6 Burst results for "Brian Dunham"

"brian dunham" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

06:12 min | 6 months ago

"brian dunham" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Beautiful outside. My name is Brian Dunham with my best friend in the entire universe, Mr James Oats. How you feeling today, brother? Evidently, I had my headphones turned up to hire. It wasn't really my fault. I'm not going to take the blame for that. Because I don't want to take the blame for anything. I'm gonna say it was someone else's fault. Well, you know, not my fault wave and it's kind of interesting. I didn't do it. One of the things we're getting away from as a society is people who take responsibility for myself. You know, we used to take responsibility for things right? Anyway, folks along these lines, we're gonna have some fun today because what we're basically going to be talking about is why do we think the way we think and I know that may sound somewhat abstract. But Do we think the way that we think because that's the way that we think. Or is it because someone else? Who has a vested interest in getting us to think a certain way. Is whether unconsciously or consciously Influencing the way that we think I don't know about you, but I think the way I think because I know the way I think that's how I think. Yeah, I just reason I think that way. I'm not really sure. I mean, whether where there is absolutely no, and everyone was clearly not thinking it's all me, right. You're the one. That's right. That's right. I'm right and everyone else is wrong. So, brother. We have to think about this in the context of very many things. We always go back to politics here. This is for those of you who may not be familiar with the show. We're starting at three PM today. We usually started for We're moving to a two hour format or at least experimenting with moving to a two hour format. But our show is called a nation divided. I'm Brian Dunn. I'm a 26 year civil rights lawyer, My C F O the office CEO of the offices, James Oats, We work together. We've been working together for Some of the most intense aspects of our respective career is definitely the last decade, but we talk about politics on this show. We talk about uncomfortable subject sometimes and a lot of times on this show. We're daring to talk about some of the things that really make us kind of cringe a society we've had a lot of discussions about race a lot of discussions about police power. And we don't always agree, and we don't always always agree, and one of the things we're going to talk about today is the media and how the media has influenced S o many aspects. Or maybe it hasn't of American thought we have situations now where partisanship in the media has reached an all time high. We have certain distinct divisions that have seemed to be accentuated over the last few years, not the least of which have been amplified by our very controversial commander in chief. But what we really want to think about Is the concept of the puppet versus the puppeteer. And when we start talking about media outlets there certain mainstream ones that seem to be dominating. Everybody knows him. So we're going to look at some statistics, and we all know about Republicans. We all know about Democrats. We all know about conservatives. We all know about liberals. We are nothing on this show. We are absolutely not liberal or conservative. We are not pro or anti trump a little crazy. Maybe, but we're definitely a little crazy. I convinced I'm from Mars, but what we're really most interested in Is getting us to look at things with a fresh perspective. That we may take for granted. So As we near the election cycle. We're really seeing the importance of How are people going to be led media to the polls? And we have a situation in our lifetimes. Now where the media has become such a partisan outlet. Tell us some of the statistics some of the statistics and she just learned about brother Jim, I gotta go back to my pew research, man. You know, I love you. Yeah, there are normal, but left there an arm of the right and they're basically an arm of the left. And it's all it's all misinformation. Yeah, but I got to get the pew research because they're there. They do a deep dive on the stuff and what I like Of course, you know, I love this is that They always give you an explanation for how they came to the numbers, right? Right. So it's not just wrong numbers. They're not just throwing out a statistic. They're telling you how they got there, so they did. It was a very recent, actually, just from about six months ago, they did the most recent study on the trust in media that Americans have. So here is this is a great, just broad stroke. They they started basically by calling up people and asking them. Have you heard of these 30 News outlets right everything from a bright Bart to the Washington Post, right, The Guardian. All the stuff in the middle and, of course, the two Big East CNN fox. Or was it the two heavyweights? There's absolutely no doubt about it. They're definitely the heavyweights. And so here is that statistic and what I find fascinating about this is it's almost identical down the two sides of the political spectrum. So I know what you're getting ready to say, but very obvious and everyone knows that this is not going to be Earth, shattering it all that 70% of self described liberal. Democrats found CNN to be trustworthy, but only 15% of conservative Republicans right so when they're pulling people, they're asking you to consider self liberal Democrat or do you consider only conserve Republican? They're asking this question. And then they're saying, what news outlets do you trust him? Which ones do you not trust, and after they clean the information, they distill it down 70%. Liberal Democrats trust CNN, only 16% of Republicans. All right, let's put paws right there. So so, basically what you're saying, if I get this right is that they are basically trying to figure out where people fall on the spectrum. How do you describe yourself to describe ourselves? A self described independence? Probably her, but we have not really. But if you're arrived, I believe it was quote Liberal Democrat And you turn on CNN, 77% trust it are going to be let in by trusting that This is probably something that happened. They believe that the news outlets getting that right. They believe that the political discourse is more or less fair and accurate. And if you happen to be someone who just describes himself or herself as a what was it a conservative survive Republican. Only 15% of you are going to believe that CNN is fair, right or correct with that 15% be watching CNN in the first place?.

CNN Mr James Oats Brian Dunham Brian Dunn Washington Post CEO Jim
"brian dunham" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

09:13 min | 2 years ago

"brian dunham" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Marathon fueling the American spirit Welcome back to Jim, Bohannon show with our guest David veto a research fellow at the independent institute and professor of history. At, the university, of Alabama Tuscaloosa Abby co, author, of TRM Howard. Doctor. Entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of the Emmett till murder case yes of the sixty three years ago now Clearly as you note witnesses potential, defendants in, the like in many cases, dead, this is a. Test. Of the Justice department charge of investigating long ago burgers that are thought to have been racially motivated. And The. Justice department in, the, last ten, years it's efforts led to five, successful prosecutions glue that of, Edgar Ray Killen involved in the murders of the three. Civil rights workers in the Mississippi who died in prison this past year, that. Of course was the subject of the movie Mississippi burning starring Gene Hackman which some of you may have seen over the years So the last. Successful prosecution came eight years ago when a former Alabama, state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the killing of one Jimmy Lee Jackson or protesters debt led to the Selma to Montgomery March again to the extent that that. That the law, still applies that's fine and good in the case, of murder I don't suppose, that there is ever a statute of limitations is there Now I'm not a lawyer but no I don't I don't believe there then again there's also the the other. Notion that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that. In fact it would be quite possible to be tried twice in one of these cases once for the state law of committing murder and once, for the federal law involving the violation of someone's civil rights. And, I believe the courts have held that such trials are. For two different crimes. And therefore do not constitute. Double jeopardy that's as I recall my memory of the reading. Of this So in other words it's not an academic exercise, our actor things that presumably. Can be done in the in these cases there would potentially be a, lot of cases out there of course we're talking like, you said, about a sixty, three year, old case in in that particular case only know, one person that could, be prosecuted, all the. Law enforcement people are. Gone and, again there was a cover up you know there were there were employees black employees of milem and, Brian who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate my wife and I interviewed one of them before he died but they're all gone now and you know the people. That covered up are pretty much all gone but there are many sort of read more recent cases you know in the. Sixties for example where a lot of people still are around So the so this evidence continuing and again the the pickings, as you might expect are so much slim but nonetheless, have been, some cases Mitch, factor there, have been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first reported by the Associated. Press last began a significant rule of the review of the till case fourteen years ago prosecutors audibly determined, that the statute of limitations let, them without. Any charges they could pursue in, a federal court Be FBI still conducted an inquiry which included an exclamation, of the emit immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two years to settle whether there were any state crimes that could still. Be prosecuted I I'm, not sure other than than murder I'm not sure what crimes we could be talking about. Here and it was interesting that prosecutors determined that. The statute of limitations had left without any charges they could pursue in a federal court if I'm not mistaken anybody involved in this had. Already been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course any retrial would be double jeopardy If there's no federal Charge that that is, still around since obviously then statutes of limitations apply to the the civil rights laws that that we discussed a second ago while I find. This of academic interest I'm not quite sure where the FBI is looking. Into this at all, you do have, Caroline like, I said Brian Dunham and. She. Was never tried okay so that would be a? Case you, could bring I I unless we get a confession from her. Or something like that I think, that that extremely unlikely but I suppose it's a possibility and it's probably the main reason they reopened, this investigation I would I would guess, in, that particular case again this is a case of of Justice delayed beyond the point of of of reasonably getting, anything done and well I suppose it makes. Us all feel better the. Something is being, investigated, I must say frankly given the, circumstances we've discussed tonight I'm not sure that I find this to be Particularly efficient use of limited federal resources your thoughts I, tend to agree with you I think there are a lot of cases that are you know where you do have some you know you, you do have some potential I just don't see it here I think. It may be was, a spur of, the moment, decision maybe somebody read Timothy. Tyson's. Which again now questions have been called about what? He but, he found in that book and said oh okay we have. A confession here let's go after, this case well turns out they really did so I think somebody maybe didn't think to think this, through I understand why they're doing it, I, just think that that's the target is not the best target it this late day are there any state investigations, that that go back this far in any. Any part of the country. That that try, to, look at at circumstances that were, improperly handled at the time or is this strictly As far as you? Know a federal effort I. Don't know then he stayed investigations going on, certainly there, are cases going back even further but, you you, have to look at examples, like you, know holocaust guy now that's being you know ninety five year old that's. Being sent back, to Germany to, be tried so you know it does happen. But I can't think of any state investigations go to go, back that far The the circumstances of course of the. The, till, case I suppose we're we're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of course I I don't recall if this was before or after the. Montgomery Alabama bus boycott which really vaulted, Dr Martin Luther King junior to national prominence. Do you recall there two are linked together, Dr TRM Howard, we talked about last, time was a prominent civil rights bigger in Mississippi well anyway he went on. A national speaking tour only. Three days after the jury's acquittal he predicted. That, it, was going to. Be an acquittal in ROY Wilkins. The n. w. c. p. basically said I, want you, to go around the country he was, getting crowds, and cities like Baltimore Madison, Square Garden, ten twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent. Memory for a, civil rights 'cause, it was building up a lot of pressure. Was attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was. In November twenty, seventh nineteen fifty five in Montgomery Alabama, and his host, was Martin Luther King then unknown nationally Rosa Parks. Was in the, audience, and three days later Rosa Parks refused to her seat she, made quite clear, that the reason she refused to give up her seat was. She was thinking of? Emmett till well Howard speech. Only three days before that had been the focus that had been the first event. Montgomerie, to, really focus on that issue so they the the issues you know the till case I think you can find it pretty clear link to the Montgomery. Bus boycott and of course then the, decision was to organize a movement around Rosa. Parks action and king was chosen to head, that we're going, to come back and, talk more about that with our guest David Beethoven again he's the author of. TRM Howard will reintroduce you. To him as well and be back in a, moment If you have freedom of speech My concern is sucker minnows talks.

murder Justice department Montgomery Alabama Dr TRM Howard Alabama FBI TRM Howard Mississippi Emmett David Beethoven Martin Luther King Brian Dunham professor of history Edgar Ray Killen Be FBI Rosa Parks Gene Hackman Jimmy Lee Jackson
"brian dunham" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

09:15 min | 2 years ago

"brian dunham" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Welcome back to Jim, Bohannon show with our guest David veto a research fellow at the independent institute and a professor of history. At, the university, of Alabama Tuscaloosa Abby co, author, of TRM Howard. Doctor. Entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of. The Emmett till murder case yes of the sixty three years ago Now Clearly as you note witnesses potential defendants in the like in many, cases, dead this is a test of the Justice department charge of investigating long ago burgers that are thought to have been racially motivated and the Justice. Department in the last ten, years it's efforts that led to five successful prosecutions glue that of Edgar Ray killing involved in the murders of the three civil rights workers in Mississippi who died in. Prison this past, year, that of, course was the subject of the, movie Mississippi burning starring Gene, Hackman which some of you may have seen over the. Years so the last successful prosecution came eight years ago when a former Alabama state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the killing of one Jimmy, Lee Jackson protesters debt led to the Selma to Montgomery March again to the Extent that that that the, law. Still applies that's fine and good in the case of murder I don't suppose that there is ever a statute of limitations is there now I'm. Not a lawyer but no, I don't I don't believe there is then again there's also the the other notion that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that in fact it would be. Quite possible to, be, tried twice, in one of these cases once, for the state law of, committing murder and once for the federal law involving the. Violation of someone's civil rights and I believe the courts have held that such trials are for two different crimes and therefore do not constitute double, jeopardy that's as I recall my my memory of the reading of this So in other words it's not an academic, exercise are, accurate things that presumably can be done in the Emmys case and there would potentially be. A lot of cases. Out there of course we're, talking like you said about a sixty three year old case and in that particular case I only, know one, person that. Could be prosecuted all the. Law enforcement, people are gone and again there was a cover up you know there were there were employees black, employees of milem and Brian who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate my wife and I interviewed wanted them before he died but they're all gone now and you. Know the people that covered up are pretty much all gone but there are many read more recent cases you know in. The sixties for example where a lot of people still are around So this evidence continuing and again the the pickings as, you might expect so much slim but nonetheless have been some cases which, in fact, there've been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first. Reported by the Associated Press last began, a significant rule of the review of the till case forty years ago prosecutors audibly determined that the statute of limitations let them, with Emily charges they could pursue in a federal court be. FBI, conducted an inquiry which included an exclamation. Of the immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two, years to settle whether there were any state crimes that could still be prosecuted I I'm not. Sure other than than murder I'm. Not sure what crimes we could be talking about here and it was interesting that prosecutors, determined that the statute of limitations had left without, any charges they could pursue a federal court If I'm not mistaken anybody involved, in this had already been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course. Any retrial would be double jeopardy If there's no federal Charge that that is, still around since obviously then statutes of limitations apply to the the civil rights laws that we discussed a second ago while I five. This of academic interest I'm not quite sure where the FBI is looking. Into this at all Well you do have Caroline like I said Brian Dunham and she was never tried, that would be a case you could, bring, high I unless we get a confession from her or something like that I think that that extremely unlikely, but I suppose there's a possibility and it's probably the main reason they. Reopened this investigation, I, would I would guess in that, particular case again this is a case of of Justice delayed beyond the point of of reasonably, getting anything done and well I suppose it. Makes us all feel better that something is being investigated I must say frankly given the circumstances we've, discussed tonight, I'm not sure that I find this to be a particularly efficient use, of limited federal resources your thoughts I tend to agree with you I think there are a lot of cases that are that you, know where you do have some you know you do have some potential I just. Don't see it here I think it may be was a spur. Of the moment decision maybe somebody, read Timothy Tyson sports which again now questions have been called about what he but he found in. That book and said oh okay we, have, a confession here let's go after this case well turns out they really did so I think somebody maybe, didn't think to think this through I understand why they're doing it I. Just think that, that's, the target is not the best, target at this late day are there any state investigations that that go back this far in, any any part of the country that that. Try to look at at circumstances that were improperly handled at the time or is this strictly as, far as, you know a federal effort I don't know of any? State investigations going on certainly there are cases going, back even further But you have to look at examples like know holocaust. Guy now that's, being ninety five, year old that's being sent back to Germany. To be tried so you. Know it does happen but I can't think of. Any state investigations go go back that far The the circumstances of. Course of the the? Till case I suppose we're. We're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of course I don't recall. If, this was before or after the Montgomery Alabama bus boycott which really vaulted Dr. Martin Luther King junior to national prominence do you recall there two are. Linked together Dr TRM, Howard we talked about last time was a. Prominent civil rights bigger in Mississippi anyway he, went on a, national speaking, tour only three days after the jury's acquittal he predicted that it was going to be an acquittal. In ROY Wilkins the NWC. Basically said I want you to go around the, country, he was getting crowds in cities like Baltimore Madison, Square Garden. You know ten twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent memory. For a civil rights 'cause it, was building up a lot of pressure was. Attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was in November twenty. Seven nineteen fifty, five in Montgomery Alabama and his host, was Martin Luther, King then unknown nationally Rosa Parks was in the. Audience and three, days later Rosa Parks refused to grow up her seat she, made quite clear, that the reason she refused to give up her seat was. She was thinking of? Emmett till well Howard speech. Only. Three days before that had been the focus bad had been the first event. Montgomerie, to really focus on that issue so they the issues you know the till. Case I think you can find a pretty clear link to the Montgomery. Bus boycott and of, course then the decision was to organize a. Movement around Rosa Parks action and king was, chosen to head, that we're, gonna come back and talk more about that with our guest David beta again he's the author of. TRM Howard will reintroduce you. To him as well and be back in a, moment Your place to talk you have freedom of speech My concern is Sacremento Chechen talk, six, fifty higher, like say open. Ideas Sacramento's talk station Looking for a, Bank that.

murder Montgomery Alabama FBI Mississippi Alabama Howard Justice department professor of history TRM Howard David Brian Dunham Rosa Parks Edgar Ray Timothy Tyson Associated Press Dr. Martin Luther King
"brian dunham" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"brian dunham" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Welcome back to Jim Bohannon, show with our guest David veto a research fellow at the dependent institute and professor of history at. The, university of, Alabama Tuscaloosa Abby co author, of, TRM Howard doctor. Entrepreneur. And civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of the Emmett till murder case yes of, sixty three years ago Now Clearly as you note witnesses potential defendants in the like in many, cases dead this is A test of the Justice department charge of. Investigating long ago murders that, are thought to have been racially motivated and the Justice department in the last ten years it's efforts have led to five successful prosecutions glue that of Edgar Ray killing. Involved in the, murders of the, three civil rights workers Nimitz sippy, who died in prison this, past year that of course was the subject of the. Movie Mississippi burning starring Gene Hackman which some of you may have seen over the years so the last successful prosecution came eight years ago when, a former Alabama state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the. Killing, of one Jimmy Lee Jackson or protesters debt led to. The Selma to Montgomery. March again to the extent, that that that the law still applies that's fine and good in the case of murder I don't suppose that there is ever a statute of, limitations. Is there Now I'm not a lawyer. But no I, don't I don't, believe there is then again there's, also the the other notion, that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that. In fact it would be quite possible to be tried twice in one of these cases once for the state law of committing murder and once, for the federal law involving the violation of someone's civil rights. And, I believe the courts have held that such trials are. For two different crimes. And therefore do not constitute. Double jeopardy that's as I recall my memory of the reading. Of this So in other words it's not an academic exercise our act, your things that presumably can. Be done in the in these cases there would potentially be a lot, of cases out there of course we're talking like you said about a, sixty three, year old case and in that particular case I, only know one person, that could, be prosecuted. All the law enforcement people. Are gone, and again there was a cover up you know there were there were employees black employees of milem, and Brian who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate and my wife and I interviewed one of them before he died but they're all gone now and you know. The people that covered up are pretty much all gone but there are many read more recent cases you know in the. Sixties for example where a lot of people still are around So this this evidence continuing and again the the pickings as you, might expect are so much slim but nonetheless been some cases which in, fact there, have been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first reported by the Associated Press. Last began a significant rule of the review of the till case fourteen years ago prosecutors ultimately determined, that the statute of limitations let them without, any charges they could pursue in a federal court The FBI still conducted an inquiry which included an, exclamation of the immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two years to settle whether there. Were any state crimes that could. Still be prosecuted I. I'm not sure other than than murder I'm not sure what crimes we could be talking about here and it was. Interesting that prosecutors determined that the statute of limitations had left without any charges they could pursue a federal court If I'm not mistaken anybody involved in this had already, been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course any retrial would be. Double jeopardy if there's no federal Charge that that's still around since obviously then statutes of limitations apply. To the the civil, rights laws that that we discussed a second ago while I find this of academic interest. I'm not quite sure whether the FBI is looking. Into this at all Well you do have Caroline like I said Brian Dunham and she was never tried, that would be a case you could, bring, high I unless we get a confession from her or something like that I think that that extremely. Unlikely but I suppose it's a possibility and it's probably, the main reason they. Reopened this investigation, I, would I would guess in that, particular case again this is a case of of Justice delayed beyond the point of of of, reasonably getting anything done and while I suppose. It makes us all feel better something is being investigated I must say frankly given the circumstances we've, discussed tonight I'm not sure that I find this to be a, particularly efficient use of limited federal resources your thoughts I tend to agree with you I think there are a lot of cases that are. Where you do have some you know you you do have some potential I just don't see it. Here I think it may be was a spur of the moment. Decision maybe somebody read Timothy Tyson's, sport which again now questions have been called about what he but he found in that book and. Said oh okay we have a confession, here, let's go after this case well turns out they really did so I think somebody maybe didn't think. To think this through I understand why they're doing it, I just think that. That's the target, is, not the best target at this, late day are there any state investigations that they'd go back this far in any any part, of the country that that tried to look. At at circumstances that were improperly handled at the time or is this strictly as, far as you, know a a federal effort I don't know of any state. Investigations going on certainly there are cases going back even further but you you have to. Look at examples like you know holocaust guy now that's being you know ninety five year old that's being sent back to Germany to be tried so you know it does happen but? I can't think of any state investigations go to, go back that far The the circumstances of course of the the till case I suppose we're we're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of course I I don't recall if this was before or after. The Montgomery Alabama bus, boycott which really vaulted Dr Martin Luther King. Junior to national prominence do you recall there, are two are, linked together, Dr TRM Howard we talked about last time was a prominent civil rights figuring Mississippi way he went. On a national speaking tour only three days after. The jury's acquittal he predicted that, it, was going to be an acquittal in ROY Wilkins. The NWPP basically said I want you to, go around, the country he was getting crowds and, cities like, Baltimore Madison Square Garden you, know ten, twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent memory. For a civil, rights 'cause it, was building up a lot of pressure he. Was attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was in November twenty seventh, nineteen fifty five, in Montgomery Alabama and his host was. Martin Luther King, then unknown nationally Rosa Parks was in the audience. And three days, later, Rosa Parks refused to up her seat she made quite clear, that the reason, she refused to give up her seat was she was thinking. Of Emmett till well Howard speech only three days before. That had been the focus dad had been the first event Montgomerie to really focus on that issue so they the issues you know the till case I think. You can find it pretty clear link to the Montgomery bus boycott and. Of course then the, decision was to organize a movement around Rosa. Parks action and king was chosen to head, that we're going, to come, back and talk more about that with our guest David Beethoven again he's the author of TRM Howard. Will reintroduce you to him as.

murder FBI Justice department Alabama Montgomery Alabama Dr Martin Luther King Montgomery professor of history Howard Emmett David Beethoven Brian Dunham Rosa Parks Jim Bohannon Dr TRM Howard Mississippi Jimmy Lee Jackson TRM Howard Nimitz sippy
"brian dunham" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

09:03 min | 2 years ago

"brian dunham" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Welcome back to Jim Bohannon show with our guest David Beethoven research fellow at. The, dependent institute and a professor of history at the university of Alabama. Tuscaloosa Abby co author of TRM Howard doctor entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of, the Emmett. Till murder case. Yes, of, the, sixty three, years, ago Now Clearly as you note witnesses potential defendants in the like in many, cases dead this is A test of the Justice department charge of investigating long ago murders that are thought to have been, racially, motivated and The Justice department, in the last ten years it's efforts led to five successful prosecutions glued that. Of Edgar Ray, Killen involved in me murders of the three civil, rights workers in the Mississippi, who died in prison this past year that of course, was the subject of the movie Mississippi burning starring Gene Hackman, which some of you may have seen over the years So the last. Successful prosecution came eight years ago when a former Alabama, state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the killing of one Jimmy Lee Jackson a protesters, death led to the Selma to Montgomery March again to the extent that that. That the law, still applies that's fine and good in the case, of murder I don't suppose, that there is ever a statute of limitations is there Now I'm not a lawyer but no I don't I don't believe there then again there's also the the other. Notion that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that in. Fact it would be quite possible to be tried twice in one of these cases once for the state law of committing murder and once for, the, federal law involving the violation of someone's civil rights and. I, believe the courts have held that such trials are for. Two different crimes and. Therefore do not constitute double. Jeopardy that's as I recall my my memory of the reading. Of this So in other words it's, not an academic exercise our actor things that presumably can be done in the in these cases there would potentially be a lot of cases out there of course we're talking like you said about. A sixty three year old case and in that particular case I only know one person that potentially could be all the. Law enforcement people are gone and again there was a cover up You know there were. There were employees black, employees of milem and Brian. Who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate, my wife and I interviewed one before he died but. They're all, gone now, and you know the people are covered up are pretty. Much all gone but there, are many sort of read more recent cases you know in the sixties for example where. A lot, of people still are around So the evidence continuing and again the the picking, as you might expect are somewhat slim but nonetheless have, been some, cases Mitch in, fact there, have been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first reported by the Associated Press last. Began a significant rule of the review of the till case forty years ago prosecutors ultimately, determined that the statute of limitations, let. Them with, any charges they could pursue in a federal court Be FBI conducted an inquiry which included an, exclamation of the immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two years to settle whether there were any state crimes that could still. Be prosecuted I I'm. Not sure other than than murder I'm not sure what crimes we could be talking about here and it was interesting. That prosecutors determined that the statute of limitations had left without any charges they could pursue in a federal court If I'm not mistaken anybody involved, in this had already been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course in the retrial would be double jeopardy If there's no federal Charge that that is, still around since obviously the statute of limitations apply to the the civil rights laws that that we discussed second ago while I find, this of academic interest I'm not quite sure why the FBI is looking. Into this at all Well you do have Caroline like I said Brian Dunham and she was never, tried that would be case you could bring I I unless we get a confession, from her or something like that I think that that extremely unlikely but I suppose it's a possibility and it's probably the main reason, they reopened this investigation I would I would guess in that particular case Again this. Is a case of Justice delayed beyond the point of of of reasonably getting anything done and, while I suppose, it makes us all feel. Better that something is being investigated. I must say frankly given the circumstances we've discussed tonight I'm not. Sure that I find this to, be a, particularly efficient use of limited federal resources your thoughts I tend to agree with you I, think, there, are a lot of cases. That are. You know where you do have some you know. You you do have some potential I just don't see. It here I think it may. Be, was a spur of, the moment decision, maybe somebody, read Timothy Tyson sports which. Again now questions have been called about. What he, but he found in that book and said oh okay we. Have a confession here let's go, after this case Lau turns out they really did I think somebody maybe didn't think to think this, through I understand why they're doing it I just think. That that's the target is not, the best, target at this late day are there any state investigations that go back this far in, any, any, part of the country that. That tried. To look at at circumstances that were improperly handled. At the time or is this strictly as far as. You know a a federal effort I don't know of? Any state investigations going on certainly there are cases, going back even further You know but you you have to look at examples like you know holocaust. Guy now that's, being ninety five, year old that's being sent back to Germany. To be tried so you know. It does happen but I can't think of any. State investigations go to go back that far The the circumstances of course of the? Till. Case I suppose we're we're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of, course I I don't recall if this was before or after the Montgomery Alabama bus boycott which really vaulted Dr Martin Luther King junior to national prominence. Do you recall the two are linked, together Dr TRM Howard we talked about last. Time was a prominent civil rights figuring Mississippi, anyway he went, on a, national speaking tour only three days after the jury's acquittal he predicted that it was going to be. An acquittal in ROY Wilkins. The n. w. c. p. who said I want, you, to go, around the, country he was getting crowds and cities, like Baltimore, Madison Square Garden you know ten twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent. Memory for a civil rights 'cause, it was building up a lot of pressure. Was attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was. In November twenty, seventh nineteen fifty five in Montgomery. Alabama and his, host was Martin Luther King then unknown nationally Rosa. Parks was in, the, audience and three days later Rosa Parks refused to per seat, she made quite, clear that the reason she refused to give up her seat. Was she was thinking of Emmett till well? Howard. Speech only three days before that had been the focus dad had been the first, event Montgomerie to really focus on that issue so they the issues you know. The till case I think you can find a pretty clear link to. The Montgomery bus boycott and of course, then the decision was to organize a move. Around Rosa Parks action and king was chosen, to head that, we're going, to come back and talk more about that with our guest David beta again he's the author of. TRM Howard will reintroduce you. To him as well and be back in a, moment Laura Ingram idea of, apologizing apologize say something incorrect on the other side is trying to racial is something they should issue the apology I. Would demand. That, Andrew gillum and all these people should apologize Laura Ingram until two on news and information five.

murder Montgomery Justice department university of Alabama professor of history Alabama Mississippi Dr Martin Luther King FBI Emmett David Beethoven TRM Howard Dr TRM Howard Jim Bohannon Brian Dunham Laura Ingram Be FBI Howard Gene Hackman
"brian dunham" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"brian dunham" Discussed on Today, Explained

"It's been sixty three years since Emmett till was murdered wise. This case being reopened. Now what happened in two thousand eight Caroline, Brian Dunham. She's since remarried. Gave an interview to author historian named Timothy Tyson. An in this interview which he published in a book last year called the blood of Mahto Carolyn Bryant admits that that was a lie that Emmett till had not grabbed her by the waist that he had not said something suggestive to her in a way this more thoughtfully sounds. But she said, I would like to tell you, honestly, but I can't remember. She said, you tell these stories until they seem true. But that part's not true. And then she said nothing that boy did could ever justify what happened to him. Now, this was a major recanting. The trials Chris grip was actually lost for decades and was finally rediscovered in the two thousands. During the trial, Carolyn Bryant testified that Emmett till had was grabbing her by the waist was speaking suggestively so much so that many of the Mississippi papers and commentators were suggesting that that this was an attempted rape that this was a violent assault and for her to admit so many years later that that did not happen that it never happened upends the very basics of the story. Why do we think she might have made it up? Did she reveal that in the interview? She didn't. Now, there are some varying theories about this ROY. Bryant was known to be potentially abusive, and there's some thoughts about whether or not Caroline might have faced some fear. From him if she didn't go along with this story, but whether Carolyn Bryant told that lie to her husband leading him to kill him until or when she told that lie on the stand, ultimately leading to his killers being cleared in the crime. The fact remains no matter what Harper tension, motivations, no matter the circumstances. This lie is alternately leads, Emmett till being killed. Got him, is alive and living in Raleigh, North Carolina. She'll turn eighty four later this month. A family member turned away reporter after the news broke saying, we don't wanna talk to you. My father used to say, we're not punished for our sands. We're putting spy sands. It was clear that she had this had been a big burden for her. So Timothy Tyson publishes his book last year. Then what what happened here was because Timothy Tyson was able to get a new on the record statement in new information from one of the primary players, it forces the FBI to reconsider the case in see in light of this new information, is there anything else that they should be doing and what could happen to her? Could she get a perjury charge at this point, the statute of limitations for perjuring is up in Mississippi and so- Carolyn Bryant couldn't face charges for having lied on the stand in the trial. However, there's the possibility the the, she admitted to some type of other crime, whether it'd be involvement in the murder or some type of conspiracy to cover it up after the fact that she could face some type of other crime. What would it mean to have some charges come down on this case in the south for the country? I think that the folks in money, Mississippi and the area surrounding it. Would not necessarily be extremely happy. I think this is a era of their history. They've been happy to try to bury and I think that there would certainly be some consternation about reopening. I think there would be some legal questions about whether or not this should be prosecuted whether or not you're able to secure Justice. So many years later. Is it surprising to you at all that this is happening under the Jeff Sessions department of Justice, one that hasn't prioritized race. One that's actually roll back some of the civil rights initiatives from the Obama years. You know, it's not completely surprising to me. This is a big historic case. This is the type of thing that the investigators on this case, the folks at the FBI and elsewhere who've been working on this aren't necessarily political actors and they had an obligation as investigators to matter who the attorney general was to look into this new information. I still think it's very unlikely thirty charges in this case. But I guess I wasn't necessarily surprised to hear that these new strings were being pulled on even when we have an attorney general who has not necessarily made these issues as priority. What about the countless other racially motivated murder cases from the civil rights era, other other movements on anything from the past that didn't get the attention that Matilda. You know, there has been large efforts. Certainly the civil rights community to resurface many of these cases. I think about the work that Brian Stevenson's done with the equal Justice initiative and the creation of the first memorial in Montgomery, Alabama to lynching victims actually visited earlier this year and seeing the names in the locations of all these folks who had been killed. Now in the vast majority of these cases, no one has ever been held to any legal or judicial account. But I do think that as we learn more about many of these cases, I wouldn't be surprised if there are additional cases where pressure is applied to reinvestigate, and in some cases, bring criminal charges in the circumstances in which they think there might be a living perpetrator still. But that said, you know, in many cases, these killings that were done with hundreds and thousands of. Witnesses, and we as a society to sided that we didn't care to hold those folks, Justice.

Carolyn Bryant Emmett Timothy Tyson Mississippi Caroline FBI murder Jeff Sessions department of Ju Brian Stevenson Brian Dunham equal Justice initiative Raleigh attorney Chris Harper North Carolina reporter Montgomery perjury