36 Burst results for "Brian"

Fresh update on "brian" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "brian" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Your free in home estimate. Well, maybe you've seen them chances are you haven't? Maybe you've been going about your life here in the D.C. area, not knowing they existed. We're talking about hundreds of Chinese made drones that have been violating local airspace and flying over The White House, the capital and The Pentagon. Politico senior national correspondent Brian bender joined WTO's Dimitri and Michelle to explain. You know, I think it's important at the outset to make clear that these are not drones operated by the Chinese government. These are recreational drones. Something you might get for Christmas even. But most of the drones in the U.S. are made in China, one company in particular DJI incorporated. And the concern here is that they are basically breaking the rules by flying over the mall, The Pentagon The White House, other sensitive areas in the National Capital Region, and these are Chinese made drones, Chinese technology, and like we hear when it comes to TikTok and all kinds of other Chinese technologies, the concern is they could be hacked into that they could be used as a means of espionage. And so that's where national security officials are concerned that this is yet another example where the sort of ubiquitous Chinese technology could be used against us. Any evidence that the Chinese government is responsible here, and if not, who might be? Well, I mean, everyone that we've talked to does not think there's any evidence to suggest this is some sort of Chinese orchestrated effort here. But again, these are Chinese drones. They're very easy to manipulate so that you can fly them in areas that are restricted like the very restricted airspace over D.C. and obviously if the Chinese wanted to, or anyone else for that matter, they could potentially hack into these drones, use them for surveillance, not just to gather pictures, but maybe even eavesdrop on communications. There's all sorts of things. And again, this is part of a larger trend where national security officials are starting to realize that the Chinese have developed lots of technologies on the Internet in our everyday lives that if they wanted to use for nefarious purposes, it wouldn't be that difficult. I'm sorry if some consider this a dumb question, but I wonder if it's on people's minds. You know, when a plane violates airspace over The White House, jets are scrambled, people are evacuated. Why isn't it the same response to these drones just because they're so tiny? Well, they're tiny and obviously they're not they're often not in the way of commercial aircraft, but there have been cases where they have gotten too close to Reagan national airport, for example. And you know, I think what federal officials are really grappling with is what new authorities might they need in order to counter these drones to go after them. I mean, you have to keep in mind these are Americans out on a Sunday with their new drone, potentially just having a good time and not with any ill intent at all. So there's privacy concerns, of course. But again, this is D.C. airspace, one of the most protected areas in the country. It's not the world. And I think federal officials are grappling with how do we confront this potential threat without crossing the line and preventing people from doing what they want to do. Like I said, without any real ill intent. Again, that's a Politico senior national correspondent, Brian bender. It is four 14 coming up. We've got Frank handrahan in sports. There was a hat trick at the cats game, but it wasn't the capsule scored it. We'll tell you about that and more

Chinese Government Brian Bender Pentagon White House D.C. Politico Dimitri National Capital Region WTO Michelle Reagan National Airport China U.S. Jets Frank Handrahan
The latest in sports

AP News Radio

01:59 min | 4 hrs ago

The latest in sports

"AP sports, I'm Ben Thomas, on a big day in college football and the big game had Ohio State hosting Michigan. Then in cap on how it played out. CFP number three Michigan stuns number two Ohio State 45 23 JJ McCarthy threw for 263 yards and three touchdowns and ran in another to help Michigan outscore Ohio State 28 three in the second half and approved a 12 clinching a spot in the Big Ten championship game. Job's not finished. We got so much more to do. CJ Stroud sauce for 349 yards and two touchdowns, but it was too late interceptions that sealed the buckeyes fate, Ohio State drops to 11 and one. Number one, Georgia overcame a slow start to beat Georgia Tech 37 14 and finish another undefeated regular season one number four TCU crushed Iowa state 62 14. But Michigan's decisive victory over Ohio State does offer some hope for playoff aspirants. Correspondent Mark Myers reports in USC took a giant step closer with a 38 27 win over Notre-Dame. Quarterback Caleb Williams encountered for four touchdowns, one passing in three running for the now 11 in one Trojans. Williams is now considered the leading candidate to capture the Heisman Trophy. But LSU tripped up falling to Texas a and M 38 23 head coach Brian Kelly. We just, for some reason, we're off today. In Clemson lost by a point to South Carolina, Alabama took the iron bowl 49 27 over auburn, coach Nick Saban says, despite two losses, the crimson tide merit playoff consideration. This team didn't give up on themselves. They didn't give up on each other. They kept fighting and won some tough games. Tennessee thrashed Vanderbilt 56 to nothing while Oregon state stunned Oregon 38 34. In the NBA, the raptures Lakers rockets and sons all winners, the NHL, oilers, hurricanes, blues, Maple Leafs, Devils, islanders, avalanche and Canucks at the World Cup Argentina over Mexico, France towns, Denmark, Australia beat Tunisia and Poland topped Saudi Arabia. Ben Thomas AP sports.

Ohio Michigan Jj Mccarthy Cj Stroud Ben Thomas Mark Myers Caleb Williams CFP AP Buckeyes Georgia Tech TCU Football USC Georgia Brian Kelly Iowa Trojans
Lawyer Sentenced to 15 Months for Fireboming NYPD Car

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:07 min | 4 d ago

Lawyer Sentenced to 15 Months for Fireboming NYPD Car

"I think most of you are familiar with the very famous Asian Indian prostitute, Uruguay, actually no, she's not a prostitute. She's a lawyer. I don't know if that's. I don't know if it's a big difference. Uru drama is a public interest lawyer in New York. And if it seems like I'm defaming our well, it's very well deserved. Why? Because this is the woman, the activist who firebombed a police cruiser during the 2020 George Floyd riots. She's one of these so called social justice warriors. And she was arrested and she was facing ten years in prison, which seems appropriate if you try to fire bomb a police vehicle. But the Biden administration decided to start protecting her. And pushing a judge and this is U.S. district judge Brian kogan of the eastern district of New York liberal Democrat to give this woman a very light sentence and in fact he did. So here's what she gets 15 months in prison. Wow. This is outrageous. You got January 6th defendants nonviolent who've done nothing who have comparable or worse sentences in this, not to mention this woman was never in solitary confinement, in fact, left wing activists came forward and put up money for her to be bailed. So she was given the opportunity to have bail. Why? Because she was not deemed to be a danger to society in the way that, let's say, just say some mom or grandmother or some guy in January 6th, there's a danger to society. We got to lock him up right now and keep him locked up until trial. Why? Because he's an election denier. Now, this woman Uruguay drama and her accomplice a guy named Colin Ford Mathis. These are people who they've been getting these glowing media profiles. And now they evidently have this kind of sweetheart deal with the Biden DoJ and with a judge going along. So, I mean, justice is really about proportionality, the it's not just so you get punished, but the punishment should bear some resemblance, some proportion to the offense.

Uru Drama George Floyd Biden Administration Judge Brian Kogan Uruguay New York Colin Ford Mathis U.S. DOJ Biden
CNN Bans On-Air Drinking During New Year's Eve Broadcasts

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

05:29 min | 6 d ago

CNN Bans On-Air Drinking During New Year's Eve Broadcasts

"Again, one of those shows that not exactly what you signed up for, but it's Monday and that's the way it is. Also on CNN, I watched the history of sitcoms. The other night oh, by the way, big news. The head of CNN. Chris licked, my told you is going to do great things at that network. He's still making sweeping changes. You know, he got rid of Brian stelter as we know, the guy who also the guy who was jerking off during the Zoom call, Jeffrey too, but he's gone. He took Don lemon's prime time shell away, and now he's really changing things. It was announced that there will be no more drinking alcohol during CNN's New Year's Eve broadcast. Doesn't Chris lick no, that was the only reason why any of us tuned in to see Andy Collin lit up with Anderson Cooper who could barely handle a shot. We used to have a drunk Kathy Griffin with a lot of fun people, Don Lennon was loaded, dancing, it's fun. Give him one day a year to be assholes. Well, seen in their assholes, all year long. But you know, one day is not that big. But no, he cut it out. No more alcohol. So I'm watching this show, the sitcom story, you know, no show ever, ever says anything nice about rosemary. You guys know rosemary. I don't think all of you do. You might act like you do, but you don't. Those of you under 40, 45, probably have no clue. Rosemary was great on the Dick Van Dyke show. She was married to Maury Amsterdam on the show. Van Dyke was something you always want. And he'd walk in and trip over the sofa, a little cushion, and it got home and had his Martine. It was one of those shows, whatever. It was easy viewing, you hear the dogs? just as loud. But rosemary at 5 years old, she was offered a 7 year contract and became a radio star at NBC radio network. And then she made a bunch of films. At 5. Could you imagine what her me too stories were about? I mean, she's dead now, but could you imagine the stories she could tell you about running around desks and who was trying to nail her? This is back when women were secretaries and housewives on librarians. I also saw a bunch of stuff how great to watch Ed Asner as Lou grant on the Mary Tyler Moore show, saw a clip where he got all hot and bothered by Mary's friend, wrote a morgen star, remember Valerie Harper house I loved rhoda. Rona was like before Laverne on Laverne and Shirley. Before Laverne defazio, rona Morgan stern was the first girl on a sitcom that, as an Italian kid, or as a city kid, you'd go, I mean, I grew up a Long Island, but I still had a little bit of Brooklyn in me. You see that girl and you go, oh yeah, that's my cousins. That's our Friends. I know wrote a Morgan stern. Jewish or Italian same thing. Laverne de fazio, same thing. I didn't grow up with Cindy's. I grew up with Laverne's. And I grew up with rhoda's not Mary Tyler Moore's. And it was wonderful to see her because then you said, oh my God, there's a chance for all of us to get work. It's a lot similar, it's very similar to what black people felt when suddenly they thought to appear. There are people began to appear in sitcoms. You know, build caused by was huge and I spy and it made them go, oh my God, we can do this. One of our own is there. So I get that. But there's one part where Lou, Lou grant walks around rhoda as she walks into the newsroom. And he goes, you, you're different. I like you. Then he goes behind it, and he says, I like it from back here too. An old Valerie Harper can say is, I think he's about to kick my tie is what a different world. Thinking back when I was a kid, I had no idea that kind of talk bothered women. Because I saw my mother and my sisters laugh at those comments. So how could any of us think that what they were saying was improper? You know what I mean? And then Betty White, they showed Betty White. I know Betty White way older than me, but I can't explain it. I had a crush on him. I remember being a teenager. And thinking, you know what? When I never married, it would be great to be married to a woman like Betty White. Look at that dimple on her left cheek, you can hold a couple water in that dimple. She's so funny. She loves her men. I just felt like Betty's the best. And that was a kid. I was right.

CNN Brian Stelter Rosemary Chris Lick Andy Collin Don Lennon Van Dyke Laverne Maury Amsterdam Valerie Harper Don Lemon Rhoda Lou Grant Mary Tyler Moore Kathy Griffin Anderson Cooper Laverne Defazio Rona Morgan Jeffrey Laverne De Fazio
Raphael Warnock and Herschel Walker Will Have a Runoff in Georgia

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:56 min | 6 d ago

Raphael Warnock and Herschel Walker Will Have a Runoff in Georgia

"Again, an interesting perspective we'll talk about, let's just go ahead and talk about Herschel Walker and Raphael Warnock right now. Is it important if you're a Georgia listener to this podcast in particular for you to go out and vote a Republican to go out and vote? Yes. I know that it's not for the control of the Senate anymore. I know it's not what we had hoped it to be, but it still matters. 51 senators from the Democratic Party in the United States Senate then can control committees. And then they can make sure that they get out whatever they want to get out of committee. Now, granted, we do have the house now to stop some of this. But that's an important thing, especially when it comes to judges that the Biden administration is going to try and pack through here the next two years. Keeping that 50 50 means that it has to come to the floor. And then it's just, it makes it a lot harder to get those judges out. And it means Democrats are put in more pressure. Especially on judges that are on the fringe of being appointments. So the 51 50 matters, you either going to have a power sharing agreement or you're going to have complete control by the Democrats. So Republicans in Georgia, if you want to say Republicans maintain at least a power sharing agreement in the United States Senate, you need to get out and vote for walker. Walker experienced a 200,000 less votes than governor Kemp and other members of the Republican statewide tickets which, by the way, this idea that Georgia had flipped in Georgia was a purple state in Georgia and it didn't happen. In fact, if it wasn't for the walker race, it was a complete beatdown in Georgia by Republicans led by the governor Brian Kemp and others on the democratic candidates up and down the line. And it's just amazing to me that the very little that is being reported about this. I mean, there were AJC reporters. And rightfully so, wrote books about how Georgia had flipped. Will it flip in one election for very different rains mainly the fact that Republicans just did not show back up to the polls in a runoff last year,

Raphael Warnock Georgia Senate Biden Administration Herschel Walker Democratic Party Governor Kemp United States Brian Kemp Walker AJC
Maryland probe finds 158 abusive priests, over 600 victims

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last week

Maryland probe finds 158 abusive priests, over 600 victims

"An investigation by Maryland's attorney general has identified 158 Catholic priests in the archdiocese of Baltimore who have been accused of sexually and physically abusing more than 600 victims over the past 80 years I Norman hall attorney general Brian frosh is asked a court to release the 463 paint report on his investigation which began in 2019 It identifies 115 priests who were prosecuted for sex abuse and are identified publicly by the archdiocese as having been credibly accused of sexual abuse It also includes an additional 43 priests accused of sexual abuse but not identified publicly by the archdiocese The court filing says the sexual abuse was so pervasive that victims were sometimes reporting abuse to priests who were perpetrators themselves Victims ages ranged from preschool through young adulthood I Norman hall

Norman Hall Brian Frosh Maryland Baltimore
Mollie Hemingway Calls Out the GOP's Unpreparedness With Abortion

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:45 min | Last week

Mollie Hemingway Calls Out the GOP's Unpreparedness With Abortion

"I think one of the other kind of struggles people have is maybe we set our expectations too high. There is a debate on the right of the role that Dobbs played in this election. I do believe that in certain states, especially in the state races interestingly enough, it was actually an anchor, especially in Michigan and in Wisconsin in a year that otherwise should have been a very good year. We lost by 5, 6 or 7 points when we had really good candidates. What are your thoughts, Molly? It's very confusing to decipher it. I mean, you take very strong pro life governors like Ron DeSantis, Bill Lee, Brian Kemp, Greg Abbott, who signed effectively or, you know, who's in a state that essentially has an abortion ban, they all won their reelection, incumbent pro abortion supportive governors also did well. I think there was clear failure on the part of the Republican Party to deal with that issue. And it's criminal because they knew it was coming. They knew they had the leak. They knew it was likely to be overturned. They should have had a plan in place. And I saw that the people who support abortion spent $391 million on targeted messaging compared to 11 million for pro lifers. That's just inexcusable. And you might not win the issue. You know, it was a big change in abortion policy and one that many people had worked very hard for and had prayed for for a very long period of time. You can certainly get it to a draw and instead Republicans kind of did this ostrich head in the sand approach of showing that not only were they weak, but they were scared to talk about it.

Ron Desantis Brian Kemp Dobbs Bill Lee Greg Abbott Molly Wisconsin Michigan Republican Party
Where's the Talent on Our Side? Joe and Victoria Weigh In

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:03 min | Last week

Where's the Talent on Our Side? Joe and Victoria Weigh In

"So big issue we've discussed, where's the talent on our side? The big, big brains. And I don't want to I'm looking. You know, it's not just the last four years of Trump. I would say from the aughts onwards, we didn't have the gingrich's, the bakers. We didn't have the people who were, you know, the good Machiavelli's of the right inside the building. Did we not cultivate them? Did they all go off into the private sector? Give us explanations. Well, the bush people don't cultivate new talent. They're not interested in it. They don't care about it because it's all about them. It's a network. That's why when Jeb Bush ran in 2016 and that famous, okay, you can applaud now. That's because that was a sense of entitlement. And they surrounded themselves with the same players, the same tired old people who didn't understand what's changing in American politics. There are great talented people out there. We just haven't done a very good job of cultivating them. And again, I blame ronna mcdaniel. I believe the blame Rick Scott. There's all kinds of wonderful talented people. The guy from Wisconsin, who was the first chief of staff for president Trump. Ryan. Brian's priebus. What did they do to bring in great new brains? What they did? They went and got the old people from the Republican national quote to quote on exactly this issue, just to give it a little bit of a flavor a little bit of color. I think it was some rag Vanity Fair or something. Bannon gave an interview about the first four weeks in The White House, and he actually used this phrase when we needed 4000 positions filled. Presidential appointments. He said, I sat down with reince and we, quote, made a drug deal with the RNC to fill those positions. And it's really quite remarkable that we achieved what we did, given the fact that the old schlep of the skull and crossbones and all the good old boys filled those positions. They went and found every rhino they could, and president Trump had a rhino in charge.

Ronna Mcdaniel Rick Scott Machiavelli President Trump Donald Trump Priebus Gingrich Jeb Bush Bush Wisconsin Bannon Ryan Brian White House RNC
Gabby Petito family settles $3M suit in killing by fiance

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

Gabby Petito family settles $3M suit in killing by fiance

"The families of Gabby petito and Brian laundrie have reached a $3 million settlement in a wrongful death lawsuit filed after authorities concluded he strangled her during a cross country trip in August 2021 I Norman hall a lawyer for petito's parents said whatever money is received will go to the Gabby petito foundation dedicated to locating missing people and curbing domestic violence The lawsuit involving the estates of petito and Brian laundrie claimed he was liable for damages because he caused her death her body was found in a Wyoming national park a separate lawsuit still pending in Sarasota claims laundrie's parents wrongly concealed that he confessed to killing petito before he returned home in September 2021 to Florida from their trip out west in a converted van Christopher and Roberta laundrie denied that claim I Norman hall

Brian Laundrie Petito Gabby Petito Norman Hall Gabby Petito Foundation Wyoming National Park Laundrie Sarasota Van Christopher Roberta Laundrie Florida
There's Something We Can Learn From Democrats...

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:29 min | Last week

There's Something We Can Learn From Democrats...

"There is something I want to say, and I know that people do not want to hear this in our audience because they email and they say Charlie stopped talking about things that went wrong. They just flat out stole it. Okay, but this is interesting though. If you listen to what happened in Colorado, because I made a lot of calls last night, right? I made calls to people on the ground in Pennsylvania and Colorado and Georgia and in most states, except Texas and Florida, and they have all said as they're doing their data analysis. They saw a same and similar collapse of independence across the board across the country. Now, people might say, well, Charlie, it's because they had this rigged system. Well, if that's the case, then how did Ron DeSantis win by 20 points, right? How did Brian Kemp win by 6 or 7 points. Now, ballot harvesting and ballot capturing and machines going down in Arizona, we are the one of the only shows that is going to repeatedly talk about it. But there is growing evidence that there was something done by the Democrats that we can learn from that is constructive and important about how on earth did we do so well with independence in the polling and in certain early returns and in person election day, but there was a faction, a type of independence that totally gravitated their support away from us. And Andrew, there could be some explanations. But the most logical one would probably be something around Dobbs, something around a targeted ad campaign, or is it Andrew that Republicans didn't sprit sprint the last half mile of the marathon? Do you think that we just kind of were candidates just kind of let up that there wasn't a targeted campaign to go after independence? I don't know, I'm just thinking out loud. Andrew, what are your thoughts on that? I mean, listen, I think Dobbs completely. It's a point that I've made on the show this week. I think, you know, living in California, you know, my wife's Friends, we would have these conversations. And it kind of, I kind of didn't key in on it enough. Honestly. But they did a great job on platforms like TikTok, social media, you know, my wife told me hers was full of it before the election of just people saying, hey, they want a criminalized miscarriages. We all know that that's so ridiculous not to be true. I mean, half of pregnancies basically end in miscarriage. That's never going to happen. That's a crazy thing. I think it worked a lot with independence. I think it worked a lot with single women. We saw them go way far to the left this cycle.

Ron Desantis Brian Kemp Charlie Colorado Andrew Dobbs Pennsylvania Georgia Texas Florida Arizona California
Eagles, NFL’s Last Unbeaten Team, Fall to Commanders

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last week

Eagles, NFL’s Last Unbeaten Team, Fall to Commanders

"The commanders have the eagles their first loss of the season as they went on to a 32 21 win Washington took the lead late in the second quarter when a one year touchdown run by Brian Robinson Antonio Gibson also had a touchdown run Taylor heinicke threw for 211 yards for the commanders who even their record the 5 and 5 We understand where we're at and we just need to keep winning The guys come in every day and work hard So you know I'm very excited where we're at Jalen hurts through for two touchdowns ran for another in a loss that dropped the bird's record to 8 and one Michael Luang

Brian Robinson Antonio Gibson Taylor Heinicke Eagles Washington Jalen Michael Luang
There Are So Many Good Stories Out of the Midterms...

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | Last week

There Are So Many Good Stories Out of the Midterms...

"So many good stories out of the midterms. We're not talking about desantis by 20, even Brian Kemp one convincingly in Georgia, Greg Abbott, just obliterated Robert Francis o'rourke. I mean, just ran over and Greg Abbott actually won independence in Texas, which is so interesting. Lombardo won in Nevada. But it's just, you know, in Arizona in particular. I mean, I'm shocked and I'm just looking at the numbers as they are. And I'd love to have somebody walk me through them. I'd love to have somebody tell me how on earth this is conceivable how it's possible how Carrie Lake could win game day in person election day voting independence two to one and then lose them if somebody dropped off ballots. It's just, and we're going to have the final numbers tonight. So just so everyone knows, there's anywhere between 90 to a 100,000 Maricopa ballots remaining. I think they're actually might be more than that. In fact, I just got a text message here for anyone listening from Arizona, okay? Anyone from Arizona listen to this. I want to, I want to talk about this. He said, by the way, your advice to cure vote was a good one. My wife and I voted at 6 a.m. on election day. My vote was tabulated, but my wife and I, among them, was among the majority of people around whose ballot couldn't tabulate. We checked our status and currently neither of us are currently listed as having voted since the primary. So we're going to have Tyler Boyer on to kind of walk through what to do here, but there is a chance that again, it's a chance. I'm not saying that it's a good chance, but knowing Maricopa's incompetency, there's a chance that there's tens of thousands of ballots in adjudication in different buckets that haven't been tabulated. And that would end up kind of closing this turnout gap that currently is a little bit mysterious right now. So

Greg Abbott Brian Kemp Carrie Lake Robert Francis Arizona Desantis Rourke Lombardo Maricopa Georgia Nevada Texas Tyler Boyer
Mark Levin Confirms He Has COVID Again

Mark Levin

00:55 sec | Last week

Mark Levin Confirms He Has COVID Again

"I'm sorry I wasn't here Friday utterly unexpected Turns out I've COVID again You can probably hear it over the microphone And I got quite sick Friday afternoon so I had a bow out Who set in for me mister producer Brian mudd who's wonderful he came in at the last minute I want to thank Brian And I've been duking this out all weekend But we have a system set up here It's really a portable system Where I can do this show from pretty much anywhere So that's what I'm doing right now You can sound I guess I sent a little bit like Phyllis Diller but that's not my intention of course I'll be fine I'm just basically not going anywhere Hanging out in two rooms And that's the way that goes

Brian Mudd Brian Phyllis Diller
No. 7 LSU's defense secures 13-10 road win over Arkansas

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

No. 7 LSU's defense secures 13-10 road win over Arkansas

"7th ranked LSU was able to grind out a 1310 win at Arkansas LSU coach Brian Kelly I'm proud of our guys having the mental toughness to battle and find a way to win a football game when we were challenged the way we work today Josh Williams ran for 122 yards and a touchdown for the tigers Harold Perkins junior had four sacks and two forced fumbles while helping LSU hold the razorbacks to 248 total yards The 8 and two tigers forced and recovered an Arkansas fumble on the razorbacks final drive with one 19 left to clinch the win I'm Dave ferry

Arkansas Lsu LSU Brian Kelly Harold Perkins Josh Williams Tigers Razorbacks Football Arkansas Dave Ferry
Brian Mudd: Countries With Higher Election Integrity Than U.S.

Mark Levin

00:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Brian Mudd: Countries With Higher Election Integrity Than U.S.

"In fact our election system so inadequate that Ghana Ghana runs rings around us in election integrity I'm not kidding because there are actually several countries ahead You see the United States actually ranked 57th overall in the world in election integrity In other words elections held in 20 countries were citizens lack freedom Have higher integrity in their elections than ours And I said here's my point What we've witnessed is inexcusable and it should be intolerable Many state and local governments have so woefully created election systems and protocols That several undeveloped countries have greater integrity in their elections than ours It's unrealistic to think that we can remain the world's superpower and Beacon of freedom in the world if we're running elections worse than every developed country in the world which yeah it's the case

Ghana United States
Brian Mudd: A First Encounter With Ron DeSantis

Mark Levin

01:22 min | 2 weeks ago

Brian Mudd: A First Encounter With Ron DeSantis

"Mentioned that I know Ron DeSantis to be not only a great governor but a really bright man It was interesting My first encounter with Ron DeSantis and his wonderful wife Casey was actually at a small private function Years ago at this point it must have been around a decade When I was introduced to them by one of the local let's say influential people in politics And it was when he was considering making the first congressional run And it was just to kind of get a read for what he was all about I remember even in a little private setting he delivered an amazing speech from a point of passion and the issues and he had such command was so intelligent Not necessarily the most affable guy he's just so focused on the issues And then Casey just an absolutely sweetheart I've watched him grow over the past decade Into the congressman he became and then ultimately our governor I've watched him grow as governor as well

Ron Desantis Casey
Brian Mudd: Republicans Nationwide Need to Do Some Soul-Searching

Mark Levin

01:36 min | 2 weeks ago

Brian Mudd: Republicans Nationwide Need to Do Some Soul-Searching

"The timing to have this conversation about the generational divide Because while we continue to await states who still haven't figured out how the hell to count votes as we sit here and wait what the heck is going to happen with Congress And along with another pivotal runoff election in Georgia the exercise of some serious that I do mean serious soul searching for Republicans outside of the state of Florida is underway It should be Regardless of the final congressional result even if even if lags on holds on in Nevada and Herschel wins the runoff and Republicans have control of the Senate with 51 I'm sorry masters does not look like it's going to work out in Arizona Lake can still get across the finish line Carrie like can still be the next governor of Arizona does not look like the numbers are going to be there for masters So the path almost certainly is going to be lax old hanging on Nevada and getting Herschel across the finish line and runoff Regardless of any of that stuff needs to change big time And there needs to be a realization of what the hell happened here Where you can have such a just absurd president Whose wildly unpopular 40 year high inflation border crisis geopolitical crisis and how there isn't so much as a wave election

Herschel Arizona Lake Nevada Congress Georgia Florida Carrie Senate Arizona
Warnock, Walker pivot to overtime in Georgia Senate contest

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 2 weeks ago

Warnock, Walker pivot to overtime in Georgia Senate contest

"Senator Raphael Warnock and Republican challenger Herschel Walker are pivoting to the second round of their race in Georgia Party leaders and donors aren't waiting to see if George's December 6th Senate runoff will determine control of the Senate the Democrats Senate campaign arm announced a $7 million investment in field operations for senator Raphael Warnock Are you ready to do this one more time We're not held a rally in Atlanta where he said the former football star was unqualified and voiced confidence in the outcome We know how to win a run off Herschel Walker urged supporters at a rally in canton Georgia Thursday to help him get out the vote We got the BT men the time to put the 18 men Even Lawson leading a political action committee in support of walker says their messages elect a check on Joe Biden Lawson's pack will focus on the GOP base the 200,000 voters who supported governor Brian Kemp but not walker and the 350,000 voters who backed Trump two years ago but didn't vote in the 2021 runoff the Democrats won I'm Jennifer King

Senator Raphael Warnock Herschel Walker Senate Georgia George Joe Biden Lawson Atlanta Canton Football Lawson Walker Governor Brian Kemp GOP Donald Trump Jennifer King
Kellyanne Conway: We Need More Unity in the Republican Party

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Kellyanne Conway: We Need More Unity in the Republican Party

"I like what Kellyanne Conway said to Jesse waters last night on Fox News. I'm glad both men. Donald Trump and Ron DeSantis are in the Republican Party and have records of accomplishment that people can point to and want to emulate in their own states and people who want to run for office because they're inspired by candidates by leaders like them who don't back down who get things done who work with a volume and a velocity. I would love to see the two of them up on the stage in Georgia with I don't know a throw Brian Kemp and Mike Pence in there too. Jesse, I think we need more unity unity and less devices than the Republican Party. Because guess what? We've got the best policies and messages. We don't have unity right now. The Democrats have no good policies and no aspirational hopeful forward looking messages, but they showed a lot of unity last week, ginning up their base and it paid off in some of these elections. She's so right. Gosh, darn it. She's so good. She is as smart as it gets. And we need more unity right now. We got to figure out a way, especially now on behalf of Herschel Walker, looks like it could very well all boil down to Georgia again, although I like Adam laxalt in Nevada, I like Blake masters chance. Chances in Arizona, who knows, we could get all of them.

Kellyanne Conway Jesse Waters Ron Desantis Republican Party Brian Kemp Donald Trump Fox News Mike Pence Georgia Jesse Herschel Walker Adam Laxalt Nevada Blake Arizona
"brian" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:02 min | 10 months ago

"brian" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Shows, you can see those there, be a part of that. You can get on the restream or you can get over to Clubhouse. We take calls on Clubhouse from the Congo shows. Usually it's like Monday Tuesday Wednesday at 3 o'clock Pacific time. And do check out some of the other social media, like Instagram, Dr. Drew Pinsky. Twitter, Dr. Drew. And today, Brian Simpson, comedy special, the stand up season three available right now on Netflix. Episode one of season three. Well done. Right, welcome. What's happening? I left out loud a lot during your, did I see that? Was I looking at the Netflix thing? I send you the Netflix thing as well, but we first started with David Spade cliff. Oh yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And I was like, oh, I want to talk to Brian. I'm ready for that. That's good. But I was telling Brian that today I have diverticulitis, which is this thing I get like every 6 months. It's like having appendicitis on the left side instead of the right side. It needs a surgery, but I've been avoiding it. It's like peritonitis, localized peritonitis. And it doesn't help me. So your colon, can you show me a picture of diverticulitis? Well, I'm guessing divert divert is the root word. No, no. I don't know why the diverticulum is I think the operant part of it. Show a picture. So you can see here. Yeah, keep going. You got to blow one up for us. Give us a diagram. Yeah, yeah. No hold Jesus Christ. I hope I'm not doing that. It shows how bad it can get. Anyway, there are these little outpouching. The do you see the kind of there? Yeah, yeah, okay, so those little outpouchings along the side of the colon on the right. Oh yeah, yeah. Yeah, some people develop those. And we don't know why they develop they're sort of genetically programmed. And they can fill with debris and start to become abscessed and get infected and leak in the leak goes actually in your abdominal cavity so you get peritonitis. It's good, right? Why is debris such a hilarious word? Do you tell me you're the comedian? Debris is a good word. So that's me. And so I have to take all these antibiotics and it makes me weak and it's just nothing funnier than that, though, a little diverticulitis. And it's recurring. I was just thinking as I drove up here when I had colonoscopies on a regular basis. But three years ago, guy looked at me and went, you're going to have to have that surgery. It's surgery. You've got to get the surgery done. And I was like, fuck you, I'm gonna take it. Yeah, of course, he's right. Why are doctors the hardest ones to convince? Because it's kind of like you know how to push the envelope. It's like, that's why you attorneys do such shady stuff. They know right where the line is. And a doctor, you know right where the line is from a health standpoint, too. I know I'll do poorly. I do horrible after surgery. It just destroys me for weeks and weeks, weeks. I don't want to deal with that. Anesthesia destroys me. I don't want to deal with that. But this thing is driving me crazy every 6 months. I'm just laid out for 5 days. How many times do I have to do that before? I'm like, all right, enough enough. Let's talk about you. Where'd you grow up? I grew up in PG county, Maryland. Where is that? PG county. It is the, it is the part of the southernmost part of Maryland that's wrapped around D.C.. Got it. And how did comedy happen? Well, that's a whole other thing. Comedy happened because from the military. I joined the Marine Corps. And that the usual course to comedy. No, no. Military actions, hysterical. Yeah, yeah. I mean, the short sweet stories that I was a foster kid. We had multiple homes or just a one or no multiple homes. I moved at least. What is that? I look at people that are resilient like doing great like yourself. And I hear that history and I go, I don't think I'm built for that myself. It would have destroyed me. I mean, there are long term you have stuff. Things, yeah, because trust. Tries to trust. I think trust bleeds intimacy issues. A 100%. But you know it. You know, yeah, but it doesn't make it. Even you know, you can know something intellectually. Yeah, yeah. But not feeling emotion that's exactly right. And sometimes it's like no matter how close I feel to somebody. After a while, I'm just like, I need you to get the fuck away from me. Yeah, yeah. You know? Yeah. And that's sort of what happens with abandonment, right? You can't get that close because the vulnerabilities to intense. Exactly. But it's a weird thing where it's like you know that the closeness is what you need and you fight to get there, but you're so used to the opposite that the closer you get, the more unfamiliar it is. It is. Yeah, it's terrifying. Yeah. And by the same token. So what people normally do is they go after people that are not available for a close relationship. Or like you said, you get in and then you end it and then you're like, this thing's too good. I get the fuck out of here. Right on the money there. Yeah. Yeah, there are the therapies designed to treat that are not that tough. I mean, they're not like difficult or anything. And they may take a while. I mean, I've done the cognitive, so when I first moved to LA, I was in a homeless shelter for a couple of years. It was for veterans only. Or something? Yeah, it was on sunset and they make you do these. They call them group sessions, but you have to do them. Depending on your level of privilege, do X amount. Where you earn it. Right. Will you earn doing less of them? I need some information. So you were in the marine for how long?.

peritonitis Netflix Dr. Drew Pinsky Brian Simpson PG county Brian David Spade Instagram Congo Maryland Twitter Anesthesia Marine Corps D.C. LA
"brian" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:33 min | 10 months ago

"brian" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Going to bring the union together. And just by the way, we're fighting for slavery, but that's not the main reason you're fighting. But it gradually, that became the main reason we were fighting. That's what it's about. They did not have slaves. They didn't have slaves. We wouldn't have had the war. Yes. But the north wasn't ready to emancipate the slaves. If you said you were fighting for Emancipation, they would have said, no. So how do you get them to your rep? How do you bring the country what's left of your country around to what you're thinking? Show them that you tried everything. And maybe colonization while a theory might have thought about. He said, I have an idea. Let's make a show of this. And when it fails and no one takes me up on it, let them know that this would never work. We have to learn to live with each other. And the reason and that's why I didn't invite Douglas. Yeah, I can't read his mind. But I read a lot of his words, and he definitely had a eurocentric white view of the world. That's his perspective, and that's all he'd ever been exposed to. Let's be fair. But I don't think you have to really remember that abolitionism was a radical position at the time. Radical. And the closest thing to an abolitionist was seward, and he did not get elected president, and yet Lincoln, that was his singular adviser. That was his probably closest adviser. He loved seward and loved seward's point of view. So he may have had more sympathy for that than we know, just judging by that relationship. Number one. But he but I really believe in his soul. He's a lawyer. That's his, that's his made up, like a lawyer. And so wrong. Yeah, and so he interpreted what was happening through a narrow legal lens of contracts amongst equals, right? The constitution is a contract amongst equal to form a more perfect union. One side of that contract is not allowed to just exit the contract without the agreement of the rest. That was his legal interpretation. Therefore, the idea of Succession didn't exist. There was no such thing as Succession, and you know where that logic first came out was Andrew Jackson. Andrew Jackson had a succession crisis, and he used the same logic. Exactly. This is not something that exists. Therefore. Yeah, therefore, it's an insurrection. You were in rebellion because there is no secession, the constitution does not allow for that provision of secession. So here's what the deal is. In the meantime, I have an obligation to send food and resources to the mail. I have to continue to deliver the mail and to the forts like fort Sumter. And so it was when he sent the ship in to provision fort Sumter because the south said, if you sent provisions and we're going to fire on you, which they did. And that was the beginning of the war. And did he know that? Did he provoke it all while they accused FDR leaving the ships out there in order to start a war that he thought we belonged in? Yeah. Yeah. So, I mean, they can go back and forth. I also think the one thing I talk about, I get on stage, I decided to do my own thing on stage and out wait for the speeches because the speeches weren't coming in this environment. So I talk about all these all these I talk about all these stories in one. And one of the things that comes up is people evolve. And just because you don't think that in the beginning, it doesn't mean that you're thinking at the end, you gave up your values. People change. You can grow. Yes. That's what you used to you would be doing if you weren't talking to me on television. You're helping people grow. There you are. Yes, I think we should we should applaud people for evolution and growth. That should be celebrated when people come particularly if they go from more racist attitudes to more of equanimity. I mean, it's just like, come on, let's shouldn't condemn that person for the rest of their life. We should like that they were like that, but come on more with the rest of us and equity. I'd be great. So I don't understand condemnation. And Lincoln evolved a lot and Douglas was part of it. And Douglas Douglas is such an interesting dude. I mean, oh my God, was he smart? And we lost Brian for seconds. We're back now. Douglas was an interesting dude. A brilliant dude. And found most acceptance early in his career in England and Europe, interestingly. Where his thoughts were just consumed as though he was some sort of profit talk speaking from on high. It was really interesting to me the way he was accepted in Europe. And it took quite a while to get it going here. He had some real headwinds. All the way through his life was terribly mistreated, including his newspaper being burned down late in his life. And maybe his house. They suspected arson. And it's just a lot there when I went back there to do this TV special on it. It's true, but he still came back, right? I mean, he still came back. He could have went to Europe and had an easy life. And he came back to finish the work here, make America more perfect union. And I think this is what you understand about him. Yeah, he had an absolute, again, as I understand him, commitment to the notion that the slaves as they became citizens were every bit a an important piece of the history of this country and B citizen with a full rights and privileges and look forward to them participating as any other citizen in this country would participate. And almost got there. It was early in the early and reconstruction. It was kind of going that way. And then Johnson and then the Democrats and then the democratic state leaders just destroyed everything. And that's why I think I told you on my other at the time we were on the air together. I would say that the single person who did the most damage to America is not on the outside force and the Japanese and Pearl Harbor. It was John Wilkes booth. Because if you had this Lincoln and you combine them with we now know of grant, the greatness that he was, the great person he was in his own way. And then you combine that with the genius of Frederick Douglass as a self made man. We would have been a different we might not have needed the 1960s. Yeah. Yeah, and understand what Brian is saying is that we were going towards.

seward Andrew Jackson fort Sumter Douglas Douglas Douglas Lincoln Europe Brian England America Johnson John Wilkes Pearl Harbor Frederick Douglass
"brian" Discussed on Couples Therapy

Couples Therapy

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on Couples Therapy

"Welcome. Welcome. Welcome to another episode of couples therapy. My name is Andy. And I am Naomi. We're a real-life couple. A real life couple of comedians. And on couples therapy, we answer a couple different questions from a couple different listeners. Naomi, it was just your birthday, a little while ago for the listeners. A week ago for us, just a handful of days. Yes. And you got many texts from your estranged family members. Did you know I did? I got texts from family that I haven't spoken to or heard from. It was a roller coaster. But it's so funny. What kind of a roller coaster? Emotional. Yes. What? What kind? You were there. Yeah, did it feel like a real one? Did you feel the wind in your hair? The vomit in your throat? Well, my stomach did. And it did clench. But I will say the best one was from my Nigerian grandmother. What I love, of course, is she writes in all caps, but she's 90 blessed, okay? But what she's in this last email, she was like, so good to hear from you. Hope you're doing well, and that it was love to do boy. In all caps, J EW BOI won word. Now, walk me through this. Now she meant to write Joe boo, correct? Yes. I assume so. But if that's the case, then that means I'm like, she's out here watching my comedy. You know what I'm saying? Because even though jubo. Yeah, sure. Much love to the Hebrew lad. The Hebrew ad you've shacked up with. Jubilant almost sounds like a superhero, though. For some reason I'm imagining a cape, star of David in the center of your outfit. But I was like, it's also like, oh God, drew boy also sounds bad. You know, so I was like, so I was like, I can't engage with you boy, but of course the first thing I did was screen grab it and show it to you. And you did think you did tell me it should be a T-shirt. Yes. The whole the whole time. The whole text should be a T-shirt. Yeah, that's good. All the chaos. Listeners, would you enjoy that? A T-shirt that's just a text from Naomi's 90 year old Nigerian grandmother. It was very tender. T-shirts, by the way, Naomi. Oh, baby. Good holiday present would be a couples therapy T-shirt, a Jew boo. Boo. Proper spelling. Proper spelling. Two different styles. You gotta break vibe and you got the classic O's, our bagels and the W's a minora. So how whimsical do you want to be? That's the question when you make this purchase. You got to miss a bitch t-shirts. We got all the t-shirts for your holiday needs. All the teas for your holiday needs. In the literary and our social media bios. Speaking of holiday needs, I believe there's a little something you guys are gonna need to do this kwanza. Yeah. All right, this kwanza season. What day of kwanza specific? The fourth day, ujima, which I do believe is collective. Not collective work and cooperative economics, I believe. Ujjayi cooperative economics, which honestly may work, the cooperation. Would that be called socialism? Possibly. On Wednesday, December 29th, you can watch season three of the standups on Netflix. Your girl is episode two. Okay, so if I ain't in your queue, you better add it to the cube, and I want you to watch my half hour special on Netflix. We need the numbers. We need to go viral. We need to create a cultural moment. We need to go viral. You know, we need to go back to sound like a character in an Aaron Sorkin show. We got to go viral. Studio 60. Is that here's hurricane? Yeah, the one that didn't last. Exactly. So, but I just want people to watch, you know, I feel like it was great. I was there, again, obviously, I'm biased. Because I love you. But even if I hated you, I would have to, I would have to admit watching that being like, damn, that was a gosh darn. Gosh, darn, good set of improv. I'm stand up. So I just hope that, yeah, I hope it translates. You know, and I think all the listeners of CT, they know the journey that I've been on with this and putting it together in two months in a pandemic, trying to be the best, get it together. You can not hold my makeup against me y'all. I told you what happened with my makeup, especially if you own Patreon. So I wanna hear just focus on the content, focus on the content, baby girls, okay? Because that's what I have. But yes, December 29. I think that day on Patreon will do an episode where we watch it and give a behind the scenes commentary, right? Oh yeah, the page is always getting the inside track. We're always pulling back the sit curtain of showbiz. Speaking of the stand ups Naomi. Our guest today. Now we did this is what we did. We tried to do a couple episodes. Leading up to the release of the standups on Netflix, December 29th. Is that at midnight on the night before? Probably. With some of your fellow stand ups from that. So this week we have Brian Simpson. Yes, indeed, Bryan Simpson is so lovely so funny. Recently named one of vulture's comedians, you should and will know in 2021 and quite frankly, that's the fact 'cause he about to be on Netflix. So you can and should, no. This is great. We recorded this a couple months ago because we thought the status were coming out in October. That was what was supposed to happen. Absolutely. And Brian, it's super at the actual at your actual taping afterwards. We're standing outside. He came over and introduced himself. I know. He's like a nice friend. Look, you guys are in here, but his life, you know, it's so interesting. And he's so open. And we love it. Okay? So I say, let's stop pussy footing around and get to Brian Simpson. Roll it. How you doing? What's going on? What do you feel inside? I'm feeling good, man. I'm feeling I'm feeling relieved. I have taken the week off just to decompress. And.

Naomi Joe boo Netflix Andy drew Aaron Sorkin Patreon David Brian Simpson Bryan Simpson Brian
"brian" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on How I Built This

"But I guess the other thing I would say just about luck, absolutely luck played a big role in coinbase. I mean, there were certain moments early on in our history where if a coin had flipped the other way, we might not be here. I think we got very lucky with the timing of when the company decided to launch and when crypto decided to grow. I think that I kind of just kept trying and things until eventually one of them hit, right? Which is it's a way of unifying those two ideas. It's definitely a lot of luck when it works. But if you just keep trying, you can kind of make your own look. That's Brian Armstrong, cofounder, and CEO of coinbase. Recently, Forbes ranked Brian number one on its crypto rich list. Magazine estimated his net worth to be more than 6 and a half $1 billion. By the way, there's so much suspicion around cryptocurrency. Why do they call it crypto? An encrypto just sounds so dodgy in secret, like what do they call it like transparency currency or something like that? You know, it's funny because in the early days, I had always thought about that too, and I was like, we should call it digital currency. Digital currency sounds better than crypto, but you know, you can't control these things, like the Internet and the memes of the world. They just spread, you know, and they get away from you sometimes. So that's what it ended up being called. Hey, thanks so much for listening to the show this week. If you're not yet a subscriber, please do subscribe wherever you get your podcasts..

coinbase Brian Armstrong Forbes Brian
"brian" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hey, welcome back to how I built this. I'm guy raz. So it's mid 2012. Brian Armstrong launches his cryptocurrency startup coinbase and users start to sign up. And he's going through the Y Combinator program solo because things didn't work out with his first partner Ben. So Brian is still searching for a cofounder and he reaches out to a number of different people, but finding the right fit? Is not easy. You know, I was kind of scarred honestly from this cofounder, search process. I was like, oh my gosh, you know, try to meet so many people and it never seemed to work out. Maybe I'm just resigned to being a solo founder, and that's my lot in life. And so I was like, let me just keep making progress on the business. So I went through the Y Combinator program, solo, we went out and I tried to raise a seed round after that. And I got a lot of no 9 nose for every one yes, but I managed to scrape together a 600 K, seed round. And then I was in the early stages of trying to launch the buy feature on coinbase. And lo and behold, the right person reached out to me. Which happened to be Fred erson. And he reached out called just over email. I had been putting out the prototype for coinbase on an I think he saw it on Reddit. He had posted it on Reddit on a Bitcoin board. Yeah. And by the way, I think there's an important lesson I've told a lot of people this, which is to how to find the right cofounder..

Brian Armstrong Ben Brian Fred erson Reddit
"brian" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"Asian, you know? It's gonna ruin your home like native thing. It's going on right now. And then the 23 year old says I'm straight. Oh no. Fuck. I was like, damn, I have to like go circle back to like everything. Get your hair. Yeah. You have to get rid of the leather jacket. Yeah. What did you like start talking more about like being indigenous and kind of like opening up everything else in your life? I mean something click? Yeah, I think it's because I just got more comfortable on stage. And I was like, because I was fighting that urge early on, I think, 'cause I was like, I know my joke writing isn't there yet. But I do want to talk about these things, but I couldn't I knew it wasn't gonna be good. And I knew it by bombed with it enough, I would lose confidence to actually talk about it. I think that's a smart way to do it. Because I think a lot of Asian communities or whatever, they'll be like, I don't want to talk about this thing. They go when they try to talk about it. They don't have they're not up there yet. And then they fuck up with it. And then two things happen. They lose confidence, but then other people will be like, oh, that's such a hack thing. Right, you know what I'm saying? But I think it's smart for you to wait. You have the good instinct to like, I'm gonna wait until I'm a little better. Because I feel like I do if I do like flip through an old notebook or I think I found something on my computer from like 20 12, 2013 or something. It wasn't even like a joke, but it was just like me like journaling, sadly. And then I'm like, wait, this is actually kind of funny. I forget what it is I was talking about when I was it was like deep, but funny. It was like something that I would talk about now. What's weird is like, so back then, you know, we had our Asian raider up and we're like, Brian, is Asian bahi. Japanese, 'cause content of Val concentration. Bahi Abe bahi, whatever. But we also wanted to claim me because they were so few Asian comedians. So we need Brian. You're part of the team now. You're still a part of the team. I don't know. I don't know. I wasn't invited to.

Brian
"brian" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"It was the pioneering days we had to learn. learn what to do learn. Yeah so And you could hear jesse. Because i forget episodes you showed up in but eventually showed up and then So that's out there. The geek quorum is also available on Podcast an it's on youtube as well if you look decorum we have. I think i don't know how many episodes We do every episode of the mandolin. What sometimes we do a couple of as a kind of a pack bunch. You know like you're saying because it's just again too hard to do them all at once Every week released for me. Because i'm not a fulltime youtuber. Not even close right. We kind of haven't done in a while or at least i haven't edited them on a while so it it's not a full season two yet but if you wanna watch some of them and again those especially the first one's really rough so maybe skip if you get some more a little better but And then as far as like if you want to contact me or other. People do the podcast. Our podcast. emails. Always been the same for god. Thirteen fourteen fifteen years now. And that's the g corum gmail.com g. q. R u m. very nice. Very nice sir. I appreciate it I cannot tell you how much fun this was. Just a catch up into dwell and yes an awesome. You must have bruce springsteen question for me the you say you're gonna ask me about yes i was i was i was gonna I didn't know if you've done the homework. So yes we're all right so if you are Back a collective or quorum person. You're like what. Brian is on a new podcast. I have to listen to this I end every with this question. And j armstrong is an honors english teacher in the philadelphia area. He just recently retired but every year he would have his seniors Honors english class in two days looking at the song thunder road listening to the song reading the lyrics talk about the imagery and at the end of the two days. He would ask us class this mary get in the car. That was your homework brian. So does mary getting the car. Well knowing that there's this legacy of previous answers is really intimidating. Because i don't know what they are what they said but You know it's kind of it's it's a bit like his cat okay. So there's there's An unknown state of of what happens in with a song like this with Not not being able to enter that state. You can't observe it for yourself to see exactly what happens which is part of what makes it so good to speculate about as it is for that but you can infer some things walls From the lyrics from the performance. And from what i gathered The singer The wind telling this woman to come with him. it's mary with them We'll call him bruce. He's definitely going somewhere he is going. That's to me is clear. The question is whether she is and the thing is what i gather from the lyrics. And what we what he says about her when he says about the town is that she doesn't have much to live for in that town so.

j armstrong jesse youtube bruce springsteen Brian philadelphia brian mary bruce
"brian" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"Don davis. I'm the composer of the matrix. Reloaded and the matrix revolutions. Hi this is. John delancey kind of the things that aren't there. Well you know. Sometimes you have that experience anyway but people at all day thanks in part because if the hopeful nature of genes vision but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion today we're going tiki tiki horror course with one of the masters are. Brian used nets. And we're going to talk about his tales of blood islands. A comic book should all get behind if he loved tiki. Are i mean look at this. There's a guy ripping his head off. Come back you gotta jump on. That is just great before we start. I have to actually tell you this. This is really true story. About a year ago we surprise my brother and built a tiki bar in his in his little garage that he has and it's grown and gotten out of control. It's just totally amazing. So my family is really into tiki lately. So it's really why that's interesting because The kickstarter video shot in the valium. Trying to remember where but maybe encino or something but it was in someone's backyard tiki bar and it was if your brothers is anything like that. I was just gobsmack. i couldn't believe it. You are of course. the whole house is devoted to tiki mugs. I never realized that there was such a subculture for tiki. I've always liked going. You know every once in a while maybe you go to a a tiki. Because it was kinda like it's kinda fun you now to something different and But wow what a this bar. You'll see it in the video that someone's backyard you even show all of it. Wow it's amazing. How people kind of guam into because it's really just a there is no place like tiki. No i think it's just some kind of some kind of inspir- inspired by the g. is coming back from the pacific after world war two and they had been in the tropics yen the tropic. You tend to drink rum. Drinks as rounders bamboo bars or kinda built like that. Of course it just became a whole aesthetic of its own. That is that is just a lot of fun. Yeah his his bars pretty good. I mean it's grown in the year that he's had it and we get together there once in a while. It's such a nice little escape and you wouldn't know it. You walk into his backyard. Kodaly normal go through this beated entrance and there. It is if you if you're curious or instagram. It's the blue monkey. So google case for that one. You gotta check it out. It's definitely worth looking into. And so he house parties or does he hang out. Oh yeah oh yeah. And he his time in the sun that invites his buddies over and they have like a little already. There is fantastic. No it's really really cool when we all get together. It's a blast to go in there and have a tiki mug collector. He likes tiki mugs. And he's actually become a pretty good mixologist too he's he's actually turned put together some really good potions that has affected me in many ways i i will say but anyway we regret i love the tiki culture and everything. It's just a fun tales of blood island..

John delancey tiki Don davis nets encino Brian google
"brian" Discussed on There I Was...

There I Was...

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on There I Was...

"And i was able to deal with it because i understood how the fuel injection system in the continental engine works ad was able to make decisions based on my understanding. And therefore if i can teach you more about how this fuel system works and you encounter a similar situation you'll be able to go through the same troubleshooting process and hopefully produce a better result as a result that sounds a great lesson. Learn is understanding the systems of your airplane. What are some of the other lessons learned from this. That the rest of us can take away brian. Well i think the biggest one is no your airplane and no it. Well don't be afraid to go..

brian
"brian" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

06:46 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"I would say last gentlemen in moscow or gentlemen moscow and we're tolls one more book hesitation ones amy compliment. Mc humira commie. Someone wants to know if you read mira commies first person singular and if so let your favorite short story is what. I'd read some of those stories when they were in magazines and stuff I loved it though. I i read it straight. I read the stories again. I don't i can't tell you which story stories my favorite. I don't remember the titles. It's weird. I don't remember the titles somehow but of course i read it. I'm the only book of more of murakami's i have not read. I think the only one i haven't read is the woman to q one q eight four or whatever that is. I haven't read that book corden bay for ronnie right. It's a great question. Corby why. I just think it's slightly sweeter i don't know i like it better and they interesting like trauma drama. Great why it's saltier okay. Yea Two final questions. How did he become a close reader or viewer is an acquired talent or natural ability. Both obsession that's just obsession in my case like i mean yes. I learned about the construction and everything in college. Some level you know tried barely turn the papers in but I think because you want that as a language like i love having that language so why does something work. i mean. that's that's curiosity right that's You watch something. It draws you in you watch it again and then to conversation for me. I might not really know all the various things that i think i journal. So maybe something else in journal but basically the conversation watch something and then as i start to talk about it with somebody. That's when i in making my arguments. I suddenly realize who i watched this thing really close. They remember all the words. And i remember what the director did in this. And then i'll go back and then like after a conversation i love going back and Watching something again and then challenging. What my feeling was i would have a hard time being like a really close reader of something that i didn't care about. I could do it. But i wouldn't enjoy it last question. You're heading into game seven in the nba playoffs. One of these guys on your team. Which one do you choose. Dominique wilkins are bernard. Oh yeah we're gonna do one more f. b. Tell you why here's the thing. A person asked. This question knows what is impossible question to answer. because i'm friends with dominique wilkins. Oh okay and dominique and bernard and bernard basically my favorite player of all time. After so. i'm not gonna i one. I'm not gonna pick bernard and make dominique feel bad too. I can't say dominique. And then do that to bernard king and so that question is going to remain asking who your favorite child. Herman on answered that question questions. Going to remain okay fine. I do final question favorite new york day my favorite ever in new york or like your ideal new york. I'm going to say when we all went to see the gates. Oh my god. I was thinking about that the other day. Yes watching the gates jean. Claude and christo's gates get built and not knowing and walk into the park so we why are these things here. What are these like stands like. What's this flat and thinking. It was gonna be bullshit when i heard about it then and then suddenly it was there i could cry right now is the most for that. He is well. It was the most beautiful thing i've ever seen in my life and the four of us went a few different times and walked through one day with snow once without snow. And just like if. I close my eyes and i think about the orange ing of central park and is being so little you guys being little but getting it you guys got it you know and We have one little tiny piece of one of the flags that they sold an and the apartment. Still on your desk near my desk in a You know cork board and Sometimes they'll just like touch with that little flag it'll bring me right back to that moment and everything like Grand stunt it was a crazy example of something working. It was a bizarre kind of art but for me that in hamilton might be sort of like the great surprising pieces of art that showed up during my lifetime and The fact that all four of us got to go and see the gates and experience in and think about it. I mean that is the amazing thing about the time we lived in being in being in new york luckily like mom and i each marrying a person who is good for each other. Having a family talked about this stuff the uv that day is a combination of many good choices coming together. I mean not again not so yes sure but it just like i just remember being there and all of us you were so little but all of us having the sense of wonder together and that's a hard that's a hard data top beautiful. All right. listen everybody and by the way it took them thirty years to get cleared. Everything i talk about the gates talk about people being told something impossible and you never felt they were operating from a place of fuck you they were operating completely from a place of this is going to be magical and beautiful and you're gonna love it and that's a great this is gonna be magical and beautiful and you're gonna love it because i love. It is a great place to do art from I hope this was useful and informative anna. You're the greatest. I love you. thank you for doing. Find me apparant album and on twitter k. Gmail.com anna is on twitter at twitter anymore and twitter and yet i guess don't those don't go with the furnace. Well yeah i if you wanna find it. I met anna koppelman and We'll see next time on the moment thanks thanks..

Mc humira commie mira commies bernard corden bay dominique Dominique wilkins moscow bernard king murakami Corby new york ronnie amy christo nba Herman Claude central park hamilton twitter
"brian" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Ignore this question. You put this here. Because so i could talk about. You basically wanted to talk about sam. That would be okay. I've definitely had great memories going to concert sam to actually green day. But i would say you were there with the green day show would also have to do with me. That was not a good night. That's got to leave concert because i had. I got very sick. And i had to get surgery. I'm finding more than ten years ago. Yeah i mean. Obviously you and i go on. A jason is bolt together which we did as a whole family too but The first time you and i went there to see jason together and Amanda came out. And he's saying cover me for man and We got to experience that together. I mean so i look. This is a great question. Because it's about the value of all this stuff about the value of music and art. And i think parents and children find all sorts of different ways to communicate especially in times where maybe kids feel isolated or. It's harder for them to really talk about everything they're about her afraid of and experiencing and i think you know talking about things like it's why traditionally in a traditional construct fathers and sons talk about sports. But one thing you and. I've always had this love songs and songwriting and You know we went to marine elaborate together. Which was amazing. And but but. Lucy davis carseat headrest. But jason's music was a real big deal. You know where you were thirteen. I think when southeastern came out and his music was a really big deal in our family. And somehow you. And i started talking about the song salat and we went together. And we've seen we've seen five or six days in shows together and each one has really like mark the time in our lives and Yeah i i think the time. All four of us went actually with great pictures from that night on that long beacon run when he's three or four shows and we saw all of them but but but mom and sammy came to. That was pretty special. Yeah definitely well. I keep asking you about music but i feel like if questions came in. You can ask them well. I guess speaking about that. Someone did ask like what what is inspiring about live performances to you or well live performances. You find inspiring. Hey we're going to get to the screenwriting question soon. I promise Do you want to get to this question. Though i missed live music a lot i was went. The other night I'm just being in watching. I go back to jason. Just because if i close my eyes right now i can really picture what it's like when he thinks cover me up when he sang That i right. After that came out southeastern especially on nights once there was a night when a man who wasn't there and said this is like i still sing this as though she's here and she was there seeing look. I think what musicians are able to do is So deep and profound difficult and brave and so seeing them really do that thing in front of you Changes you and i do find. I walk out different in some ways because of what these people are able to give to us. It's a very yeah. They're getting aid and yeah they get the applause back but there is a an openness. It's rare that a human being shows you the best part of themselves the most special part of themselves just kind of willingly openly and allows you make themselves so vulnerable that They could maybe ended up crumbling if it doesn't go well. And and the fact that musicians do that and the great ones lists you up at lifts the whole room of his just really special to me. Eight nine screenwriting. Do you start with the end of the story and then worked at the beginning. Start with idea and concept and go from there. A world is usually the place to that. David and i tend to store meaning and not always but this universe this world these people seem compelling if not a universe character almost never plot i character a fascinating individual in a situation that's challenging a world and then who are the characters in that world and then you have that then either the very first. I have to have the first image. I have to know where it starts before an eye. And yeah you need to know where it's going you can change along the way but it is useful to know what the with the last series of images are going to be or where the character is gonna land if it's not if you're not a visual thinker and i'm not always but story wise. Where's the character you're having gone through these experiences whereas the character going to Land and so you need to know that for an episode for the season's arc you need to love for series arc and you definitely need to know that to tell A two hour movie story. I seem to remember a bunch of questions about outlining so yes about soon asked. What is your outlining process in. How does it differ between reading a feature versus writing billions. I i can just see the one time. I didn't have an outline proper lee composed. The movie took me like four years to right and with solitary man. The great thing about reading with the partners you need outline because how the two you gonna go and often work in it. Connect if because we are seen separately. If there's not an ally saucer men alone. i didn't properly outline minnows. I started before. I had an outline and then i stopped to try to outline the rest of it and it was took forever. I love the movie but it shouldn't have been that hard. I should've just cried on the outline. I i think y especially like what was i. I saw something in life. And that's what started me writing. And i wrote in a fury the first whatever fifteen twenty pages and then it's a jot down what i knew the next forty pages were right then but what i then shoulda done instead of writing. Those forty pages was outlined. The rest. And i didn't so the process pretty similar. You know you you..

jason Lucy davis sam Amanda sammy David lee
"brian" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Chandler's playing him in the show and reading the book. I just suddenly started getting so excited about all the things that it was about the story the narrative itself compelling but then as i started like thinking about what it said and i don't talk too much about this stuff now because there will be plenty of time to really talk about this but in terms of what it is but suddenly what it meant and the reasons for it and where it fit in society but and that's all sort of like intellectual more than that it was. Oh this seems like to dive into this. Seems like it's going to make me like really glad to open final draft document. Like i want to talk about this. I wanna think about this. I want to imagine what these characters would do. And so that sort of fire gets lit and when that fire gets lit and it could get lit in little ways like little fires can get lit. But if one keeps going and growing inside internally. That's a great way to know that. I'm working on the right thing and then as far as you know look i just went and walked through the stages that were building where When i walked you through were building and Looking at it getting built. This new world is looking to do this stuff for a living. And you want to be. Somebody got to tell stories on On film or on television and that's the dozen excite you. It's time to kind of hang it up. I love the idea of getting to work with new people. Like i love. We're still making billions right now. The show billions. And that's man. That i l of everything about making that show and then on top of that to be able to do something with a new creative group of people also and You always learn about yourself. You learn about the way like tell stories and And opening a document and starting to write writing scenes is still like something. That's is still something that feels like magic to me like i was working writing billions today. Actually some scenes from billions last night and today. And i had the conscious thought as i was. I was sitting on the couch and This place that. I'm staying at a record player and i put on the first stray cats album and that was playing as i was working and i had the thought like okay. This is still my happy place. My happy place even now fifty five years old and having made so much stuff over twenty five years the having a document open and making characters talk and getting lost. Inside of that world is still thrilling to me and and so with super pump. There's even a whole new world to. I saw you tweeting last night. About the record player. I was wondering if you're tweeting about it because people are asking about it in your asking me anything but it seems like you were just writing and listening to records or you mean why Well somebody wrote in and asked. I bet you have an incredible record collection. Tell us about it or why you don't. Oh that's great. No what happened. Is this place that i happen to be staying. Has this incredible record player. And i'm a huge chuck berry fan and the person who's house. This is a chuck album so put that on which was great but then it made me start thinking about vinyl and how much i loved it. What a humongous lead. Just enormous part of my life. Vinyl it was records my room. My child groom anna was just covered with records. Everywhere i didn't we didn't grow up with record. Yeah you were never a big like vinyl is better guy. No because i made the change like at a certain point. I had to let that go and i did let it go. I felt i had to let it go. And because i did mass this huge collection of records and then it was like vermont. It's as you know. We moved many times in the beginning of our marriage. Right and you're gonna take auto especially because there were all had already had cds and cds and digital audio tapes had replaced them. But there's a thing that happens when you listen to records that. I just had sort of i guess. If i had sat down to think about it i would have known but the rituals regarding meaning you look at the record. You read the back you take the record out of its inner sleeve. You look at it and make sure it's not too dusty. You see there on scratches on it. You put it down and the other thing. Let it play you gently Put the arm and stylists down on on the record as it starts to play but the other thing about albums that had side one inside to in a very clear way if they were really built to have a certain flow. The artist always thought a lot. About what the first song should be. The last song would be on side one with the first song or beyond side too because these are these big kind of reset moments but also it forces you to listen because the side one ends you have to get up go and this was considered a drag right. Weather cd made it that. You don't have to go and turn over the album to keep hearing it. But i liked the fact that the music kind of calls to you and you have to focus on it you have to pay attention to it and get up and turn it over and then you put side to want and then that starts playing and you really start listening to that and it. It demands the attention that the artists have earned. I think and look. I love getting in my car. Plug in the phone and being able to listen to all the music in the whole world but i went and i bought a couple of albums and i yesterday and i decided i was going to be really careful and thoughtful about what albums i was going to buy and i'm not looking to buy expensive rare records. I'm finding by reissues. let it get. I got the stray cats which this great Rockabilly band who. I didn't in their in their time they weren't. I was listening to other music. They weren't my favorite band but I got that and i got some blues records. I've been listened to a lot of blues lately. So i got I got to albert king albums. And i got a clarence gatemouth brown album. Who's an old blues guide. Been dead for a long time. Mom and i actually went and saw him play in the very early nineties and I almost said we went and saw to see him play before he died. But that's certainly yeah from there and And and our kings a scrape blues man. So and his grow. Listen to all these records yesterday and it was really Your loved the way they sound. I mean i'll i'll i'll put a record on tonight. I'm sure you'll be able to experience the whole thing. The first member of our family to get a record player for to play. Taylor swift's no vampire weekend or you got to play the last weekend album. Yeah my twentieth birthday. Something like that like my my friends at school. We have one. That goes a little fast and it is a ritual thing what records are allowed to play my friend. Maria said he's kind of music. Snob won't let us play any livia. Rodriguez on vital. We've been banned from getting meals for vinyl. Yeah it's a whole thing. she's great. Olivia rodrigue i know. Are you sure. Maria wants to be on record about this. I think she'd be happy to be on record about this.

Chandler chuck berry anna vermont clarence gatemouth brown albert king Taylor swift Maria livia Olivia rodrigue Rodriguez
"brian" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"I put out the request for questions on this feed and also unsocial social. You guys came through my daughter. Anna compliment is here. She does this with me now. Ask me anything tradition as the that your kids get involved in some way mainly me one time it was also sale. It's you basically you basically do this with me now through an also I know in your private life. You've been doing a bunch of stuff in the podcast biz on your own while you're in your senior year of college. We don't need talk about where or anything but And you got this audio all figured out. So hopefully it'll track and All right so you guys. I i put up with requests for questions and you really came through and oh i did want to start by saying the feedback on the quentin tarantino interview with so great. Keep it coming. I'm so glad that that interview resonated and some of you said and knew that it was clear what it meant to me and how long i'd been sort of shadow preparing like not knowing that i was exactly preparing for this but i was and then it turned out to be i. I had occasion to have dinner with anna and a couple of her friends. One of Media studies major and. she didn't realize but she she didn't i just on the pod and she started just talking about tarantino movies and we got to have this whole conversation and then she realized in the middle of it well she had said to me the night before she was like. I really wanted to debate your about tarantino. So part me assume she knew so. I didn't really say anything and then it was very fun to watch it. All unfold were great commerce. She's brilliant and brilliant. She challenged you on some stuff. It was great. It was really fun. but yes. It was really great because it just so happened. I'd never been more ready very wasn't that moment Let's get into it okay. So the first question. We got an email from somebody that said i wear a bracelet that says proved them wrong and you mentioned on. Pmt about not striving to prove someone wrong or to constantly be out to get revenge and that at some point you'll have to have a motivation. That isn't centered around getting back at someone. I'm paraphrasing so. I guess my question is what motivates you first of all i. There is something so beautifully great about actually wearing a daily basis. So i think those things are so powerful and potent and i. I will say did something like this. Is your the shoes. exactly right. david i trying to get a movie made and it was really proving difficult to get the movie made and i. It was a point in our lives where we felt like we weren't getting a lot of help from our agents or managers These are not the same people who represent us now. And i realized i wanted to try to take some steps every day and at that time nike was doing this thing where you can do personal. Id on your shoes. So i got these ridiculous paint Basketball shoes high tops. And i had them stitch the move solitary man. I had them stitch the name solitary man on the shoes. The shoes like white and pink and then the white area. I had them do it in pink and just choose recovered with the word solitary man. And what did i wear them. Every day and eddie was wear these shoes every day. I would look down at my shoes at one point for my shoes on the desk and sees alterman and no i had to take one step. Do one thing to try to get. The movie made that day like. Hey i can't rely on other people. This is gonna come down to how aggressively i'm gonna try to get the film made and Wearing those shoes day. One of the shoot a picture of me in those shoes. When i went to shoot the movie and it really was so powerful to do that. to have that totem in a way To look at and to represent why this potent white mattered. As far as what motivates somebody look in the beginning trying to prove the people wrong. Who didn't believe in you or who thought you didn't have the talent or who were mean isn't recognize. You like it does get you out of bed in the morning. It can but it never gives an in. The end gave me a sense of completion or satisfaction to do that. Because there's always someone else to prove wrong. Who's another slight you can find. And and so. I try to have a more personal motivation or just be motivated by the work itself which does happen now. you know. I'm four weeks out from starting to shoot the new show super pumped and no part of the motivation to do. This came from a place of resentment or anger or proving. Anybody wrong You know if. I were still looking for that. After how good the last few years have been in so many ways from for me professionally not good with the what everyone in the world suffered through all of us with covert but have i just look at professionally To still pretend they're these obstacles. There's always an obstacle to getting something made. There's because you're trying to you know entice people to spend millions of dollars to make something but it was a story that compelled me. Mike is accent. This book and reading the book excited and i would see. That's the thing right. Instead of being anger excitement enthusiasm curiosity. But do you think that your were able to get to that place. Because you've already proven a lot of the people ron. They do think proving people wrong like a step you had to get to. I think that when you're young it's a way to fortify against self-doubt is to look at the doubters and be like they're wrong because you don't wanna let their doubts in. Yeah i mean look. They're probably some people never felt that they were doing this for that reason. But and it's pro. I mean to be clear. It was never the prime driver meaning at the creative writing even the first movie. It's like david we're trying to prove anybody wrong. Going into the basement in writing that movie but then as the doubts as people express skepticism. You you you do i did. We did churn and use that sort of lack of belief to help. Well i'm not gonna let denby dot jerk be right. I am going to succeed and not let those people. I mean you know the people who are mean to you or to me at summer camp right that motivation you're saying runs out eventually and you need like excitement. I figured that motivation is dangerous to your own sense of peace and harmony. Which is the older. I get the more important. That's because there's always someone new to prove wrong. I don't get into that don't they don't it. It's better to have them give them no power. Basically right is what. I'd say. But i really still salute the bracelet. The bracelets epic Speaking about working on superpower we got a lot of questions asking about. What's your favorite part about starting a new project. Or how do you begin to start a new project. Well if you've been listening to podcasts for awhile and your last answer curiosity. Certainly a part of it like mike is accent. Dave me this book. I didn't know a lot about how uber came too big. I was fascinated by venture capitalists. I had met bill gurley. Who's one of the kyle..

tarantino quentin tarantino Anna alterman anna david nike eddie Basketball ron Mike mike Dave bill gurley
"brian" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

Taste Of Taylor

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on Taste Of Taylor

"Of joy or jones age but she said if i said baby would hugh cried. And i'm like no you wouldn't. Oh my god. I'm like moved to tears seriously. Brian i mean like we know timmy. Okay i bow down. I love you so much. Thank you for coming on the podcast. And i think you guys. I'm here to help you plan the trip in a big european getaway after the stress of this year. Yes is so what you deserve. I love you both so much. We love you so much. Oh my god okay. So we'll be talking. We'll be figuring it out. I think back in the podcast. I sit down with you in studio. And i go to your credit cards. Kinda like with you and the shape terrified. Let's do it. I love financial points boot. Count you are. Just i just. I can't say nice things about you. I worship at the love you when you're ready to eat again. Come down to pennsylvania on. You're the first person i'm company with me. Tell you and you guys just to really quickly go over all the things that you need to follow brian. Where should people follow to get like all the resources that they need. Acta points on all major channels. The points dot com. And then if you wanna see the ridiculous of my personal life and my travels you can follow me brian. Kelly yes told the correct way if you know what i mean out their little brian le vian to bits and pieces. Thank you so much for coming on the pod. You guys. that's it for us is a fabulous week. make sure to rate review and subscribe. That's how it is going to pay for her wedding. Okay review and subscribe and yes. That's it for us. We've after next week with another amazing guests until then by girl by..

timmy hugh jones Brian brian brian le vian pennsylvania Kelly
"brian" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"Now i did grow up in. A stereotypical talion catholic background. Where they'd be a picture of sinatra the pope and the last supper in that order. Hello everyone and welcome to a new episode. Is set lessening bruce. Your podcast all about bruce springsteen his music and mostly as fans. I am your host jesse jackson joining me today. We're getting off the bruce bandwagon but he will come up as he normally does A couple months ago. brian Had me on his podcast and we had a great time. And so i ask brian if he would return. The favorite did so brian. Welcome to the show. Thank you thank you for having appreciative. Yes so tell my audience a little about yourself. Well i The whole elevator pitch. I suppose Well i do work full-time Boring insurance adjuster job. And i do enjoy music. Music is that that definitely brings joining life all all sorts of music arts culture and whatnot. i. I am passionate about a lot of mental health issues as say. She gathered from our Visit on my podcast. The gist i. I enjoy just learning more discovering more. Just seeing what makes me tick name of your podcast again. Mental health film comment okay. Not not a very creative name. The fit the fit purpose of it. Yeah and so. What a lot of times this year will you will talk. Men are mental health issues and combined with pop culture for example we talked a blind by the light We touched a little bit on love and mercy on and so Yeah and it was a lot of fun. So what before. Get to your early background. What what drove you to do that. Kind of podcast. What what was the You know your origin story. Why did you decide to start talking about this. I'm not sure to be honest with you. there happened some times when i've been watching various different movies and i've watching the movie and i think there should be a podcast to talk about this movie because i was i was watching and i'll be perfectly. I was watching this movie. The effect of gamma rays on mannion. The moon miracles watching this. Which by the way is an amazing movie of you may have to seek it out because it i..

brian jesse jackson sinatra bruce springsteen bruce mannion
"brian" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:36 min | 1 year ago

"brian" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Brian Lehrer Show on W N Y C Good morning again, everyone first this hour, one slight correction from our previous segment. Uh, because I know a lot of people are interested in WHO Congresswoman Alexandria, Ocasio Cortez is endorsing in various races. We had said that she endorsed one candidate. We've got some corrections on that, and we looked it up and confirmed that, in fact, she has endorsed two candidates. Equally in the district 39 City Council race in Brooklyn, Shahan, Hanif and Brandon West, so to AOC endorsements. And if you're interested in who she endorses, you know you'll choose who to rank first and ranks second, obviously, but I want to make sure that for the sake of accuracy, both these names are out there as endorsed by AOC. Beneath and west in district 39 in Brooklyn. And Covid related news from over the weekend. The G seven nations have pledged to give a billion vaccine doses to poorer countries. Half of that one billion will come from the U. S alone. Here's President Biden, speaking at a press conference in Europe yesterday. We are committed to follow on to do some significant work, including Not only how we deal with the distribution and help and getting shots and arms for the rest of the world, but how we're going to deal with putting together mechanism to anticipate. And deal with and be aware of the next the next pandemic when it comes along, and there will be others and there will be others. But if a billion donated dose it sounds like a lot. It's probably not enough. Earlier this month, the World Health Organization estimated that 11 billion doses are going to be needed worldwide to reach herd immunity. And leaders of the United Nations over the weekend criticized the Biden and G seven plan as way too timid. Locally, New York City health officials have announced that the city has reached quote functional immunity. So what does that mean for New Yorkers, especially those with ties abroad? Joining me now to talk about the global vaccination effort and how the U. S can be most effective and how our global city is a part of that conversation in terms of connections to so many countries abroad. Vaccine, tourism quote unquote with people coming here for shots and much more, asked, Meter Khalida, co founder of U. R. L Media and CEO and publisher of Epicenter N Y C Me, Trebek with US. And Emily Rauhala, Foreign Affairs reporter at the Washington Post. Back with us, Emily Maitre. Hi there. Welcome back to W N. Y C. Hi, Brian. Good to be here. Hello. And listeners will open up the phones right away for people with connections to different countries. How is the COVID 19 vaccine rollout going in your home country? How are your family members navigating finding a vaccine? Have you not been able to go home since the pandemic and why it's a big issue. We know for so many families who are not able to be reunited with their loved ones because of travel restrictions. Yet, even though there is so much news coverage of many people here doing exactly that, reuniting with their loved ones, which much make much make it that much more painful for people who can't is it vaccination status? Standing in the way is it immigration status? Give us call 646435 70 to 86 46435 70 to 80 or tweet at Brian Lehrer. Emily can we start with the G seven pledged for a billion doses. Where are they coming from? Who would they be going to? And how quickly Sure thing. So the big news of the G seven actually broke just before the G seven and that was the 500 million doses fighter doses from the United States. And after that news broke last week, I think there was an expectation that there would be similarly big announcements from U. S allies in the G seven. But what we saw play out over the weekend was slightly more modest than expected. Uh, yes, the G seven says. It's a billion doses. Um, the recipient organization of those doses, Kovacs actually says. Well, it's it's 870 million doses. If we want to get specific, so a big number and that every dose is potentially life saving. And that it is the first real group effort, so to speak. But as as you set off the top there since the estimate is 11 billion doses are needed. It's it's still relatively small. Um Metra. Do you know why the Pfizer vaccine which we've law known as the hardest to store since it needs to be kept at, like, minus 70 degrees. Do I know. I'm sorry. Say that one more time. Just curious if you know Biden why Biden singled out the Pfizer vaccine. I feel you know, I I I don't I don't know why, um Actually don't know why, um, fighter in this case, I mean, I actually, um, You know, I think we've talked earlier about some of the variants that Pfizer and Moderna have, Um Been shown to be effective against, including those that have surfaced in India and Brazil. But I I You know, I cheered the news because Pfizer husband shown to be effective, but I don't know why he chose fighter. Emily do you because again, if it's about distribution all over the world with a lot of transportation of these doses into places that may not be in some cases, all that developed with a lot of You know the best refrigeration equipment. Here are these doses that need to go minus 70 degrees or whatever the exact number is until they're used. Um it's great because they are I think it's considered, you know, one of the better vaccines. But how come Yeah, I think there's two things the first you just hit on it. This is this is a vaccine that people want so it's highly effective. People have seen its success in places like Israel and the United States. We have the most data on this vaccine, and it's showing really early promise against the variance so countries even though they know that it might be more difficult to transport. This is the vaccine. Countries, for the most part want. They're a little bit suspicious of of why they would get the quote unquote, you know, less good vaccines. Um, you know, there's arguments about whether that's true, but my understanding is a lot of countries want the fighter. And the other has to do with, um, you know, President Biden's own political line domestically announcing this, the White House readout stressed that these are doses. To some extent that would be made in the United States. So there's a plant in Kalamazoo, for instance, that will be making some of these doses, so it gives the administration the chance to Past this not just as a multilateral foreign policy initiative, but as a you know, quote unquote by American American workers type. Project, and we should say not to be misleading that at least the three brands that are being used in the United States, Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson and Johnson, Uh, do seem to be Around as effective as each other, keeping people out of the hospital and keeping people from dying from Covid so not too Overstate any difference in their effectiveness. And one other thing on this Emily you wrote last week that President Biden's vac vaccine sharing strategy has been pan My congressional Democrats and some health advocates as too timid and John flak from European allies as too bold. So what was the criticism from Europe? Sure, so the criticism from Europe has basically two elements. The first is that there's a real divide between what the United States thinks the world should do. Moving forward on the issue of of patents. The World Trade Organization and where Europe stands. So the Biden administration reversed its position on the patent issue, which could help make it easier to make vaccines elsewhere in the world where they're badly needed. And Europe is basically holding the the old US position holding the line on that, saying this isn't the best way forward. So that's that's the part of the criticism. There's also a criticism from Europe. Saying, You know, it's nice that you guys want to jump into vaccine diplomacy right now. But you're, um use of the Defense Production Act and other measures have really put America first at the expense of others. Meanwhile, we Europe are sharing um so you know. There's there's a There's a bit of a stand up happening between the United States and Europe on this particular issue, And I think we see that in the very modest vaccine diplomacy from the G seven Uh huh. So the announcement which sounded like Always hearts and flowers, and everybody was on the same page You're saying read between the lines and there are things they didn't say that indicate that it's timid. That was certainly my read, and, um, I think that there it's great that they got together. It's great that they're talking. It's great that there's going to be a billion doses. But this very much feels like the start of Frankly, years of talks on these issues. Alright s metric Khalida, As I said in the intro New York City has reached but officials are calling functional immunity. What does that mean? Technically and practically for New Yorkers and Some of our listeners will know you and I have been talking for a week after week after week on this show about people who are harder to reach. And so I'm afraid when we talk about functional immunity, like a big, overarching figure, X percent of New Yorkers are now Immunized it. It It leaves out or risks, leaving out those who have been harder to reach. That's right. I would say that, um, one way we can look at functional immunity. I'll give you a personal anecdote in 24 hour period Last week, I flew on a plane. I rode the subway and I watched in the heights in a movie theater. And so that for me was a sign of my actions literally embracing the functional immunity that you speak of right that we're starting.

Emily Rauhala Emily Maitre World Health Organization Brian Defense Production Act Brazil India Europe Emily Kalamazoo Israel yesterday Pfizer last week Last week Brooklyn United States White House Hanif 870 million doses
"brian" Discussed on Republic Keeper - with Brian O'Kelly

Republic Keeper - with Brian O'Kelly

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"brian" Discussed on Republic Keeper - with Brian O'Kelly

"These kinds of things i believe in the talk about civil war now and in all kinds of stuff. And there's say we just need unity and here's the problem. The problem is we will never have unity. And here's y fifty years ago. Republicans and democrats were kind of virtually the same they. They both wanted the same thing. They just got their different ways. Right answer would be like no no. No we're going to raise taxes or not at all. We're gonna do this right. It was more differences. Were more technical or strategic or or you know how they would go about doing it now. We have fundamental worldview conflicts debt that are morally based gay marriage and then the the christian worldview right You have Transplant transgenderism socialism. Pro-life it socials in which isn't which is private property right which is which is right wolf property ownership and then second amendment which principle of self defense and the second amendment and we end but these are polarizing issues. That are are fundamentally. People can't make a different decision about them. They can't just say okay. Well i'm i'm gonna do it. Which is why. I always just. I have a hard time understanding catholics. Would vote for joe biden. You either believe that. That is a baby that that that conception is more than a biological function. I believe that christians believe that it is not simply a biological function That that there is a spark of god based life that happens and and because of that it is life and if you believe that you have to be pro-life and if you believe that it's just a bunch of cells that you can scrape out of a uterus while then you're not going to go to the mat for the pro-life thing. Fundamental worldview different reconcilable differences that iran. So so here's the the challenge though. And i maybe not the challenge but one of the things that that i guess i would say it this way. I have friends in you have friends. I'm sure who have those beliefs and they're still my friends right and i still care about them and i still love them and i still let them into my life in unbelievably intimate ways right. I share personal things with them. They're my friends and those irreconcilable viewpoints are the minority of the relationship. So we don't let that one thing poison. The whole thing right yeah. The problem in our civic discourse is that we are doing that we are letting that one thing that we have a point of disagreement with someone about become the only thing that we see. And i think that's easy when you don't know anything else about them so we will be personalized and we're just put them in the those are the those are the pro-choice people those are the baby killer. People or those are the bad people. Right we're the good people. Those are the bad people and so I think that's too simplistic. But i think that's what ends up happening is. It becomes this binary thing around morality. But i also don't think that it's necessarily wrong I i do believe that. I mean if if a guy came up to you and said brian am going to make sure that your children are never successful. I'm gonna make sure that they pay more of their money in taxes than they could ever imagine is going to happen. I'm gonna make sure that they have to do this. That and the other thing. Even though i know it goes against your religion how you feel against how would you feel about that. Now angry too. So here's my. Here's my victimized right. Here's my theory. I will fight them and fight them and fight them and fight them. You wanna turn my country communist. You absolutely not debate you in this great so debate you wherever but if you were to show up on my doorstep hungary i would invite you in fiji dinner and i think that should be the christian view for those who are politically engaged. And it goes back to that. Oh bible verse speaking the truth in love right and again. It's two sided. Think you said something really interesting there. Chris that that let me let me see if i can pull out of what you just said something important and i think what what it is is that we're not fighting the people we're fighting the destructive ideas that they hold now if there was a by over those destructive ideas because they don't nobody's told them the truth probably sufficiently right. So what if there was a group of people who knew the truth and had access to the truth and were charged with sharing it with the world and then they said well. We don't wanna do that because we don't wanna be controversial. That would be tragic. That's what i think. The church is doing right now. Well a few things. There's a few things going on with the church. First of all where we america right today. I i lay the blame entirely at the feet of the church. I'll tell you why i'm so. I'm so happy to hear saying. I've been saying this. I've been a lone wolf sanit. I'll tell you why seventy five years ago we owned the entire country now. That doesn't mean that everybody was christian. We have a huge jewish population. Seventy five years ago. I'm sure we had some muslims and various others and there are probably a few people that were atheists but we the judeo christian worldview owned america and it is the judeo christian worldview that made america amazing. and so. here's what happened. And i'm actually reading. I just got protected. Those minorities the christians christian world so alleged continuing to limited. And i have a buddy was a longshoreman guided. A bible study with for forever. And i'm sure he'll see this Every tuesday morning for years and years and years and he's a retired longshoreman and he says this the non-christian longshoremen knew more about what a christian should be then many of the christians. I knew they would say things like why did you say that. Aren't you a good christian. You we're all going for a beer. We know you won't come because your a good christian. The non-christians no and so two year point when we say we used to own everything. It's not that everybody agreed with christianity. Instead it was the dominant culture and everybody knew what it was and no one considered doing the quote unquote wrong thing and i put it in air quotes and even that is a sign that i'm like i'm shy say that the truth is the truth. Which is stupid..

joe biden iran wolf sanit fiji hungary brian america Chris