21 Burst results for "Brian Depalma"

A Feminist Guide to 'Carrie'

Feminist Frequency Radio

01:41 min | 4 months ago

A Feminist Guide to 'Carrie'

"Is hard to imagine a time when the name steven king wasn't synonymous with horror. The book that i put him on the map was nineteen seventy. four's carry which would also become his first novel to be adapted into a film. Cinematic adaptations of kings works are hit or miss to put it mildly but few have had the cultural significance and staying power of carey directed by brian depalma. One of the most significant american directors of the late twentieth century and also kind of sexist. The comedy stay tuned. Anita y'all i just read this shit. I didn't write it. It's fine all right The combination of carries narrative with diplomas directing style results in a film a fascinating contradictions. I'll veritas airland. You're so good. We can absolutely see the male gaze and things like diplomas love of leering at female bodies and slow motion and yet there are also a strong argument to be made for feminist readings of the film the anger that animates protagonist carry weight as her telekinesis powers wreak havoc on the people who oppressed her and ridiculed her and ostracized her for her entire life as felt righteous invalidating to so many girls and women who have helped cement carry status as a classic in the decade since its release the theme of the poll from which are patriots selected. Carry as a discussion topic was bad. Mothers and in the film her mother margaret as religious zealot who keeps carry living in ignorance of the most basic aspects of her own body and tries to make her feel deeply ashamed. Her desire to go to the prom have healthy relationships with other people her age meanwhile her classmates relentlessly ridicule her for her social awkwardness and inability to fit in. No wonder she wants to burn it. All down

Anita Y Steven King Brian Depalma Carey Patriots Margaret
Sean Connery dies, iconic “James Bond” actor passes away at 90

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:13 min | 11 months ago

Sean Connery dies, iconic “James Bond” actor passes away at 90

"As James Bond and in many other roles. He was one of the smoothest actors ever to grace the screen. Sean Connery died overnight in the Bahamas at the age of 90. Born in Scotland in 1930, Sean Connery defined cool for a generation as the suave spy James Bond and Dr No James. He returned his double 07 in from Russia. With love Goldfinger Thunder Ball, You only live twice. Diamonds are forever and never say Never again. Not only was he a box office smash, she was sought by master filmmakers in Alfred Hitchcock's Marnie John Huston's The Man Who would be King Sidney Lumet's murder on the Orient Express and Brian DePalma's The Untouchables, for which he won the Oscar. Get Capone. Here's how you get him. He pulls a knife. You pull a gun, He sends one of yours to hospital. You send one of his toe the mark. His list of beloved Flix is endless. Highlander Hunt for Red October. The rock and my favorite is Harrison Ford's father in Indiana Jones and the last crusade I came here to say, Oh, yeah, and who's gonna come to save you Junior? He received the Kennedy Center honor in 1999 and was knighted in 2000, Remembering Sean Connery, Jason Fraley, Deputy news. Coming up

James Bond Sean Connery Capone King Sidney Lumet Marnie John Huston Brian Depalma Harrison Ford Dr No James Alfred Hitchcock Bahamas Orient Express Kennedy Center Jason Fraley Indiana Scotland Russia Oscar Murder Jones
An Interview With Academy Award Winning Editor: Paul Hirsch

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

09:44 min | 2 years ago

An Interview With Academy Award Winning Editor: Paul Hirsch

"Next guest is an Academy Award winning editor his book a long long time ago and cutting room far far away. My fifty years of editing in Hollywood hits Star Wars Kerry Buehler's Day off mission impossible so many more I can go on ray planes trains and we'll deals. Please welcome Paul Hurst. I Paul thanks for coming on the podcast today. Hope Your Day as well my pleasure so I mean there's the history you have. It's amazing. I mean I'm going through some of the people. Oh you've worked for John Hughes. Brian Depalma George Lucas. Is it fair to say that Brian Depalma is your mentor. I mean I've heard you say on occasion is is that a fair as a statement to make absolutely yes. Yeah and and there's so much here Chris I don't want to jump too far ahead of myself but you know just going through your filmography and you know there's tons that I've mentioned but there's also work that you've had I haven't heard it interviews but you've I think you've contributor on like World War Z.. The Great Gatsby life of Pi. How does that work? Paul you just have a little bit of an influence. You do some work in that film and you're not like the leading editor. Hugs that work. Why why aren't you credited for the same way you weren't some of your other works right? Well h film is an individual case so but usually it's. It's a picture that the studio for whatever reason has some concerns about and They they say would you mind either looking at it and giving US notes and would you mind coming in for a few weeks or it's phrased you know differently but there comes a point where frequently that's On a picture even working for many months at the director and the editor and maybe even the studio executives the producers sort of what I call snow. Snow blind no not sure what they're looking at anymore because it's been working on it so long. They don't have objected to take on. What's there and any light to bring it? Excuse me like bring in what they called fresh eyes and sometimes just watching picture giving notes and sometimes sometimes it's actually sitting down and doing a version So that's how you know And then I find that Not taking credit is a way to make my suggestions more tolerable eligible that. I'm not trying to hog credit from someone yet. It makes sense to me. Yeah you know so that. The suggestions go down uneasily could easily because they're often as genuine efforts to help. I have a question down the road that steps on this topic. But I'll ask you now because it's just it's it's appropriate at this point. Do you find that studio executives as time goes by our. I don't WanNa say the word meddling because that's has a negative connotation to it but you find that their involvement is more were. The work should probably be left to those in the creative process. Director writer editor is is it. Is it more intrusive as time goes by Paul Well I'll say this that the most successful films that I've worked on. I've been the product of my collaboration with the director. Essentially just the two of us Making decisions incisions about the cat. Now that's well said and and you know I wanNA talk a little bit about your early life so you grew up in Paris. How many years were you in Paris for Paul? I was in Paris as a child for about four years. Now are you do you still can you. Are you fluent in French. Can you still speak it as something. You influence fluence. My accent is very good. I'm fluid to the degree washing. Sam Fluent I. I always impress french-speakers but equality. My accent hurry I hasten to tell them that might calculator is very small and and I don't have a real facility. Use it sound them. But I'm sure if I went over there and spent two or three Munson Johnson total immersion. I'd I'd get back to where I had been. You know when I was eight years old so I have the vocabulary of an eight year old child but you know I think I think if I stayed there pick it up you know. Yeah that's certainly flew in my book and then you were at your dad's a painter and I have to believe you get some of his his eye for things in art history major. You're the second art history major I've had and I think what two weeks which ages which is telling because I feel history major. Paul she was. She's a costume designer urine editor. I feel like history majoring in history. GIVES YOU LA. This supreme I for details. Is that kind of going overboard or do you think there's something to that. I really don't know One way or the other. I'm an art. I was an art history. Major not major distinction there right as she the average she she was also an art history major so it was like yeah she go ahead. I'm sorry but in my case as an art history major you spend a lot of times looking and yet projected images in dark rooms and critiquing them so I was sort of being prepared for a lifetime of work. Doing just that although I wound up doing moving images instead of still ones but I think my background is was useful in terms of developing an aesthetic about the elements of life of a style in visual arts. And there are many qualities that you you know you you try to achieve whether it's you know Symmetry your balance or a brace or certain a set of qualities that he strived for that are not necessarily only in visual arts. To 'cause I majored in music in high school I went to High School of Music and art and so my work in film. I find that very closely tied to my feelings about music for for me. Music is an essential elements of my work in terms of making presentations whether it's to the director to the public or whatever music than essential ingredient in what I'm doing yes well said you know. People that are listening to this. podcast cast many see editors and they think they know what it editor's job is but many times it's a teen involvement many times. You're working claburn as you mentioned with a director. How would you? What's your cliff notes? Version of what editor is for those listening in probably aren't sure exactly what it is. How would you define an editor's job? Well I can read to you from the introduction to my book which is essentially a chapter devoted to answering exactly that question but No I I have to say I have ordered on Amazon and I did read an excerpt I think it was on entertainment magazine. Entertainment Weekly Weekly. It was a really beautiful excerpt they printed and people said some really nice things anymore. Campbell talkie movies are made in the editing room and so much of your book I want to get into. It's really an amazing. It's an amazing story. Your life is there's been so much to it you are our consensually. What the editor is doing is putting together? The experience that the audience is GonNa have and everything that's done on a film the writers the actors cinematographers the production designers. The costume designers the makeup people. Here people everything the all their work is Toward one end an s to provide the editor with raw materials. Everything they do do is in service of the cut and the editor takes everything that they have done and uses it to bill. It'll be experienced the audiences. Yeah and do you find as you because you've been so effective for so long. I mean that's a testament to your abilities. Do you find that much of your. Your work is is is with the directors. You find that a lot of it is I know George had faith in you clearly Brian has yes. I had faith you clearly. Do you find that typical or is it. Not Typical of of the job varies as much as human beings very Taylor. Is there ever a time. Where director says you know what I completely trust? You have at it and and do what you have to do or as a director always kind of in some way have to monitor the process like I said everyone's different Are Comfortable having having any drive in some of the likely take the real themselves you know so it varies from person to

Editor Paul Hurst Director Brian Depalma George Lucas Brian Depalma Academy Award John Hughes Paris Kerry Buehler Hollywood United States High School Of Music Chris Entertainment Weekly Weekly Munson Johnson SAM Taylor French Amazon
"brian depalma" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

11:45 min | 2 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Nerd all and what's going on everybody. Welcome back to nerd on the podcast. You didn't need right but you deserve and we're all levels of nerd are welcome. Hey <hes> so excited. I'm very excited. This is a special day. It's our one one hundred and first episode but more importantly we have a guest in the studio but everyone at home listening and watching you've heard him portray brian brian depalma in blockbuster major von rag how you say that on rag and you'll get a guy like hey <hes> <hes> going on star wars resistance going on and lupin the third poi- post damron and han solo on star wars battlefront two ghost in the shell l. blue dragon the fate slash day series naruto bleach to power rangers turbo in-space anzio and concerto from fist of the north star but close to the nerve on heart the voice of war grandma and your one of your favorites acquisitive ladies and gentlemen boys and girls and everyone in between an outside. We have lex lang however.

brian brian depalma lex lang
"brian depalma" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Police it's a great movie yeah that movie van DePalma man he's a genius Brian DePalma all right let's take a break here for the weather and then we'll come back we'll jump back into it what revenge movies do you love three one two nine eight one seven two hundred I look at your forecast here for today a slight chance of early morning showers high in the mid eighties but the upper seventies near the lake partly cloudy cooler overnight with lows in the upper sixties tomorrow partly cloudy warm humid high near ninety chance of showers and thunderstorms are some could be severe warm human overnight with a low of seventy four Wednesday mostly cloudy chance for morning or afternoon showers or thunderstorms partly cloudy cooler in the overnight hours low in the low sixties and for Thursday sunny and pleasant with lower humidity high in the mid seventies partly cloudy cooler overnight low in the upper fifties get those windows open man then for Friday partly cloudy little warmer high in the low eighties partly cloudy overnight with a low in the low sixties currently sixty eight degrees at o'hare seventy three midway seventy two at the lake front okay let's let's take a let's take a break here and when we come back we'll jump right back into the revenge movie topic right here on seven twenty WGN WGN radio ecosystem WGN radio is everywhere WGN radio dot com it's the daily record of all our shows and podcasts the WGN radio app northwestern Wildcats football and basketball WGN plus our huge collection of podcasts for every taste and topic or just tell your smart device play WGN radio on WGN radio system everywhere you are seven eleven has more drinks than times you've been caught singing in your car and random lyrics stored in your brain combines choose from flavor filled Slurpee and big gulp drink Chris coconut water energizing colder and hot coffee fresh organic cold pressed juices invigorating energy drinks cooling pure leaf iced tea refreshing deer park one hundred percent natural still and sparkling spring water plus many more only at participating seven eleven stores hi I'm Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans America's largest mortgage lender I've got great news mortgage interest rates have dropped so if you're thinking about buying a home right now is the time to lock that low rate even before.

Brian DePalma WGN CEO America Jay Farner quicken one hundred percent sixty eight degrees
"brian depalma" Discussed on I Was There Too

I Was There Too

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on I Was There Too

"But so they still hadn't cast this part. So I bought this black wig. And I'm standing there. And I'm saying me student. He'll and I I understand will looking to cast it if of that speaks wench and all of a sudden the DP stands up ago. Peter look at her eyes. They look just like PJ's. And I'm like darn it. What are you doing? And he gets PJ's that you. As I want the part of the French Ville darling has been cast so he'd been cast, but you will model this like okay anyway. So that we use later on when I dish ind for a private Benjamin. And I had gotten the role and then Goldie Hawn decided she wanted to fire the director and get another director. And so my agent called and said all you lost the park has now there's an indirect ri- said. Well, let me audition again. Are you kidding? No, no, they don't. They're throwing out all the castle. I found out the day that are auditioning for my part. I went there. I put the wig on because the point was used busted, just look different. And also that they didn't want any blondes and. Goalie on the produce. She wanted to be the only blonde. And so she had thought about it. And now peaches Cup, long Teheran. So she's out. So I went in I busted in red for him. And it was I mean, it was a pretty forceful entry. I have to say and he's all right. You got the part. Okay. I said, I'm not get the part of wanna keep the part. The straight a wig the word totally nothing that have gotten you rolls. Let's talk a little bit. You have to make a difference. And you have to do something just a little, you know, maybe not pushy. But outstanding maybe to just wasn't there. Also, a red ball cap that diploma really responded. Exactly all my props are coming in handy. Liberty in vernacular my first audition, and I did I was I had moved from New York to LA only been out here two weeks, and I only had a modeling agency. And they said there's this mass audition, George Lucas, and Brian depalma, they're both casting. They're just going to look at people. So we should get this straight. So they George Lucas, and Brian depalma we're sharing the same casting session for Star Wars. And Kerry initial the initial auditions for the voice, you know, every teenager in town every young person come to this. And so we waited like three hours in the hallway then you walk into this office. And there's one desk two chairs George Lucas, Brian depalma, Brian looks at George. She's I'll put her on my list, George k I turned to go. I have my red baseball hat on. I'm wearing overalls because I didn't wanna look pretty I wanna look unusual again a little bit of thing. Don't go trying to be the prettiest girl have a little character. You know, so had the red baseball hat because I heard there was a lot of sun out here. You know, make sure you don't burn. And as I turned to go he said for the next audition where the hat, I said, my red baseball Howdy said where the hap- so I did and subsequent three auditions. I wore advert every time. I laughed. He said bring the hat. I wanna got the call that. I had the part. He said don't forget the hat and lucky. I don't have the hat. It was a many a couple of fans have made me a couple of hats, including the pins rainbow pins and rainbow patch and a cloud patches, a really cool habit was made a felt and I washed it found felt who knew back then I mean that was a long time ago that these things would become coveted in that there would be an e bay or there would be a Facebook or any things now how. How was diplomas a director? He seems very serious is the case he was very serious. But I think the serious part of him was because like a painter he was painting a canvas, and it was his canvas. And he wanted it to come out the way he wanted it. So there wasn't much chance for ad-libbing. Even though it wasn't an ad lib. Verbal ad-lib, but I was really only put on initially for the first week and just for the volleyball game, and because of my red hat, and.

Brian depalma George Lucas PJ director baseball Goldie Hawn Peter George k Teheran Facebook ri peaches Cup e bay Kerry New York George LA three hours two weeks
"brian depalma" Discussed on She Who Persisted

She Who Persisted

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on She Who Persisted

"But it's like superpower turns into this like animal who like fights the patriarchy, but she she has sex with people, but it's like on her term, then she turns people this. There's this one scene where one of the guys had sex with ends up pissing blood. And it looks like he's getting his period because he's. Perfect. Naps a need to watch this to watch it. And there are three of them. There's like there's like a handful of who they are totally worth watching. I I've really, you know, the special effects on it or are, criticized. But it's a I I think it's a great movie. Yeah. I really really enjoyed it. Yeah. It sounds like the female and empowering version of this mailings IT around ministration. Yeah. Exactly. And this whole idea of her turning into a where wolf as she gets her period is the same idea of like a metaphor for purity. But it's not like this Negga. It's they have power and they can take revenge instead of instead of being victimized. It's great via talking about animals creed creed. Also, I mean, this is I don't know how to bring it back to the topic. But yeah, that's fine. I think it wasn't that bad. Creed. Also says interesting I didn't really know what to make of it. But she says that in the film, and apparently this is something that comes up out of the horror films. There is this link between women pigs. So in the exorcist, we have the scene. What Reagan shouts the size mine? I think carrying she stretching pig's blood and also in the scene before prom when the girls actually get the pig. Blood bay, keep referring to women's pigs. And then she says well as because both pigs and women bleed, and then also pay kind of associated with the critique discussing body. So yeah, find that interesting. I know what to make of it. If you think about the kosher and Islam ick hall restrictions on eating pork. And they talk about pigs being kind of dirty animals, and they did have diseases most pork. These days doesn't have noses and other types of diseases because they're raised differently and cleaner in whatever. But but yet I mean, we've seen that women who have periods are also shunned by these same cultures told not to be part of religious ceramah. Oni? So this kind of connection between pigs and women, particularly in terms of menstruating women. I can see what she's saying, especially because the flow of blood is I think in immagination connected to pigs because we also the saying to bleed like a pig, at least we have it in gem. Yeah. And so the film is very much about bleeding and about the terrifying powers of blood menstrual blood and also about blood flow is kind of one of the initiating moments for women into womanhood. Yeah. And there are many instances in fill with blood is very prominent does of 'cause the first flow of menstrual blood. We have the pig blood in the end than we have the washing off of blood in the very end, which offend also very very interesting. I talked briefly about this because it's not just Mira full to the showering thing. But it could also be analyzed in religious terms. And we talked about menstruation to booze. We talked about the. The symbolic. Ritualistic cleansing that women have to go through in some cultures. So and it also reminded me of that. So she goes home. She lies down in this fetal position of top in washes off both blood and makeup, which of both sides of womanhood. Then this mixture of blood and Wolter, and she kind of cleanses herself. And I think that's interesting. So another incident of blood vary end is mother's wounds. Right. And then cheese rooms. Yeah. Yeah. No. I mean, I think it's a I think a lot of Mirroring and a lot of symbolism that can be drawn in this film. I think that Brian depalma actually does a pretty good job of showing that Mirroring symbolism in the movie despite the the other kind of shortfalls like really kind of voyeuristic male gaze. That's to be expected in most films in the seventies. So I have a question does sure English language version of Kerry have a subtitle. There is a subtitle. There are subtitles story. Yes. Because the German version is cold. Oh. Oh, you mean. Oh, you mean, the title does have a subtitle? I don't believe..

Blood bay Mira Reagan Brian depalma wolf Kerry Wolter
"brian depalma" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey, welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and Robert. I wanna talk about a certain kind of movie scene. Okay. I know you've seen movies like this. I was trying to think of examples and for some reason, the only really good one I could think of was the Brian depalma mission impossible movie. Okay, there there are tons of examples. So here's what the scene is. A character is having a realization about something that happened in the realization takes the form of remembering something from earlier in the movie and suddenly zooming in on some detail in the background of the shot. That was not noticed the first time around. So in the Brian depalma mission impossible, there's a scene where Tom Cruise is remembering scenes that happened earlier, but like zooming in on people in the background and being there were other agents, their agents there all along which in the in the structure of the film, it is basically the character. Remembering scenes that were already depicted in the film yet maybe with a zoom or something, but but but now they have they have additional information regarding what they were looking at. They're able to think back and essentially remember detailed that they had overlooked. Yeah, and that that is often how memory is portrayed in fiction right there in there's this great kind of drama to write like, oh, it was right in front of my eyes. It's right where I was looking, but it was, you know, I didn't realize it until now. It's like they, they posit that memory works like a camera where you can take a picture of a scene, and then later go back and look at that picture again and pick out different details in the background of the picture that you didn't notice the first time. Yeah, it's it's depending on this, like you said, if this fallacy of of memory as recording. Yeah, as recording that can be replayed and then studied again for detail the same kind of fallacy. Honestly, that is a that has been utilized in remembering, quote, unquote, remembering ritualized, satanic abuse. Oh, yeah, other such things. Yeah. All the idea about re recovered memory at highly problematic concept. But yeah, it's not just what I want to emphasize today though, because we've talked about problematic concepts of memory all the time about like the idea that you can retrieve information you didn't have before the very, very doubtful. But I wanna talk about the idea of seeing itself because another thing that's involved in this movie scene where somebody takes a picture of what's in front of their eyes. And then later they go back and zoom in on different elements is the idea that whatever is in front of your eyes is recorded in some way because it, you know, it's apparent. It's obvious that you have access to the information because you looked right at it. And so what we want to talk about today is whether that's actually true and. What it means for information to be obvious visually or otherwise, and what it means to see and in doing so we're, we are going to discuss the invisible gorilla. Classic psychology experiment, but it..

Brian depalma Robert lamb Tom Cruise Joe McCormick
"brian depalma" Discussed on Whimsically Volatile

Whimsically Volatile

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on Whimsically Volatile

"Yeah, wouldn't it be good if the in in an action film where they're just sticking. Ages die and they cycled through like fifty fifty leading, right? Yeah, and the cutbacks emission control looking at the little scanner that somehow tells them that they're alive or dead, and they're like, now that one's gone again. I don't get get get what char ski on this. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. It's. I just think it's so crazy, and that'd be a good chunk of the film. They just keep sending people to do this one procedure that just kills everybody. Yeah. And then at the end, the go, I don't know. I think we're burning through a lot of personnel. I mean, maybe we should just wrap this whole thing up. Yeah, and then credits. Yeah, yeah, mission, impossible mission. Impossible, literally full. Yeah, mission really wasn't possible. Yeah. And so that movie was really fifth or sixth one, I think, right. Yeah. I get to see the first one, which I can't believe I haven't seen because it's directed by Brian depalma. Oh yeah. Interesting, right. Yeah, boy, they, I mean, I'm telling you is action packed? Yeah. Who an action scene? He knows how to do suspense. Also with an action film, you need a touch suspense or else. It's just like big blasts of things happening. Yeah, at one after the other. Yeah, they had. They had Scooby doo mask reveals, oh, in the first one? No. In this one. Oh, really? I guess it's like a, is it a thing at the thing. Yeah, it was the dad also tickled me very much because I'm like, oh. So. There doesn't exist in this world. A prosthetic that is realistic. Our see she put over human head. That's right. Make it look like another human head. That's right. As we've discovered by looking at the fem skin phenomenon and there certainly isn't one that you can just rip off also true also. True. They're not easy to slide off. No, they don't. It's not Halloween mask. That's right. You just take off of mannequin just stick it on your head. 'cause those don't look like people know. They don't doubt. Looks like a mask. It looks like a mask like, uh, again, the fem skins out. I guess I had a problem with my suspension of disbelief because I just like, well, see, it's funny because suspension of disbelief is critical to so many films any film really? Right. But sometimes there's these things that stick out his so jarringly annoyingly impossible even with its mission, impossible nece that it taints the whole thing..

Brian depalma
"brian depalma" Discussed on Night Call

Night Call

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on Night Call

"It's kind of part of this larger argument that she has just about like what actually constitutes feminists film or like feminist oriented film and it's not usually the thing that's being called a feminist film and also the title feminist film usually doesn't mean anything especially when you're talking about a film directed by man like the most like a film can really only be feminist like a medicine as far as like how it's being made and whose point of view is being prioritized and that brian depalma movie about harvey weinstein he just announced he's making maybe not something that i'm like expecting laws yeah all i mean it's hard because i love carey and i think it's a very feminist where i also am like well i mean it's better than not doing anything i guess but it's really hard when you hear a man a white man in their seventies be like you know i really want to show a woman's perspective like we'll able to do that pretty effectively a woman makes doing this interesting experiment why can't men have opinions of those like you can have opinions you just also have fifty million movies made by mad about this and maybe because anna biller is also saying like she's making bluebeard movie all we're all big fans bluebeard but that's that's my man was like some men the robots just replace women because then you don't feel bad about putting them in the junk room it's a horror movie so you have to be able to show the horror i get that right but she was just saying like horrors become so narrow that like nothing has advanced genre even like the meta thing meta critiques of final girl genre and it just like reinforce this one girl is better than all the other girls like i think the thing that's like more gracious to me is like sure you can you can have that structure but like when you can feel the film is trying to be like look girl power after watching you know.

harvey weinstein carey anna biller brian depalma
"brian depalma" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"A bunch of kids how these think that these trailers would already be kind of preselected and i don't know how that happened but i loved it happened i mean it's really good pr i is great it's funny because i i don't see the trailers being that scary i i love the trailer i think eight twenty four has done an amazing job with the marketing and it's been so so exciting to watch as a first time filmmaker but it is funny that that even the trailer has gained that reputation are you get scared by films i mean when i was a kid there were few films that really like rex may and sometimes i do get scared by films but when i was a kid you know brian depalma's carrie really really upset me and a very very deep way i saw it when i think eleven or twelve also resolution there either like no great no great resolution there no i mean it's deeply sad horror film it's also very funny it's very campy i watched it again recently i was shocked at how campy it was but my memories were of just the heaviest film imaginable so you can relate to that experience of leaving the theater your heart still kind of racing and what am i pretty you told me i was kinda pale when it came but you can relate to this well in that case i watched the film wasn't that upset by it that was good and then it was when i tried going to bed that the images were like really not going away and they are getting worse and they're preying on my i mean that's really insinuated itself into my consciousness and then there's another phone called the cook the thief his wife and her lover by peter greenaway and that film isn't technically a horror film but it is deeply upsetting dealing with very ugly human behavior but that that film i saw when i was too young and that that really affected me at images really stayed with me i know that that that film was rated nc seventeen it was the first nc seventeen film and he asked what he could do to to change the rating to an art and they said nothing it's the tone and that makes sense to me because the tone is so punishing end just it it's a film that feels evil and so when i said.

brian depalma carrie peter greenaway
"brian depalma" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"See just a close up of her fist clenching when she years the news and it's coming out in little bits throughout the movie and that's hard to do because you gotta keep a mystery alive this is a thriller but at the same time you don't want detective expositions showing up and ruining it all so what were the challenges that you had to do with for exposition in this film was right all of the exposition and then start to pair it right back impair it right back and i personally don't like lots of dialogue for me the power is between the lines it's the looks like you're you're suggesting and as not mentioned earlier learning to be still on camera that was that was a key thing and not can communicate is a great communicator on cameron understands what what a lens is doing so you can put the camera on her and just the smallest movement just gives you everything and it's a visual medium i'm a visual person and if you can tell it in a look than that's always going to be better than a line natalie anything no ice done by that as an actor i prefer to lose lines than so torn as a writer but no ultimately the right thing to do is lose the line if you can communicate communicates in camera sheer curiosity your movie starts off with the woman being strangled and then we pull back and we're in a scoring session was that kind of a nod to brian depalma's blowout yeah with i was another reference actually that we didn't mentioned earlier and it was because i loved it yet thank you it was important for us to give the movie away in the opening moment so you were kind of duffin your cap and saying pay attention everything is not what it looks like and i love recording studios anyway there are like a magical place to be if if you ever have an opportunity to do that it's an amazing thing to stand in a room and watch a score being recorded and so wanted to put that on film and i thought it was a great way to kind of access that world and discover her it was almost like a kind of you know who.

cameron writer brian depalma
"brian depalma" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Earlier army in you know desperately needed a assistance and you know and found the kid in the shining and the twins in the shining and it's amazing if you care about how movies are made and you want to brick stories some of which you sort of know how what much of how much specificity required in every task and how demanding was but leon story about how movies are made is just thrilling incredibly appealing figure is relationships with kids suffered because he gave his life to to stanley kubrick but the stuff from full metal jacket in the shining and and watch just all by itself that makes the makes it makes it worth it wow i actually i watched movie documentary that was sort of similar i mean not it's more sounds like more interesting story but this forget it was called was on brian depalma and just his work him sort of reveling it was called depalma the pomme right i watched that because he recommended that on your show thinking that was fast i really liked diploma again you don't have to like love breida palment but to be into that movie but but check out film worker is really really good if you it's just a five short you know less than ninety minutes so it's a it's a unquestionably a a worth and obviously the assuming everybody's seen you know our bg but obviously people should see that too all right brit beta get dr.

brian depalma leon ninety minutes
Remembering Margot Kidder: Lois Lane and 9 more memorable roles she played

Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

02:07 min | 3 years ago

Remembering Margot Kidder: Lois Lane and 9 more memorable roles she played

"Seventy six years old see that's not old enough i'm sorry just as a reference what is all i'm trading up eighty eight is eighty ninety i'd go ninety he gotta live your life don't you though as lived his life yeah not old enough i guess i say that now that i'm inching closer to that's going to happen the older you get the more you push that number over it's inevitable margot kidder is not getting a lot of press she passed away you know she is i'm impressed by the look i found some article where all the stars all they say the stars and then when you read it you'll recognize the first three names and then after that you go i don't know who that guy is but everybody was commenting on how much she meant to them her acting abilities maureen mccormick wrote something very very nice about the time that she met margot kidder and how it changed your life and everything yeah very very sad i just haven't heard it all over the news like i thought i would didn't she do a run with letterman to for a while was margot kidder i don't remember that steve it's possible but i don't remember that that she was re i remember there was some association there she may have guessed it a couple times but i don't think with any regularity teri garr bright schrage that right only sixty nine two right right that's certainly not old enough our somebody and i can't remember which of the news sources listed the five essential margot kidder roles other than lois lane because i think anybody who knows her or ever seen her in anything would agree that lois lane was like the top of the hill for so they mentioned the movie that i mentioned yesterday which is a really obscure movie called sisters that brian depalma did before he was famous real eerie movie about twin sisters and the treatment that they're seeking because one of them is psychotic and you don't know which one is psychotic you don't know who the villain is and who the evil twin is i wrote it down i was actually a good for a hard movie to find really obscure she also did a movie i forgot about called black christmas which is a horror movie and one of the co stars andrea martin from setv in a serious role.

Margot Kidder Maureen Mccormick Letterman Steve Lois Lane Brian Depalma Andrea Martin Setv Seventy Six Years
"brian depalma" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"His whole you know when he's giving him the tour of the data center and and did you read about how they shot that like without having a budget which is pretty amazing even though it's not a very long seem they constructed a model mounted the camera up at the ceiling had the model as a tunnel attached to the camera and then had the actors way down below walking just on that little you know catwalk and then and then did a matte painting under the catwalk so the mataka for he yeah village he talked about how they had to line up the angles on that absolutely perfectly to get them to all work together but even when the actors look up there basically looking up into a model much i just loved i mean that's like some star wars shit there you know that's like yet they really thought that through for move that you know was constantly under financial strain they critter showed up until they're ready to stop working so i gotta shut down this podcast will come back in a year and they will make we'll make a podcast will make a podcast in germany it'll do well and we can continue this one two years like it's down for two years right one thing that you know richard was really smart was to have such a fantastic cinematographer is back i mean 'cause the movie for movie that was so fraught it looks great and this is the guy who shot you know deliverance in the long goodbye and he worked with brian depalma and so it had that great kind of wide framing even though the colors really pot i was for a movie that was fraught as it was at sure looked great you know i said that this was his trip down the rabbit hole at the beginning and it's it's kind of that and it's also it's a little cane as far as the structure goes with the way that he will go to different p.

brian depalma germany richard one two years two years
"brian depalma" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"White people still like the movie even though they do not have a white savior is because i'm not talking down to white people either i'm not i'm assuming that you're identifying with chris the protagonists yeah i'm not assuming you're identifying with the white people in this film which is i think you know it it goes to to this thing you're saying of people like it when you treat them as being smart intellectually and emotionally smart as well and i think people feel that i'm i'm i respect the audience yeah yeah well it it shows and has paid off now it has paid off for you absolutely and uh of course everybody must be asking the same question i hope it's not one that you've answered to death but do you have more ideas percolating in your in your head i do i do and um right now i'm working on uh i'm a script right now for the next movie emina right and uh i can't really say anything about it but i can't say i love you now i'm i love you know i i i want i want more hitchcock entails i want more brian depalma i want more um kubrick i want more spielberg so i i i'm pushing in the direction continuing the direction of genre and specifically i i love be movie premises that are executed in as in a way as possible that's a jaws is together that's what that's what the the best movies of all time art vat alien.

brian depalma chris
"brian depalma" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

We'll See You In Hell

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

"Uh the movie is called the fury instructed by brian depalma and it's coming a couple years after his a horror breakthrough kerry mmhmm mmhmm and joe i gotta say i had seen this movie when i was probably 1213 and i just watch for the first time in however on that is twenty years it it's fine but it pales so much in comparison to carry that it just kind of dozen register at all it's corny and an important thing to note for those of you that haven't seen it to heart and and what i've decline a horror movie is a little strong but it's considered our movie about tela connectik powers right so you have to make the comparison yeah he's dancing quite close to carry territory carry it tori kari tornado god de ever turn it on the uh sh kari tori folks d i i it it it it's i agree with you it's a bit of a snooze or it's it's a real slow burn it's look i think when palme does it right he nails it he's made some of my favorite films scarface carry the untouchables wants the documentary oh it's a fantastic documentary diploma that'll help you know where to start with his career i mean he's truly an incredible filmmaker yeah he's one of those guys that can make shit really exciting just by virtue of the way shoots that being said when he's doing a slow burner sometimes i'm not in the mood and i can't take it i felt this way about blowout people say blow out is like his finest film i know people that say it's their favorite movie ever i mean iran tino's affair maria yeah i was i was i love blow all but i i wouldn't even put it in the top.

brian depalma kerry mmhmm mmhmm palme joe i iran twenty years
"brian depalma" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on Channel 33

"Instead of conversation with an audience in some way and you know i'm doing exactly what i want to be doing jason bloem is here last week talking mud boston i bill and they talked a lot about the making of kicking and screaming and how long it took to get that into the world and you know that some of the personal connection of that story and bill my boss' quite obsessive that movie and you know you could see him placing his life onto the lives of the characters there's a whole other generation of people that work at this company that have a very similar relationship the francis high where they say like that is my movie that is my life i feel so connected to that do people approach you and say like you captured this part of my life on a regular basis yeah i mean people do say that i mean it it's it's always nice when people say i mean it's what you know i i think back to movies that did that for me and how how important they were my life still are you know i mean i remember when i was a kid nice a diner you know in and i thought like oh i am those guys even though i was younger and not living in the fifties in baltimore and i remember thinking about that movie was sort of everything i felt like oh i totally relate to all those guys and that kind of conversation my friends and things and then i also thought like that's the kind of movie i'd like to make so that sort of was inspiring and sort of all fronts and are so many movies like that are people the like asked me like oh like group was seem so what an odd thing for you to be brian depalma fan i think that while high of the sun ought at all i mean is an interview i heard with tom petty where he some they asked him what his influence as word he said the radio and and i feel that way you know that my influences are movies that's part of the reason why i asked you that sort of the direction of your career because after seemed to palma.

jason bloem francis high baltimore brian depalma tom petty palma
"brian depalma" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on Channel 33

"Have you learned anything specifically from working closely with her and then going back in doing something on your own abs interested to hear about what the the post greta morgan experiences like too yeah absolutely i mean i am not even sure i can quantified it's it's it's but i know it's there you know i mean i it's something actually i i made with jake paltrow we made this documentary about brian depalma mullet m one thing brian says um which is a big his that said many times the personally to us but we made sure we we included it in the documentary was that um you know for him he felt you know he wrote and directed a lot of his early movies but he felt he needed to work as a interpretive director on things like scarface in the untouchables that it that it helped free up mop you know by getting outside of his own material like that he he you know he learned something and so when he went back to writing his own material he had sort of some things had changed and i think i i don't do that i don't i mean i haven't done that i should say i you know directed somebody else's material i i generated all i kind of consciously or unconsciously look to do things that that sort of take me even in stuff that i'm riding in a way take me outside of my own stuff you know and and and i think working regret on those two movies did sort of both their extremely personal movies and i feel very connected you know as connected to those movies i do to any of my movies but who working with her and having this sort of other you know voice both in the script stage and also as a performer kind of changed.

jake paltrow director scarface greta morgan brian depalma
"brian depalma" Discussed on Pop Culture Continuum

Pop Culture Continuum

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on Pop Culture Continuum

"1966 blow up michelangelo antonioni um a you're seeing this one group oh it's chippy it's almost um i don't know he he did this is i think his first englishlanguage film at stars a vanessa redgrave and some other dude whose name i can't remember it doesn't really matter i'm it's about a photographer who thinks he might have photographed a murder while he was out uh photographing shit in the park i mean he's generally does like fashion models and shit and he's like lives a party kind of lifestyle but then he gets obsessed with like blowing up the film to see if he can see what's going on in it um if he actually did see the murder and it's but it very weird too like i don't know what's gone out the fucking mines playing tennis don't ask me the ending his super ambiguous but it's it's already but in a really good way um and also a blow up which was by brian depalma starring john travolta nancy alan enacting eighty early '80s movie and was loosely based on this movie um blowout blowout sorry yes because this is la via um anyway definitely were checking out another criterion one uh all right number three for you first movie oh maybe on first but one of the first moves seen feeder not only move for a long time but after i think i've seen something else but perfume used it intermission for kids mary poppins very fun uh in spite of the awesome.

vanessa redgrave murder brian depalma nancy alan john travolta
"brian depalma" Discussed on The Canon

The Canon

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"brian depalma" Discussed on The Canon

"He's to fact up the audience will never empathize with him he looks to evil and then right before shooting started he said lewis listen either michael douglas goes i go in cherry lansing was like yoga douglas has been with this project from the beginning see later brian obama y'all yeah yeah but brian depalma was part of that wave that wanted to make fail attraction more of a clear starry because what's interesting about the script is that it started out as kind of a complicated look at sexual attraction where both the married husband and his mistress were equally at fault and that was a religious sherry lansing to the script now share lansing was drawn to it because she felt like she had been that single woman who meets a nice man who's married who really breaks her heart and she identified so strongly with glen coast in this idea of career woman who aren't allowed to have it all 'cause you have a career woman in england close who gets to our these like kuwait business suits and walk around insured housing was like that's me i like this woman i want us to gut from women like her in than in trying to get this film made everybody who signed onto it started with ryan to palma said what if she will we may curve really fuck and crazy in the guys innocent now of course of course coerce me knots that it's always gotta end up being the crazy bitch in l a mean that's the through line of of women from the first one that got their period you're too emotional.

lewis michael douglas cherry lansing brian obama brian depalma sherry lansing ryan palma kuwait