35 Burst results for "Brexit Brexit Brexit"

Yoram Hazony: Not Honoring the Opposition Will Destroy the Nation

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:29 min | 2 weeks ago

Yoram Hazony: Not Honoring the Opposition Will Destroy the Nation

"Speaking of Civil War, I mean, a lot of people on both now the fairly radical left and the fairly radical right have proposed almost precisely that. They said we no longer have enough in common to maintain a cohesive nation that you can't have a nation that includes both the woke and social conservatives, fiscal liberals. You can't have that nation. It doesn't exist. It's never existed. There has to at least be a common base of values. And in the absence of restoration of that base of values, maybe it's better if we all go our separate ways. Now, I mean, Franklin, I think that sounds wildly optimistic about what would happen if you actually have the breakdown of a country that has 330 million people. One giant federal military with nuclear weapons that seems like a pretty optimistic vision that everybody just kind of puts down their weapons and walks away. But when does a nation become so noncoherent and non cohesive that is no longer a nation? Well, you've just described very well when it happens. I mean, it's happening right now. What's happening is that in order to, in order to maintain the cohesion of a nation or, you know, the same thing is true in a family. Any group of human beings that stays cohesive, that stays solid. I mean that under pressure internal and external pressure, they pull together instead of blowing apart. In every human loyalty group, what's necessary is that the leadership consciously purposely gives honor to the different competing tribes. Because there's no way to every nation nation is diverse. There's no such thing as a homogeneous nation. Every nation is made up of tribes of subsectors that sometimes they hate each other and sometimes there's a risk of their going to war. The job of the central, the central leadership, the job of the top leadership in the nation, is to make sure that there's a balance that honors being given to the different tribes. And what's happened in America is that, you know, at least since Donald Trump. I mean, the same thing happened in England with Brexit. So it's not localized to America, but at least since Donald Trump had probably a lot longer than that. The idea of I should see the other side as a part of my nation. I give them honor. They give me honor. Has just been completely lost.

Franklin Donald Trump America England
Dr. Steve Turley on the Return of 'Traditionalism'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:33 min | Last month

Dr. Steve Turley on the Return of 'Traditionalism'

"For you for doctor Steve. What is the best term that covers from Orban to Trump to Brexit to Farage to maga? What for you is the most discreet in the philosophical sense, nomenclature for what we are witnessing? Yeah, so when all is said and done, I would go with the idea of conservative as traditionalism. We're going back. This is a return. That's the key. So modernity is inherently liberal. Modernity is inherently all about throwing away our traditions and customs is now out of date and superstitious and so forth. What we're seeing now is a return. I mean, even China is talking more about Confucianism than it is marks. This is hot now. Everybody wants to go back to their civilizational religions at this point. So, but it's what makes it complicated. What makes it complicated is that it globalism territorials. How's that for a no, magic? Nice. If globalism territorial laws politics, takes it away from the local. The way this is the Greta Thunberg, the great reset where you're actually denying the way human beings live, which is in community, with sovereignty with territory. It's the antithesis of what about 6000 years of written history. Exactly right. Exactly. And it's replacing civilization with a

Farage Orban Steve Greta Thunberg China
Once You Reject Establishment Politicians, the Effect Is Seismic

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:24 min | Last month

Once You Reject Establishment Politicians, the Effect Is Seismic

"On that phrase, doctor Steve, of the decoupling or the alignment. The alignment. Yeah. Somebody said it to me thusly with regards to Brexit. And I think the same applies to America first maga to Democrats voting for the billionaire from queens. Once somebody who's been voting labor or the left for 40 years whose parents work for voted for labor, in the coal mines, for 40, 50 years. Once they vote against their party, once they vote against the establishment politicians, you don't go back. What once you want as a lifestyle decision, you reject the establishment that you have been not a part of but supporting for decades, that has a seismic effect on politics, does it not? Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. And that's exactly what we've been seeing now over these last several years. And again, it's not just the states, not just Britain. We're seeing it throughout France, marine le pen with national rally and the like. My heavens in Italy right now, if they were to have their elections, there are two right wing parties, leg and brothers of Italy would run away with it. So yeah, these are just these shifts are fascinating because they really do reveal a massive gap in alienation between the people and their elite rulers.

Queens Steve America Italy Britain France
Kurt Schlichter: Who Told Biden to Use the 'Breakfast Burrito' Angle?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:42 min | Last month

Kurt Schlichter: Who Told Biden to Use the 'Breakfast Burrito' Angle?

"LatinX or whatever they want to call which I encourage the Democrats to continue to run on that Don't dissuade them It's the greatest marketing idea ever You're going to persuade hundreds of millions of Hispanic voters around the world to vote for your leftist causes with such a wonderful term Democrats please double down on LatinX The Latin Hispanic community Spanish loves it They clearly love keep doing LatinX But Joe Biden went out yesterday and I know And gave his speech and seemed to infer that Spanish people were like breakfast tacos So I want you to listen to this This is a news report It's Jim's favorite sound bite of the year It's very short but it's a news report about Jill Biden comparing Hispanic voters to breakfast tacos Check this out The national association of Hispanic journalist is responding in a tweet encouraging quote doctor Biden and her speech writing team to take the time in the future to better understand the complexities of our people and communities The group adding we are not tacos That's real That's not the Babylon B brother That is real Do we really have to do that We are not tacos Are we at that point now Does your book address this stuff by the way The identity politics I'm a little stunned that a doctor like doctor Jill Biden would say something so bizarre I'm also wondering what the hell is a Brexit taco I know a breakfast burrito Yeah me too Yeah you can check for like once in a while Yeah Yeah I don't really get the whole breakfast burrito thing That's like two bridges too far I mean what are the thought process with your speech writers Get me breakfast tacos I want to work the breakfast taco angle

Jill Biden National Association Of Hispan Joe Biden Biden JIM
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson resigns. Here's who could replace him. - NBC News

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson resigns. Here's who could replace him. - NBC News

"Anti EU sentiment to his populist campaign leading Britain out of the block and reneging on the post Brexit trade deal he signed the outgoing British prime minister Boris Johnson has been the bane of Europe's Brussels for many years I will not miss him French finance minister brunner the mayor says highlighting an open disdain unseen since the Europeans welcomed the U.S. election loss of Donald Trump in 2020 and while transatlantic relations picked up quickly since the arrival of president Joe Biden don't expect anything similar with a new British leader David mcallister the leading EU legislator dealing with a Britain says even with a new prime minister they'll likely be few changes in the British government's position on

Minister Brunner Boris Johnson EU Britain Brussels Donald Trump David Mcallister Europe Joe Biden U.S. British Government
Conservative contenders who could succeed Boris Johnson

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

Conservative contenders who could succeed Boris Johnson

"Bookmakers in Britain are eyeing up a successor to prime minister Boris Johnson William ked Johnny with star sports has been outside number 10 Downing Street with a board with the current odds for prime minister the favorite defense secretary Ben Wallace Kajali considers Steve baker a supporter of Brexit a major contender I say major contender he's ten to one now for 50 to a big move for him Johnny says chances are good for the two cabinet members in Britain who recently resigned Kicked all this off Was previously the health secretary had been chance of before Again reasonably big runner received public profile Did he jump ship soon enough Is the question to ask if both him and also if you see that Soon act was Boris Johnson's treasury chief Bookmakers have been busy in Britain since science started to appear that Boris Johnson was on his way out I'm Ed

Prime Minister Boris Johnson W Ben Wallace Kajali Britain Steve Baker Johnny Cabinet Boris Johnson Treasury
What Does Boris Johnson's Resignation Mean?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:46 sec | Last month

What Does Boris Johnson's Resignation Mean?

"To get your take on what the imminent resignation of Boris the mess Johnson, because he looks like he looks like his hair was thrown at him in the morning. He looks like a hobo in a $5000 suit. And acts with that level of responsibility and coherence. What do you think the effect of the change at the top in the British government is going to be? Well, who knows what the change in the top of the British government is going to be? I mean, look at all the problems they have, how many decades it took to get Brexit going? And then once they decide to do it, how many referendums they had to have. So nothing in any government moves quickly. But

British Government Boris Johnson
Who is Dr. Stephen Turley?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:10 min | 4 months ago

Who is Dr. Stephen Turley?

"He is doctor Steve turley, the author of numerous essential works. I'm just going to mention the return of Christendom also the new nationalism and the one that one of our team here says has the most beautiful color cover beauty matters. Steve turley welcome back to America first one on one. Doctor Sabbath is wonderful to be back with you. Thank you so much for having me. You are a busy man. It is hard to keep up with you the amount of content you put out there. For those who missed our last discussion, it just give us a little potted of who Steve is. What he studied and what you talk about most often. Yeah, thank you for that. I started a YouTube channel about 5 and a half years ago is actually November 1st, 2016. Of course, when an election was coming up right around that time. And I predicted that Donald Trump was going to win because I thought this was going to be a Brexit election based on the studies that I did at Durham university with where I got my PhD out across the pond there. I came across some studies called post secular study. This is back in 2009 or so 2010. And they basically were making the argument that the old globalist world order is more or less dead and a much more traditionalist national sovereignty based world order was rising. I didn't believe it at the time. I didn't have any evidence of that with Obama. They were using Russia as an example or India or some Middle Eastern nations and I just thought that was so far removed. But when I started seeing Brexit heat up, that's when I started to see, oh, so this is what they're talking about. And then when Donald Trump on the campaign trail started referring to himself as call me mister Brexit. I realized we've got something. There's some trends here that are very predictive and thank God they brought you and others like you into the sphere of The White House and I've been doing it ever since November 1st, 20 2016. And boy, we're almost about to hit 900,000 subs on YouTube if you can

Steve Turley Donald Trump Durham University America Steve Youtube Mister Brexit Middle Eastern Russia Barack Obama India White House
Macron Moves Into Final Two of Presidential Race

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

Macron Moves Into Final Two of Presidential Race

"Macron managed to make it through to the final two against marine le pen in the French runoff. The result of Sunday's vote, according to the Financial Times, the le pen is closer than ever to winning power for the right in France, emulating the nationalist victories of Donald Trump in 2016 and Brexit in the UK 6 years ago. I don't know other than the fact that people just don't like Macron. All right, so that a poll of 1500 people show you had 52 to 48. Within the margin of air. And that would be stunning if le Patton, who began on the far right like her father in his move more towards the middle, previously supported Putin doesn't support Putin now. It would be a shock to the system if le pen wins, that that might shock Germany into consciousness as well.

Macron Le Pen Financial Times Donald Trump Le Patton France UK Putin Germany
Brendan O'Neill's Advice for Getting Involved With Issues That Matter

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:59 min | 5 months ago

Brendan O'Neill's Advice for Getting Involved With Issues That Matter

"About the average person that the taxpayer, the citizen, the person that listens to the brand and O'Neill show? Do you give them advice? Because for me, it's the same thing every single day, I say, get involved politically. It's sexy to be a senator. It's sexy to be a president. The thing that really matters is to do what my wife did last week, where she handed in her application to run for the board of the local community center. That's where politics really, you know, to use that Catholic phrase of subsidiarity. It is all local. What advice do you give to people who are fed up don't have a podcast but want to help? Yeah, I agree. I think getting involved at any level is always a very good thing to do. And one thing I've been inspired by over the past year is the parents revolted in America where you have all these parents groups or individual parents going to PTA meetings and school meetings and saying, look, stop teaching our kids about critical race theory. Stop indoctrinating our children into transgender ideology or identity politics. We don't want it. And I think that parental pushback has been a model in some ways of how ordinary people can get involved in these kinds of issues and can make a real difference. I think one of the problems in the UK is that there were so much pushback from the chattering classes against Brexit that people thought, well, you know, we voted for change and it looks like it's not going to happen, and it took 6 years for it to actually happen. So people started to lose faith, but I think over the past few months, as we've come out of lockdown, as we've rediscovered normal life and as we've seen war erupted in Europe in a terrible, terrible way, I've heard lots of people having discussions about the need to be more serious about our nation's life and our community life. And I think people should try to do that in any way they can, including by getting involved at any level of influence and that they can do. And that's really, really important.

Local Community Center America UK Europe
Ric Grenell: U.S. Weakness Led to Brexit, European Borders Changing

Mark Levin

01:18 min | 6 months ago

Ric Grenell: U.S. Weakness Led to Brexit, European Borders Changing

"But when I hear this stuff and you may disagree with me I don't know your view The American people don't care about Ukraine You know the American people didn't care about Austria The American people didn't care about Czechoslovakia The American people didn't care about Poland at one point And then all of a sudden we have the Third Reich I'm not saying this is the Third Reich I'm not even saying this is the old Soviet Union but I don't think we should be so cavalier as people with a public microphone that just blow this sort of thing off I'd be curious about what you think Yeah I actually agree And I would go one step further in that it matters for NATO and it matters for Europe I spent a long time in Berlin hearing from Brussels and Paris and Berlin about why the transatlantic relationship was really about strengthening Europe And I told Chancellor Merkel that the reason why Brexit happened the reason why Crimea happened rewriting of the European borders which is Absolute nightmare Scenario The reason why we've had the borders rewritten in Europe In the last ten years a couple of times is because of weakness from the United States That's just a plain fact

Czechoslovakia Ukraine Austria Poland Berlin Chancellor Merkel Europe Nato Brussels Paris Crimea United States
 Elizabeth the Steadfast: Queen marks 70 years on throne

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 6 months ago

Elizabeth the Steadfast: Queen marks 70 years on throne

"Britain's Britain's Britain's Britain's Queen Queen Queen Queen Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth the the the the second second second second will will will will mark mark mark mark seventy seventy seventy seventy years years years years on on on on the the the the throne throne throne throne on on on on Sunday Sunday Sunday Sunday an an an an unprecedented unprecedented unprecedented unprecedented rate rate rate rate this this this this made made made made her her her her a a a a symbol symbol symbol symbol of of of of stability stability stability stability from from from her her her early early early days days days as as as a a a glamorous glamorous glamorous young young young royal royal royal in in in glittering glittering glittering tiaras tiaras tiaras to to to a a a more more more recent recent recent incarnation incarnation incarnation as as as the the the nation's nation's nation's grandmother grandmother grandmother the the the queen's queen's queen's witness witness witness the the the end end end of of of the the the British British British Empire Empire Empire the the the advent advent advent of of of multi multi multi culturalism culturalism culturalism the the the rise rise rise of of of international international international terrorism terrorism terrorism and and and the the the challenges challenges challenges posed posed posed by by by brexit brexit brexit and and and the the the covert covert covert nineteen nineteen nineteen pandemic pandemic pandemic in in in a a a world world world of of of relentless relentless relentless change change change she's she's she's been been been a a a constant constant constant representing representing representing the the the UK's UK's UK's interests interests interests abroad abroad abroad applauding applauding applauding the the the nation's nation's nation's successes successes successes and and and commiserating commiserating commiserating in in in its its its failures failures failures and and and always always always remaining remaining remaining above above above the the the fray fray fray of of of politics politics politics Charles Charles Charles de de de Ledesma Ledesma Ledesma London London London

Britain Queen Queen Queen Queen Elizab Mark Mark Mark Mark Brexit Brexit Brexit UK Charles Charles Charles De De London
Mike Graham Describes How the Journalism Industry Has Devolved

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:16 min | 7 months ago

Mike Graham Describes How the Journalism Industry Has Devolved

"Mike, you have this almost unique experience. Because you're not just a media professional from one country. You've done it here in America. You've been massively successful being this. You know, one man why a service for the globe before you came back to the UK and then started you also talk radio program. Let's drill down here a bit on what's happened. Because as a kid growing up in West London, you know, I'd love a news junkie. I was listening to LBC radio as a kid, you know, Adrian love at midnight as an 8 year old and my little transistor I'd buy the you know I'd pick up the Evening Standard coming home from school on the tube on the subway. That media doesn't exist anymore. Back then, you know, if you said the word journalist, it wasn't necessarily pejorative, and it was actually a trade. I mean, you knew stuff, you worked your ass off, the unions were problem, but you had a skill set and you were challenging the establishment. Yes, the BBC was always lefty. I get it. But it was a skill set. It wasn't just, here's a typewriter right stuff. Today, a snotty nose 21 year old is given a Gmail account and a search engine and they're allegedly a journalist. Will you walk us through you as a first hand witness? What has happened to your industry mic? Well, you're absolutely right. I mean, the BBC was always slightly left leading, but it was never so obviously biased, as it is now. You know, when I grew up watching people like Richard baker reading the news, you know, these were people like sort of Walter Cronkite, you know, they were respected and you could believe everything that they said. And that now has kind of changed. Now we have a guy called Hugh Edwards who makes 750,000 pounds a year. Now, I know that his dwarfed by some of the salaries over there. But he took a 250,000 pound pay cut and thought we should be grateful that he'd done it because he was apparently saving us all some money. That's paid for by the taxpayer. That's our money. Right, because if you don't buy a BBC television license, you can actually go to prison. It's the only tax which immediately sends you to jail if you don't

Lbc Radio West London BBC Adrian Mike America UK Hugh Edwards Richard Baker Walter Cronkite
Journalist Mike Graham Knows How to Connect With His British Audience

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:42 min | 7 months ago

Journalist Mike Graham Knows How to Connect With His British Audience

"So I sort of headed off to make my fortune in America back in the days of the Ronald Reagan's America, which is what my favorite one of my favorite times in American 1980s, you know, when you've got rid of charter, you've got rid of Watergate and it all gone away

America Ronald Reagan
How Britain's Mike Graham Got Into the Journalism Business

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:49 min | 7 months ago

How Britain's Mike Graham Got Into the Journalism Business

"He is talk radio's Mike Graham. He is the caliph of the independent republic of Mike Graham. Welcome to one on one on America first, Mike. Sebastian, thank you so much. I'm delighted to be able to join you. There's an awful lot to talk about. Unfortunately, I have to say, we don't fight them on the beaches anymore. We help them out of dinghies and then give them a free hotel room and a couple of pizzas to begin on with. Yeah, unlike here where a CIA contract is fly them on unmarked jumbo jets across the country. And unload them under the cover of darkness. So we have to connect the connections is still there across the channel between our two nations. For those who don't listen to your show via podcast or YouTube every day, shame on you, 'cause my kid's superb. For those who aren't familiar with your story, Mike, would you tell us, would you share with us? 'cause you have an interesting background not only in journalism, but here in the United States. So Mike, what is your story? Well, my story is that I got into journalism because it seemed to me to be the only thing to do when I was growing up in London in 1970s. My father was involved in newspapers and I just thought it seemed like a fantastic business to be in getting sent around the world covering stories that somebody else was paying you to do. Staying nice hotels, you know, hanging around driving great cars, meeting fascinating people. And I found myself working in fleet street at a time when the trade unions basically had the business by the throat. And believe it or not, the times newspaper, which is still going, it used to be known as a thunderer. Actually didn't publish for an entire year. Thanks to the trade unions who were so powerful in those days. So it was very difficult to get jobs. It was very difficult to find a permanent work situation because people were employed in newspapers because they didn't know whether from one day to the next. They'd be going out on

Mike Graham Mike Sebastian United States CIA Youtube London The Times
Boris Johnson Receives Sue Gray's Partygate Report

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:04 min | 7 months ago

Boris Johnson Receives Sue Gray's Partygate Report

"I want to update you on the breaking news. Boris Johnson will address the House of Commons at three 30 in Great Britain. It is now 1240 in Great Britain, and when he does that, we will know how deep the trouble he is in. I do not know what's in the gray report, nobody does. I'm looking at all the newspapers, the gray report is the report on the prime minister and his team partying during COVID lockdowns. It is grabbed him in a scandal, which is threatened to topple his premiership. The 1922 committee requires I believe 52 letters from members of parliament. Requesting a vote of no confidence, in which, of course, labor would join toppling the prime minister as happened to Theresa May because she fumbled on Brexit, Boris Johnson delivered on two years ago today, as a matter of fact, effectively getting Great Britain out of the European Union and God bless him for that, but will he survive this? I don't know. I don't know what's in the report, but I'm watching and keeping it in front of me every minute of every hour.

Great Britain Boris Johnson House Of Commons Parliament Theresa European Union Britain
The Origins of the Podcast 'Triggernometry,' Hosted by Francis Foster and Konstantin Kisin

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:26 min | 9 months ago

The Origins of the Podcast 'Triggernometry,' Hosted by Francis Foster and Konstantin Kisin

"Crowds. Then around 2013 to 2014, I started to notice something change. And gradually, audiences became more and more sensitive. Not all audiences, but mainly audiences, audiences inner London, in central London, particularly young people. I started to notice that jokes that used to do quite well, then you used to say certain words and immediately you could feel the audience sees up. You could feel that there was attention around an audience when you broke certain topics. It was just, even if you dealt with a topic in a very sensitive, a very fun, a very playful way it didn't matter. You could feel the tension starting to come in. And then, obviously, everything exploded when Brexit happened when Trump happened. Then a narrative came in that if you voted for Trump, if you voted for Brexit, you were stupid, thick racist, white, all of these things, which they all lumped in together and then that's when the real divisions happened in comedy. And that's when I saw comedy becoming more woke, becoming more illiberal, becoming more intolerant. And it's progressed and then obviously we are where we are now. So that is my story with regards to trigonometry. And by the way, we started it in 2018 as a reaction to all of that because we saw what happened with Brexit with

London Brexit Donald Trump
'Eurotrash' Author David Harsanyi Shares His Thoughts on Brexit

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:55 min | 10 months ago

'Eurotrash' Author David Harsanyi Shares His Thoughts on Brexit

"Welcome back to one on one with mitigated columnist David harsanyi. Well, let's grasp the nettle by the thorn Brexit. What does Brexit mean? Is it the last saving grace? Is it the Hail Mary? Or is it irrelevant in terms of the Euro trash ideas of the continent? Because at the end of the day, it's not the continent. It's the UK and it's the UK rejecting the bad ideas. Well, what is the geo strategic or historic import of those 17 million breaths saying thanks, but no thanks. Now, as you know, the British have always been a poor fit I think in the European Union or fit, the French didn't really even want them to be part of it initially. They are far more far less controlled than ever took on the currency. They're more free market oriented in general. The British are my favorite my favorite people in Europe because we come from them. We are their spawn. We have there. It's their ideas that made America great. I think they manifested in more better ways here in the long run and the British sort of abandoned many of them, but in general I'm a fan and I'm a fan of Brexit. But does it really change much? I don't think so. I mean, the so called conservatives in Britain are just in Europe, there is no real ideological right. There is a nationalistic right, perhaps. There is sort of a status right. But there aren't very many classical liberals on the right. There are some, I'm not saying, but when you have these governments, it's usually just once status party against another, which is what's happening now, probably in Britain for the most part. So I don't think it changes much in the trajectory of Europe itself. Obviously, it's different. I'm a bigger fan of Britain than Germany, but in the end, neither cold a torch to hold a candle to the United

David Harsanyi Hail Mary UK Europe European Union Britain America Germany United
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Does purchase. How figure in the humphry enough of bad. Aim secretaries kuchis is she all. She all worse civil liberties. It's hard. I think you would burn a by the way theresa may probably would have been the way if you could have had her way but unluckily for her and luckily for us she was there in that sweet spot of live dan tory coalition where they needed to do the things they claim to criticize about the labor body before them. So that sort of saved us on this front not on immigration but it did on so many civil liberties issues. I'm i think. New labor was new. Labor was like a full spectrum attack ready and you look at people like blunkett evens with jack story before the september eleventh attacks. You know th there is a slice of modern torey opinion that likes to pride itself liberties. That's essentially i think a a very mild pick 'em reductionist and exclusive sense of civil liberties which is really simple for like us right if you're someone that they can't imagine what life is like then you can go get fucked if you're testy you can go get fucked however the for things like habeas corpus and identity cards there is that david davis strain in the conservative party and that protects that i think from getting quite as bad at the moment as it was on a new labor however undoing lots of however is now problem and the distinction now is that it's embedded in the coach wall right so there's an attack on institutions which simply did not exist under the new labor period and does now and there's also really divisive attempt that unit pretty patel baddie bothered to conceal that she was targeting specific protesters with what she was doing which is particularly dangerous when you think about the fact that discretionary power that you handing to the police. Because you've got the hamster parliament's hang. I'm looking and i'm looking at extinction agenda since you're rebellion. You know this. These are the guys that are essentially. I want you to go for so on that basis. it's sort of. it's less comprehensive. I think than the assault on civil liberties was happening on labor. But it's more sort of toxic and more dangerous because it's part of that culture war attack on the institutions on individual groups just briefly going back to the election spell that bill hands a lot more power to Michael gov is sexual states. It's not really a health thing per se. But there are of course remiss. He maybe advantage even sexually position any views. Now do you think there's any credibility behind their dreams. I can tell you whether that's with adds up. I mean at the moment. I haven't heard anything that would suggest that is complete nonsense during the thing. That's just that has any real substance behind it. I'm brushing was the birth johnson's pretty much pretty happy with what pretty potatoes during that kind of cross. Apparently so we're told for not bringing the numbers down. Further onto the migrant. Arrive was the summer. I don't really see that means. She's posturing precisely the way that he would one. It would seem odd if that was the flip that happened right now. I mean frankly. I got to tell you out fucking take it by the was of course. Yeah yeah you would come back years. He's not a stretch wishes now gracie the home office is running series of long-haul mass deportation flights to various locations including zimbabwe nigeria jamaica. Some of the people in these rights arrived in the uk in a very tender young ages and really only know life here in the uk. Are we witnessing another wind rush. Well i mean. I sort of feel name. Anyone have moved to say about this. But i like the fast when roche channel is an even ever So it's win or even our another wind rush in the window. Standard is still happening. People are still in compensation on their descendants are still vulnerable to deportation and other violations of devine's. I'm i mean. I think why. I understand why. This conversation focuses in particular on people who've lived in the uk for very long time. I think we should be questioning. The idea of hutu matic deportation post conviction for anybody. Whatever you eat on the criminal punishment system the point as in day somebody to victims themselves sentence announced the end of that so i think when we know that the wet however somebody's being in the country when we know that the impact Disproportionately racialist on cost. I think quite a list. I think you should be thinking about. Actually whether mandatory deportation provision should implants for anyone many gracie mentioned that j. c. w. i i'm sure they are missile. Absolutely i mean i agree absolutely what gracie just said then. I mean. we've been quite lucky with these last few flights that we haven't had any clients on but jc. W i in general completely opposes these kinds of deportations. They're really cruel. They happen in the middle of the night. They tap people from their families. They've often sometimes have been out of prison for absolutely years and have just had this threat of deportation held over their heads. The reason that we're seeing this kind of speeding up deportations over summer is obviously because the government has the asylum. Bill coming back in september so twofold. They're trying to kind of rally up support for that terrible proposals. That will come back. In hopefully in september committee stage and also because the foundation of that bill is these third-country agreements deals with other countries to take people from the uk who supposedly don't belong here now. Some of those deals we think of being secretly agreed. So this imbaba dale. Zimbabwe previously didn't actually accept removals. Which is why. We're seeing some zimbabwe flights now because we think that the government has some kind of deal with zimbabwe of meant to suddenly accept these deportation flights and again some of the rationale behind that is really tied into international development and foreign aid because they've reduced the budget so they kind of using foreign aid as a threat to be held over international countries. You know basically take the people that we don't want and we'll give you a bit more money for it saying there's a limited supply in. Let's talk about this Government panel reviewing the human rights. And of course we've we've seen dominant cummings getting frothing theory about it on to turn his logo last couple of weeks as well. Brexit's is loathe the european court of human rights in particular and never seem to tire of bashing human rights. In general. what's go. What else do we need to sort of. Get out of the whole thing. Essentially sort of brexit mock to right And in fact if you remember under the david cameron government before brexit. That was sort of an attempt to sort of prevent. Its rulings from being sort of of being advisory in in british law. It's important to create the distinction between the things that we're talking about because the european convention of human rights is based with the council in the country europe as completely separate to the eu. It's also distinct away from the human rights. Act which a before you can take your case to strasbourg under the human rights at boston navy. You can do it in the uk. England welsh whatever his the thing they've already launched an attack before brexit those to try to make it advisory but then brexit happened and it was fucking we hit brexit in counter intuitive.

dan tory jack story patel baddie Michael gov gracie blunkett zimbabwe david davis roche channel uk theresa hutu matic conservative party imbaba dale devine jamaica nigeria johnson Brexit david cameron government
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"I think that's very very clear you'd be approved Brexit potty and then what are they going to do in the referendum that would follow. Would you say where we're going to now campaign against the deal negotiated for new. You'RE GONNA have to say well. We're going to have to push for it in the referendum to and on that basis I think you'd have to be an unusual remain into that's a deal for me than the Lib Dem one but that was because they were saying that they would whether they okay campaign for remain or not we depend on the deal they gone but that would sweet but that would be weird because then that would mean that there's a possibility of accepting they've come back with a shit deal. That ain't GonNa Campaign Against Weed seems like not great for politician. I wouldn't put it Boscovich with how'd you you've been pushing for this unit for something like this. You know for for a long time I mean how do you feel about it would you would you have gone further. Do you think that Labor cannot completely close the door on the option of respecting the two thousand sixteen result on some magic kind of no downsides circumstances like how did you feel when this when this was announced was like yes or yes but yes but and I think people are looking for three things from Labor clarity consistency and conviction and where we've got to this week I think gives us some clarity and certain extent some consistency in the my relief and it was a genuine feeling of relief is thank God between what is now likely to be the period up to the end of the thirty first October we no longer needs have running weekly battles with our own leadership dragging them kicking and screaming to the right position on these issues. You know we know that whatever deal Boris Johnson comes back with we will vote against it and push for it to go to a public votes where we will campaign. I'm paints to remain. We know that if he tries to push no deal will insist that that option is puts the public and we would campaign to remain so that gives you the clarity and I think everyone would want to get behind sending everyone listens. This would want to get get behind it. The the challenge however is beyond that and and actually between now and October where where I think we were lacking his conviction because why would want the Labor Party say and genuinely understand what Jeremy Corbyn was trying to try and say we don't want to alienate a divided todd country wants to bring people together to chart a way forward look how damaging and divisive disease and and let's not ignore the message that people send us when they voted for Brexit. I accept the sentiment of all of that but the problem is the in in trying to please please everyone. He's pleased no one and we haven't been true to ourselves or true to our voters and most importantly I think true to the national interest even if like me voted trigger article fifty because you thought it was important let the government trying to negotiate something onto show some willingness to accept the result. The last couple of years have been a total horror show every single promise that the brakes tears made hasn't been delivered they can cry foul play as much as they like but the problem is they're all of those promises were made could not have possibly possibly being delivered and Boris Johnson's about fun as to why the Boris Johnson comes back with for sure what was promised during the referendum..

Boris Johnson Brexit Jeremy Corbyn Labor Party
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Is that I always felt that part politics wanted a constitutional Unser too, hard policy dilemma, grandma erupting to sort of. Our deers kind of fossilized really one of the maze. The idea that regardless of the content or anything else that there was a fundamental sort of break in public trust in what government had to say during the rock, and that then made it very difficult for the warnings about economic vector Brexit referendum to take hold on. Do you have any sympathy for that argument, irrespective of the content of what's being coming? I'm on while these two for some reason because a lot of the people who voted the Brexit people who actually pro Iraq. If you look at the leading. Conservative breaks. It is I think most of them would have lined up. In favor. Not again cider. I mean trust in politics. I mean more in terms of that that instinctive when you're in the pub, forty five minute thing. Yeah. No. I understand. I understand that I discount that. But I think I mean festival financial crisis was also a huge moment. I mean, I think post nine eleven the policy decisions. Just the difficulty of the fact that everything's very messy post financial crisis the same thing. Now, I think all of that feeds into a sense of expenses scandal. You're on chase your fees by does Ryan issue. All of that. Plays into it. But I think well, I think two things first of all just very basic level. I think you'd held this referendum at any point in the last forty years. You could have lost it. He was always going to be a risk to hold it. But Secondly, I think. In today's world. I think less. It's less about trust than it is about feeling by people that the world is changing fast beyond their control. And it's a desire to reassert a sense of control of which sense of identity is very bound up. So I don't think it's. I think the trust issue is always there. And by the way. I grew up in politics in nineteen late seventies early eighties. I promise you people didn't hugely trust politicians. I didn't know what. At what stage? Politicians have regularly high on the trust school. They never have them for all sorts of strange reasons, which are often unfair to the politicians of might be by the way. But you know, I think it's more to do with what you can see right around the western world today. You can see this in America. You can see it all over Europe, which is feeling by people in the immigration issue becomes a big question. And all of that my world is changing. No one's asked my consent for this change, and I feel it's not suiting me on immigration, and I was looking back at ODA sauce. Maury polls just before you can't para ninety seven few of the five percent of people. Of course, any demographic group were concerned about immigration. Just wasn't a big issue to them and people on the left and right. I have criticized you for supporting the two thousand four entry of eastern European workers into the UK helping to foster anti-immigration sentiment. I don't agree with that. I think it had far more to do with successive government. Failing to invest in infrastructure, particularly housing education reskilling and things like that. What's what's your view? So what are the things you? Learn. Really strange apologies. Once you leave powers of something. I say to people off they've left office be really careful that you your opponents don't define your record. So, you know, the risk me is for the left that wanted to find it. He did Iraq and nothing else. And you know, all of the things the labor government did around investment ways policy of all the rest of it. Just gets thrown out the window and on the right? It's they were just open borders policy. Now, let's just rewind the clock two thousand five by the two thousand five election on immigration. That was the starting point of it with Michael Howard at the time running on immigration, and as blocking the path of that by saying, in fact, the right way to deal with immigration is to encourage it, but have a prop assist the pan population..

Iraq Brexit Unser labor government Europe Ryan Michael Howard UK Maury America forty five minute five percent forty years
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"We'll put off by it. Then went to you what I'm gonna make yesterday tickly if it's people are coming from outside. London. You know, where it's like, it's really big commitment. And and that that seems to dismaying because people are like what exactly my Martin for is everybody here on the same page and also what about into authenticity and commitment. Booking? These people have been losing them more with three years and acting in the most jaded Taku demeaning fucking manner. The leaders absolutely now remains of how to drive they've been rushing. They've been principal. They think carrying the what goes on in that country and to see them suddenly stopped doing this kind of subterfuge tactic is so fucking depressing to me I had to spend but quarter of this afternoon after I basically complaining about this stuff. If you going to come to the much no come to it's important to the March. The people that leadership is increasing the catastrophic fucking stupid. This also comes of course, after that numerous attacks on new away all of which is palm poss with the same idea this last man standing tactic now when they cut you away, they undermine our own plan b if we lose this thing is part of the same thing. Wait, and wait and wait to the vote. Wait till everyone else is dead, and that is party political strategizing, but people who have previously only wept and political parties, and it basically acting in this manner and executive the same way they used to do when their labor attacking the lip dense, which is a treat any other group as competition something that must be a nine. This is I mean reading really bad to improve people's hoping vote on DEA because obviously the people who supports it. He won't part. The campaign came out, you know, if the loan period of of people cut a disagreeing not being on the same page. This was the clain of the solution. The way to bring. Again, exactly, I it's it's somewhat heartbreaking to see activists who I support, you know, McQuay at each other's throats, but certainly not not lining up. This. This is happening now get can be put to one side this. It's not like something terrible has been lost is up saluting. No damage. I mean, of course, Reese malls. And Jillian doses are going to jump up and say that this whatever obviously anyway. Anyway, it doesn't matter the March. I think will still be a success. Those guys need to sit down and make sure that it works. But that involves not just the ticket a bit more restraint. It also involves the people vote organization sharing a little bit more flexibility in a bit more openness to other ideas. And unless there's sit down and start demonstrating a bit more solidarity with each other. We're gonna keep on seeing this kind of pointless attacks within the mission. That's all may third time's a charm bringing the deal is groundhog Mike there any popular ahead of your holy. Do you think that that slow crumbling of the the DP resistances is is going to get over the line is you're gonna be given substantial changes in Japan where they want with it been bringing different cults in his two trillion. Amazing. They just forced him into a room got the knives out and be like Cox saying something about fucking Vienna. Convention some of a convention really hope that Jeffrey cups, and it means nothing to me. UC as Englishman. Fanta game. Yeah. So they go in the room on the headlock. Nelson's that come on. All right. I think this is it's sixty four because. Which one? I'm into have look at it this week. But everything was a bit hectic, and it doesn't do. I mean, I've already been reliably informed, but several boys it doesn't do it. I think it doesn't even if it did you would only be able to come through the whole arrangement not just the backstop parts of the whole thing would collect. However, they want to present it as unilateral exit. I've hospital sixty. Fact, I found on the respected academic research gentle Twitter dot com,.

Jeffrey cups Twitter Martin Taku London DEA principal UC Reese executive Japan groundhog Mike Cox Nelson Vienna three years
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Let's be let's be honest about that one of the major factors was the new EU Japan trade deal, actually, which means that you don't take the Goshi? Goshi. Quicker than. That the key thing about that. Is that it allows Japan they're four hundred to import into the EU without tariffs. Therefore, the rationale for having a factory in the only next to the U decreases. However and unfolding diesel sales. That's a factor too. And that's frankly, good thing, I'm Saudi fed up with diesels. Poisoning my children because I live with the wrote. But there you go separately. And so that is no consolation to people in Swindon. The fact is although there were a number of things going on here. Brexit was undoubtedly a factor and the Honda leadership were real reluctant to say. So I think because you don't want to criticize a sitting government, and you don't want to especially when you have a particular culture of being very careful. I think about you. Yes. Face exactly not losing face. But the uncertainty that Brexit crates, and particular and supply chains clearly is undoubtedly a factor inner things can be many things at the same time. Right. Who the fuck you thought if you go around, you know, saying that we are going to interrupt, you know, global just in time supply chain for complex manufactured good. You are going to discourage investment in your country with us new people coming in or whether it's people who are ready here where there's a very tenuous plan isn't necessarily making that much money. Choosing to go out, and that can coexist with the effects of a free trade agreements with you know, market concerns with this general sensor on the car industry. The what used to be a manufacturing product with a little bit of Technet is fast becoming tech product in a metal shell. And that means that you'll regulatory lobbying is going to need to be quite hard. And you're not going to do that in fucking Britain. If it's caught between the two great big joins of regulation, which is the US on one side and the EU on the other all of that stuff comes into Place. play. That's why it's so dispiriting to look at the Commons yesterday, Tuesday and business secretary stand up and actually to be fair to him to give food credit really do pretty much say this, and you go, well, it's complicated..

EU Brexit Japan Swindon US secretary Britain Honda
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"I mean to what extent is this? So difficult to understand. This was an agreement that the UK so trees amaze own government agreed and signed off with twenty eight other Member States. So the idea that now this will be reopened the backstop will be removed and there'll be a new deal is just fantasy. And I think what you'll see happening vis-a-vis the EU in the next two weeks is they're gonna play hardball. That'd be okay. So if you want to take this down the line, let's do it. They still haven't been convinced that Theresa May has anything in parliament that can deliver majority. So if a has to be a new deal, it will be a no deal. So all this stuff that Johnson has been spouting about how it takes two to Tango, every would say that wouldn't they the was doesn't have deals. That's that's rubbish and you'll be there. Okay. So of course, there is room for some flexibility, the EU has already clarified that they don't want the backstop to ever come into action either. And that's actually in the withdrawal agreement, you know, veiling alternative arrangements failing this magic tech which hasn't realized failing a trade deal, which means that there's no need for border failing that as an insurance policy. We have the backstop so the eye so that's already there. So I don't know what they can do in order to clarify it more. They can you know, they're definitely not going to remove it from the woods agreement. If that's the red line that the conservatives have moreover, the backstop is a British creation. It is in the withdrawal agreement because that is essentially what the British government asked for. They said, you know, give. That trees amaze speech in Lancaster House, her red lines. Brexit words, we're leaving the customs market, we're leaving the single market, but we cannot have a border. So then the said fine. We'll then we'll have to have in the Irish Sea that was unacceptable. So they had a UK wide customs union as the final outcome for the box, which is something again that the UK asked for so as far as the us concerned, they're like, well, this is your solution. So we're not we're not going to renegotiate it. We have tangled Boris, and you agree to it year ago when he signed up to it, you did say anything, then when your foreign secretary. It's true to say because he was he's on CNN CNN. The Trump don't sky, and they posted thing and the U of just put the specialist you're going we're not going to reopen the Madrid agreement goes, well, you know, it takes two to time go, and you would like the fucking exactly. Right. You've just negated your own argument. So how did labor play on this week? We're going to source on. Told y'all think like Labour's position on anything? Something. I mean, you know, maybe pointing from a lot of voters blabber food is I've took too. I mean, a few people have expressed how tie they all. And you just want to get it over this and have a nice magical break that suddenly to no one knows how to deliver this but labor as they have nothing on the table. Even when they were doing they were making the headlines. It was just absolute void. We will find a way it's just I don't I I used to be quite an admirer of their leader because we such aggressive compaign, but it's been two years of silence, and nothing and and stubbornness, and it's really difficult to grasp for me. Jeremy Corbyn is just as bad as some of the worst liars on the conservative side. And in fact, I found his whole today his say, you know, find the saying I will go and talk to Theresa May really really cynical because that's Oviously after Treasa may his swung behind the ER g and the DP and going for the hardest kind of new deal Brexit or on on on the. Xtop? So now he wants to negotiate with her. So I wouldn't. Well, I it's very cynical. Right. So I I almost see this as his stand in what he can later claimed was a principled opposition to the conservative party decision..

EU Boris Theresa Jeremy Corbyn UK CNN Lancaster House Irish Sea British government Treasa Johnson Trump Madrid secretary Brexit two weeks two years
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Again question is is this likely to pass? What do you think any know apparently, not last read the soccer? Yeah. Now that apparently this isn't popular. So there's a lot of the others on this one. I'm not sure why. But yeah, apparently is going to be struggling to get through. Well, it's been itching because I I read that's some labor from benches have have sort of had a word with the leader of the opposition's office saying, look if you try and push through a second referendum. I'm we're not happy about that. Actually, the sort of overwhelming support for a people's vote amongst the labor party backbenches is not is not a given. And there have been some very sensible voices. I think people at least Nandy have been consistently. I found very reasonable in debates that I've I've seen her in an Stella crease talking about the alternative of a citizens assembly, which I've been reading about this morning, and the more I read about it, the more I like it. Yeah. It's interesting. I don't know whether the amendment from neighbors is popular or would go through Stephen push the new states and points out of the people's people's vote needs enough Tory rebels council out Labor's referendum opponents plus seven, and he calculates that. That's now stands about thirty because he's counted him out. At least twenty three labor opponents. So he reckons that it's only charges to be the last option standing, and therefore that chance could be blown. If it goes up for a vote an early. Does align with my sense that basically everything else would need to be exhausted before people. He's right in way. What we're saying before that the order in which options are presented his is critical way. He's wrong is that there's nothing to prevent parliament from introducing some different motion in the future alter and the people's vote. It's not a one shot. And then you're done thing. What I what I've sensed to do with all these motions for for quite a few months is that the the official the the official position putting forward something is the kiss of death for it. It needs cross party support. And therefore, it must move from cross party Bank. Ben backbenches that gives it a much better chance. And also more importantly, not just remain as preparing it. And that the moment there aren't enough Bryce is or people. He wanted to leave backing a second referendum backing people's is the messengers that are important here. And so the opposition that's fair enough. But if it's just remain as gunning for it. It's not going to fly, I heart. See how it would. Why would? And what circumstances do you think the prejudice would support a second referendum that? Well, I don't know. But that's that's the would there be a situation if. I don't know that they would in. That's the problem for as well, gene of one Naria if parliament swung behind much softer breaks. Yeah. Then they might actually support a referendum with all three of actions as soft Brexit. No deal or no breaks. Yeah. I mean, I got again into Sapir second vote people's vote territory and a note idea that you can have no deal. I mean, we we talked about this. We have been here. But I, but yeah, I'm increasingly increasingly worried about a God bless. I really have. No, I with good reason. Why you agree? I mean, it's it's yeah. It's it's one of the things I I've had to question, you know, if I don't believe in referendums, I can't I can't then be on the side of another referendum. Look, I agree generally, disagree specifically because the reason we're in this situation is a referendum and eat feelings stink. Typically, like the only way to cancel it out is another horrendo- in in in terms of just balancing it out, whether whether it will happen core bins planning general reminds me do you remember the underpants gnomes from south park where where they go. Our plan is to make profit by collecting underpants resent their plan, and it's like collect underpants question mug, and then prophet. And to the people who say, let's have an election because that will sort Brexit out are a little bit like the underpants gnomes in that they assume if there is an election labour will win it. And then labour will swing behind the remaining option. Neither of these things. Stand up to any scrutiny as far as I two more amendments. From the labour benches Henry for indicative votes on all the various options, including Canada, Norway and Stella Christie's for a citizens assembly..

Labor Nandy Stephen Brexit soccer Bryce cross party Bank official Ben backbenches Stella Christie Canada Norway
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"So I think the leaders are in a position to do this. And I think remains will will sit well, essentially fall in behind the levers that can get past the idea that actually the VAT stop is there a reason. And I think the common sense might accomplish what I'm saying is actually commonsense, prevail. Matt one for that issue. Gms commonsense. And so maybe that's not going to happen. And and something other mental thing happens. But yeah, I think the certainly remained remain seem to have the initiative here. And I think that will make leave move. And then I think the the common sense of the. Remain as we get closer to the deadline will then make them fall in lawn. And so therefore by doing the better that remain is do the more likely they are to make people fall into line behind her deal. I think so do you think do we think is gonna go without do? We think there's getting enough rates. For the fire deal pass. I just don't see that. No because it depends so heavily as we will talk later about each amendment. But it depends so heavily on the running order of things. Effectively. It will be the last option standing that will get the most traction. So the order in which the speaker select the amendment is absolute key. If a vet Cooper's amendment goes through then that effectively creates time or theoretical unbelievable. If we don't have that we don't have a position where we are looking at extending or or revoking or whatever, then whoever whoever does not vote for the deal will be responsible for not. That's the problem. So it stops being the conservative party, and it will be the labor party stopped at night. This Carter Nadia when the conservative party were trying to get the deal through. That's what that's what that's gonna come down to it. It comes down so bad light. So these these amendments are actually quite important to get through hopefully, well the votes on Tuesday. And so far we've got a four particularly significant amendments. Let's try and unpack them amendment is the big one it's a vet is and it simply aimed at preventing no deal in March. If there's no deal if no deal has been agreed by the February. There's a vote and extending article fifty this amendment's expected to pass and John Donald favorably about this on Wednesday. Morning. Just for we recorded there. Do you think labour will whip it's MP's to toback it? Those are the noises they were making last night and this morning John McDonnell was saying it was a very sensible amendment. And now whether they will sort of openly support it or simply get the whips to tell her MP's behind the scenes just not that in. I don't know the vet Cooper amendment is hugely significant for another reason. At a technical reason, it is the one that allows parliament to put down legislation at if there's no deal by the end of February thing it says, and that is significant all the others emotions, which affectively the government can abide by or no they vet Cooper motion gives parliament the power to put down legislation and vote for it. And so that's why it's hugely significant. Now, one run intended consequence of this is in wish art Bloomberg warned that the delay. Would mean we would never vote in two thousand nineteen European lection 's which may result in a kind of petulantly electing load of you is Steve I mean, you not in a great way in the moment. I think it's well, I think we're could that revive it. Yeah. I think that they'll do very well. Because people the the people that will want to vote will quite happily go out and put on a UK bunks. I think there's people that wouldn't vote for you keeping for their impale with definitely vote for the European parliament. But so what that's democracy, and there's nothing really you can do about it except for just shut your head and say, why haven't people learned is you can't you can't you can't blame the electric not being well educated we've had been paying in Europe before. So it's it will just be fat and potentially essentially you'll you won't get what you get the. You get the twenty fourteen out. I think if the conservative party full-on leave then I think they'll pick up a lot those boats where before it was it was, you know, people combining I, bro..

Cooper European parliament Matt Europe UK Carter Nadia John McDonnell Bloomberg John Donald Steve
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Hey, exactly fun visitors. Exactly. Yeah. How did you end up? Devoting your Pseudonomas life to covering the slo MO disaster. Brexit was sought by accident on Mont business. I was starting to one business down. I wrote. Hello. You not to kingdom. It went viral. Then didn't speak twenty one. And I was meeting up with a friend of mine. He was Dutch coming back from working at Google because of Brexit, the hats if he thinks of Britain's is home and he hats, literally movies family back to Britain. So that he was in Britain. So he knew what would happen. And so he was here and have a chance to to to do what you needed to do. And he was setting up a company, and we we sat down, and we talked and we said look shit. We worked together on this because I'm closed down of still got some money in my business to produce go. And he said we we worked out that actually now I not nothing of what he needed. And then I said look this happened to me this first person must but I haven't smoked to anybody. This happens may of got subtly all these followers of no idea what I'm doing. And he said just show business down and work on this. And that's that's what do, you know? I'm in businesses still running. But it's you know, it's effectively not doing anything. And. Yeah. So this is this is now what I've been doing the government. Yeah. Yeah. So yeah. Hopefully, Camacho get jobs and start making some money again. I'm literally living off the redundancy that I got my start about this is there's no money into its threats. No, well, I might practically nothing that you need to become an Instagram influence there. I have no actually invite somebody went onto the Australia threat. I had somebody that was we compare you to influence, and they said can you contact us? And it's like now, I assume as I do that integrity goes out the window, and I started using one. Influence on Instagram. Looks like is not a beach shots drapes in an e you flag selling all remaining acts mugs Khalifa through thick folder of trade document. With a person selling Prozac. Idea. I'll tell you why they remain a fire festival would have been very well organized. Tediously? Well. We're going to get Ryan to plan equifax be close air quotes in a minute. But first because he's going to be taking a short break from the show after this week here, the.

Britain Brexit Mont business Ryan Instagram Google Camacho Khalifa Australia
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Welcome to the plan. B edition of the maniacs. Completely new podcast. You've not heard before my name is Laurie and dense cake. By the way, it is good to see the times and the telegraph much Twitter picking up moustache glasses gag and running with it. It feels like we finally made some contribution to the national culture this week. Brexit rancor hit my daughter's school. She had a row with brick St. classmate that I will call Danny because it's probably legally suspect or actually name him after lively exchange views, Danny snapped only posh people like politics. Anyway, my daughter replied, Danny? Nobody likes politics. Which is true. But we do like talking about how much we don't like it and joining me to examine another week in national poetry, two of our regulars commentator actor singer cook. And as we discovered last time he was on trained sailor every time he appears he just adds another string to his bow. Hello, Alex shortly that should be Blix a remote. Oh. How about the may pulling the sixty five pound Josh quite for central status. Felt. Yeah. I think it's it's the right gesture to make completely praise her you. You're less impressed this week with BBC news twenty four discussing the settled status scheme without a single EU twenty-seven migrant on the panel because he needs to have him them without a single anything on the handle to be on. You just you know, four white English people. And the subject wasn't what what do you think of the the fee as political commentators, the subject was how do you twenty-seven migrants feel about the settled status scheme and all four of them had very definitive takes as to how you twin seven migrants feel about it. And I thought the discussion might have been enriched by an actual e u twenty seven migrant, but as I was told afterwards, the partner of one is any you twenty seven migrant. Albeit they already have British citizenship some years ago, and apparently that entitles him to say that they think the sixty five pound fees terribly res it's like one of those business panels where they get white men to discuss diversity. Yeah. And the point is I don't think they would do that any more in that kind of program. I think if one of their slated subject was trans rights, they would make sure that community was presented. I see a lot with the twit seven migrants really were quite absent from the debate in big flagship programs like Newsnight, and and politics live. I think there should be more as for UK people living in the U. They're completely whitewashed from the from the entire debate. You never get here from them. Also, this is Ingrid Oliver actor comedian writer director, Halloween good. How are you? On surprisingly calm. And then today to be honest. I what about semi German regulars you were moved by the letter to the times some spread a big fingers from Germany from their probable next Johnson sled to that definite form, national goalkeeper. Does that lets us to go viral? It was why do you know? I love that less. And I did it why the goalkeeper particularly ups was I was sort of holding it together. And then I go to the goalkeepers. I'm bless him. My my boyfriend's an awesome supposed to say he that's that's the thing that really he related to that bit. I he was everyone's we went his actors Senate lessons to Scotland just full era Fernan gang guys, we love you come on man, don't do this. But that was performed referendums. It wasn't too late. Sadly, so one it was welcome and lovely and far more than we deserve. It's sadly, I think too late. It's not just plan. B that's wearing a cunning disguise this week. We have a mystery special guest Steve list is the popular super tweeter and twisted thread starter known for such hits as Hello United Kingdom. It's the United States of America. Here we need to talk. He's a nerd and a regular on our poke costing brothers cake watch. Hello Steve wasn't maniacs. Thank you very much for inviting me. I'm Steven list, you'll wrap name like Lil people's vote. Brexit Sexton Tassio, I'm not even sure what is. Why do you why do you like to stay on? Well, it's because I own a company, and it's it's my my home addresses registers, actually, if you just talk my name to Google it just comes up my dress. That sort of thing. So it puts me off. That's great though, transparency in..

Steve list Danny Josh Twitter Brexit Sexton Tassio Laurie partner BBC Ingrid Oliver Google Senate UK Alex Steven list United States Germany Johnson America Scotland
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"And the only reason it's ever ended up like this is because the government has lost its work in majority on Brexit, if the government's delegates work majority Brexit be BBN non Christian. So that decision of of the house was right? But if you are taking a constitution seriously. Yes. Visa problem after problem? After problem. I'm the Walsum Brexit is who to credit are honest face say, we don't care for for parliament. We want the people's vote to prevail. But for phones, Brexit tears, who was purported to say, oh, we want to bring back control of our laws to our soft empowerment, and until the supreme court when cooling judges enemies of people and putting benches and speaker in on front pages and dividing. What he framing rate here. Do you actually care because if Brexit is going to succeed, we will need an independent civil service to work. We will need independent, which is to your neither legislature to be hell of a lot more effectively. It has been for thirty forty years. Do you? Sincerely, want us to Brexit. If so stock trashing domestic institutions couple of questions about fifty. The fewer hunters. On the on the burger decision of the constitutional people with which to everything in the argument. You just said about the general thing we still quite uncomfortable with on the basis that he was going against the business mission that had been passed by the house. So in other words, he was giving him power that they had sort of signed a way that only ministers could could amend it. When you say, it's right. It was the right time for someone to do something unprecedented on point of principle, or do you think that there was actually a precedent that he was able to? And to the extent and novelty is welcome to the extent him against president is welcome a lot of government a government too often false his free stuff in the back of business motions because they know they can't actually be amended. So good. Taking back control of its own agenda. My other one was what happened with the partisan thing that changed overnight. Always that long slow process of untorn vacation. Social liberal over long. And it was really when Cameron came out against the human voice sounds chilly. This doesn't seem to make sense. Invent been the credit couldn't chap into the realized free. Markets didn't go to CRA Librium achievement towards disagree. Live night put me being partisan anymore. And policy failures. Former lawyer I used to be a lawyer full big huge projects the IT NHS. NHS IT project day cards. I don't think product failures in policy failures in inside. And that fascinates me. That's why I'm not party parties. I'm because it can happen to any party. And so when Brexit happened and morning after the referendum was over. No, you always crying arms going for. This is the most fascinating mess will ever be able to write about because it's so interlocking everything is open here because exit and it still hasn't settled your your surgeon hearing it someone's brain and going guys I've never seen a tumor like this. That could win a prize for this. Before we move on..

Brexit Walsum Brexit CRA NHS president untorn Cameron thirty forty years
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"I'm not sure it would pick up many or indeed any seats in the North Pole. Midland's just not they mentioned him much opposition. Because my loan later that we mentioned the toll on this show. Isn't it to an extent the sort of polling this before labor have chosen? Policy route and made the argument for it is like going into a pizza restaurant and asking table of people there, do you prefer Margarita pepperoni or sushi. And you know, the the the other option is not even in their head because no one has stood up and argued for it. The polling may be very different. If someone actually takes a leadership position and says, I think this is what's right for the country because wise it I know what he's doing now. But Bubby dispute sat in my personal view is Kobe, and if we do have a referendum coping comes off offense and advocates remain. I think this will actually Robbins track from it. But what we can say in these consistence is that's labor voters, maybe voters in the referendum voted around to to remain today. Labor mode is three to one or more pro remain. Believe voters are having second thoughts because it's conservative governments and endeavoured screwing. Up. So we do know that's a monthly and even more labor party members. There is a strong wish for remain. And therefore, however hypothetical question how much you try and aim off in terms of how leaders behave if you have a leader who's doing against the views of eighty percents of his natural supporters on the big issue of the day. That is as as Humphrey Appleby would have said twenty years ago in yes minister, that's courageous. Okay. Moving on to television because there isn't enough Brexit exit go around because is having a Brexit withdrawal symptoms over Christmas. This we we got channel villas Brexit the on civil war featuring Benedict Cumberbatch as the Chevy Sherlock Holmes of leave. Dominic Cummings Britain makes a noise it groans..

Dominic Cummings Britain North Pole Humphrey Appleby Brexit Bubby Midland Benedict Cumberbatch Sherlock Holmes Robbins Chevy Kobe twenty years
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"I'm Ingrida, and I am very much. The layperson over maniacs. Someone who has been avidly watching Brexit from with horror and no expert, but with a real thirst for knowledge. I've been part of Romania access year has been quite something. I would not describe myself as somebody who's particularly political before two thousand sixteen. But since Brexit's I've been increasingly horrified what's happening to our country. So being possibly maniacs has been an outlet of you felt you your knowledge levels have been raised. Because one of the weirdest thing was the show is at world doing this every week. And even we don't really have a handle on it. If we can't predict the future, and you know, people friends now that now that I'm on remaining people always ask me what's going on with Brexit. And I've even though I read everything I have read everything there is to not read out their apartment withdrawal agreements here that I it's almost impossible to put into words, the so many caveats, and and permutations that you end up feeling like you don't anything about which is the is probably the very night to Brexit of. So yeah, it's been. It's been a quest this year of trion onto stand as much as I can because I think it's incumbent on all of us to do that. But you realize that this Christmas tourism as friends of sanctuaries what's going on with Brexit. She's gonna I I really don't know. I have play it's. But that's I think they're experts within areas of it. But nobody can be an expert on all of it's just it's impossible. It's too. It's too far-reaching. So we can do is try and understand the basics and the fundamentals as much as possible studied is moderate. It is Danny dies. Matt cuddle, man. Yeah. So what what have been your your high points of the Brexit year in? I if such a thing as a high point intermarried year, I think the high point for me was there maniacs show that we did in December because I'd never done live show before with remain ax. And I was love looking on audience is hundreds of people with a pro you t shirts and and their points of beer or having a lovely time. But just sort of genuinely curious engaged and it felt like a catharsis. Yeah. And they were really nice people. And they and they afterwards in the publisher of says people explaining how much it means to them. And you realize that actually we didn't surface most in the future. They'll be making a film like cavalry were just before over terribly wrong. A little tiny podcast remaining, James Graham's gonna writes. Yes maniacs to me before HBO. It'd be very short movie. Very tiny set. I play myself because that would be other team. But it was those shows were pretty fantastic..

Brexit Matt cuddle Romania HBO trion Danny publisher James Graham
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"And I don't choose a political Twitter. Just went crazy was saying it's only choose pick his eight o'clock on the Monday, the number ten spinners Russain. Yes. The voters going ahead tonight and within a couple of hours that had just been so much news ready, and it's only Wednesday. And this is this is a slightly atypical week in the world of Brexit. But it's not last on typical Anya. Brexit time is just crazy. Suffering from news poisoning. I need to have a full news. Yeah. News talk. News talk show. What's your hope for twenty nine and you're not allowed to say people's vote because all which is you know, the one what else is kind of would you look for? And I think that the whole concentrating on remaining and reforming in your and making take back control really really mean something. So I think there's a huge amount to those who tend to censor left politics and counting cells progressives to do a lot more to enhance Representative democracy in starting to talk about how we redistribute wealth. And the proceeds of globalization how we're going to pan for population growth, promoting greater democracy in the workplace. There are always wide ranging constitutional reforms being thrown over as well. So I think I think there is now a real appetite for very very very serious change of the order that radical liberals like there's no Jewish. I come from have long been espousing and been largely ignored. I think the time has come for us to to be able to champion those and actually get caught through. So don't use political calls his usual change by drugstore operating system operating systems change reboots move to twenty first century of some source. That's kind of crap Steve hill would come out with his son goes right now. No me. What's your breakfast island discourse, your tune that you've chosen to to to give up of heart to the listeners for the year to come? Now. This isn't just because the teenage me remains completely in love with Damon o'byrne if you're listening on the show. It's because the lyrics are so powerful. And it's it's the universal by blah for those of you who aren't familiar lyrics, go on about how it really really really could happen and right now recording this in this poker in this because Joe on a cold December Wednesday afternoon with the window sales towards the final say, the number of politicians and celebrities and other influential people have up till now said very little about Brexit, and certainly about coming out for people's vote are now beginning to join our ranks swollen. And the wind is really an ourselves for that. So I do believe that it really really really could happen stick. No, thanks very much happy Christmas. Happy new year. Thank you. Singer..

Brexit Twitter Damon o'byrne Representative Steve hill Joe
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"How's the experience of doing remaining alongside your day job -idn't because been helpful as it helps you cope? I it certainly has. So I've only been doing the job Besser Britain's April this year. So for almost a year during the post, I was in a much less Brexit related role. So the cost provided this amazing outlet for me, all of my frustrations around the direction that the country was headed, and it provided this lovely safe-space every Wednesday afternoon to crowd into very hot malls. And so talks people who feel the same way as I do. What was your are? No. It's been a widow year. What's been your high point of two thousand eighteen on as relates to the world of Brexit? And well, my high point was the labor postie conference when kiss Doma stood up and said, the labor party position just to be clear is to keep every avenue open, including the option to remain in the EU. And he. Got the most enormous, and I'm plummeted stunning vacation from the party faithful. Who of course, as we know are as pro remains, you can get and so that was that was show. Hi point to to see the visual and audible impacts of labor members telling the labor from bench in no one says how thrilled they were the prospective labour changing its position in thinking that he kinda freaked all their Bill not speech because it was reported the few things dropped in kind of proved by lotto. Well, the night before they'd had this funny session. Locked away went on for hours and hours and hours to try and buy shout labor policy motion would be on Brexit, and they emerged with it. And then in the morning Donal dismissed what had actually been contained in that. Which was the that labor would keep the option to remain on the table. And so as far as I'm aware care was. Just upholding what he knew had been agreed the night before and had come out of that room. So he was reinforcing that so whether lotto had approved or not it was certainly what the party faithful had signed up before we're recording this on Wednesday that fateful Wednesday. This also serve we'll we're going to have a relatively manageable. And then the no-confidence motions going forward voted on tonight on the listeners are hearing this in in end of December January so the review hostages to fortune. Hey, what so far has been your low point, Brexit wise? Point for me was almost accounted to my best point which was when it felt like the labor party. We're going to row in and buck the government on delivering Brexit. So if we wind back about six months, or so in those early days of the summer that was probably the lowest point for me person in terms of campaigning to stay in the EU wouldn't just felt like such an uphill struggle. We had eleven liberal Democrat MP's among green MP and a handful of s people that that probably backs opposition. And it just felt almost inevitable because for so long. The campaign has been about convincing the MP's rose about convincing the country. So that stage, I certainly felt very very worried that labor would just going to ruin behind the government to deliver Brexit. Look what we all. Now, it could be anything. He's all up in there. Brexit isn't even dog is whatever is a very short-lived animal packs a load of us into one year. That's what Brexit it's like interstellar. Where Matthew mcconaughey goes close to the black hole and time just accelerates, and it goes back to earth and everybody's dead. Learn grandkids recruiting this on Wednesday..

Brexit Donal labor party EU Besser Britain Doma Matthew mcconaughey Bill six months one year
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"I have been doing the show since the beginning. You know, who Who I I am? am? And what have you got about from doing this show since the beginning? I mean, it's so personal devotion. Isn't it's. Yeah. Twice a week. This shows the most fun thing that I do in my professional life because it's actually people that I know in like and also because you get to sort of. There's something about the time that you have and the non binary opposition nature of the format. The means that you actually get a bit further. So a bit more time to explore be when you know, having just a fight over and over with someone especially someone who's just fundamentally disagrees. So the leave remaining quite fundamental. It's not about discussion of tactics or whatever you actually find yourself getting I think integrates degrees of complexity and a bit more nuance. Fistican the new at other winds have found things let's defending a position your couch. Just explore these things that's true. I suppose there's something funny thing is you do sort of a TV or radio thing and you'll the remainder you do feel the responsibility to represent. I know that sounds preposterous from booting. If you screw up. You're not screwing up for yourself. You're screwing up for the people who who who have this and who feel pretty embattled right now. And so you not kind of works into this sort of eager that we really want to give way too much and that it's more performance of. Whereas when you when you do this that's not a requirement version of this. It's a bit more genuine in this. It's audibly more cerebral because you genuinely are thinking through the stuff and talking through the stuff rather than just sort of going in for essentially sort of wordy boxing merge. So we're recording this on twelfth Wednesday the twelfth of December and just as you were coming in the letters went in for the no confidence vote, we have no idea what's going to shape up over the next twenty four hours. And you're listening to this at the end of December of January, Dale listener. God knows how relevant is going to be. Well, it gives you a high point you're encouraging aspect of the whole Brexit message. This year. Encouraging. It was I mean the point I enjoyed the most was was Johnson and Davis resigning. It didn't it wasn't a good thing. It didn't improve the situation tool in the end the didn't really do much harm either. But it wasn't because it made things go very well for us. It was just that. It was really really funny. Yeah. So and it was and there was a suit of mnay. There was a bit with during the recording this thing, and then we'd recorded one for half an hour, and then stopped and went to go back and do it again. And there was a point where we were quite historic. And I remember thinking this is actually very enjoyable. Indeed, just watching them for the path because it was. World back. We when we hit one year, we listen to the first year to to the first did. And we talked about it. And one of the things we were talking about was, isn't it funny? How we kept on saying all soon the truth will assume reality will hit but right now and then just happening. But the moment that it did happen was I think when she produced checkers, which was a plan that even though it was realistic did grappa with reality. And as soon as she did it they fucking detonated just imploded the guts out from under them. I'm resignation started and the sort of the civil war among the Brexit offers funding took place, so in that sense. It was extremely entertaining. Even didn't particularly do us any good. I mean, did you think that marks final departure rather break fat block of politicians and objective reality that it's no longer about evidence of any kind. Now, it's all entirely about just feeling but also allegiance and commitment. Yeah. Exactly. And cleaved the Brexit. Front into for a while. We will talk about we need something that divides, the Brexit's we need something to divide the basically the sort of central right guys. You just go to do. And the thing that from the sort of true believing religious Jacob Reese mall on your frauds tubs? And this was actually that moment. Because suddenly there was something that looks like pragmatism in truth wasn't pragmatism..

Brexit Jacob Reese Dale mnay Johnson Davis twenty four hours one year
"brexit  " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"brexit " Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Hi, I'm Ruth Taylor. And I've been to think about what is like to to rainy remain access year. And it's been is being sitting really it's been extraordinarily. Really? It's been a way of blowing off the tension that builds up over a week, and this sheer stupidity of all the things that happen and being able to thrash out and talk about it and laugh about it. That's the most important thing with with with a group of people. It's been marvelous could charge people to come in here. And they could just sit on the couch and be part of the remaining ex Johnson group hug thought that his new patron strategy. Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. Only for the very very high level to the took. Let's start of on average. What was your high points of turns eighteen in the in the Brexit, cinematic universe? It was the people's vote March in October. I've been on a couple of previous marches those have been great. But this one was just so big. I think it was seven hundred twenty thousand people proximity turned up, and I was on my way on the tube with. Some friends and my family, and we heard that Green Park station had been closed because of overcrowded then we had another station of close because for over crowding and the walk quite a long way just to get to the towards the starting point. And it was then I realized just have big. This thing was eight was huge. There are there are, you know, sixty sixty million people in the UK, and almost what in sixty of those people actually turned out to March. And for me that was extraordinarily. And the it was impossible to get an idea of how many people with that. Because there was simply so many overs. We already see a head of this. You know, the first hundred thousand an amazing feeling I actually got more walking on getting to the Mars than during the modulus. Oh, logjam that we just basically in three hours. We shuffled from you know, Green Park. Do you think Paul way dump a deli? And then we went to the poll puffing hat. I'll say we could repeat that is horrible winter months right now, the weather was there's going to be, you know. We'll be further bites of that Sherry there might be. I've heard arguments day from Jodi on Borgen for a more gonna for a general strike should the government try to implement no deal. So I don't quite know what that would lead to. But we'll see interesting what she low points the Brexit here. When they meaningful vote was cancelled. I thought we were finally going to get a decision that would lead would move on woods to the next stage in the hideous Brexit journey, and we didn't and it was snatched away from us last minute by Theresa May too. Frankly cowardice and it was pointless thing to do and it then set in train of week in which no deal became even more likely..

Green Park Ruth Taylor Theresa May Sherry UK Brexit Johnson woods Jodi Borgen Paul three hours