what's the the movie was in a classified setting what I can tell you is that you know Russia interfered in our elections last time it is continuing to do so it is done so around the world by the way in other elections entities and in the news crystal clear that they prefer Donald Trump now I understand the administration wants to shoot the messenger but this is a serious national security issue and and I've said to administration officials you know if you told me that the Iranians you know want to defeat Donald Trump because he killed the general Soleimani I wouldn't say oh you're just trying to make a political argument that the Iranians prefer Democrats I would understand the logic of opposing you know an opponent of the regime in their eyes but I I I by the same measure expect them to recognize that Gladden your Putin who has said publicly he supported Donald trump over Hillary Clinton continues to prefer this president to the alternative it and so they just need to open their eyes and stopped in nine rounds we played the club just before you came on of trump's national security adviser Robert o'brien on television this weekend saying we've been very tough on Russia and we've been great on election security so I think it's a non story do you think they've been great on election security it depends on who that pronoun refers to if you're talking about Paul Nakatani who runs the NSA run cyber command who has the less than a the most important job on defending our elections then I agree that all night sorry the general who runs an essay is great at the agency level they are focused on this problem and I try to we we sure my my my my constituents that they're a lot of good people in your government who still take this stuff seriously we have exquisite abilities that we all pay for and we will deploy them to keep our elections safe and free but it matters a lot the signal they get from the White House it matters a lot that that these agencies not be cooperative the way we've seen at the justice department or the state department by trump loyalists who will say or do anything that could make the president happy there's too much at stake in o'brien did say in the clip even though this was a classified briefing that he has seen no intelligence that suggest Russia is trying to help trump have you seen any such intelligence I can't comment on the content of classified material that I've been retelling what has been publicly reported that I'm aware of suggests that you know that the that the books are statements by the national security adviser he doesn't have a lot of credibility with me most of these people around the president now are there for one regional entities compare it without thinking about whatever the president says for once and that is not the same thing is keeping our country safe will keep in our elections here for the rest of us after all these people accountable another part of that story as we reference just before you came on is that Bernie Sanders has acknowledged that he was briefed the Russia is trying to help him in the democratic primaries and we played a clip of senator Sanders from twenty eighteen a speech at Johns Hopkins called building a global democratic movement to counter Thor tarian isn't that excerpt was also quoted in Michelle Goldberg's New York times column today and she wrote that by contrast under trump the US has abandoned even the pretense of backing democracy and human rights and I see in this morning's news trump is in India in a city that NPR's reporter describes as literally plastered with posters of trump holding hands with their Hindu nationalist leader Narendra Modi's and I don't think Sanders will be doing that so I gather you're a Joe Biden supporter in the primaries but how much would you describe as a false equivalency the claim that Bernie Sanders would be like Donald Trump when it comes to Russia and enabling authoritarianism yeah well I will neither was I mean in other words I I I don't think that anybody has to be confused that Donald Trump has been cozying up to dictators in a way that is offensive and an unjustifiable but I would feel better if if one of the leading democratic candidates wasn't also for bizarre reasons emphasizing how great parts of the Cuban regime more or or if he hadn't decided to honeymoon in Moscow at the height of the Soviet Union and those are also very questionable choices and and things that emphasize for major American politicians I don't like any of it I wish people were clear that they had these dictatorial regimes are bad and are at odds with American values although as far as it pertains to the president and of course many things have been brought up the Sanders supporters would say about Joe Biden and things that he's said about race and sex it cetera going way back but they went way back then and now we play the clippers all the respect I don't know what that has to do with praising the Castro regime when you might want to win Florida in November so you're saying the things that Bernie Sanders said just recently about the Castro regime being not all bad I think there's something I think there's substantively sort all this analytically very dangerous when the moral imperative each year he's to be Donald Trump and anybody who's involved in themselves in some you know some some Ivy League seminar on what's good and what's bad about being even focus on winning this election and that's what I care about because if we put Donald Trump in the White House for four more years the consequences are devastating for everything we care about from the healthcare people sentenced to the environment okay receive quality climate change you know that everything so I with the Democratic Party would focus on how to win this election and I do not think the conversation about the good points of the Castro regime are helpful in any way so Bernie Sanders is going to be our nominee I hope I hope the focus is on winning you're in a Hudson Valley district that you represent it since twenty twelve

Congressman Maloney Russia Donald Trump
Appeals court approves of $6.7M award to graffiti artists

Brian Lehrer

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

Appeals court approves of $6.7M award to graffiti artists

"And a federal appeals court in New York up held damages for graffiti artists whose work was destroyed to make room for luxury high rises a panel of judges says the developers must pay six point seven million dollars to twenty one artists who lost their work at the famous five points site in queens it said the destruction violated the visual artists' rights act of nineteen ninety the building in Long Island City was covered in murals and drew artists and visitors from around the world the developer painted over in twenty

New York Long Island City Developer Queens
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 5 months ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show and if you would like to see good morning everyone and we begin as we usually do on Fridays with our weekly ask the mayor said when my questions and yours for mayor bill de Blasio at two one two four three three W. N. Y. C. two one two four three three nine six nine two or you can treat a question just use the hashtag asked the mayor good morning Mister mayor welcome back to W. NYC good morning Brian so you gave your state of the city address yesterday and the big room with a big well natural history and titled it save our city will you give us because most people didn't hear it the essence of what you think still needs to be saved after six years of your administration yeah and Brian this comes from talking to new Yorkers all over the city is seventy town hall meetings all across the five boroughs in so many other conversations and I think what people are feeling right now is very anxious about the future of the city because it's become so on affordable because are worried about being displaced and not able to stay in their own neighborhood because they see small businesses a lot of closing all the time they see vacant storefronts there's a tremendous sense of anxiety about whether this is still going to be a place for everyone and a livable affordable place or not you know in the speech I said look we we overcame huge crises in the past once upon a time people were fleeing the city because it wasn't safe and that was dominant as as idea and a concern for decades and we became a much safer city we became a city with a very strong economy a lot more jobs as a lot of things I'm very proud of is best in the last six years but I was trying to be blunt about there's a new and different kind of crisis that we're facing which is all about affordability and whether our neighborhoods will still be places for us you know whether this is a I quoted the the concept this land is your land from the famous song you know what that new Yorkers are basically saying to me all over we don't know if we're going to be the last generation or family able to live here and so what I propose yesterday was a series of very different approaches we've tried a lot of things and I can tell you a lot of things that help people to live here and afford to be here fifteen dollar minimum wage and a huge affordable housing plan and you know rain freezes free lawyers to stop evictions we've done all sorts of things but I'm being very honest having done the mall it's not enough for them to go to the next level so for example passing laws that will protect millions of tenants who right now do not have protections to stop rent gouging by the landlords huge rate increases on the topic unfair objections we need to do that we need to create community land trusts that one sure that public.

Brian Lehrer
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:37 min | 5 months ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone on a day when the Senate will take its final impeachment trial vote I always Democratic Party may or may not finally released its full caucus results and there is a state of the union address to react to or tear up your own copy if you want to follow speaker policies lead our first guest today is relevant to all these things New York senator Kirsten Gillibrand is a juror in the impeachment trial was a candidate in the presidential race and was in the joint session of Congress for the speech thanks for coming on such a consequential day senator welcome back to W. NYC thanks so much for having me is the state of the union in twenty five seconds from the start of the president's speech and will invite you to react our borders are secure our families are flourishing our values are renewed our pride is restored and for all of these reasons I say to the people of our great country and to the members of Congress this state of our union is stronger than ever before shows senator Joe brand is the state of our union stronger than ever before I would not have given him such high marks I thought he unfortunately he lied a lot during the speech she told a lot of things to the American people that simply weren't true stuff about the economy stuff about people who have come off food stamps stuff about energy independence stuff about pre existing conditions it was really a very defensive speech and it seem to me to be much more of a campaign rally take speech then a proper state of the union I was deeply offended when he gave the medal of honor to Rush Limbaugh I thought that was very inappropriate and I really didn't like how he treated immigrants I thought that was extremely defensive and then just he made a lot of statements that just weren't true we fact checked a bunch of stuff last night and at least five or six claims were just through the fall and we could such at the president's claims all day and the news programs on the station are doing it to suffice to say for the moment that he took credit for many things in the economy and claim they were reversals from president Obama when really they're continuations of the exact same trends that have been under way for a decade but let.

Senate Democratic Party senator Kirsten Gillibrand Congress senator president senator Joe brand Obama Brian Lehrer New York Limbaugh
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:33 min | 10 months ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone tonight democratic presidential climate change forum on CNN is now being framed by a real life disaster that many scientists are saying can probably be linked to the warming earth and that of course is hurricane Dorian for one thing according to The New York Times this pattern where hurricane strolls in one place for hours like Dorian did over the Bahamas that's a sign of climate change will explain why about that and more as we open the program today with three short interviews about the Dorian emergency and the larger climate change crisis with us first is New York times Miami bureau chief. from this day currently covering Dorian Patricia thanks so much for some time on an intensely moving assignment K. for you obviously welcome to W. NYC thanks for having me and first things first we've all been hearing about the devastation in the Bahamas what can people here do if they want to help in some way. well there is a robust Bahamian community in South Florida out that has organized to send donations and there haven't figured out quite how to get them yet they've got various planes ready to go but you know they they need to be cleared for landing and people have really turned out to to offer all the help that they can you know what a lot of organizations like the red cross and other NGOs will tell you is that cash helps them you know just just money donations to be flexible with what the needs are but what I've heard from people who have already flown over the Bahamas and as a liver some supplies is that you know everything you can think of starting with water and other basic necessities including hygiene products are are very necessary right now. then after devastating the Bahamas Dorian is now causing hundreds of thousands of evacuations to be ordered maybe it's more than a million people you know better than I do from coastal communities in parts of Florida up to the Carolinas what's the extent of the movement of people in the U. S. now. in Florida V. evacuations were limited to some vulnerable a beach front communities they learned from these accusations a couple of years ago in hurricane Irma where many more people moved that that was not the wisest course of action for a storm like this that moves from south to north and effects such a broad swath of the state because then people are left on the roads and don't know really where to go well the storm is sort of following them so here the evacuations were for what some official side were miles not hundreds of miles where some people just were asked to move inland to be away from the storm surge there are more about evacuations right now in not in Georgia and the Carolinas because the storm track has appeared to move slightly closer to the northern Georgia and and South Carolina coast still perhaps not land fall but as we know storms hi does not have to cross into land for the storm surge to be dangerous your article today is a heart wrenching description of some of the specific challenges of getting elderly people in nursing homes and assisted living facilities to safety what's the big picture of that. this was another lesson from past storms where you know sort has a large retiree preparation population and they wanted to make sure that didn't have a repeat of sweltering conditions of the power went out for some of these people that proved to be deadly during her can hear about twelve people died and recently for workers from the nursing home where were charged because those deaths were deemed homicides this time they have made sure that places have better up power generators and and backed up but they had to evacuate some some places that we're just in danger of flooding that there's a lot of communities in northeast Florida especially Jacksonville and Saint Augustine that flooded in past storms even when the storm did not hit them directly those plans were put into place and according to the state people got out as needed and and hopefully the storm would be as bad as as it could have been and and my despair all there was the tragedy of a dozen people who died two years ago during Irma in a nursing home lost all its air conditioning in a power outage I mean this is you know not Florida's first rodeo when it comes to hurricanes and neither was Irma would they have the systems down Pat by now. you know on the one hand you would think that Florida is perhaps the best prepared state because we do get so many hurricanes on the other hand every emergency manager will tell you that every storm is different and that they learn something each time and so my did require new regulations and the state law setting higher and marched at more strict standards for what the power back up had to be at nursing homes especially including that they have to keep comfortable temperatures for people who are who are really vulnerable to the heat I think some of those regulations were first tested last year during hurricane Michael which hit the panhandle but a lot of places still don't have all the equipment in place that they should especially nursing homes which tend to be larger are still you know it takes awhile for them to make these investments to over there for structure and so I think that's going to be an ongoing process for the state so now the climate change angle and I know.

Brian Lehrer two years one hand
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:58 min | 11 months ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There's the Brian Lehrer show on WNYC good morning everyone and here's one central thing to know about the firing of police officer Daniel Pantaleo yesterday he was fired by NYPD commissioner James o'neill not for applying a band show cold to Eric garner throughout but for continuing to apply it after garner was effectively subdued NYPD court ruled that while certainly not preferable that old was acceptable during that brief moment in time because the risk of falling through the window was so high but that eggs engine circumstance no longer existed the court found one officer Pantaleo Mister Garnham moved to the ground o'neill so later this hour we will play an extended excerpt of commissioner o'neill statement announcing the firing of officer Pantaleo you've been hearing brief sound bites elsewhere we will give you commissioner o'neill's complete ration out in his own words a luxury of our long format including what the famous video of the incident looked like to him and commission on deals gone agonize grappling with both sides so that's coming up first though with all the headline grabbers that have been in the news the last few days you may have missed this story which we could say is shocking in its simplicity a US appeals court on Thursday ruled that migrant children detained by the U. S. government must be given soap dry clothes and clean bedding sure say that again because it doesn't sound like a matter for federal court it's true a US appeals court on Thursday ruled that migrant children detained by the US government must be given so dry clothes in clean betting and yes I guess your tax dollars paid for the trump administration's argument that the law does not require migrant children detained by the US government to be given so dry clothes and clean betting but that appeal was rejected we'll see I guess if they decide to ask the United States Supreme Court to declare soap would detain children a discretionary amenity my first guest today would have something to say about that he is US senator Jeff Merkley of Oregon because he serves out west in the state not call California senator Merkley is not so well known around here but among other things that may jog your memory about who he is I'm Sarah Merkley co authored the vocal rule after the two thousand eight financial crisis remember that the vocal rule which prohibits banks from making some of the kinds of high risk investments that help bring on the crisis and bring down the economy interestingly Merkley if I've got my history right hell confinement or deny it also voted against confirmation of Obama nominee Ben Bernanke for federal reserve board chairman because he thought Bernanke was too easy on the banks before the crisis became full blown we'll see what he thinks today maybe some of you saw The New York Times website has a front page story today about the too big to fail banks wanting to ease the rules again right now for how much they need to keep in cash reserves for back up if they're bubbles burst again Jeff Merkley was the only U. S. senator to support Bernie Sanders for the democratic presidential nomination in twenty sixteen Merkley may be the only Democrat in the entire U. S. Senate to consider running for president in twenty twenty but the site to seek reelection instead okay maybe that's an exaggeration he filibustered the Supreme Court nomination of Neil Gorsuch for fifteen hours on the Senate floor and it was a video of Merkley added child detention center in Brownsville Texas that went viral in June of last year and help put the issue of family separation in the center of the American conversation did you ever watch this moment where he interacts with the police officer there who is not letting him man to inspect the facility I'm a US.

Brian Lehrer fifteen hours
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:52 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's the Brian Lehrer show on WNYC fee angry at Bernstein, filling in for Brian Lehrer with us, now, one of the founders of black lives matter at Lisa Garza. She's also a founder and principal of the think tank and activist group called the black futures lab. She's the director of strategy and partnerships at the national domestic workers, alliance and a founder of supermajority a clearinghouse for women's activism. Maybe you saw her up, Ed in the New York Times this week called, dear candidates, here is what black people want, which was pegged to the release on Tuesday of a extremely large survey called the black census project. Thank you for joining us. Lisa garza. Glad you're on WNYC today. Thank you so much for having me. So tell us about the black census project. What, what was the project looking to do? Sure. Well, the black of project was really geared towards doing a number of different things. The first thing that we wanted to make sure to do is to start the path of making black people powerful in politics, what we know is that black communities are incredibly diverse. But yet, the ways in which communities are engaged, politically doesn't actually take advantage about level of diversity, what we are concerned about is making sure that black voices black concerns and black experiences get represented at the state level at the federal level, and what we did to that end was we set out to talk to as many black people as we possibly could about what we are experiencing in the economy in democracy, and in our society, and we have a black communities, very simple question, which is what is it that you wanna see for your future? We talked to black people who lived in rural and urban areas. We talked to liberal. In conservative black communities. We even have to black people who are currently, and formerly incarcerated. And what we found was really incredible. Most of the people that we talked to said that they really had never been asked these types of questions about their experiences. They had not been asked what they want to see out of their democracy. They not been asked what they wanna see in terms of changes to the economy, if we were to project forward, I would say that's a pretty dangerous proposition for the twenty twenty elections. Black people are the most consistent base of the Democratic Party. And yet, the majority of people that we talked to said that they feel very strongly that politicians don't care about them or their experiences and that instead, they care more about big business. And so these are things to consider for candidates and their campaigns. How do you engage communities? In such a way that they can be activated motivated, and energized in the twenty twenty election so that we can change what's happening in the White House. So let's unpack some of that I am curious though just for starters. Your sample size, was thirty one thousand which is he entry? How did you go about getting that all that data? We are really proud of our methodology actually, we intentionally surveyed communities that are often left out of traditional polls, the way that we did, it was that we utilize both online and offline strategies. Online. We partnered with organizations that have huge following that our civil rights organizations like color of change, or black, who have millions of members that join them online to figure out how they can address the problems that they face in their communities, so partnering with those types of organizations allowed us to reach a wide swath of black communities, but we also know that not everybody person is online, and that actually there are barriers for many black communities tax us, the internet. So what we did with Bill partnerships with more than thirty grassroots black led organizations across the nation and twenty eight states and we help to ensure that they. Were able to not only administer the survey at self but we also train those organizations in the art and the science of community organizing and what we were able to accomplish this together more than half of our survey responses in that way, we partnered with organizations, specifically that are rooted in and have deep relationships with some of the communities, under the umbrella of black communities, that are traditionally left out of conversations. We partnered with organizations that work with currently incarcerated people. We partnered with organizations that work with black people who are lesbian gay, bisexual transgender gender. Non conforming. We worked with organizations that were rooted in black communities that were liberal and black communities that were conservative again. We didn't have a dog in the race about what people's politics were, we really wanted to better understand when we're talking about black. Communities. What are the issues that black communities care about, and what a black communities wanna see, for our future, and that's how we were able to reach more than thirty one thousand people that is an impressive number. So, so let's talk about unpacking some of the data that you found. And it's pretty sobering you, you were just alluding to this. But the poll revealed eighty four percent said politicians care about rich people. A lot seventy seven percent said politicians care about white people, a lot just four percent said they care about black people. A lot in three percent, said poor people a lot. So I guess, you know, those are some pretty sobering numbers. I mean, other than the question about sort of the Raisch, the race question of the rich poor question. Is that different from a population sort of Representative of the whole population of the US? Is that significantly more pessimist? Well, I think it's a question of pessimism inside of the most consistent base of the Democratic Party. I think what we're finding in this period is that people are not only cynical about politics, but they are cynical about their government Representative serving them as opposed to serving the wealthy incorporations. And that is something that turns people away from politics and frankly turns people away from participating when people feel like they are up against Goliath. There's not really much incentive for them to show up to the polls. Now what we know about black communities is that it's a little bit different. Black communities tend to be very pragmatic as it relates to elections, and impresses, where there aren't deliberate efforts to keep what people away from the polls, and we should talk about that. You know, black folks are turning out. However, I think what we find and this is true, not just about black communities, but voters across the board is that we have low participation in elections and low participation in elections, has a lot to do with people feeling like change doesn't happen on that level, where in a different kind of situation right now where certainly in twenty sixteen the United States allowed a person into the White House who is changing the rules in ways that are also supporting the limiting of people's participation. While also turning up the heat on some of the issues that are impacting our most vulnerable communities and black communities are no exception there. There are a lot of efforts that are gearing up right now to change what's happening in the White House in twenty twenty and those efforts cannot be successful, if they do not have a clear and strategic plan to keep black voters engaged motivated and activated. And to expand the number of black people who go to the polls. This is really what this survey helps to eliminate are the issues that keep people from believing that change is possible, government level, the issues that are impacting black communities lives every single day, and how their lives are being impacted, and it actually is a window for candidates, and their campaigns and current and perspective, elected officials to better understand what black communities that we serve eight. At least want to see done about the. Problems that exist in our communities. So I would say that the black, census project is really a gift, it's a gift to people who are trying to save our democracy, and it's a gift to people who are seeking to represent us inside of our democracy. And we really hope that candidates, their campaigns and other efforts that are attempting to figure out how to change the balance of power in twenty twenty are really paying attention to the results of this report. My guest is Lisa Garza. She is the founder and a principle of the think tank and activist group called the black futures lab and the author of a recent op Ed deer candidates, here is what black people want. So if you have a question or a comment on that, please give us a call at two one two, four three three WNYC two one two four three nine six nine to with your calls for at least the Garza. So one of the things that you talk about in Europe. Ed piece is about. Sort of the, the ritual, every year of candidates going to have fried chicken in Harlem with hot sauce. You didn't mention this. But there's almost always a stop at Sylvia's and how frustrating that is sort of that sort of gesture, but the sort of meaning in the dialogue stops there, so talked a little bit. And I presume you're talking now to the democratic field. What is it that you would like to see from the candidates? Well, one of the things that we should just be super clear about is exactly what you said, Sylvia's is a great restaurant. So let's just be clear about that food is incredible. But that can't be the totality of engagement, the candidates, do with black communities. And I believe that Sylvia's and others would probably agree with that this isn't an indictment on food. It's an indictment on the ways in which candidates, and their campaigns shortchange black communities by engaging symbolically rather than substantively, many, people might be surprised to know that there are black people that don't even like fried chicken. As a result, you're going to have to do a little bit more in order to capture votes. One of the things that is important for us to communicate to candidates and their campaigns. When you use these types of symbols that in some ways, draw on stereotypes about our communities. It makes it clear to buck communities that not only do you not have a relationship with us. But you may or may not be interested in developing a deeper, one candidates and campaigns should engage communities in the ways that we exist and anybody who's ever been to a black person's household during the holiday season. Nossa black communities are incredibly complex. We have, you know, our boozy cousin. Right. We have our cousin from the hood of we have our black power goal. Right. We have our church going grandmother. And so the reality is, if you wanna engage a black family, you've got engaged black family. You've got to go. Oh, to number of different places where black people are you have to be able to be fluent in the experiences that black people are having whether it's healthcare, and particularly when you go into the south, you need to be able to talk about how you're going to expand programs like Medicaid and Medicare, you need to be able to talk about the, the racial dynamics that exist in, you know, keeping money from expanding programs that disproportionately help black communities in particular, have access to healthcare, you've got a dress not only student debt, but you have to address the cost of college, you've gotta understand that most black families in this country, make at least ten thousand dollars less than the cost of one year of a four year. Public college, you've got to be able to address those issues and unfortunately, fried chicken and hot sauce won't get you there. What will get you? There are. Town halls and other meaningful. Avenues of engagement where you are asking black people. What it is that we are experiencing where you are listening to those experiences where you're listening to the idea that we have for solutions and where you're putting policy solutions forward that not only address the issue itself, but address the impact of structural racism on those issues so that black people can benefit from the changes that you're proposing in the first place. Let's take some calls listeners and black listeners in particular. We invite you to talk to at least Garza a black lives, matter founder and now leading groups, including the black futures lab, which has just published. It's black census project. A survey of thirty one thousand people tweet at Brian Lehrer or call us at two one two, four three three WNYC, two one two four three three nine six nine. To maybe you want to answer one of the black census questions, like what are your top priorities for the next president? Or how can you feel?.

Lisa Garza founder Brian Lehrer White House WNYC Sylvia founder and principal Democratic Party United States New York Times Ed director of strategy Harlem Europe Bernstein Bill government Representative Representative
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You. Could get the Brian Lehrer mug coffee mug. And then we throw in the fair trade coffee. So or whatever gift you choose. You also get the coffee, and so it's a great incentive if the programming isn't. And you know, I've said here and past pledge drives that we really don't care how little money you donate the point of this membership organization that's trying to be community radio. Is that everybody who listens on the radio listen to on a regular basis donates a little bit. We don't want to be accountable to just a few people with deeper pockets. We really want this to be a community organization in its structure, and it's funding. And that's why the programming comes out the way it does. And so there's no minimum on membership anything that you choose to voluntarily donate. Makes you a member of WNYC. It's just like that. And this thank you gift for this morning is consistent with that. Idea. So any donation no matter how small we will send you this twelve ounce can of WNYC bland, which I don't know what that means. But it's gotta be good coffee from the Brooklyn roasting company, any donation at all and one thing that you might want to do is match it with the Brian Lehrer show mug, which we'll also send you, you know, coffee mug get it for a ninety one dollar donation to the station or the quarter a day club. Because if you were to donate a quarter a day to WNYC magin that's lot any radio where you just had to put in a quarter in that was your your pay to listen to WNYC for the course of a full day. You wouldn't think much about it? Right. It's a quarter. Put it in a slot yet. I got my. So we're stabbing we hereby established today the quarter a day club for supporting WNYC and that adds up to.

Brian Lehrer WNYC Brooklyn ninety one dollar twelve ounce
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:57 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"If the Brian Lehrer show own WNYC good morning again, everybody. I'm Jamie Floyd filling in for Brian Lehrer today happy earth week as well all this week. The Ryan lower show is looking at different aspects of environmental science and policy and how they impact our lives starting with Bill mckibben on earth. Jay and yesterday Beth Gardner talking about her book on air pollution today. We're bringing it a little closer to home with a deep dive so to speak into your recycling bin joining me for this is New York sanitation department's deputy Commissioner for recycling and sustainability, rigid Anderson. Hello, thank you for having me. She's going to answer your questions about what we can do. And in some case are required to do to cut the amount of refuse to that ends up in the landfill somewhere. And later, we're going to be joined by one of the people who ends up bearing much of the burden for sorting recycling. And all of that if acidity manager at a big. Apartment building right now. Tweet us at Brian Lehrer or call it and ask the expert about recycling and composting and all of that good stuff. What are you doing? Right. What are you doing wrong? Those questions to us now at two one two four three three WNYC two one two four three three nine six nine to well gum to you deputy Commissioner I have a lot of questions in my own. All right. Let's hear it. All right. There's one piece of really good news for earth week. And that's that the city is once again why today the scope of organic pickups, right? That's right. And it had been suspended. I think last summer, so so what changed that led to this renewed support for composting? Yes. As you mentioned, we've recommitted in the new one NYC plan to go citywide with organics collection. And we we've had a huge learning curve with this program. We started with thirty five hundred homes in Staten Island in. 2013 we've been growing the program district by district ever since. And we've we've learned a lot about how participants will do the program what is difficult and what tips actually we've had a lot of participants. Give tips to their fellow neighbors. How to do it better? And we've been working on, you know, making our truck questions more efficient, and and we're excited excited to continue expanding. And as I understand it organic waste ends up in different facilities, and some of them are more forgiving than others when it comes to things like say bones, or or fatty substances are there citywide rules about this kind of thing. Absolutely. So win when we started this concept of separating your food scraps for composting, we really did it on a, hyper local scale in community composting sites. Those sites have more of a manual approach to creating compost, which is the biological degradation of this material, and we focused on the vegetative. Matter when you do this at a huge industrial skill. You can take anything from bones to fatty tissue your half eaten hamburger, everything you're you're French fries. We'll take it all and we'll take your coffee grounds to your bones to your meat everything. And what happens to all that composed of ways? I mean, does it end up as compost for the parks or somewhere else we create a large amount of compost? I it's yard waste. It's not just your food scraps. At your leaves your your yard waste your during spring cleaning in your yards, and we create compost that we sell back to landscapers. They love it. It's black gold to them. And we also have a huge distribution network. Not only to community groups and parks but residents themselves gardens community gardens. Exactly. And you know, we did the segment earlier this spring Brian did that China was no longer interested in buying American recycling. And a lot of cities are. Sailing back therefore, but not New York. So why is it still so right most effective here? So we took the long-term approach when we negotiated are recycling contract. We said this is utilized for the city. There are costs to running a program in. So we built in sort of a long term plan to pay for recycling and to have a revenue share when the markets are good and to sort of help our vendors handle, the fact that we're committed to them when the markets are bad. And so we have been more insulated than other cities. It's a huge problem in certain parts of the country. I'll ultimately what's happening is a good thing. Reclining up the recycling. We're making it better. We're going to grow it stronger. And there's a lot of investment domestically in recycling. There's also a lot of confusion. Let's dig into some of that. So for a lot of people just getting them to put the metal here in the glass there in the plastics and another been all of this is confusing. They want to do the right thing. We want to do the right thing. But we don't know what the right thing is do we get too caught up in the weeds of all of this give we'll dig down a little deeper, and I already have questions popping up. Right. But give us an overview of best practices or just how to think properly as a good global citizen or good New Yorker good citizen of New York. New Jersey, Connecticut, how to be a good twenty-first-century dweller in an urban setting. Absolutely. And we say, you know, if you are hand-wringing, you're worried about climate change about the environment still recycling and composting are things that you immediately can do and it actually makes the difference for climate change for the environment. The first thing is no your program. Whether if you're in New York City. No at New York City's rules are if you're in a town in Connecticut. No at that town's rules, aren't because depending on their contracts, depending on their infrastructure. They may have a different type of program in New York City. We have a dual stream program. So we click your paper and cardboard separately for metal glass and plastic and we do the work. We're trying to be the experts for you. So what we're trying to do is tell you just very simply what to put in the bin. And we know we've done the research to figure out that there are markets that there's ways that we can handle that material. Right. And you're trying to do it in the most cost effective and officiant way possible not just for us. But then for the city. Absolutely. So let's take a call from Reggie in Brooklyn. Reggie thank you so much for calling and it sounds as though you have a question or do you have a comment for bridgette? Andersen. The short version is. Plastic. I mean, come on Bridget. You're the deputy Commissioner for recycling and sustainability kid, you just make it happen. It's a fair question. Reggie it sounds like you're a little frustrated. No one's really doing. It. Dirty dirty. It's not working. Broken that way, business and technological fix. You're saying dirty plastic that was your question. China rejects comes out thirty per comes out. Greasy be sort of things. Right. So the the idea is we have a list of items that we want you to put in your been. It's our preference that you rinse out your your yogurt tub that you're inside your peanut butter jar. If it's empty we want it whether or not you have the ability in the time to to rinse it out. I'm rinsing out his actually headphone you're building it reduces the attraction of rodents and things like that in the in the storage areas. But if it's empty we wanted, and we want all of it these are valuable products. I think convenience is a critical piece, especially when you're in a multi environment when you're busy city and a busy lifestyle. And so our goal is to try to make it as convenient as possible. So you really don't have to think twice work hard to do it. It just is what you do. Yeah. It is interesting. What Reggie says, you know, I when he mentioned the moon, we always use that example. But when you really think about what NASA? Does and the moon and all of this technology. They've got going. Why can't we apply some of those systems to recycling? You mentioned that a town in Connecticut has one system, and we have a different system in different contracts, and all of that why can't it be systematized? So that we're all doing the same thing. And we just get it. And it becomes part of the American habit to do the same thing with your plastic milk carton or may not have plastic milk cartons anymore. But that's the next conversation about to get do have a market. So I would say a lot of it's about money and infrastructure and have cities had the the money to install the updated fancy new equipment. We have optical sorters that consort plastics by resin type. We had there's a new effort to have robotics that helped it pull out plastic bags and pull out contaminants, and that actually helps to to clean up the stream the idea with with China and other export limitation. Right now is they want the bail of plastic that you sort and send away they want it to be primarily the thing that they're asking for with minimal other contamination. So sorting is critical to that. And there's a mechanical sorting, and then there's manual sorting. And so the idea is how to invest more in that mechanical sorting to help make it easier, and you answered very clearly Reggie's question, which was also mind about rinsing, that's helpful water bottles. You don't yes them. They're clean. What about the cap put the cap on and give it to us? It is it is usually a polypropylene cap, and we actually in New York City sort and bail and sell our polypropylene number five plastic which is actually a different plastic from the bottle and speaking that's interesting because most people don't know what to do that. And what about plastic bags? Let's talk about that big in the news right now. And then we'll talk about paper bags the state just passed the ban on in the. New budget. When are they actually I mean, this is sort of a metaphysical question? When are they going to go away? Go away forever. Right. But tell us how that's going to roll out. Right. So the state passed a ban on single use plastic bags that goes into effect March first twenty twenty so in a little less than a year, and it's for certain stores. So it's your retail stores, your grocery stores, your nonfood retail stores exempted from that are things like carry on takeout bags. If you're at a restaurant, for example, if you have a doggy bag, they will still be able to provide it in a plastic bag, however significant significant reduction, you can there will still be your produce bag or your bulk food bag, you will still be able to be plastic, but it's a significant reduction in plastic bags which extremely important. And so we will see, you know, businesses working through their inventory in advance of this March first deadline, and we want individuals to begin to think about carrying a bag to the market or even caring bag to the place where you get your lunch. Absolutely. So you don't get that little plastic bag that you get every single day, and then have to figure out what to do with it. And to begin thinking about how maybe you dispose of your cat waste or your dog differently and that individual change magnified overpopulation makes a big difference. So then let's talk about the paper, the New York City decided to do what with paper so part of the state law allowed localities to pass a fi five cent fee on paper bags and New York City jumped at the chance we had passed our fee prior that was superseded by the state. So now again, starting March first twenty twenty if grocery stores are providing a paper bag that there's a five cent fee associated with it. And the idea here is not for people to spend five cents on a paper bag, but to get them to bring their own backing about that same because you'll just shift to the other product if it's available in other cities where they just did a bag ban on plastic. There was just a wholesale shift over to paper bags and so that. Doesn't provide the reduction piece that we're looking for. I didn't take a toll obviously both in production and waste so. So let's take a call from Phil who wants to go back to the issue of composting. Phil. Hello. Thank you for calling WNYC's Brian Lehrer show, you're on with Bridget Anderson. She's here to answer all your questions about composting. Okay. Quick question. I live in leaving for Goodwin. We will want to get compost in collection. Yeah. And one of the things that I find very disheartening is when I do my composting I by the biodegradable sort of light green bag that you put into the bins or given out by the city when I go to posit my compost compost collection been I find a lot of people using heavy plastic bags to put their composted. And it just seems like such a juxtaposition of like organic waste in the plastics. And also, I also see a lot of like cops and debris in there because I live near the smoothest bird. So people are dumping in their trash into that. And then thinking how does this city separate, you know, this plastic Agana compost and another question, I have is when you have something saved example, a bottle of olive oil, usually those bottles of olive oil have like a little plastic thing inside the neck of the bottle, and maybe like a sort of foil collar around the. Bottle. So when you go to recycle that bottle. Do you have to disassemble the caller, you should you. Take a fork and pull out that little piece of classics. It's in the neck of the bottle..

New York City Brian Lehrer Reggie deputy Commissioner for recycl Bridget Anderson China New York Connecticut deputy Commissioner Bill mckibben Ryan Jamie Floyd Phil Staten Island Jay NASA New Jersey
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's the Brian Lehrer show on WNYC. Good morning, again, everyone many poor people today than a month ago. No the name and face of Arizona, Senator Jeff flake for better or for worse or for tortured ambivalence. Of course, this came as a result of when California professor Christine Blasi Ford delivered her allegations of sexual assault against the now supreme court Justice spread Cavanaugh flake was the sole Republican defector on the judiciary committee to call for the FBI to investigate. But the next week voted to confirm flake confirmed later that in the end he was always planning to likely vote for bread cavenaugh, but the nation needed a bipartisan pause in his opinion, regardless the call still made him a household name. And a short lived hero for Democrats. My next guest this American life producers Zoe chase had been accompanying the Senator in the days before and really the weeks before and sometime after that historic decision originally, not thinking. She was doing a cavenaugh story, and she chronicle those moments for powerful and thoughtful episode of this American life that some of you have heard called the unhappy deciders. Hi, Zoe, welcome to WNYC today. Thanks so much for having me, Brian. It's exciting. So you thought you were following Jeff flake for a different story before this nomination fight exploded. Well, I I don't know ABC. I would put it exactly that way. It's more than I thought I was done with Jeff flake before the nomination fight exploded because they had done this this this long story for this American life about Jeff flake trying to get a deal done, you know, the basically legal status for undocumented immigrants, and it's really hard to do a deal like that around immigration reform when you're a Republican running for office. He is not a Republican running for office. He's just a Republican who's retired from the Senate. So he thought he could do a bipartisan deal turns out he could not this is not a moment for bipartisanship, then this cavenaugh thing. So then do that story that's three areas. Then this cavenaugh thing heats up, and I see the Jeff flake is in the middle of it. And he's looking as as you pointed out as tortured Lee ambivalent as he always is. And I called them and said, hey, can I hang out with you figure this out? And that's why the title for the piece. The happy the I'm sorry. The unhappy deciders, right? Yeah. Exactly. He was not happy about having to to make this decision. And when I called him, and we talked before I went down there just to see if if there was a piece to do if he was truly undecided. He truly was I believe he really was in that he had a limited amount of time to make up his mind, and he did that kind of in front of the whole country. Here's just twelve seconds from your episode of flake agonizing over the cavenaugh decision. Debate staff.

Senator Jeff flake WNYC Zoe chase Brian Lehrer Christine Blasi Ford Arizona FBI California Senator assault ABC professor Senate Lee twelve seconds
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian lehrer on wnyc with the novelist salman rushdie is book the golden house is now out in paperback and jason in brooklyn you're on wnyc with salman rushdie hello jason hi thanks for taking my call i'm a big fan of both of you gentlemen so it's nice to be here thank you so mr mercy i i am beginning novelist and i've finished my first novel and i'm currently shopping around and i'm a white straight male and my protagonist is a young woman of color and i'm you know i am wondering if i'm encountering adversity because of that and i'm just wondering you know you've written this novel and i i haven't read it yet but i'm i'm guessing that you're one of your protagonist is someone struggling with gender identity and being that i don't know exactly how you identify personally but i'm just wondering if you how you approach that and do you fear backlash because of it what was your approach to to to doing that in my view is that no subject is off limits to anybody you know you have you know you have the right to choose anybody as your as your character into an that fair enough but you also that doesn't excuse you from criticism of and that's to say you have to get it right you know and and what i felt in this two characters in my novel one is one is gender conflicted and the other is high functioning autistic and in both cases i thought it was incumbent on me to do the work to do the homework which includes legwork to get out there and find out enough about the subject to make sure that i don't do something dumb you know and i think in that sense there's not there's a relationship between fiction and journalism there's no there's no there's nothing sacred about sitting at home and just making things up sometimes you at you have to get out of your safe little space and go and find out enough in order to make what you're writing truthful credible and so that's that's the way i approach it.

Brian lehrer salman rushdie jason brooklyn
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian lehrer on wnyc so are democrats counting their proverbial chickens before they hatch in counting on a blue wave to wrest control of the house and maybe even the senate in november that's what jonathan alter suggest in his most recent daily beast column he warns that republican money and a search for progressively pure candidates and democratic primaries could backfire and he uses the cynthia nixon primary challenge of the more centrist andrew cuomo as a prime example even though it's not a congressional race and he joins me now jonathan who's written two books about president obama among other things welcome back to wnyc thanks very much brian democrats with their head screwed on right or reviving an old ethic party and country over personal preference tell me why you think cynthia nixon's candidacy is quote screwing well first of all i think she has the perfect way to ron and i i think she is arguably doing some some good things in pushing andrew cuomo to the left so that's that's been interesting and people have a perfect right to vote for her my concern is what they do with their support for her and what that support in terms of time and money means because you could argue that every dollar that goes to a a primary fight like that especially one with a lot of publicity is one less dollar that would go to elect a.

Brian lehrer senate andrew cuomo obama brian democrats ron cynthia nixon jonathan president
"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"brian lehrer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian lehrer on wnyc and maybe you like many people were surprised to look at the new york times on tuesday and see an op ed piece by a retired supreme court justice calling for the repeal of the second amendment that doesn't happen every day so we called the new york times and asked can we get stevens on our show to talk about his call for the repeal of the second amendment and the answer sort of was yes justice stevens wouldn't do it but coincidentally new york times columnist brad stevens no relation different spelling also wrote a recent column calling for the repeal of the second amendment and he is our next guest now some of you know brad stevens is one of the times conservative columnists he had long been with the wall street journal editorial page but his mix of us is unique to him he's a nevertrumper also whenever putin are but he also wrote a pro john bolton colin the other day and a pro mike pompeo column a few days before that endorsing trump's hawkish new security team and yes he's a conservative who calls for repeal of the second amendment brad stevens joins us now thanks so much for coming on you're a pretty real stevenson my book your article actually goes much deeper than justice stevens one does but i think you injustice stevens agree on the premise that the second amendment is a relic of the eighteenth century can you start there to make your case.

Brian lehrer the new york times brad stevens putin mike pompeo trump york times wall street journal john bolton