40 Burst results for "Breyer"

Fresh update on "breyer" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 2 min ago

Fresh update on "breyer" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"In classrooms New Mexico's governor is using National Guard members as subs She's a very good teacher and she's very kind She was really fun I really liked her uniform because I like how it has like the patches and stuff Supreme Court Justice Steven breyer officially announces his retirement President Biden saying justice prior now since his intention to step down from active service after four decades four decades on the federal blinds in 28 years on the United States Supreme Court Mister Biden says he'll nominate a black woman to the court As tensions between Russia and Ukraine build The White House says that Ukraine is already dealing with a humanitarian crisis since the invasion of Crimea The USAID has a disaster expert in the country who's monitoring the situation closely coordinating with other donors assessing the evolving humanitarian needs of the Ukrainian people and liaising with partners to determine what steps may be needed CBS News brief I'm janitor Kuiper P.

Justice Steven Breyer President Biden Mister Biden Supreme Court Russia National Guard New Mexico Crimea White House United States Usaid Cbs News Kuiper P.
"breyer" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:44 min | 6 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on WTOP

"Just ahead We're tirelessly to give faith to the notion that the law exists to help the people President Biden praises Stephen breyer as the justice announces his retirement from the Supreme Court on political pushback as Senate Democrats gear up for a swift Supreme Court confirmation process I'm Mitchell Miller today on the hill When the alleged shooter was arrested in magruder high school They kicked the door open I'm Nick I and Ellie and researchers say gas stoves are a risk to both the environment and public health Time 5 31 Supreme Court Justice Steven breyer made his retirement plan's official today at The White House and as President Biden paid tribute to the outgoing justice he detailed his plans to nominate a replacement next month The president called Stephen breyer and exemplary justice He's written landmark opinions on topics ranging from reproductive rights to healthcare to voting rights to patent law He says he'll name his choice to replace breyer by the end of February And that person will be the first black woman ever nominated to the United States Supreme Court The retiring justice offered his thoughts on a divided America breyer pointed to the Gettysburg address and Lincoln's hopes for the endurance of a self governing nation You know who we'll see whether that experiment works It's you my friend Stephen portnoy CBS News Washington Sent a Democrats are pledging to fast track the confirmation of justice breyer's successor but some Republicans caution against moving too quickly Mitchell Miller today on the hill Main senator Susan Collins disagreed with fellow Republicans and voted against the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett who was rushed through the confirmation process shortly before the last presidential election Collins doesn't want that to become the norm We can take our time have hearing go.

President Biden justice breyer Supreme Court Mitchell Miller magruder high school Justice Steven breyer breyer Ellie Senate Nick Stephen portnoy White House hill Main Lincoln CBS America Amy Coney Barrett Susan Collins Washington Collins
Fresh update on "breyer" discussed on Bloomberg Law

Bloomberg Law

01:11 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "breyer" discussed on Bloomberg Law

"Chuck This is Bloomberg law with June grosso from Bloomberg radio I've been talking to professor Stephen vladeck of the University of Texas law school about justice Stephen breyer stepping down from the bench You always hear that justice breyer was a consensus builder Think Biden even mentioned it A dealmaker How did he approach the internal dealings with other justices on cases From what we've noted and of course there's a lot we still don't Justice breyer was very often one who would try to form coalitions behind the scenes We know from reporting for example by Jonas pubic and Jan Crawford Greenberg the breyer helped afford to compromise in the 2012 Affordable Care Act decision where he and justice Kagan worked together with chief staff as Robert to come up with a sort of a series of decisions they could all live with We know that you worked in various circumstances with justice Kennedy before she retired with justice O'Connor to forge consensus And so I think this again goes to how much the court moved around him that by 2018 when justice Kavanaugh replaced justice breyer I don't know who was left for him to work with I'm not sure that he thought if he still had folks on the right with hoops who could forge consensus At least due to any of the high profile cases where those kinds of ideological differences tend to manifest So he was I think for much of his career actively involved in trying to sort of tend the center of the court And then one of the real legacies of his resignation and his retirement and one of the real sort of darker lines of all of this is how much that sensor just no longer exists As you mentioned he taught administrative law before being appointed to the first circuit Were there issues that he was passionate about during his long tenure on the court Well I think justice fire was very passionate In ways that perhaps the not everyone would be about administrative law about the relationship between Congress and the executive branch about the public responsibility of the court to maintain and sort of facilitate that relationship as opposed to obstructed it But I don't think we associate him quite the same way with any one particular line of issues or line of cases that for example we think about justice Ginsburg or even perhaps justice but in my OR and I think part of that again because where he was most effective was usually out of the limelight It was usually behind the scenes where it wasn't that he was necessarily sticking out some very visible public position but where he was really trying to help the court as an institution move along I think that's why as we hear from the other justices about his forthcoming retirement I suspect we're going to hear a lot about that And about how much they enjoyed having him around and how much he aided them in their own sort of approach to their jobs So that's why I think this is going to be such an interesting process over the coming weeks and months because justice breyer whatever you might think about him in no respects was he ever a lightning ride And I think that's part of why this confirmation process is such an interesting departure from the last couple of confirmations that we've been through Explain how so how it will be different because it's been incredibly contentious the confirmation process has become ugly and certain respects Yeah I think we ever have short memories but if we harken back 12 years 13 years when just started my work was nominated to replace justice deuter Yeah there were some of the same ugliness about justice Sotomayor in her background But compared to the confirmations that would follow it it was actually pretty smooth failing And part of that was because as with justice breyer everyone understood that that particular confirmation was not going to shift to the center of gravity on the course and it was not going to radically change the direction of the court And that the justice that just sort of was replaced in justice Tudor was a very significant number of the court but he wasn't necessarily out on a limb all by himself where his departure was going to open up some gave them whole in the court's jurisprudence And that's very much what this feels like as well where whoever President Biden I think will almost certainly sort of be to the left of justice breyer but of course that's not going to move the court because justice breyer is no longer anywhere close to the court's center of gravity And I think that's part of why at least from where I'm sitting I don't think this is going to be as contentious a process as when justice Kavanaugh was nominated to succeed justice Kennedy or when justice Barrett was nominated to succeed justice Ginsburg because the stakes junior just so very different I am personally going to miss he livened up oral arguments by presenting some crazy hypotheticals to lawyers during the oral arguments And you argued at the court Are those difficult with a difficult to answer Difficult to understand for me It's up to court I would say that he terrified me No I mean justice breyer I think he has to sort of a loose aspect that I think folks may not fully appreciate is sometimes not entirely how do I say inherits But I think to some degree he's having fun at least in some of these cases with the very fact that we're struggling over these questions When he when he starts talking about jib's oval sorts third cousin has really come up with a case a couple of terms ago I think it's like a class cloud that I think is that he's just figuring out loud and he's puzzling through these cases The way that he approaches these cases which is with the very pragmatic beds informed by his very area dates backgrounds So I think arguments will be different after justice breyer I'm not sure how many of us will miss the three page longs just a question I got in trouble once because he asked me a long multi part question and I sort of I probably took a little bit of liberty but I said you know if I may just as far I'd like to answer that in three parts As we said it was one question It was his style too And I think it was a style that was in some respects cute And I think we'll be probably missed If it doesn't necessarily effect savings beyond just how we prepare for arguments So how would you describe his legacy on the court You know I think much the same way that I thought I was like justice Stevens is legacy when justice Steven stepped down in 2010 Justin Stevens famously was appointed by president Ford was a Republican a lifelong Republican who by the end of his career was one of the more solidly reliably liberal votes on the courts And Stevens when he was asked in 2010 he said I didn't move so much as the court moved around And I think there was not a some play in that I think just even might have been a little bit exaggerated but he wasn't totally exaggerated And I really think when we look at justice breyer's legacy that's going to be a big part of the story What might have been if Hillary Clinton wins the 2016 election and we have a democratic majority on the court for the first time since 1969 Justify would have been an enormously important part of that story So you and justice Ginsburg would have been the senior liberals on the court And therefore usually the control of the majority in divisive cases So I think his legacy is going to be defined at least in part by what could have been I think his legacy will be defined by how much he sort of lived in the center while there was still a sensor to live in alongside justice justice O'Connor And I think his legacy will be defined by sort of an age gone by where having a pragmatic judge on the court who thought that part of the job was to build consensus across the perceived aisle was actually a future and not a bug You're going to have briar who's been on the court for almost 30 years being replaced by someone new and a black woman How does that change the dynamic on the court and among the liberals on the court Three women now The most significant thing it does is it really I think is elevates justice Sotomayor or that much further She now becomes not just perhaps the rhetorical leader of the liberal wing but the senior member of the liberal wing So when it comes.

Justice Breyer Breyer Justice Ginsburg Bloomberg Radio Stephen Vladeck University Of Texas Law School Jonas Pubic Jan Crawford Greenberg Justice Kennedy Kavanaugh Justice Tudor President Biden Kagan Biden Bloomberg Justice Barrett Connor Chuck Sotomayor Robert
The Unvaccinated Are Less Worried Than the Boosted

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:20 min | 6 hrs ago

The Unvaccinated Are Less Worried Than the Boosted

"In The New York Times of all places. How do you like that? Two COVID Americas. The unvaccinated are less worried than the boosted according to a pole. That's this is very important stuff. The scared versus the less or unscared. That's the division in this country. The scared are almost always on the left, leftists are scared of life and scared of death. I said this for years prior to the COVID issue. They're scared of marriage, they're scared of divorce. They're scared of having children, they're scared of global warming. They teach kids to be scared, you're not a white kid, you should be scared of whites. Their profoundly unless happy, scared people can not be happy. Fear is paralyzing. They're paralyzed. New York Times. The unvaccinated are less worried than the boosted.

Covid New York Times
Fresh update on "breyer" discussed on Bloomberg Law

Bloomberg Law

01:40 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "breyer" discussed on Bloomberg Law

"I think it's again another respect in which breyers retirement may well be the end of an era Today President Biden said that breyers work tirelessly to give faith to the notion that the law exists to help the people Do you agree with that I think so I mean I think every Supreme Court Justice would like to be similarly memorialized And so so much of this is just about the eye of the beholder I don't think folks think about justice breyer the same way that maybe they think about justice though to my order justice Ginsburg because he wasn't as visible in cases affect him civil rights for example But for all his warts for all of his flaws not the fact it was justice breyer who wrote what until recently it was probably the most important contemporary abortion decision in favor of woman's right to choose and the whole woman health case in 2016 It was just as brier who was often writing the lead decisions in affirmative action cases It was just prior who was supportive at least a large chunk of the court's prudence that is now in descent And so I think what complicates this legacy June is not him I think we knew who he was in 1994 when president Clinton omnis him It's how much the court moved around him It's how different a court is left than the court that he joined and how he looks through that lens as opposed to the lens that we thought would be assessing him through 28 years ago Would you describe him as more of a moderate than a liberal Terms are so subjective I certainly think that for the duration of his tenure on the court he was probably the most centrist of the justices typically identified as liberals Of the democratic appointees and even when justice Stevens and pseudo were still in the court The breyer was probably the one closest to the center And Judy we have empirical evidence of that There were high profile cases where it was brier who provided the key this vote in favor of what we might think of as a more conservative position The hamdi case in 2004 it was breyer who provided the 5th vote for the proposition that even American citizens could be detained as enemy combatants under the AUM It was does his prior in a series of cases in the early 2010 who actually traded places with justice Kennedy in some fairly significant questions about the right to sue the government to enforce federal claims against state officers And so I don't think there's any question that he was certainly the most moderate of the justices we typically use the L word for the question is whether that made him a moderate the abstract and I think folks are just going to disagree about that Coming up we'll talk about possible nominees to replace justice breyer This is Bloomberg Progressive presents metaphors About bundling your home and auto When you bundle your home and auto with progressive you get great savings and round the clock protection which is as beautiful as looking your firstborn.

Breyer Brier Ginsburg Biden Justice Stevens Supreme Court President Clinton Hamdi Judy AUM Justice Kennedy Government
YouTube Bars Right-Wing Media Personality Dan Bongino

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:06 min | 7 hrs ago

YouTube Bars Right-Wing Media Personality Dan Bongino

Fresh update on "breyer" discussed on Bloomberg Law

Bloomberg Law

01:00 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "breyer" discussed on Bloomberg Law

"This is Bloomberg law I divided Supreme Court rejects a religious challenge tell us a little about the facts of the case Interviews with prominent attorneys in Bloomberg legal experts My guest is former federal prosecutor Jimmy garley joining me as Bloomberg law reporter Jordan Rubin And analysis of important legal issues cases in headlines The Supreme Court takes on state secrets multiple lawsuits were filed against the emergency rule is this lawsuit for real Bloomberg law with June Grasso From Bloomberg radio Welcome to the Bloomberg law show I'm June grosso Ahead of this hour President Biden announces that justice Stephen breyer will retire from the bench and a nominee to replace him will be chosen by the end of February And the new Manhattan district attorney comes under fire in just his first month in office Gun.

Jimmy Garley Jordan Rubin Bloomberg Supreme Court Bloomberg Radio President Biden Grasso Justice Stephen Breyer Manhattan
"breyer" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:34 min | 10 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on Today, Explained

"It's time for someone <Speech_Male> younger who <Speech_Male> better understands <Speech_Music_Male> the politics <SpeakerChange> of the moment <Speech_Music_Male> to sit in that <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> seat. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm talking <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to the students now. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> say I want you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to pick just this <Speech_Music_Male> up. <Speech_Music_Male> It's an experiment that's <Speech_Music_Male> still going on. <Speech_Music_Male> And I'll <Speech_Music_Male> tell you something. <Speech_Music_Male> You know <Speech_Music_Male> who we'll see whether <Speech_Music_Male> that experiment works. <Music> <Advertisement> It's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you, my friend. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's you, mister <Speech_Music_Male> high school students. <Speech_Music_Male> It's you, <Speech_Music_Male> mister Cole with student <Speech_Music_Male> that you, mister law <Music> school students, <Speech_Music_Male> it's us, but it's <Music> you. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's that next generation. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And the one after that. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> My grandchildren <Speech_Music_Male> and their children. <Speech_Music_Male> They'll determine <Speech_Music_Male> whether the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> experiment still <Speech_Music_Male> works, and of course <Speech_Music_Male> I'm <Speech_Music_Male> an optimist <SpeakerChange> <Music> and I'm pretty <Music> sure it will. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> Ian millhiser, <Speech_Music_Male> he's got <Speech_Music_Male> some books about the Supreme <Speech_Music_Male> Court you can find at <Speech_Music_Male> the old book shop. He's <Speech_Music_Male> got some articles <Speech_Music_Male> about the Supreme Court. <Speech_Music_Male> You can find over a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> vox dot com. <Speech_Music_Male> A program today <Speech_Music_Male> was produced by <Speech_Music_Male> amna Al saadi <Speech_Music_Male> and Victoria <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Chamberlain who was edited <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by Matthew Collett <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and engineered by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Paul mounty, Laura <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> bullard checked

Fresh update on "breyer" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "breyer" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Certified as substitutes so kids continue learning in person They can work for one day They can work for half a day The Biden administration's vaccine mandate for healthcare workers is now in effect in more than two dozen states that in challenge the mandate and also here in Washington D.C. mayor Mario Bowser has now extended the districts indoor mask mandate through February and says all residents can pick up two free KN 95 masks at new COVID centers beginning Friday With justice Steven breyer announcing his retirement President Biden makes it clear he'll appoint a black woman to the court CBS's Jan Crawford points out that only two other black justices have served with clarence Thomas a conservative currently holding the seat for liberal African.

Biden Administration Washington D.C. Mayor Mario Bowser Steven Breyer President Biden Jan Crawford CBS Clarence Thomas
"breyer" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

11:52 min | 10 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on Today, Explained

"What interests you and make informed credible decisions. To start building your wealth today and get your first $5000 managed for free for life, go to wealthfront dot com slash explained. That's W E L TH, FRO and T dot com slash explained. To start building your wealth. Go to wealthfront dot com slash explained to get started today. This episode is brought to you by Wix. Are you ready to take your business online? You need Wix. The leading website creation platform that's got all the tools you need to create, manage and grow your brand. Over 200 million people are already using Wix's wide range of solutions to enhance their businesses. Like ultra smart SEO tools designed to get you found on search engines, faster loading times to create outstanding user experiences and payment solutions to help you boost your revenue. Plus, with enterprise grade security built into every site, you know you're in safe hands, so whether you're starting your online business or you've got a side hustle with Wix, you can design a site to showcase your work that'll look great on any device. You can also manage everything from one dashboard on desktop and mobile, so you can be available anywhere at any time. In the office, at home or on the go, want to get started, head over to Wix dot com and create your website today. That's Wix dot com. We did it. We did it Joe. And before we hit the break, you said that a lot of the work breyer did on the Supreme Court was invisible. I want to better understand that. But before we jump into the invisibility thing, who was Stephen breyer before he was justice Stephen breyer? He was a Harvard Law professor. Who went on to become senator Edward Kennedy's chief counsel when Kennedy was chair of the judiciary committee. And he was extraordinarily successful in that role. Judge breyer, when he was chief counsel liar. Had the confidence of Democrats and the Kennedy said in the Biden, senator heflin, he was very close with his Republican counterpart. He was very good at maintaining relationships with the Republican senators, his children would play with senator strom Thurman's children, be like arc, former segregationists, Republican senator, and I think that the president was right. When he announced the appointment, the nomination, he comment on judge briar's political skills in having the support of everybody from Senate Kennedy to senator hatch. He was just very good at brokering those sorts of bipartisan deals. He was also there at a time when there was a neoliberal consensus that no longer exists. What the big projects he worked on when he was on the Senate Judiciary Committee was airline deregulation. But breyer came of age at a time when bipartisan deal making was still not just possible but very common. The best I can do in an opinion is to give my reasons. And if it's a good opinion, those really are my reasons. And then others will come along and say, oh, I can't believe he thinks that. Okay, that's their right. That's the purpose of an opinion. And he was very, very good at striking those sorts of deals. He was very good at it when he was working in the Senate. He was very good at it in the Supreme Court and sadly, I mean, I think one explanation for why he might be retiring right now is that the very skill set that he had this ability to broker those sorts of bipartisan deals, I think, is now largely obsolete. How did breyer get on the Supreme Court? Who appointed him? So breyer was appointed to the first circuit to a lower court in 1980 when president Carter was a lame duck. Okay. This goes to show how beloved he was across the aisle. All that the Republicans had to do was like wait a few weeks and Ronald Reagan could have filled that seat. But Republicans like justice breyer so much that they said, no, we'll let him have it. We like this guy. Breyer sat on the first circuit for about 14 years. And then when a vacancy opened, president Clinton went to orrin hatch, a very conservative Republican senator and said, so who do you think I should dominate? And hatch, again, this was a different era where you could have good faith conversations. Hatch faces should look like you're not going to make the person that I want. I know you're going to nominate a liberal. The two people you should look at are Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen breyer. And who did Clint and Wanda putting on the Supreme Court, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen breyer. I asked the Senate to consider and to promptly confirm the nomination of judge Stephen breyer as the 108th justice of the Supreme Court. Breyer owes this lofty career he's had to this era where there was a certain good faith and bipartisanship in government that I think most people who only know today's politics wouldn't recognize them might not believe was real. The case for judge breyers confirmation is clear and compelling. His share excellence is broad understanding of the law is deep respect for the role of the courts in our life and in protecting our individual rights and his gift as a consensus builder. So tell me how he made himself invisible once he got to the Supreme Court. Well, it's not so much that he made himself invisible. It's just that that same deal making skill that served him so well in the Senate also served him very well on the Supreme Court. So there was a case called Fisher V University of Texas. This was a case that everyone thought was going to kill affirmative action forever in university admissions. There are several thousand admissions officers in the United States. Several thousand universities. And what is it we're going to say here? It wasn't already stud than gruder that isn't going to take hundreds or thousands of these people and have federal judges dictating the policy of admission of all these universities. You see why I'm looking for some certainty. And what happened was justice Kennedy initially staked out a pretty hard line position against affirmative action, just a Sotomayor, rode a barn burner descent about the importance of affirmative action, and breyer was able to broker a deal between them until maybe a few months from now when it goes before the Supreme Court again. Yeah, it may be, yeah, now there's a new case. The conservative majority Supreme Court has agreed to hear a challenge to the consideration of race and college emissions. The lawsuits accuse Harvard University and the university of North Carolina of discriminating against Asian American applicants in an effort to promote diversity. And there's a new majority on the Supreme Court, so this deal isn't likely to last very long. But, you know, it kept it alive for several more years. When chief justice Roberts started to get cold feet about striking down huge swaths of the Affordable Care Act, he went to prior and justice Elena Kagan and tried to broker a deal with them. And they managed to reach a deal, which weakened the Medicaid expansion. You know, it did do some damage to the Affordable Care Act, but it kept most of the law. Thanks, Obama. He was quietly working within try to find bipartisan ways to preserve as much as what he cared about as possible. When Anthony Kennedy, who was a more moderate conservative was on the court, he was able to work with Anthony Kennedy. When justice Roberts, who's at least more moderate than the current court is, he was able to work with chief justice Roberts. I suspect that at least part of his calculation is to why he's retiring now. I don't think anyone can work with the court's current majority. Okay, so he's a broker, but is there a case that gives us a sense of his actual judicial philosophy? One of the cases that I think he will be remembered for is whole women's healthy Heller stat, which basically kept roe V wade alive for another 5 or 6 years. I mean, there's a big case in front of the court right now that seems likely to end the constitutional right to an abortion. A Mississippi abortion case was heard at the Supreme Court of the United States. What happened? Based on what I heard today in this Mississippi case, I think the most likely outcome is that roe V wade is doomed. But the last time there was a big fight over abortion. This was in 2016. It was breyer who wound up writing the opinion. And what's interesting about his whole woman's health opinion is here is this like hugely politically charged, very consequential thing that everyone is fighting over. And he wrote the most technocratic opinion about abortion that you will ever read. The surgical center provision requires in addition that a facility maintained, for example, personnel trained in cardiac life support and operating room with a clear floor area of at least 240 ft². A post operative patient holding room, a post operative recovery suite. A one way traffic pattern, and they must meet special surgically related standards concerning ventilation, air conditioning, piping, plumbing and others. The district court found, I think that was just indicative of his approach to the law. I mean, he was a technocrat. He believed that the way that you tried to find the answer to a difficult question is that you studied it, you understood the policy really well. You understood the nuances of it really well. And you approached it from that angle. And that is not the approach that many of the more ideological judges take. But I think that that was the approach that breyer often took in his opinions. I mean, you could say that this idea that the court remain apolitical that it just call balls and strikes as Roberts likes to believe, is sort of being flushed down the toilet as nomination processes become more more political. And was it not briar who famously flushed a toilet during oral arguments in 2020? I mean, there's a lot of speculation that when the subject matter of the call ranges to the topic, then the call is transformed. I think Brian was probably responsible for toilet gazi. If it's yellow, let it mellow if you're on a call with Ruth Bader, flush it later. But I just think that both parties now have a much more clearly defined sense of what they want out of the Supreme Court than they did when breyer got there 28 years ago and when he was talking about not politicizing the court and you know there was a lot of consternation last year when he was suggesting that he wasn't going to retire under Biden because he didn't want his retirement to look political. Most people's reactions certainly my reactions, your court is not this apolitical body that you might have thought it was in 1994. It's become something else. Breyers had a very successful career in a very successful tenure on the Supreme Court. I think.

Stephen breyer Supreme Court breyer Kennedy Senate Harvard Law Judge breyer Ruth Bader Ginsburg senator heflin senator strom Thurman judge briar senator hatch Senate Judiciary Committee Breyer justice Roberts judge Stephen breyer Wix senator Edward Kennedy roe V wade
"breyer" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:15 min | 10 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Supreme Court. This long overdue in my view. When he came into.

"breyer" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

03:27 min | 10 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Correspondent at vox covering the Supreme Court, why are we going to talk about ice cream today? I'm very confused. Sorry. As we've been reporting, Supreme Court Justice Stephen breyer is retiring at the end of the court's term in June. Justice breyer is retiring from the Supreme Court. What does it mean? The most immediate significance is what it does not mean. It does not mean that breyer is going to stick around until he could potentially be replaced by a Republican president. And then we would have a 7 to two Supreme Court with the Republican advantage. But it also means that President Biden gets to nominate his first Supreme Court nominee. I will select the nominee worthy of justice breyer's legacy of excellence and decency. It means that this seat will continue to be held by someone reasonably liberal who will vote in the way that breyer has historically voted. I think it also may represent a recognition on breyer's part that the sort of bipartisan deal making that he has historically been very successful at as a justice is not something that his colleagues are interested in anymore. Okay, hot take. Let's hold that thought for a minute and talk about what comes next for the court. I will listen carefully to all the advice I'm given. And I'll study the records and former cases carefully. I'll meet with the potential nominees, and it is my intention. My intention to announce my decision before the end of February. So one piece of good news for for Biden is that it only takes 50 votes plus the vice president to confirm a Supreme Court nominee. So he doesn't need any Republican votes in order to get this done. Now, obviously, Joe Manchin and kyrsten sinema have been a frequent thorn in Biden's side, but not really on nominations. I mean, you know, Manchin blocked near a tandon's nomination at the beginning of the presidency. I think there was one other nominee to a banking job who got blocked, but for the most part, Biden's nominees and especially his judicial nominees have sailed through without too much trouble from anyone in the democratic caucus. So, you know, a Supreme Court nominee is obviously a bigger deal than a lower court judge, but Manchin and cinema so far like all of the Democrats have hung together on nominations. And there's also a handful of Republicans, Lisa Murkowski, Susan Collins, maybe bit Romney, but you know what you call someone who gets exactly 50 votes plus the vice president for their confirmation vote. You call them your honor. Nailed it. This is the Democrats first real chance of some still laughing. This is the Democrats first real crack at a Supreme.

Justice breyer Supreme Court breyer President Biden Biden kyrsten sinema Manchin Joe Manchin tandon Lisa Murkowski Susan Collins Romney
Grandpa Joe Will Nominate Any Black Woman Available for the Supreme Court, per Campaign Promise

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:57 sec | 12 hrs ago

Grandpa Joe Will Nominate Any Black Woman Available for the Supreme Court, per Campaign Promise

"Let the games begin, we're gonna have a rodeo now that Stephen breyer is apparently retiring from the Supreme Court, the race is on to find, well, I guess any black woman who will fit the bill. Because that was Biden's promise. Remember standing there and Charleston, South Carolina, listening to Joe Biden say that on the campaign debate stage, I promise I pledge we will our administration. If I make it to The White House, we'll have the first female black Supreme Court Justice. And I just checked out, chalked that off to grandpa Joe going off again about curing cancer and making empty promises, you know, like I will crush the virus. Remember that one? That was a good one. That was a doozy. That was an old even goodie. I will crush the virus. Yeah, it's doing great. You're doing great.

Stephen Breyer Supreme Court Biden Joe Biden Charleston South Carolina Grandpa Joe White House Cancer
"breyer" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

08:47 min | 12 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"To, in my concluding segment, talk about what is it that makes entrepreneurs. Distinctive or unique. Now some of you are probably entrepreneurs. And many of you are probably not. Your most people aren't. They're professionals or they are. They work in some salaried field. They're paid by the hour or by biweekly or monthly, but they don't live the entrepreneur's life, of course, raising the question of what is an entrepreneur's life, what makes it different. Many years ago, when I was at the Hoover institution, the director of Hoover, well-known economist named John raising a really nice guy kind of a roly poly guy, John rayson and I were flying in a private helicopter, not ours, of course. It belonged to a wealthy entrepreneur, we were flying across the San Francisco Bay, did this entrepreneur's estate? I was basically there because I was giving a little talk. I think I had a new book caught around then. And I remember John raising leaning over to me and saying, we were talking about the entrepreneur whose home we were going to visit, obviously, a kind of a palatial home and I believe Marin county. And one reason said to me, I bet I can do what that guy does. And I remember that kind of struck me because I can see why raising him was thinking that, raisin was an economist, so he was familiar with the world of business. In fact, in other words, this wasn't some like sociologist or Professor of romance languages. You know, I think I could run Amazon. No, this was a guy who actually had credentials in the economic field. And yet that question kind of nagged me of course I didn't say anything at the time. I just sort of nodded, but I was thinking to myself, can he? I mean, is it really the case that an academic who deals with economics could do what an entrepreneur does? And I think as I think about it, I realize that probably and I only say probably because you never know, the answer to that is no. He could not have done what that guy did. I know in my own case, I've become something of an entrepreneur, but only in later life. For most of my life, I was, well, kind of kind of a salaried guy. I worked at the heritage foundation for their magazine, I then went to work for the Reagan White House. I was in think tanks, the American enterprise institute, the Hoover institution now, there was a small entrepreneurial element in what I did and what I mean is I would get a salary for working at a think tank and that was kind of my base salary. That's kind of how I paid the mortgage and made for the car. And then I would do speaking and I'll get paid for that and I would write books periodically and I would obviously receive royalties for that, but by and large I had a sort of predictable flow of income that came from these sources, there was nothing particularly entrepreneurial about it until I got almost accidentally into the movie business, and then once I started doing that, I realized that wow, this now involves a whole different game. I now have to be involved in a wide assortment of decisions. Well, think about it. How do you make a movie? Well, the first thing you do is you have to have the idea for it. That part was familiar to me. That's in the sense no different than writing a book. You have the idea. But the next thing is you gotta go get money, you need investors. That's an entrepreneurial function. In fact, most entrepreneurs don't use their own money. Steve's jobs didn't fund apple on his own. He went to venture capital from so he got investors. Then you have to do legal work to set up your enterprise. Then you have to assemble a team. Then you have to make the movie that involves cinematographer as gaffer as all kinds of people. Then you have to get distributions. You have to negotiate with companies, lionsgate, and so on. And finally, you have to market the film. Now you can kind of see here when you lay all this out why it's pretty hard to make a movie. It's pretty hard to make a movie because people who generally have one or two of those skills don't have all of them. Generally people who have money or access to money aren't all that creative and they don't know how to make a movie, you have creative people who are pretty good at making movies, but they don't know how to they don't know how to bankroll them, and they have no idea how to market them. So this is the kind of complexity that I was, as I say, I wasn't that I set out and said, I'm going to become an entrepreneur. It's like I kind of signed on to do the movie and then I realized, oh, wait, where's the money? Oh, wait, how do we do? What do we do next? So piece by piece, I sort of began to I began to learn my way. And this now brings me to the book I wanted to talk about. It's this book right here, not a very well-known book, but to me, a very fascinating one, it's written bio famous economist, Joseph schumpeter, who is known for other things, schumpeter's known for his idea of creative destruction. But this book the entrepreneur to me is a kind of little known classic. Now why? It's a little known classic because it talks about the entrepreneur in action. It describes what the entrepreneur does and it distinguishes what entrepreneurs do from what other people do. It makes all kinds of trenchant and valuable observations and I now realize I'm probably just gonna introduce the book today and then I'll go into it in a little more depth tomorrow. Notice if you think about it that we have powerful figures who make the case for capitalism. I think, for example, of Adam Smith, I think also more recently of someone like Ayn Rand, but while Adam Smith talks about the sort of macroeconomic effect of what entrepreneurs do. He talks about the invisible hand of competition. He talks about mercantilism and free trade. He looks at history and discusses the corn laws, but if you look at Adam Smith and say, well, can you describe in the. Wealth of nations who entrepreneurs are? What kind of people are they? How do they spend their day? What makes them different? Adam Smith doesn't really go into that. Now, Rand goes into that a little bit more, but really her focus is on the clash between the sort of Titanic entrepreneurial builder and then the left wing fake altruist. The progressive, if you will, who is cunningly trying to leach off the entrepreneur, denounced the entrepreneur while slipping a hand into the entrepreneur's back pocket and Rand is very effective in doing this, but to me, schumpeter is in a class of his own and simply observing and trumpet himself is not an entrepreneur. I mean, here's a guy who was an emigre from Europe to America he became a Harvard professor, but what I like about Trump beto is he wasn't just a theoretical guy. He wasn't just making, if you will, the microeconomic or macroeconomic case for capitalism, he actually said, look, let me closely observe the entrepreneur and think about what kind of person becomes an entrepreneur. How do entrepreneurs view themselves and how do entrepreneurs carry out activities that make them different from the run of the mill? Now simply introduce the topic by saying that the champagne describes the entrepreneur as quote a man of action, a man of action. I think what he means by this is that most people are not people of action. Now obviously everyone is acting and doing things. So that's not what he means. But what he means is that most people in the world follow a predictable conventional and a safe path. They travel if you will a certain road. And here we come to the key observation of schumpeter as he says that the entrepreneur doesn't travel the road. He makes the road. And so that's what he means by a man of action, a man of action is someone who looks at a situation and starts off by saying, oh, you know the world as it is? Is not the way it ought to be. I can see away in which the world should be different than it is. And I'm going to play a role. In fact, I have an idea of how I can move the world from the way it is closer to the way it should be and the.

Hoover institution John rayson heritage foundation for their Adam Smith John Marin county raisin San Francisco Bay Hoover American enterprise institute schumpeter Reagan lionsgate Amazon White House Joseph schumpeter Rand Steve apple Trump beto
"breyer" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

03:55 min | 12 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"And we, of course, objected, and we presented the case of what he saw. Of course, we're using the primary evidence in the case, which is the surveillance footage of him going into the capitol as the primary evidence. That's what the court should be concentrating on. That's what he did. That's what he saw. You and I would agree Marina that by simply being in the capitol building at that time, he was in that sense committing an infraction. He admits that, and he said, look, I shouldn't have been there. But the point I want to make is this to people who just said, well, he broke the law. The law isn't just a matter of did you break the law, but it's also a matter of how do other people who do sort of the same thing get treated. Now you make the observation in your documents that the leftist Kavanaugh protesters of 2018 they disrupted proceedings in the Senate gallery and they typically got a a $50 fine and B dismissal. Case dismissed, pay 50 bucks a year out of here. It's not gonna stay on your record, no house arrest, no fine apart from the 50 bucks. And I think what you're saying is, what is so different about what my client did? He walked in there, he didn't know what was going to happen. He certainly didn't know what other people were doing. He wasn't asked to leave and saw his penalty although perhaps not severe in the big scheme of things is pretty severe when looked as proportionate to what he did and what other people similarly situated have gotten. Absolutely. Not only if we compare him to the Catholic protesters to receive the disparity treatment of those protesters in the disparate penalties, we see more than that. So let's take a step back. Let's go back to the cabinet protesters. Not only did they receive this $50 fine and a dismissal disposition without anything on the record, they're kind of worse because those individuals disrupted Senate proceedings inside the gallery. So the particular individual that we note in our pleadings, this woman stood up in the gallery and she made a faucet and she was arrested and removed. My client never went into those semi gallery. My client was in the hall. I actually stood next to the front doorway enter the whole time. Played in a small photo and left before shaking us with an officer. So his contact was significantly less egregious than hers. So, of course, we were appalled to learn that someone like her is going to get a $50 fine in a dismissal where so we have to face a year prosecution, a conviction. Albeit for petty offense, but nonetheless that's a conviction. And his fine was $742. He had a restitution to pay even though he didn't break anything, but this is something that the government's ordering for all such defendants. And the government relentlessly prosecuted him the entirety of the year. The government asked for 14 days in jail. They didn't ask for a client. They asked for 14 days of jail. That's something that we should all be very aware of. And of course the government had a dismissal disposition for him or for someone like him someone facing a misdemeanor charge. It's on their website. If you go to the website for the federal prosecutor's office for the District of Columbia, you will see on their website that they will look at each case individually offered dismissal disposition when it's applicable to that individual defendant. They're going to look at each case individually they said. But as we revealed in our pleadings, the individuals who are faced with January 6th prosecutions were told not to even worry about that. That's not going to apply to them. None of their cases are going to get dismissed unless maybe they pass away. But that's it. There's really no dismissal disposition offer to them. So they're not being treated fairly at all in our opinion. Right now I want to commend you for the good work you're doing against people who have been terribly vilified and keep it up and I hope we can have you back to talk about other cases as they get resolved. I.

capitol building Kavanaugh Senate Marina government cabinet District of Columbia
"breyer" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

05:32 min | 12 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"Guys, as I've talked on this podcast before a number of the January 6th defendants have had trouble getting good attorneys. In some cases they end up saddled with State Council and in some cases those are leftists who sort of tried to propagandize them against their beliefs, but an attorney who does not fit into that category. In fact, an attorney who has been capably representing some January 6 defendants, some delighted to welcome to the podcast Marina medvin. She's a nationally recognized attorney. She's had some big and important cases and she has been representing I believe several January 6th defendants, Marina, thanks for joining me. I appreciate it. How many of the January 6th defendants are you representing currently? Right now we have 6. UF 6, okay, awesome. And as you remember, I had contacted you some time ago to say, hey, come on my podcast and talk about this and you were like, wait a minute. I've got these ongoing trials. I can't really do that. So when I read that there was one of your clients that the case, the case was resolved, I was like, let's talk about that one because it'll give us a little window into how these prosecutions operate and how these cases come to a conclusion. So let's begin by talking about this guy Michael steppe off who is Michael stepakoff and what was the what was the conclusion of his case? Rabbi Mike. Michael stepakoff is rabbi Mike. And rabbi Mike is the leader of a congregation in Florida. And he came to Washington D.C. in order to take part in the protest, just like everyone else, seeking election integrity, seeking fair elections for his voice to be heard for the voice of his congregants to be heard. And he followed a crowd into the capitol building. It was there for a total of 5 minutes inside. He shook hands with the police officer. He walked out, took some photos he walked out. He didn't do anything with as far as violent or anything that appears negatively against his types of people. But he was charged search warners executed on his house. His family was humiliated, and he was brought to court in D.C.. He was on probation for over a year. And the case concluded as one year probation with two months of home incarceration and 60 hours of community service. So it's a pretty complex penalty for somebody charge for the first offense. In a class B, petty offense misdemeanor effect. So Maria, let's put what you said in a little bit of slow motion. Here's a guy. He's a he's a rabbi, and he's a messianic rabbi, which means he's sort of a rabbi who is Jewish, culturally, but nevertheless believes in Jesus. Never comes to Washington, D.C., he's upset about the election. Let's look at what he did. Now you said he went into the capitol building. Apparently he observed no violence, and not only that, but he was part of a group where the cops were around and they were interacting with these guys and shaking hands with them and you have that on video don't you. This correct, we did request for the 5 minutes of footage, the security footage of him in the building to be released to the public and it has been released on Thursday and we posted your website. So everyone could see for themselves because at the end of the day, look to see for yourself. Don't trust me. Don't trust the Nash or anyone else for it. Well, look at the video. And see what's on it. And you'll see a crowd of peaceful protesters walking into the capitol through open doors, and you'll see police officers there. And the police officers aren't asking anyone to leave. They're interacting positively with the individuals walking in. We are shaking hands. I was able to count 7 individuals walk up to police officers during a 5 minute video and shake hands. Now Marina, I wanted to turn to the prosecution here because I want to give people a sense of their modus operandi. What the prosecution is doing is evidently producing video that occurred 12 minutes before mister steppe off got there and 30 minutes after he left, and it looks like the argument they were trying to make the judges somehow that this guy, Michael stefa is responsible for what other people did before him or after him in short that he was part of a group or a crowd, and he is somehow held responsible for the actions collectively of the crowd. Is that an accurate summary of what the government was trying to show? That is exactly the argument we made to the judge. Yes. I'm sorry. Well, I was going to make the point that you argued that this is a guy in a justice system who should be held accountable for what he did, right? Correct. That's what criminal sentencing is. In federal court and state court, we look at the individual and his individual contribution to the alleged events. And here, instead of looking mister at mister stubber cop's individual involvement and what he would have seen or what he would have done or what was right around him, the government brought into evidence video from 12 minutes prior and 30 minutes after he left in order to say that the events around him were very tumultuous and much more complex than he led on..

Michael stepakoff rabbi Mike Marina medvin Michael steppe Rabbi Mike Washington D.C. State Council Washington, D.C. Marina warners D.C. Florida Maria Michael stefa Nash government
"breyer" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

06:39 min | 12 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"May be a little weirdness on my part, but every time I hear Michelle Obama's name, and most recently, I've been hearing it in the context of the maybe she can be a replacement for a brier on the Supreme Court and I'm thinking wait. My mind always goes back to her, Princeton thesis, and I'm like, have you read her Princeton thesis? This woman is dumb dumb dumb. Christopher Hitchens, I think it was who said, this thesis is not written in any known language. It's semi illiterate. I think I said once on social media that if this thesis was submitted in India, I don't think it would survive the 7th or the 8th grade. So then you have to ask a question that goes beyond Michelle Obama because think about this is not just an indictment of her. I mean, she can't help being dumb. But Princeton, why would Princeton degrade itself in this way? Well, the two word answer to that is affirmative action. A lot of these characters who have been put forward as the best and the brightest are far from the best and they're clearly far from the brightest, but the question is, how do we get people like this? I mean, we're not just talking about people who like, this is not someone who is trying to make the pole vault and narrowly hit the bar. We're talking about people who can't even get themselves up on the pole. These are people who are who don't belong. Maybe not just at Harvard, but I'm not even sure if they belong in college at all. But nevertheless, we get some insight into this question when we look at the data that's coming out now from Harvard. And think about it. Harvard has kind of the pick of students around the country. And this applies no less to black and Hispanic students as it does to white and Asian students. And when you look at the data what you see is, well, here's a tweet that summarizes some of this. It says that if you're an Asian American applying to Harvard and you are in the 90th percentile, which means your essentially in the top ten, the top ten in what, the top ten in grades, the top 10%. The top 10% in grades, the top 10% on the SAT, the top 10% across the board. If you're in the 90th percentile. You will be passed over for whites who are in the 80th percentile. In short, it's a little easier for whites it seems to get in to Harvard than Asian Americans. If you're Hispanic, you would only have to be in the 60th percentile. In the so 40% of people ahead of you and you still have the same chance of getting into Harvard as an Asian American in the 90th percentile. And then if you're black, you only need to be in the 40th percentile, which means 60% of people taking the SAT, or 60% of people on grades are ahead of you. So look at the inequity of that. Really, what's happened is that Harvard has set up, you could almost call it separate racial tracks. This is not to say that there's no competition, but everybody competes in their own racial track. So Asian Americans compete against who, Asian Americans, whites compete against whites. Blacks compete against blacks. And this is how Harvard does their racial balancing. Ultimately they want to get the best students, yes, but not the best students across the board. They want the best blacks. They want the best Hispanics. And since these groups don't perform equally in academic preparation, this is why they have set this up this way. And as a result, Harvard is sort of lost its place, so you can't talk about how it is having the best students in the country. They clearly don't. They have some of the best students in the country, but they have very mediocre students also who are supposedly there to provide diversity. How mediocre people provide diversity is unclear to me. It seems to me if you have a lot of smart people in a room you're gonna get a more diverse set of ideas than any other way. All right, now there are colleges in the country that don't do this. To me, the most notable of them is Caltech. Caltech has essentially remained meritocratic through all this affirmative action nonsense of the past 40 years. Caltex point is if you can do math if you can do science if you are ready for Caltech, you compete in a single race in which everybody everybody goes at it together and we pick the best of the lot. And that is the end of the matter. Now, it may seem that, wow, you know, this is affirmative action is really needed. We need to have essentially racial discrimination. Embedded in the rules and in the law, why? Because whites are after all, so racist and their attitudes and we've got to combat this existing racism in society. It's a very interesting survey that is put out by this guy. It's actually shared by a young Asian American activist who I've had on the show, Kenny zoo. And he makes the point that when you look at how racial groups raid each other. Well, first of all, pretty much every racial groups rates its own group the best. That's true of all the groups. But here's something interesting. When you look at whites, they rate the other racial groups, which is to say blacks, Hispanics, Asian Americans, all the same and all almost exactly the same as whites themselves. Whites are the closest in having an almost uniform rating for all the groups. Whereas when you look at any of the other groups you find that they are far more race conscious. And so for example, I'm looking now at blacks, blackspot blacks, first of all, they put Hispanic second, they put Asians third, meaning that blacks don't blacks prefer Hispanics to Asians, and they put whites last. If you look at Asian Americans, Asian Americans, obviously put themselves first, but then behind they have they have a white Hispanics and blacks rated about the same. And Hispanics have Hispanics first, they have Asians and blacks, second kind of almost tied, and then they have they have whites raided last of all. So the point I'm getting on here is not necessarily what the rankings turn out to be in terms of who's ahead of who, but rather whites of all groups appear to be the most colorblind whites of all groups appear to be raiding people as individuals, whereas these other groups have stronger prejudices. I like this group and I don't like that group. Of course I like my own group best of all. And so we're putting into place racial preferences to fight a problem that manifestly does not exist. We all know that in order to keep our immune system strong, we need extra protection for it, especially now..

Harvard Princeton Michelle Obama Christopher Hitchens Supreme Court India Kenny zoo Caltex Caltech
"breyer" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

08:01 min | 13 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"You can get it right off The Epoch Times app. And we're here to talk about justice breyer stepping down. Well, I don't know if that was a surprise, but didn't prior say earlier that he was not going to step down. Exactly. He had said that he didn't want to make the court political. So that was his reason for not stepping down, but evidently he's now chosen to step down. Now, ideologically, it seems to me this is no big change because it preserves the 6th three majority, presumably a liberal or leftist is going to be replaced by another leftist. Breyer did vote occasionally with the conservatives, but not in any big issue. And he was for the vaccine mandate. On roe V wade, you don't expect him to be going oh no. To keep it. Right. So what do you think his reasoning is for the shift of approach? I think that there has been a lot of talk from the left about packing the court. And I think that's something briar really felt like with harm the integrity of the court. And so I think in some ways he might have stepped down in order to prevent the left from pushing that continually instead maybe focusing on filling this seat as opposed to trying to pack the court, although I don't think packing the court would have worked anyways because Manchin and cinema wouldn't have voted for it, but I think maybe brier felt like he needed to give something to the left. To diffuse the political pressure for the court backing. Now, interestingly, well, here's Jen Psaki, who essentially says publicly that they're going to be limiting the search to basically a black woman, black women. So we identity politics has made its way now to the Supreme Court. And let's think about this for a minute because the court is not a ideologically or demographically representative institution. It is a creation of constitutional democracy, but its job is to be a check on the democratic majority. And how would you feel if you were, you know, on the court, but you got the black female seat on the court. I mean, what a disgrace. Yeah, I mean, I think it would just be, it would just make you feel like, oh, I only got this because I was a black woman because they said point blank, you're getting this because you're a black woman. So I think that would be pretty frustrating and also just the fact that I'm sure that people can get that seat based on their merit, but you know the left doesn't really care about that. I saw a tweet today from one of the Obama ate Joe Lockhart and he goes Republicans better gear up. He's like, you don't dare to vote against a black woman who's the first black woman in history. So the implication is that somehow our side is intimidated by this precedent of history and I'm thinking, well, first of all, black women aren't exactly a key demographic base for the GOP. So not to mention the only black person on the court is on our side conservative clarence Thomas. Right. So when they appeal to this historic forest, I mean, obviously, they're not going to look at conservative black women. So it's not merely a matter of race and gender. I just mean them assuming that we're gonna not like a black woman as crazy 'cause we like this black man. I mean. Right. I don't know why they would think that. They're the ones who laid in clarence Thomas. I think it's also interesting that these are the left after the recent events on the filibuster blasting cinema blasting mansion, you know, these people are, we need to run them out of the Democratic Party. And an amazingly Schumer was part of this. Schumer actually, well, he even he didn't say that he supported it, but he didn't oppose it either. And what that means is that I think that little reckless because Schumer now needs cinema and mansion both. He can not afford to lose either one of them, and if even one of them is themed and is thinking, well, you know what? We're gonna teach these progressives. I don't think that will actually happen to you. I don't think so. I think that they probably will vote to confirm this person assuming this person is a legitimate judge and everything, but if they pick someone who's really extremely woke and then that person is doing all kinds of political things, I think maybe they vote against them because Manchin might not want to be attached to that. What do you think is the possibility? I think it's low because people are saying on social media. It's going to be Kamala Harris. Because apparently that serves two purposes at the same time on the one hand, they're embarrassed having Kamala Harris on the second part of the ticket. Sort of like we picked the black woman. I mean, think of it. It didn't work out there, right? So now they're back to the black woman theory, but nevertheless, the idea is maybe we can shift or out of The White House and move her into the court. Now she is ridiculously unqualified. I mean, she is a former attorney to be sure, but just from her statements. I have to she'd be part of confirming herself, then. If the Senate was tied, she would have to be the tiebreaker and confirming herself over there. I guess that would be a way for the Democrats to get rid of her because they know how wildly unpopular she is so they can scoot her off away, then I guess she becomes kind of a meaningless vote because they have the minority anyways in the Supreme Court, but I think that would be just a new level. 'cause it kind of signals, hey, this is the only black woman in the country we can pick for anything. She's only black women in the country we can pick to be the vice president. She's the only one we can pick to be on the zippering court. I mean, there have to be better, better options. The other thing I think is kind of funny is that two names that have circulated usually in tandem are Michelle and Barack Obama. And what I find particularly funny about this is the assumption that both of them are women. Obama too. So the gender fluidity within the Obama family is apparently playing out here and again, I think this is unlikely that they'll actually do that. My guess is they will look for a black female judge somewhere down the line and try to have that person go through. Right. And they might also maybe another reason why our step down is because he knew that a lot of conservative decisions were going to come out this year. You know, maybe overturning roe V wade and some other things. So he thought, you know, let's try to get the Democrats some positive news. Oh, that's interesting. You're saying that, well, this is a good point. Now if you think of the dog's case, which is the abortion case from Mississippi, although the decision is supposed to come out in the spring, the justices vote on it much earlier. Then they go into the rigmarole of writing the majority decision, then they pass that over to the minority, they write the dissenting opinion, all of that takes weeks. So it is possible that the judges know how this decision is going to come obviously including prior. And I guess what you're saying is that Brian thought will look if these guys are going to take a major blow, maybe I can head off the storm a little bit by exiting myself or maybe he's like, I don't want to be in the scene when this comes down. I'd rather be, you know, but here's my beach house in Massachusetts. And we'll let the firestorm engulf other people along the way. Now he's staying on till the end of his term. And so I do think another thing surprising though about him retiring is that he actually seems pretty lucid. He's not like Ruth Bader Ginsburg was where she's falling asleep and incoherent. It seems like he's still a person, so I think him stepping down is still pretty political decision. Although I think if we were to lucidity tests across the board, this would imply that Pelosi and.

roe V wade Schumer Jen Psaki Manchin clarence Thomas Joe Lockhart Kamala Harris breyer Breyer brier Obama Supreme Court GOP Democratic Party White House Senate Michelle Mississippi Brian Massachusetts
Mike Gallagher: Regarding Biden's Supreme Court Nominee, Concede the Battle to Win the War

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:16 min | 13 hrs ago

Mike Gallagher: Regarding Biden's Supreme Court Nominee, Concede the Battle to Win the War

"When the bombshell announcement was made yesterday, the justice Stephen breyer is retiring from the Supreme Court. I immediately went in my mind to November 8th. What does this do to the midterms? Because whether we like it or not, the next Supreme Court Justice is not going to be a constitution supporting conservative. It's just not. We could dream, it ain't gonna happen. And I kept thinking, how are Republicans going to react to this? How are Republicans tasked with interviewing and interrogating and grilling this pick behave? Very, very important message on the MyPillow text line to start this hour that I agree with. Concede the battle to win the war. If Republicans go nuclear and attack the nominee, they will be exploited because the Democrats will accuse Republicans of being sexist, racist, whatever other hot button, buzzword they can throw

Supreme Court Stephen Breyer
"breyer" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:57 min | 13 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

"The only thing better than grind in all night for your side hustle? Is your roommate picking you up with Mickey D's breakfast? The perfect pickup deal. There's a deal for every morning at McDonald's. Right now, tastes breakfast perfection when you get a warm and savory sausage mcmuffin with egg for just two 50. Price and participation may vary, can not be combined with combo meal. Just as briar is stepping down and who's going to be his replacement, is it going to be Kamala Harris? Danielle, this is a gill and I will be here to discuss I'm going to examine whether Mitch McConnell is actually a more effective leader of his party than Chuck Schumer is of the Democrats. Attorney, and Marina medven is going to join me. She represents some January 6th defendants. She's going to talk about a pro Trump rabbi who was arrested after January 6th. I'll expose the magnitude of Nvidia's racial discrimination at Harvard and drawing on The Economist Joseph schumpeter. I'm going to try to look at what it is that makes entrepreneurs different than everybody else. This is the dimensions of the podcast. America needs this voice. The times are crazy in a time of confusion, division and lies. We need a brave voice of reason to understanding and truth. This is the dinesh de Souza, podcast. I'm here with my daughter, Danielle, this is a girl. I don't really know if she needs an introduction. But let me mention she is the author of the book their choice, the abortion divide in America. She also has a show on epic TV called counterculture with Daniel de Sousa guilt,.

"breyer" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:11 min | 13 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on WTOP

"Formal retirement announcement expected today from Supreme Court Justice Steven breyer Strong economic growth in the fourth quarter of last year despite that surge in the omicron variant One person is dead several others injured in a shooting at a northwest D.C. hotel A ten 31 Supreme Court Justice Stephen breyer is expected to meet with President Biden today at The White House and then the two will publicly announce that the 83 year old liberal justice will retire at the end of the current term His departure gives the president an opportunity to deliver on a campaign promise to fill a vacant Supreme Court seat by naming the first black woman to the high court Here's CBS correspondent Deborah alfaro Today's Supreme Court Justice Stephen breyer is expected to announce his retirement at The White House President Biden declined to comment further as the news broke yesterday But the president made this declaration on the campaign trail in 2020 I'm looking forward to making sure there's a black woman on the Supreme Court The top candidates are all sitting judges The FrontRunner 51 year old federal appeals court judge ketanji Brown Jackson a Harvard Law School graduate and former law clerk for justice breyer Breyer's departure will not change the 6 three conservative advantage on the court but nomination of a black woman could help the president politically after failing to persuade the Senate to pass legislation shoring up voting rights If no Republicans support his nominee all 50 Democrats can still confirm the nominee with vice president Harris casting the tie breaking vote And Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer is promising prompt confirmation hearings for the next Supreme Court nominee More on that from Mitchell Miller on Capitol Hill Senate majority leader Schumer says he wants the upper chamber to move with all deliberate speed on the nominee and he believes the president will stand by a pledge he made during the campaign President Biden stated that he would choose a black woman as his choice for the Supreme Court and I expect he'll follow through on that Whoever is chosen is likely to face a largely party line vote in a sharply divided Senate Democrats now only need a simple majority to get the nominee confirmed since Senate Republicans got rid of the filibuster for high court nominees when Donald Trump was president On Capitol Hill Mitchell Miller wtop news Good economic news this morning the last quarter of 2021 picked up the pace bouncing back from the 2020 coronavirus recession The economy ended the year by growing at a solid 6.9% annual pace from October through December well above what most economists had expected The commerce department reports the nation's gross domestic product the total output of goods and services expanded 5.7% last year that's the largest one year expansion since 1984 A new report expected today by the Department of Health and Human Services shows more than 14 million Americans have signed up to get health coverage this year through the Affordable Care Act insurance marketplaces That beats the previous record enrollment by nearly 2 million The popularity.

Supreme Court Justice Stephen breyer President Biden Justice Steven breyer Deborah alfaro Mitchell Miller ketanji Brown Jackson White House justice breyer Breyer Senate vice president Harris Capitol Hill Senate D.C. Harvard Law School Biden CBS Chuck Schumer Schumer Donald Trump
"breyer" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:33 min | 18 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"He was granted clemency 30 years later. And who else who are the other contenders? There is another strong contender, leandra Kruger. She's younger, which is an asset. At 45, she'd be the youngest Supreme Court Justice among those currently serving. She has Ivy League degrees too from Harvard and Yale. She clerked on the Supreme Court. She worked in the solicitor general's office under Obama and argued 12 cases at the Supreme Court. She was dynamite in these hearings, incredibly poised and polished, even when she was fighting, losing battles, and all of the 9 justices had their knives out for her. She's currently a judge on the state Supreme Court of California. They're a handful of other 40 something federal judges who might be chosen for breyer's seat, but judges Jackson and Kruger are far and away the favorites. And what about the confirmation end of things? How likely did any of these women would be confirmed if nominated? Well, it seems the Democrats are present. Do you have the votes? All they need is a majority. And when judge Jackson was confirmed to the appeals court last year, three Republicans joined Democrats to vote for her. And this is one of those rare times when Democrats can thank none other than Mitch McConnell for the present rules. He blew up the Senate filibuster for Supreme Court confirmations in 2017 in order to get Neil Gorsuch on the bench. The McConnell rule holds, and the Democrats bear Senate majority may be just enough if the party can hold together as well in this instance, as it has for Biden's many lower court nominations. And what about the ideological makeup of the court? What do you think all of this means for the court going forward? However, quickly, mister Biden gets a successor confirmed, and whoever she turns out to be, the court's direction will not change in the short or medium term. There will still be twice as many conservatives as liberals, abortion rights appear to be endangered, gun rights around the upswing, affirmative actions days are probably numbered. At least in the near term, the next justice will probably find herself dissenting early and often. And what about four soon to be former justice breyer? What do you think his legacy will be where will he end up in the history books? Justice breyer has been a stalwart, but pragmatic, liberal justice, who believed the judges should look beyond a laws text to its purposes into its consequences. His pragmatic approach was really about rolling up our sleeves and figuring out together as common citizens, how to work out our differences. This attitude inspired his majority opinions upholding abortion rights, delineating the limits of presidential power and addressing the delicate matter of religion in the public square. Everyone likes to make fun of priors, lengthy and almost stream of consciousness, hypothetical questions in oral arguments. But he was also a delightful questioner. He was funny. He was at once professorial and down to earth. One thing that preoccupies justice breyer is the stability of democracy and the rule of law. The idea that people will trust the system and abide by its rules, even when they disagree with them, because they feel represented in and by their institutions. It's helpful to a country to have a system where people follow laws where people in fact follow laws interpreted by judges and may do that even when the judges are wrong. So I think that's the goal. Prior wants that as his legacy, but by retiring at this time he seems to be telling us that public faith in the judiciary might be threatened if the court is not protected from drifting.

Supreme Court leandra Kruger Harvard and Yale judge Jackson breyer Neil Gorsuch Democrats bear Senate Supreme Court of California Justice breyer mister Biden Ivy League Kruger Mitch McConnell McConnell Jackson Obama Biden Senate
"breyer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:34 min | 18 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Who make public radio great every day and also those who listen It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Stevens keep And I'm Rachel Martin Supreme Court Justice Stephen breyer is expected to announce his retirement today at 83 he has written many of the courts less glamorous but legally important decisions Here's NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina tomburg If Stephen breyer hadn't been a justice Hollywood might have made him up Deeply intellectual fluent in not just law but philosophy art and culture he was also absent minded geeky self deprecatingly funny physically fit but so preoccupied that he three times suffered serious injuries when knocked off his bicycle Among breyer's most publicly well-known decisions was the one he wrote in 2016 striking down a Texas law that closed nearly half the clinics in the state without any demonstrable safety justification The decision had no majestic language but its effect was profound in reaffirming at the time The rights of women to terminate pregnancies The closures mean fewer doctors longer waiting times increased crowding and significantly greater travel distances all of which when taken together burden a woman's right to choose For the most part though breyers monuments were not so much the decisions that he authored as the decisions that he influenced Behind the scenes he pushed and prodded his fellow justices for consensus On everything from ObamaCare to affirmative action In 2013 when the courts conservatives seem poised to invalidate all affirmative action programs in higher education the justices instead punted on the issue by a 7 to one vote Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote the decision but breyers hidden hand was said to be behind the compromise ruling And three years later Kennedy would for the first time embrace affirmative action in higher education Sunny and disposition naturally optimistic briar believed in persuasion and viewed a descent as a failed opinion But he did dissent and sometimes passionately as he did in 2007 when a 5 justice majority struck down voluntary school disaggregation plans in Louisville Kentucky where the schools had once been segregated by law and in Seattle where they'd been segregated in practice As breyer noted the court had long allowed local school districts considerable leeway to prevent resegregation But now it was striking down the same sorts of plans because of the votes of 5 justices two of them new to the court It is not In the law it's so few have so quickly changed so much It was hardly the only time that breyer would see the court's handiwork even his own work quickly undone by a dramatically more conservative new court majority Breyer for instance was one of the justices who wrote the court's majority opinion upholding a 2002 federal law aimed at limiting the influence of big money and campaigns Only to see the law gutted by a different and more conservative majority 7 years later Briefly despondent he ultimately returned to his optimistic ways always hoping to persuade and sometimes succeeding But this year faced with a 6 to three conservative supermajority apparently determined to reverse some longtime legal precedents that he cared deeply about including abortion breyer decided it was time to go Stephen Gerald breyer was born in San Francisco where his father was a lawyer for the city's public schools An academic star at Stanford Harvard Law School and Oxford breyer would go on to spend decades as a professor at Harvard Law School but with several stints in Washington in the Justice Department then as an assistant prosecutor in the investigation of the Watergate scandal and as chief counsel for the Senate Judiciary Committee then chaired by senator Edward Kennedy It was Kennedy's example the top prior important lessons on how to forge consensus He tell us don't worry so much about credit Credit is something where if you succeed there will be plenty of credit to go around And if you fail who wants the credit While on the committee brier helped enact legislation that deregulated the airline industry and legislation to make federal criminal sentencing more uniform He was so successful that when president Carter nominated him to the federal appeals court based in Boston just days after Ronald Reagan was elected in 1980 Republicans let the appointment go through An act of cooperation that is simply unimaginable today Breyer served as an appeals court judge for 14 years eventually becoming chief judge and in 1994 president Clinton named him to the Supreme Court Once there he proved a moderate liberal who worked well with moderate conservatives like Sandra Day O'Connor when she retired and conservatives of a new brand began to populate the court Breyer sought to make the public case against the conservative doctrine of originalism often debating conservative justice Antonin Scalia now deceased While Scalia argued that the constitution must be interpreted as the founding fathers would have at the time it was written briar countered that the founders understood perfectly well that nothing is static citing for example the constitution's ban on cruel and unusual punishment Flogging as a punishment might have been fine in the 18th century That doesn't mean that it would be okay and not cruel and unusual today What's more he observed in an NPR interview even historians don't agree on what the founders meant at the time they wrote the constitution History is very often in these matters a blank slate or a confused slate and if you want to govern the country by means of that history then you better select 9 historians and not 9 judges to be on the court and I'll tell you those 9 historians will very often disagree with each other The job of a Supreme Court Justice breyer said is to apply the constitution's values to modern circumstances.

Justice breyer breyer NPR news Rachel Martin Nina tomburg Justice Anthony Kennedy Breyer NPR Supreme Court briar Stanford Harvard Law School Stevens Oxford breyer Kennedy Senate Judiciary Committee Hollywood federal appeals court Louisville Texas Kentucky
"breyer" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:09 min | 21 hrs ago

"breyer" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Welcome back to the Jimbo Hana chores We look at the impending retirement of justice Steven breyer of the U.S. Supreme Court with Alan Dershowitz noted attorney and of course Professor of law at Harvard host of the podcast the der show and author of his latest book case against the new censorship of Matthew in Great Falls Montana good evening And what's on your mind denied Matthew Yeah I had a question for Alan and Do you see any problems with a clearly geriatric choosing a Supreme Court Justice when he has destabilized the world he's created the highest inflation in decades can't hold the sentence together or control his bowels and divide it You're asking for an opinion about the president It's really not part of the discussion in this portion of the show of Alan wishes to his free to but that's not really part of the discussion I voted for him I think I don't agree with your characterizations I've known him for 40 years and America's democracy More people voted for him than for the losing candidate So he's the president and we should respect the presidency but everybody has the right to vote for who they want All right Guild and Manila the Philippines who listens online good evening guild Clearing in Jim and grading professor Dershowitz this is your disciple in Manila All of the points I wish to discuss about the qualifications based on race and based on sex you've pretty much already covered But in normal affairs putting that type of restriction on your race and your gender in order to get a job flies in the face of a lot How are they able to do this They shouldn't do it And the Supreme Court has granted tertiary in a case involving Harvard in which Asian American students claim that essentially they are the victims of a ceiling that is there's a floor from minorities but ceiling for Asian Americans and the Supreme Court's going to deal with that And I suspect they'll have something to say about the idea of using race to discriminate against another group like Asian Americans who have themselves been subject to horrible discrimination in America including a 110,000 Japanese Americans being put into detention centers The idea that we discriminate if we do and that's what the Supreme Court will have to decide against Asian Americans in academia is going to pose a serious problem on the equal protection cause of the constitution All right To Mike in Denver good evening Jim good evening Thank you so much for taking my call and always for the opportunity to participate in a lot And professor Dershowitz I always value your insights So thank you so much And I just had a quick comment in question Thank you So Ellen justice breyer I know he was a big proponent of a living constitution which was the idea that an interpretation of the constitution can change with the times And he's kind of been an outspoken defender of the idea that justices decide cases based on their judicial philosophy not their politics So my question would be what effect do you think this is going to have overall on the Supreme Court decisions losing someone like Steven breyer who has that philosophy of a living constitution Well I think anybody nominated by President Biden will support a living constitution my own view is that part of the constitution is dead part of its living The part that says you can't be president unless you're 35 years old That's dead You can't change that You can't be present if you're 34 and 364 days You have to be 35 But the part that says due process equal protection cool and unusual punishment Those are obviously open ended terms designed by the framers to be able to change with the times It was the chief justice Marshall who said it is a constitution we are expounding a constitution that now has lasted longer than any written constitution in the history of humankind and I think the reason for it is part of it is living part of it is dead and the key is to decide which parts are subject to interpretation and which parts are not For example I think equal protection of the law can not be construed to mean that you have racial preferences or racial lack of preferences You can not allow race itself in and of itself to be a determining factor I don't think there can be a debate about that under the equal protection clause of the constitution but obviously some justices think there can be but I suspect that will come to an end shortly All right We have more calls to come and we will get to those but before we go to the breaker let me ask you first of all about your book case against the new censorship who's censoring and who is censoring whoever The thing that's most dangerous is it's not the government It's private industry It's Google and Facebook It's universities And you mentioned podcasts It's coming back It was off the air for a while because it technical issues And now rumble has taken it over and starting next Monday at 5 o'clock You can hear me on rumble and I'll talk about all of these issues that talk about all the great things I hear about when I'm on Jimbo show Outstanding And one more quick thing before the break and then more calls and that would be the court apparently now has the opportunity if it chooses to do so to throw out roe versus wade Do you think they will No I don't I think that there's clearly four justices in favor of that Probably for maybe three three justices who are opposed to it And it will be up to support press and we have to see what Cavanaugh will do My suspicion I can't even make it a prediction because I don't have a basis for it Is that the court will uphold the Mississippi statute moving back the time for abortion but will not explicitly overrule roe versus wade which is a now a 49 year old president and deserves to be given some weight I think the number of the justices would not have voted for row as a matter of first impression 49 years ago but now that it's been on the books I suspect Robertson may be Kavanaugh will not vote to overrule it More to come on the.

Steven breyer Supreme Court Dershowitz Manila Matthew Alan Harvard Alan Dershowitz Ellen justice breyer Great Falls President Biden Jim America Montana Philippines Denver Mike Marshall wade Facebook
"breyer" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

CNN Political Briefing

05:45 min | 1 d ago

"breyer" Discussed on CNN Political Briefing

"Hey everyone, I'm chrysalis. Editor at large in politics reporter in for David chalian. I write and host the point newsletter and YouTube show for CNN. This is the CNN, political briefing. Here's what you need to know when politics for Wednesday, January 26th. After almost three decades on the bench, Supreme Court Justice Steven breyer plans to retire. Sources tell CNN that breyer plans to form an announce his retirement at a White House event as soon as tomorrow. The president very much wanted prior to have the first official word on his retirement when he was asked about it today. Take a listen. There has been no announcement for justice breyer, let him make whatever statement he's going to make. And I'll be happy to talk about it later. But we know this is coming, and we know the retirement is huge because it means President Biden will have his first opportunity to name a nominee to the Supreme Court if all goes according to plan. Breyer has faced massive pressure in recent years from the liberal left, which has urged him to leave the court while Joe Biden still has a clear path to replace him. So, just for some context here, the court currently has 6 conservative justices and three liberal justices, because it's almost certain Joe Biden will choose a liberal to replace breyer, the new pick will not fundamentally change the balance of the court. However, Biden's pick will likely be much younger than breyer, meaning they could serve on the court for decades and decades to come. The news of briars retirement comes as the courts conservative majority has flexed its muscles in a huge term thus far. The court has already heard a case that could overturn roe V wade and another that could expand gun rights. Breyer is expected to stay on until the end of the term and a replacement is confirmed. Democrats are at least initially voicing confidence that the Senate will confirm whoever Joe Biden picks to replace breyer. There is some sense of urgency among Democrats to get this done as soon as possible because Republicans could well win back the 50 50 Senate in 2022. Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer said Biden's nominee, quote, we'll receive a prompt hearing in the Senate Judiciary Committee and will be considered and confirmed by the full United States Senate with all deliberate speed. Mitch McConnell, the Republican Senate leader, said back in June that he wouldn't allow President Biden to fill a Supreme Court vacancy if one were to arise before the 2024 election if that is Republicans won control of the Senate in 2022. So there's a reason for the urgency from Democrats. And that strategy is similar to the one McConnell followed in 2016, when president Barack Obama was in office. He's argued because there's an upcoming presidential election. Voters should get a say before that president gets to make an appointment. We of course know how that one turned out. President Donald Trump won and nominated conservative justice Neil Gorsuch to the court who was confirmed by the Republican controlled Senate. But when justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died in 2020, where Joe Biden was the democratic nominee for president, McConnell changed his tune, rushing the nomination of judge Amy Coney Barrett to the bench. So he seemed to have ditched his whole voter should decide argument to squeeze in another conservative justice when the opportunity arose. Elections have consequences, and that is most evident when it comes to fulfilling vacancies on the Supreme Court. Want to know who said that in response to today's retirement news? Republican senator Lindsey Graham. That's right. Longtime Trump ally, but someone who has voted for democratic nominees in the past. Now, on the campaign trail, Biden has vowed that he would fill a potential Supreme Court vacancy within African American woman. Here's Biden during a 2020 debate. I committed to, if I'm elected president, have an opportunity to appoint someone to the courts will be I'll appoint the first black woman of the courts. It's required that they have representation now is long overdue. If he made good on that pledge, it would be a first for the high court. Members of Biden's team have also previously said they are seeking diversity for judicial appointments. They said they would break from the norm by considering historically under represented legal backgrounds, including public defenders and civil rights and legal aid attorneys. The potential candidates at this early stage include katangi Brown Jackson, who was confirmed last year to the powerful D.C. appellate court. Leandra Kruger, who serves in the California Supreme Court and Jay Michelle child, South Carolina U.S. district court judge. And if you're curious about breyer himself, well, here's a few facts he was appointed in 1994 by Bill Clinton, before serving on the court by her worked in Congress as the chief counsel of the Senate Judiciary Committee in the late 70s, which allowed him to understand the process behind many of the statutes that made their way to the court. At 83 years old, he spent his career trying to focus on how it would work for the average citizen. He stressed that the court shouldn't be seen as part of the political branches of government, but recognized that certain opinions could be unpopular. Listen to what he had to say at Harvard Law School last year. Is wrong to think of the court as just another political institution? And it is doubly wrong to think of its members as junior Lee politicians. If the public sees judges as politicians in robes, it's confidence in the courts and in the rule of law itself can only diminish. Breyer has been a consistent liberal vote on the Supreme Court, remaining true to his liberals in areas such as the death penalty affirmative action abortion gun rights and campaign finance. He's also had an unwavering belief in the U.S. system of government and a very pragmatic view of the law. In his later years in the court, he is best known for a dissent he wrote in 2015 in a case concerning execution by lethal injection, where he wanted the court to take up the constitutionality of the death penalty. One other thing that breyer is known for is having an optimistic view of the world. He highly valued collegiality. Listen, I would like to see less controversy in the political world. I would like to see less division in this country. Listen to people who disagree with.

breyer Senate President Biden Joe Biden Supreme Court Biden CNN David chalian Justice Steven breyer Breyer Senate Judiciary Committee justice breyer roe V wade President Donald Trump McConnell Neil Gorsuch judge Amy Coney Barrett Trump ally Chuck Schumer Mitch McConnell
Breaking News: Justice Stephen Breyer Set to Retire, No Discussion Allowed for New Nominees

The Dan Bongino Show

00:39 sec | 1 d ago

Breaking News: Justice Stephen Breyer Set to Retire, No Discussion Allowed for New Nominees

"Know what's fascinating with the breaking news that justice Stephen breyer Supreme Court Justice Steven breyer is set to retire now Jim and I were kind of chatting there during the break and she brought up a great point you know Biden had already previously committed to nominating a minority female for the position so it doesn't matter what is said during the hearing I mean she could come out and say anything she wants anything you say against it You will automatically be deemed a racist It doesn't matter every media organization will pile on You question anything said nominee does You will be deemed a racist It is a tactic they use all the

Justice Stephen Breyer Justice Steven Breyer Supreme Court Biden JIM
Justice Breyer to retire, giving Biden Supreme Court pick

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 d ago

Justice Breyer to retire, giving Biden Supreme Court pick

"Justice justice justice justice Stephen Stephen Stephen Stephen Bryer Bryer Bryer Bryer is is is is giving giving giving giving president president president president Biden Biden Biden Biden in in in in opening opening opening opening to to to to make make make make his his his his first first first first Supreme Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court Court pick pick pick pick Bryer Bryer Bryer Bryer said said said said in in in in twenty twenty twenty twenty fifteen fifteen fifteen fifteen to to to to this this this this day day day day would would would would come come come come I I I I think think think think I I I I would would would would prefer prefer prefer prefer to to to to retire retire retire retire than than than than the the the the alternative alternative alternative alternative the the the the eighty eighty eighty eighty three three three three year year year year old old old old liberal liberal liberal liberal justice justice justice justice says says says says he's he's he's he's stepping stepping stepping stepping down down down down after after after after more more more more than than than than twenty twenty twenty twenty seven seven seven seven years years years years that that that that won't won't won't won't change change change change the the the the court's court's court's court's six six six six three three three three conservative conservative conservative conservative tilt tilt tilt tilt since since since since a a a a democratic democratic democratic democratic president president president president will will will will pick pick pick pick his his his his replacement replacement replacement replacement and and and and a a a a slim slim slim slim democratic democratic democratic democratic Senate Senate Senate Senate majority majority majority majority will will will will almost almost almost almost certainly certainly certainly certainly confirm confirm confirm confirm him him him him or or or or her her her her president president president president Biden Biden Biden Biden has has has has pledged pledged pledged pledged to to to to name name name name the the the the high high high high court's court's court's court's first first first first black black black black woman woman woman woman Sager Sager Sager Sager mag mag mag mag ani ani ani ani Washington Washington Washington Washington

Bryer Bryer Justice Justice Justice Justic Biden Biden Biden Biden Supreme Supreme Supreme Suprem Senate Senate Senate President President President High High High High Court Sager Sager Sager Sager Ani Ani Ani Ani Washington Washington
Caller: Will Justice Thomas, Justice Alito Focus on What Their True Job Is?

Mark Levin

01:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Caller: Will Justice Thomas, Justice Alito Focus on What Their True Job Is?

"I wanted to know in your opinion whether or not just this Thomas and justice Alito are going to be able to during deliberation focused the justices and what their true job is Back it into these policy decisions or discussions that they are opinion So this is Thomas is all about following the law in the interpreting the constitution Now while you're quite right and the answer is no Because Kagan is an ideologue breyer is a longtime ideologue And Sotomayor is a very stupid person and an ideologue You have a few on there who are playing games the chief justice does often I'm afraid Barrett may be in that camp will see soon enough And Kavanaugh from time to time So really the two most solid constitutionalists the kind of justices that the framers had in mind are Thomas and Alito And then Gorsuch most of the time And then the others in the case of the chief justice his decision in ObamaCare and also his conduct when it came to the Pennsylvania cases that were coming to the court were disgrace Absolute disgrace I don't trust him at all So to answer your question

Justice Alito Thomas Breyer Kagan Sotomayor Gorsuch Kavanaugh Barrett Alito Pennsylvania
What Data Set About COVID Is Justice Stephen Breyer Being Fed?

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 2 weeks ago

What Data Set About COVID Is Justice Stephen Breyer Being Fed?

"Go My question really is I'd like to turn this to is state You heard what I asked I mean you know 750 million new cases yesterday are close to that is a lot They were not 750 million new cases yesterday First of all there's 330 million people in the United States To have no idea what he's talking about and he has no idea what he's talking about Go ahead I don't mean to be facetious But that's why I said I would find it unbelievable That it could be in the public interest Just suddenly stop these vaccinations And he was talking about stopping vaccinations Does he even know What's being debated his colleague son of said nobody's mandating Vaccinations and then he says it would be unbelievable if we stop these vaccinations And even dealing with the same set of information are they dealing with reality Go ahead It was given was a lot of people will quit Well we should consider that My wonderful law clerk has 61,475 63,422 61,466 61,474 to 475 Those are pages I don't think you should read all 61,000 But nonetheless there are at least 5 or ten pages where they went into this They said 5 or ten pages where they went into this And of 61,000 and change

United States
What Is the Legal Rationale for Biden's COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate

Slate's Political Gabfest

01:50 min | 4 months ago

What Is the Legal Rationale for Biden's COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate

"Gap best vaccine mandate has taken effect. You listeners have to get vaccinated or else you have to listen to me. Spin out stephen. Breyer fantasia every day. That's gonna be. The new mandate from the vest after shunning mandates. For months president biden has announced a broad mandate. So he's requiring federal employees and contractors to get vaccinated. He's also requiring healthcare workers at federally funded institutions get vaccinated and he has had osha. The occupational safety and health administration come up with a rule that will require companies that have more than one hundred workers to demand vaccination or weekly testing in order to protect the workplace health and safety of other employees. there he also doubled fines on people who violate math mandates on things like airplanes so emily. It's pretty clear that this mandate on federal workers and those on federally funded health clinics legal straight up. No problem i mean people may not like it seems like biden can do it. What is the legal rationale for the mandate on large employers. The legal rationale for the mandate is that the federal government through osha through. It's occupational health and safety powers sets tons of rules for workplaces. There are plenty of other vaccine. Mandates out there in the united states in schools and at work and lots of other conditions that the government sets for employers and employees to follow and so the biden administration wants to see this as kind of routine use of its powers in that domain and there is some precedent for this but this is also in its scope and its sweep and introducing a new vaccine pretty unprecedented and so i expect legal challenges to binds vaccine conditions. Once this rule is finalized.

Breyer Fantasia Osha President Biden Stephen Emily Biden Biden Administration Federal Government United States
Justice Stephen Breyer Says 'Criteria [Was Not] Met' to Rule on 2020 Election

Mark Levin

01:20 min | 4 months ago

Justice Stephen Breyer Says 'Criteria [Was Not] Met' to Rule on 2020 Election

"I am so disappointed in them. No judge, including the Supreme Court of my United States has had the courage to allow it to be heard. Why was that? Why was it Because they didn't bring a case. I guess that met the normal criteria for being heard. And this is why This justice needed to be seriously challenged if you're going to bring up the subject. Rather than an attack on Trump. Because they didn't bring a case. I guess that met the normal criteria for being heard. And what would that be? And what would that be? Go ahead. He decided to take a case. There have to be four votes to take it so I can't go beyond that. What we do know is that they were not four votes to take it because it wasn't taken. And there are criteria and, uh, if we don't take a case, it's you know, I mean, the reason was all likelihood is that the criteria weren't mad and he doesn't tell us what the criteria are. But I will tell you the criteria were met. I just told you why they were met. The criteria were met. That Article two Section one close to was clearly violated more than once by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania.

Supreme Court Donald Trump United States Supreme Court Of Pennsylvania
Supreme Court Sides With Cheerleader Who Wrote Profane Social Media Post

News, Traffic and Weather

00:56 sec | 7 months ago

Supreme Court Sides With Cheerleader Who Wrote Profane Social Media Post

"A cheerleader over a vulgar social media post and Ed Donahue has the latest The ruling was 8 to 1 in favor of Brandy Levy. She did not make her school's varsity cheerleading team on Snapchat Levy vented, using curse words and a raised middle finger. I was a 14 year old kid. I was upset. I was angry. Everyone. Every 14 year old kid speaks like that. At one point. Levi was not in school at the time, but was suspended from junior varsity cheerleading activities for a year. Justice Stephen Breyer ruled the suspension violated Levi's First Amendment rights. Young students and adults like me, shouldn't Be punished for them, expressing their own feelings. And letting others know how they feel. But the justices did not rule out schools from disciplining students for what they say off campus. Ed Donahue, Washington and we will talk about that in this portion of the program with your calls

Ed Donahue Brandy Levy Levi Justice Stephen Breyer Washington
Supreme Court Sides With Pennsylvania Cheerleader Over Snapchat Post

Steve Scaffidi

00:39 sec | 7 months ago

Supreme Court Sides With Pennsylvania Cheerleader Over Snapchat Post

"Court with a big ruling today, siding with the high school cheerleader who is vulgar social media posts got her suspended from the squad. Andy Levy dropped a bunch of F bombs into a Snapchat post after she was cut from the varsity cheerleading squad, and she endured the wrath of her Pennsylvania High school. The school argued it needed to expand its discipline policy beyond campus in order to monitor and prevent cyber bullying. The Supreme Court agreed the school's regulatory interest remains significant in some off campus circumstances but side With Levi Justice, Breyer wrote for an 8 to 1 majority. Those interests were insufficient to overcome Levi's interest in free expression. Aaron Carter Ski ABC News New YORK Milwaukee Bucks

Andy Levy Pennsylvania High School Levi Justice Supreme Court Breyer Levi Aaron Carter ABC New York Milwaukee Bucks
Tribal Police May Detain Non-Native Americans on Reservation Highways

Chris Plante

00:25 sec | 8 months ago

Tribal Police May Detain Non-Native Americans on Reservation Highways

"Can stop and search non Indians on tribal lands for potential violations of state or federal law. The court had previously held the tribal police have little authority over non Indians. But Justice Stephen Breyer wrote for the court that allowing a temporary stop in detention so that state or federal authorities could be called in enhances public safety. Right now. There are young people across the world facing a tough

Justice Stephen Breyer
Women Street Photographers - Melissa Breyer & Emily Sujay Sanchez

The Candid Frame

01:55 min | 10 months ago

Women Street Photographers - Melissa Breyer & Emily Sujay Sanchez

"Back in two thousand nineteen. I interviewed photographer. Narasaki me ova about her. Founding of women street photographers a collection of hundreds of women who share a passion for street photography. What began as one. Woman's inspiration has turned into a community that has showcased and inspired photographers. The world over the annual exhibits have displayed. Amazing work the breakthrough any assumed limitations of sexuality and locality. The recent release of the book women street photographers provide a new way for that talent to be displayed and shared and today we speak to two photographers were included in that monograph. The first is melissa. Brier also provides the forward to the book. Her work consists of ongoing themed projects including true stories watch woman and city of clouds. Emily's j sanchez is a relative newcomer to the world of street photography her on the lot next communities of upper manhattan and the bronx results enrich photographs of an overlooked community especially among street offers. They are only two of numerous talent. Who's worked can be found in. The seminal book. This is a body ex and welcome back to the candidate for him first off. Congratulations on the book. It is non gyda fantastic job putting it together. Yeah i know a lot of work. God knows especially wrangling. That many photographers especially street photographers. I don't get it. yeah. I don't know how she did it. A real feet but she's supernatural so might makes sense.

Narasaki J Sanchez Brier Melissa Emily Manhattan
Breyer says big Supreme Court changes could diminish trust

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 10 months ago

Breyer says big Supreme Court changes could diminish trust

"Supreme Court justice Stephen Bryer is urging caution for those who propose changing the makeup of the court such as expanding the number of justices justice Stephen Bryer says liberal advocates of big changes including adding more justices to the Supreme Court should think long and hard about what they're proposing he says politically driven change could diminish the trust that Americans place in the court Breyer's comments are from the text of a speech he gave remotely to the Harvard Law School of which he is an alumnus prior noted that despite a conservative majority he and his colleagues stayed out of the twenty twenty election battle supported Louisiana abortion clinics and rejected efforts to end legal protections for immigrants who entered the U. S. as children Briar at eighty two is the oldest justice and is facing some pressure to retire now while Democrats hold the White House and have a slim edge in the Senate Jackie Quinn Washington

Justice Stephen Bryer Stephen Bryer Supreme Court Breyer Harvard Law School Louisiana White House Jackie Quinn Washington Senate
Supreme Court: Booking.com can trademark its name

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Supreme Court: Booking.com can trademark its name

"Travel website booking dot com Khun trademark its name. It's a ruling that also affects other companies whose name is a generic word followed by dot com The high court issued its 8 to 1 ruling today. Lower courts had cited with booking dot com but the Trump administration had appealed to the Supreme Court. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg wrote for the majority. Justice Stephen Breyer dissented.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg Justice Stephen Breyer Supreme Court
Supreme Court throws out Louisiana abortion restrictions

Bloomberg Law

07:32 min | 1 year ago

Supreme Court throws out Louisiana abortion restrictions

"Been talking to Stephen Black professor at the University of Texas Law School about the decision today We're a divided Supreme Court struck down a Louisiana law that opponents said would have left the state with only one abortion clinic. Chief Justice John Roberts provided the crucial vote during the court's liberal justices in a 5 to 4 majority. So Justice Stephen Breyer, who also wrote the majority opinion in the Texas Case, wrote the majority opinion here did he reiterated his reasoning in the Texas case, or did he just follow precedent? No American. I think a lot of the plurality of him by the prior was very much not just reiterating what he wrote for the majority four years ago in the home of health case, but also do not carefully trying to explain why that decision for your so should control the case. Why the Louisiana line is not in any material way. Actually, or legally different fromthe law that the court threw out in Texas four years ago. If I can, you know for Brier, the queue is to show why these cases are not the similar And you know, I don't get you. Justice. Roberts actually agreed with that. I think you just agreed with the endorsement of the analysis from the earlier decision on hold and help if that's why he felt obliged and compelled to write separately. What was the thread running through the dissenting opinions? What's interesting about this case is, you know if you read the sentinel opinions that actually very little tune about roar, Casey and a whole lot about standing, you know, I think for the defenders, the ground they were hoping in this case would be resolved on Was that the abortion providers June Medical Services, etcetera weren't proper parties. The challenge Louisiana long the first place that would have allowed the court sidestep a major ruling on the stuff into scope of the right to pursue a pre viability abortion. But of course, there were consequences all his own indignant much harder for a court to hear these kinds of pieces going forward, so No, I think for the dissenters for justice Promise Justice Alito. The quarters from Kavanaugh know there at least stated opposition here with principally to the court allow in this case to reach America at all. I suspect June that that no one will be surprised if no. Were those marriage to be properly before them. They just hostile to them that know the descent maybe focus on stand them, but I think it's not hard to imagine that there are objections on the merits behind them as well. So during his confirmation hearings, Justice Cavanaugh was questioned again and again on Roe v. Wade, and he said he would follow precedent. Did he veer from that in this decision? I don't think so. I mean, just, Kavanaugh wrote only a very short to page dissent, although he joined a large chunk of just much longer defense. You know, I think Kavanaugh is a little bit cagey and careful on exactly that point. Doesn't say a lot about roar. Casey. He really put it on the procedural question of whether these planets had standin on why he thinks that matter should have been read ended the trial court traditional back finding on that question. But, you know, I think folks are not gonna have trouble reason. If you imagine this is You know, suitable and without necessarily saying that he's probably a reliable vote for the conservatives in a case where the merits of an abortion restriction really aren't properly before the court. You know, I don't think it's directly inconsistent with anything, he said during the confirmation process, But Matt it certainly doesn't come running like wall. We've heard a lot about Justice Roberts Justice Gorsuch Has Cavanaugh been a reliable conservative vote during his first term here, I think, for the most part, I mean, I think there's one or two paces June where You know he's been on the other side. We're siding with the progressive on Ly one that comes to mind when you was the deciding vote on. It wasn't an especially major contention case that without an antitrust case You know, I think he's probably been in some respects more reliable in a smaller data set as a conservative vote than justice. Gorsuch has been, obviously, of course, it's you know, it's fresh off of the Majority opinion he wrote in the LGBT discrimination case, You know, so I think I think it's pretty clear that injustice. Cavanaugh, the conservative, got what they were hoping for. Um Whether that hold across the larger data set, we'll see. But you know, I also think it's also a sign of the times. June. You know, we had a 30 year period We had a Supreme Court with No. Two very obvious swing. That justice is Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, Justice Anthony Kennedy, where you could see these pretty profound shift in majorities from one case to the next. That's not where we are. Now we have a solid conservative majority and results, like the abortion case, don't change that. I think they just show that there are at least some elements that even the solid conservative majority won't transgress. This was the third time in two weeks that Chief Justice John Roberts disappointed conservatives in a blockbuster opinion. Is he now the next Justice Kennedy Oh, I think it's been clear June since Justice Cabin always confirmed to the Supreme Court that in most, not all but most of the high profile, divisive partisan No social and contentious cases before the Supreme Court. The departure of death of Kennedy puts to Justice Robert from the middle, and I think, you know we're seeing that this term in spades. It's not just his decisive vote today in the Louisiana abortion paid not just his majority opinion in the doc a case you know that he also joined Justice Gorsuch. In the LGBT discrimination case, So you know they're going to be out liars where it's not the chief Cruz the swing vote, But I think you know in the high profile cases more often than not, yes, where there's a 5 to 4 majority, and it's No for the conservatives who sent him the the one who will have been personally to switch sides with the chief justice John, I don't think that's because anything about the chief has changed. I think that because No. The court itself has changed. And because the kind of dispute the court is taken are increasingly grounds new towards ones where any of those five justices were going. Be disinclined Tio. Ride with the quote unquote conservative position. It's going to be John Roberts. Using this opinion and looking forward at some of the other opinions that are coming out, especially the decision on the subpoenas for Trump's financial records. Does this tell us anything about how justice Roberts may vote on that? I really don't think so. You know, I don't think that this is any kind of broader shift or pattern in how the chief justice instead of his job, you know, I think he's he's able to take that from cases differently. I mean, you know, right after we got the abortion opinion this morning, we got the chief justice's majority opinion. And that's the Buchanans, which was a very classically conservative separation of powers. Hold them from him. So I don't think we should read anything broader into his vote in these cases, other than the reality that he is now the Longboat And, you know, do not could show up again as early as you know the cases where they were coming down on Tuesday or the rest of this week or next week. You know, I don't think this is the last time this term that the chief going to be the swing vote, But I also don't think that you know the fact that he's this one wrote in some cases allows us to predict in which cases It most likely

Chief Justice John Roberts Justice Roberts Justice Gorsuc Supreme Court Justice Cavanaugh Justice Anthony Kennedy Justice Stephen Breyer Louisiana Justice Alito Justice Roberts Kavanaugh Texas Justice Sandra Day Justice Cabin Casey Justice Robert Stephen Black University Of Texas Law School June Medical Services
In metro Atlanta, Easter and Passover observations go digital

Kilmeade and Friends

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

In metro Atlanta, Easter and Passover observations go digital

"On this Good Friday many churches around the metro area are working to plan a very different Easter Sunday service than they've ever had to do before needless to say I think Sunday will be a very strange Easter associate pastor Joseph Breyer with Decatur's Oak Grove United Methodist tells me the online video service for this Sunday for calling elements from Palm Sunday last year from Easter last year sense of the whole choir put together ahead of time to release on the church Facebook page and YouTube channel McBrayer says for for the the the Oak Oak Oak Grove Grove Grove congregation congregation congregation even even even though though though it it it may may may be be be awhile awhile awhile until until until I I I can can can experience experience experience that that that in in in person person person again again again it it it gives gives gives them them them a a a taste taste taste of of of that that that sense sense sense of of of belonging belonging belonging after after after trade trade trade gets gets gets ninety ninety ninety five five five point point point five five five W. S. B.

Joseph Breyer Decatur Oak Grove United Methodist Mcbrayer Facebook Youtube Oak Oak Oak Grove Grove Grove
"breyer" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"breyer" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Why not you drastically cut the budget for the justice Breyer justice tells when you factor right the state thank you very much this is in shock the presumptive nominee and again picture if you will in your mind corona virus has happened in this country the economy is shut down our president speaks to the nation every day two eight tried to tell you where we are as a country what we're doing and be to offer a glimmer of hope do you want to turn the keys over to that jackass to get up there every day she can go through this I'm serious can you imagine that it just bailing out on senses in the current affairs and that way you know you know the thing you know the thing I mean it's I don't know why it was someone more in their prime that you just can't stand and you're totally against you go jackass on them I'm all for it there is that part of me that does feel he's running for right now I'm starting I'm starting a closer to van camp okay like nobody held a gun your damn head made you do now yeah but he's gone through this to even David got to the point one time where he felt bad for Geno is one time and I yes I'm not even joking hi he looked down because he got lost in his sentence he looked down and then look back up and said I'm sorry and it it really did remind me of my grandpa after he had a severe stroke because he would get lost about things and yeah would apologize I did feel bad the same time that man cannot be president now right not not just because his inability to put together a sentence because let's be honest Donald Trump loves to take the scenic route to his point to yes I know it's because this guy looks lost is it North Carolina South Carolina is in north South Carolina is it East West south west north you know this guy doesn't know where he is half the time and so what that really means is a bunch of unelected court on court advisors would come in and run the country guys like Ben Rhodes who admitted he misled a young dumb press corps that was enamored with Barack Obama about the Iran deal I mean these guys bragged about it yes I know okay you know what's worse is the state where Joe is right now what's that if you just got beat by an so long Bernie that is true was there really a bye bye Bernie party from former Clinton staffers who he asked ME I don't know why but I said first when I read it I thought it was bye bye birdie and for some reason the actual title of what these former Clinton staffers try to put together the actual title makes it so much worse it was actually just called by by Bernard I don't know why going Bernard makes it much worse than just but yeah bye bye Bernard Hillary for America celebration toast to this email went out to former staffers of Hillary Clinton early yesterday afternoon they say he's finally gone again join for a celebratory toast if U. K. and then they changed it to a more generic Hillary for America and a primary celebration toast and then the call was cancelled by about three o'clock or three thirty yesterday afternoon I started getting some push back when this whole thing leaked there's a bad law because there are people in Bernie Bros disappointed in my you know that there's going to be a wild one man the hard core Bernie and the hard core Hillary folks are just some very very bitter people it seems and they hold all right Josh all body yes no doubt about that all right to switch gears talking about the corona virus who would have ever known that Wimbledon had a massive pandemic insurance policy I read that today I know who had the foresight for that well I barely was done in two thousand three with the sars scare wow put into their insurance so even paying two million a year for this policy for the past seventeen years so as it goes they pay roughly thirty four million over that time it does seem like a lot but because well they're canceled this year they will receive a hundred and forty one million from the policy well unless of course they can prove that this is a pre existing condition somehow we've had pandemics before we sure as hell are going to pay on this one if they had some shift in attitudes going on somewhere and on a quick sports note there has been much of that in the news there's nothing to report other than Tom Brady talking with Howard Stern yesterday and for Tom Brady to open up on a number of different topics as of my friend said who would have picked Howard Stern in that pool all the different sports people that he seems to lack a gym grade all these people over time interesting but on one of the things he talked about was getting marriage counseling with Giselle did you guys see that part nope it makes total sense because it doesn't matter who you are like a Tom Brady if you ever think man she just must feel lucky to be in his presence not so much because as he was quoted saying she felt like I would play football season and she would take care of the house then all of a sudden when the season ended I'd be like great let me get in all my other business activities let me get into my football training and she said they're going to well what are you going to do things for the house we're gonna take the kids to school and do that so that was a big part of our marriage that I had to like check myself because she was like I have goals and dreams to so that's why he stopped attending the OTA's during the off season cutting back on business ventures and said initially he resented her for that they get counseling and then she wrote him a very thought out letter about how she felt in the marriage he says I keep it in a drawer and I read it and it's a good reminder for me that things are going to change and evolve over time see you see a couple like that from the outside what if they ever have to fight about things taken care of you got nannies you god cooks you got whatever money's no object for anything they're just like everybody else math in that yeah just now it's not exactly trapped I mean not just there's like a gazillion options out there for her yes that's true but band I found that but I know it is weird when you see.

Breyer