35 Burst results for "Brexit"

Who is Dr. Stephen Turley?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:10 min | Last month

Who is Dr. Stephen Turley?

"He is doctor Steve turley, the author of numerous essential works. I'm just going to mention the return of Christendom also the new nationalism and the one that one of our team here says has the most beautiful color cover beauty matters. Steve turley welcome back to America first one on one. Doctor Sabbath is wonderful to be back with you. Thank you so much for having me. You are a busy man. It is hard to keep up with you the amount of content you put out there. For those who missed our last discussion, it just give us a little potted of who Steve is. What he studied and what you talk about most often. Yeah, thank you for that. I started a YouTube channel about 5 and a half years ago is actually November 1st, 2016. Of course, when an election was coming up right around that time. And I predicted that Donald Trump was going to win because I thought this was going to be a Brexit election based on the studies that I did at Durham university with where I got my PhD out across the pond there. I came across some studies called post secular study. This is back in 2009 or so 2010. And they basically were making the argument that the old globalist world order is more or less dead and a much more traditionalist national sovereignty based world order was rising. I didn't believe it at the time. I didn't have any evidence of that with Obama. They were using Russia as an example or India or some Middle Eastern nations and I just thought that was so far removed. But when I started seeing Brexit heat up, that's when I started to see, oh, so this is what they're talking about. And then when Donald Trump on the campaign trail started referring to himself as call me mister Brexit. I realized we've got something. There's some trends here that are very predictive and thank God they brought you and others like you into the sphere of The White House and I've been doing it ever since November 1st, 20 2016. And boy, we're almost about to hit 900,000 subs on YouTube if you can

Steve Turley Donald Trump Durham University America Steve Youtube Mister Brexit Middle Eastern Russia Barack Obama India White House
Macron Moves Into Final Two of Presidential Race

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:51 sec | Last month

Macron Moves Into Final Two of Presidential Race

"Macron managed to make it through to the final two against marine le pen in the French runoff. The result of Sunday's vote, according to the Financial Times, the le pen is closer than ever to winning power for the right in France, emulating the nationalist victories of Donald Trump in 2016 and Brexit in the UK 6 years ago. I don't know other than the fact that people just don't like Macron. All right, so that a poll of 1500 people show you had 52 to 48. Within the margin of air. And that would be stunning if le Patton, who began on the far right like her father in his move more towards the middle, previously supported Putin doesn't support Putin now. It would be a shock to the system if le pen wins, that that might shock Germany into consciousness as well.

Macron Le Pen Financial Times Donald Trump Le Patton France UK Putin Germany
Brendan O'Neill's Advice for Getting Involved With Issues That Matter

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Brendan O'Neill's Advice for Getting Involved With Issues That Matter

"About the average person that the taxpayer, the citizen, the person that listens to the brand and O'Neill show? Do you give them advice? Because for me, it's the same thing every single day, I say, get involved politically. It's sexy to be a senator. It's sexy to be a president. The thing that really matters is to do what my wife did last week, where she handed in her application to run for the board of the local community center. That's where politics really, you know, to use that Catholic phrase of subsidiarity. It is all local. What advice do you give to people who are fed up don't have a podcast but want to help? Yeah, I agree. I think getting involved at any level is always a very good thing to do. And one thing I've been inspired by over the past year is the parents revolted in America where you have all these parents groups or individual parents going to PTA meetings and school meetings and saying, look, stop teaching our kids about critical race theory. Stop indoctrinating our children into transgender ideology or identity politics. We don't want it. And I think that parental pushback has been a model in some ways of how ordinary people can get involved in these kinds of issues and can make a real difference. I think one of the problems in the UK is that there were so much pushback from the chattering classes against Brexit that people thought, well, you know, we voted for change and it looks like it's not going to happen, and it took 6 years for it to actually happen. So people started to lose faith, but I think over the past few months, as we've come out of lockdown, as we've rediscovered normal life and as we've seen war erupted in Europe in a terrible, terrible way, I've heard lots of people having discussions about the need to be more serious about our nation's life and our community life. And I think people should try to do that in any way they can, including by getting involved at any level of influence and that they can do. And that's really, really important.

Local Community Center America UK Europe
Ric Grenell: U.S. Weakness Led to Brexit, European Borders Changing

Mark Levin

01:18 min | 3 months ago

Ric Grenell: U.S. Weakness Led to Brexit, European Borders Changing

"But when I hear this stuff and you may disagree with me I don't know your view The American people don't care about Ukraine You know the American people didn't care about Austria The American people didn't care about Czechoslovakia The American people didn't care about Poland at one point And then all of a sudden we have the Third Reich I'm not saying this is the Third Reich I'm not even saying this is the old Soviet Union but I don't think we should be so cavalier as people with a public microphone that just blow this sort of thing off I'd be curious about what you think Yeah I actually agree And I would go one step further in that it matters for NATO and it matters for Europe I spent a long time in Berlin hearing from Brussels and Paris and Berlin about why the transatlantic relationship was really about strengthening Europe And I told Chancellor Merkel that the reason why Brexit happened the reason why Crimea happened rewriting of the European borders which is Absolute nightmare Scenario The reason why we've had the borders rewritten in Europe In the last ten years a couple of times is because of weakness from the United States That's just a plain fact

Czechoslovakia Ukraine Austria Poland Berlin Chancellor Merkel Europe Nato Brussels Paris Crimea United States
 Elizabeth the Steadfast: Queen marks 70 years on throne

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

Elizabeth the Steadfast: Queen marks 70 years on throne

"Britain's Britain's Britain's Britain's Queen Queen Queen Queen Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth the the the the second second second second will will will will mark mark mark mark seventy seventy seventy seventy years years years years on on on on the the the the throne throne throne throne on on on on Sunday Sunday Sunday Sunday an an an an unprecedented unprecedented unprecedented unprecedented rate rate rate rate this this this this made made made made her her her her a a a a symbol symbol symbol symbol of of of of stability stability stability stability from from from her her her early early early days days days as as as a a a glamorous glamorous glamorous young young young royal royal royal in in in glittering glittering glittering tiaras tiaras tiaras to to to a a a more more more recent recent recent incarnation incarnation incarnation as as as the the the nation's nation's nation's grandmother grandmother grandmother the the the queen's queen's queen's witness witness witness the the the end end end of of of the the the British British British Empire Empire Empire the the the advent advent advent of of of multi multi multi culturalism culturalism culturalism the the the rise rise rise of of of international international international terrorism terrorism terrorism and and and the the the challenges challenges challenges posed posed posed by by by brexit brexit brexit and and and the the the covert covert covert nineteen nineteen nineteen pandemic pandemic pandemic in in in a a a world world world of of of relentless relentless relentless change change change she's she's she's been been been a a a constant constant constant representing representing representing the the the UK's UK's UK's interests interests interests abroad abroad abroad applauding applauding applauding the the the nation's nation's nation's successes successes successes and and and commiserating commiserating commiserating in in in its its its failures failures failures and and and always always always remaining remaining remaining above above above the the the fray fray fray of of of politics politics politics Charles Charles Charles de de de Ledesma Ledesma Ledesma London London London

Britain Queen Queen Queen Queen Elizab Mark Mark Mark Mark Brexit Brexit Brexit UK Charles Charles Charles De De London
Mike Graham Describes How the Journalism Industry Has Devolved

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:16 min | 4 months ago

Mike Graham Describes How the Journalism Industry Has Devolved

"Mike, you have this almost unique experience. Because you're not just a media professional from one country. You've done it here in America. You've been massively successful being this. You know, one man why a service for the globe before you came back to the UK and then started you also talk radio program. Let's drill down here a bit on what's happened. Because as a kid growing up in West London, you know, I'd love a news junkie. I was listening to LBC radio as a kid, you know, Adrian love at midnight as an 8 year old and my little transistor I'd buy the you know I'd pick up the Evening Standard coming home from school on the tube on the subway. That media doesn't exist anymore. Back then, you know, if you said the word journalist, it wasn't necessarily pejorative, and it was actually a trade. I mean, you knew stuff, you worked your ass off, the unions were problem, but you had a skill set and you were challenging the establishment. Yes, the BBC was always lefty. I get it. But it was a skill set. It wasn't just, here's a typewriter right stuff. Today, a snotty nose 21 year old is given a Gmail account and a search engine and they're allegedly a journalist. Will you walk us through you as a first hand witness? What has happened to your industry mic? Well, you're absolutely right. I mean, the BBC was always slightly left leading, but it was never so obviously biased, as it is now. You know, when I grew up watching people like Richard baker reading the news, you know, these were people like sort of Walter Cronkite, you know, they were respected and you could believe everything that they said. And that now has kind of changed. Now we have a guy called Hugh Edwards who makes 750,000 pounds a year. Now, I know that his dwarfed by some of the salaries over there. But he took a 250,000 pound pay cut and thought we should be grateful that he'd done it because he was apparently saving us all some money. That's paid for by the taxpayer. That's our money. Right, because if you don't buy a BBC television license, you can actually go to prison. It's the only tax which immediately sends you to jail if you don't

Lbc Radio West London BBC Adrian Mike America UK Hugh Edwards Richard Baker Walter Cronkite
Journalist Mike Graham Knows How to Connect With His British Audience

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Journalist Mike Graham Knows How to Connect With His British Audience

"So I sort of headed off to make my fortune in America back in the days of the Ronald Reagan's America, which is what my favorite one of my favorite times in American 1980s, you know, when you've got rid of charter, you've got rid of Watergate and it all gone away

America Ronald Reagan
How Britain's Mike Graham Got Into the Journalism Business

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:49 min | 4 months ago

How Britain's Mike Graham Got Into the Journalism Business

"He is talk radio's Mike Graham. He is the caliph of the independent republic of Mike Graham. Welcome to one on one on America first, Mike. Sebastian, thank you so much. I'm delighted to be able to join you. There's an awful lot to talk about. Unfortunately, I have to say, we don't fight them on the beaches anymore. We help them out of dinghies and then give them a free hotel room and a couple of pizzas to begin on with. Yeah, unlike here where a CIA contract is fly them on unmarked jumbo jets across the country. And unload them under the cover of darkness. So we have to connect the connections is still there across the channel between our two nations. For those who don't listen to your show via podcast or YouTube every day, shame on you, 'cause my kid's superb. For those who aren't familiar with your story, Mike, would you tell us, would you share with us? 'cause you have an interesting background not only in journalism, but here in the United States. So Mike, what is your story? Well, my story is that I got into journalism because it seemed to me to be the only thing to do when I was growing up in London in 1970s. My father was involved in newspapers and I just thought it seemed like a fantastic business to be in getting sent around the world covering stories that somebody else was paying you to do. Staying nice hotels, you know, hanging around driving great cars, meeting fascinating people. And I found myself working in fleet street at a time when the trade unions basically had the business by the throat. And believe it or not, the times newspaper, which is still going, it used to be known as a thunderer. Actually didn't publish for an entire year. Thanks to the trade unions who were so powerful in those days. So it was very difficult to get jobs. It was very difficult to find a permanent work situation because people were employed in newspapers because they didn't know whether from one day to the next. They'd be going out on

Mike Graham Mike Sebastian United States CIA Youtube London The Times
Boris Johnson Receives Sue Gray's Partygate Report

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:04 min | 4 months ago

Boris Johnson Receives Sue Gray's Partygate Report

"I want to update you on the breaking news. Boris Johnson will address the House of Commons at three 30 in Great Britain. It is now 1240 in Great Britain, and when he does that, we will know how deep the trouble he is in. I do not know what's in the gray report, nobody does. I'm looking at all the newspapers, the gray report is the report on the prime minister and his team partying during COVID lockdowns. It is grabbed him in a scandal, which is threatened to topple his premiership. The 1922 committee requires I believe 52 letters from members of parliament. Requesting a vote of no confidence, in which, of course, labor would join toppling the prime minister as happened to Theresa May because she fumbled on Brexit, Boris Johnson delivered on two years ago today, as a matter of fact, effectively getting Great Britain out of the European Union and God bless him for that, but will he survive this? I don't know. I don't know what's in the report, but I'm watching and keeping it in front of me every minute of every hour.

Great Britain Boris Johnson House Of Commons Parliament Theresa European Union Britain
The Origins of the Podcast 'Triggernometry,' Hosted by Francis Foster and Konstantin Kisin

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:26 min | 6 months ago

The Origins of the Podcast 'Triggernometry,' Hosted by Francis Foster and Konstantin Kisin

"Crowds. Then around 2013 to 2014, I started to notice something change. And gradually, audiences became more and more sensitive. Not all audiences, but mainly audiences, audiences inner London, in central London, particularly young people. I started to notice that jokes that used to do quite well, then you used to say certain words and immediately you could feel the audience sees up. You could feel that there was attention around an audience when you broke certain topics. It was just, even if you dealt with a topic in a very sensitive, a very fun, a very playful way it didn't matter. You could feel the tension starting to come in. And then, obviously, everything exploded when Brexit happened when Trump happened. Then a narrative came in that if you voted for Trump, if you voted for Brexit, you were stupid, thick racist, white, all of these things, which they all lumped in together and then that's when the real divisions happened in comedy. And that's when I saw comedy becoming more woke, becoming more illiberal, becoming more intolerant. And it's progressed and then obviously we are where we are now. So that is my story with regards to trigonometry. And by the way, we started it in 2018 as a reaction to all of that because we saw what happened with Brexit with

London Brexit Donald Trump
'Eurotrash' Author David Harsanyi Shares His Thoughts on Brexit

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:55 min | 7 months ago

'Eurotrash' Author David Harsanyi Shares His Thoughts on Brexit

"Welcome back to one on one with mitigated columnist David harsanyi. Well, let's grasp the nettle by the thorn Brexit. What does Brexit mean? Is it the last saving grace? Is it the Hail Mary? Or is it irrelevant in terms of the Euro trash ideas of the continent? Because at the end of the day, it's not the continent. It's the UK and it's the UK rejecting the bad ideas. Well, what is the geo strategic or historic import of those 17 million breaths saying thanks, but no thanks. Now, as you know, the British have always been a poor fit I think in the European Union or fit, the French didn't really even want them to be part of it initially. They are far more far less controlled than ever took on the currency. They're more free market oriented in general. The British are my favorite my favorite people in Europe because we come from them. We are their spawn. We have there. It's their ideas that made America great. I think they manifested in more better ways here in the long run and the British sort of abandoned many of them, but in general I'm a fan and I'm a fan of Brexit. But does it really change much? I don't think so. I mean, the so called conservatives in Britain are just in Europe, there is no real ideological right. There is a nationalistic right, perhaps. There is sort of a status right. But there aren't very many classical liberals on the right. There are some, I'm not saying, but when you have these governments, it's usually just once status party against another, which is what's happening now, probably in Britain for the most part. So I don't think it changes much in the trajectory of Europe itself. Obviously, it's different. I'm a bigger fan of Britain than Germany, but in the end, neither cold a torch to hold a candle to the United

David Harsanyi Hail Mary UK Europe European Union Britain America Germany United
EU warns Britain: Don't press the emergency Brexit button - Reuters UK

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 7 months ago

EU warns Britain: Don't press the emergency Brexit button - Reuters UK

"The possibility of a pace brexit trade who is getting closer as both the United Kingdom and European Union remain at the standoff over Northern Ireland and fishing licenses the tension between the two sides was aggravated after the U. K. rejected ET proposals to streamline the trade of goods in northern islands before the talks Britain's brexit minister David frost said they were hopeful the E. you would address the concerns of northern Ireland's when negotiating this significant gap between us if that gap narrows and the commission listened to what we said in the compound type and look at the situation in Northern Ireland then maybe that will help us with excellent however that the U. K. government said the latest proposals did not address what they call fundamental difficulties in addition to the Northern Ireland question both sides also made no progress in negotiations it was symbolically important U. K. fishing licenses all France talks

Northern Ireland U. K. Northern Islands David Frost European Union United Kingdom U. K. Government Britain France
What’s behind the fishing dispute between the UK and France? - Aljazeera.com

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 7 months ago

What’s behind the fishing dispute between the UK and France? - Aljazeera.com

"Britain and France are being told to sold out that pays breaks at specific fishing rights which is escalating by the day many fear the disagreement could lead to a French blockade of British fishing boats and trucks please resign a tiny part since the disputed directly affecting his business what is stopped we will build volume official bill to export into the source of our faith countries are accusing each other of being in breach of the post brexit trade agreement that both sides signed before Britain left the European Union Britain has said it was actively considering launching legal action if fonts gay street with threats of a blockade jazzy Fishman pizza Kay says the spot is the leasing game for both sides he's got to wait that will be no witness I need to be loose Karen Thomas

Britain European Union Britain France KAY Karen Thomas
EU adopts 5 billion-euro Brexit reserve to help businesses

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 8 months ago

EU adopts 5 billion-euro Brexit reserve to help businesses

"The European Council is generating a five point eight billion dollar reserve aimed at helping businesses tackle the short term effects of brexit the council which represents the national government of every E. U. member nation says the money will cover extra costs and compensate the losses from Britain's withdrawal from the twenty seven nation trading bloc despite a trade deal struck in December to ensure tariff free trade Britain's trade with the EU has fallen sharply Britain's departure has affected many parts of the E. U. economy with the fishing sector particularly at risk officials say the reserve money would benefit both public and private businesses I'm Charles Taylor that's not

National Government Of Every E European Council Britain EU Charles Taylor
UK eyes visa change to ease trucker drought amid run on gas

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 8 months ago

UK eyes visa change to ease trucker drought amid run on gas

"The British government to change their minds about these rules for truck drivers says the keys at the petrol pumps pileup impatience at the petrol pumps his tribe is waiting increasing the long queues to fill their tanks one mattress has had enough of my time I thought I would fill out usually I leave it on the car seven three I'm not going to get to work the truck driver's shortage Robertson has had a knock on effect to petrol stations causing the British government to do a U. turn on its previous policy at ease visa rules for truck drivers well so welcome relief government officials awarding the new measures will any be temporary the whole IT industry in the U. K. is sold to markets to to many factors including the pandemic and an aging what full some breaks its post brexit immigration rules means ESI's isn't Connecticut live in what visa free in person as they could when the U. K. was a member of the trade bloc Karen Thomas London

British Government U. Robertson ESI U. K. Connecticut Karen Thomas London
U.S. Spat With France Shows Challenge of Keeping Allies Unified

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:24 min | 8 months ago

U.S. Spat With France Shows Challenge of Keeping Allies Unified

"I want you to put on the secretary of state hat. That many believe people believed you're going to wear. Should hillary clinton have won the two thousand sixteen election. And tell me what you would do if you were sitting on the seventh floor of the state department and this submarine controversy arose. And you might want to recap it for people who didn't listen to talk about it last week. You're on the air with me when the story broke. Yeah in in very short strokes. Australia signed up for france to build diesel electric submarines which are pretty good but over the last week or so they have done a one eighty and signed up with the united states in the united kingdom to build vastly better nuclear powered submarines. The french have lost a multi billion dollar contract. Their outrage what i would have done in retrospect was spend more time speaking with our allies. The french our oldest allies the first nation who came and fought alongside us in the revolutionary war. There are very fond of pointing that out as we subsequently fought a small war with them but such was the nineteenth century at the moment there still very strong allies within nato and so this came across to them as a very bad industrial policy. But also a real stab in the back to an ally. If i were sitting in tony blinken shoes right now and tony by the way. Interestingly is a franco phonic. He speaks beautiful. French lived in france for many years. I think he is and ought to be the point. Man on trying to rebuild this at the moment quite shaky set of relationships. And it's not just france hewitt's it's also with europe. Broadly we see particularly in the wake of brexit as the united kingdom pulls out. We now see france taking a lead in germany in working toward a much more independent eu policy. That'll bleed into our efforts to stand up to china. That's why this is important. I think secretary blinken that ought to be pretty much at the top of his chat list. Right now is working with his counterparts in paris.

France Hillary Clinton Tony Blinken United Kingdom Australia United States Nato Tony Hewitt Europe Secretary Blinken Germany EU China Paris
Shake, Rattle the Roles: Britains Cabinet Reshuffle

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:10 min | 9 months ago

Shake, Rattle the Roles: Britains Cabinet Reshuffle

"Britain's prime minister starts today with a very different cabinet than he had yesterday on. Peculiarity of british politics is the cabinet reshuffle. A sudden reordering of who's in charge of what in the government this one was. Well telegraphed and members of parliament had been pressing. Boris johnson on. Who shouldn't be in charge of much with all the talk of cabinet. Reshuffle can the prime minister guarantee that the foreign secretary will finally be sucked that any shuffled or does he intend to the world and competence reshuffles serve many purposes rewarding loyalty punishing perceived foolishness and setting or resetting a political agenda but they're messy and embarrassingly public ministers shuffled past the cameras outside downing street toward their new fates expecting a promotion. Knew it might not seem like a great time for such disruption with the country focused on what the pandemic will bring next and on britain's role in the crumbling of afghanistan but the prime minister has plenty of other business still to attend to and now a new team to tackle. It was expected that. Boris johnson would hold reshuffle. He has space to do so. Now and macelroy is a senior editor at the economist. Britain's coming out of the pandemic enough to do something like that. that wouldn't look like distraction. He won a tight vote on tax raising last week to fund the nhs and social care so he feels that he sweeps all before him. And this is the time to clear out some deadwood and makes them promotions. And what is the dead wood. That's been cleared out with the most. Prominent deadwood. That went out was dominic robb brexit. Here a lawyer. He became foreign secretary and went through that role. I think without great distinction. But he did it and then got into terrible trouble. When the fall of kabul happened. He was on holiday with his family and he didn't really appear to respond quickly enough to the

Cabinet Boris Johnson Britain Macelroy Parliament Afghanistan Dominic Robb NHS Kabul
Ministers to Outline Proposals to Address NI Protocol

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:46 min | 11 months ago

Ministers to Outline Proposals to Address NI Protocol

"You government. Ministers are set to outline how they want to overhaul trading arrangements between britain northern ireland the measures which governed by the northern ireland protocol designed to prevent the need for border checks on the island of ireland after brexit but the government in westminster is concerned about the impact that it could have on exports to northern ireland when the terms fully kickin over the next few months the agreement has also angered large sections of northern ireland's loyalist community. Let's get the latest now with george parker political editor at the financial times. Thank you for joining us. George just bring us up to speed. I on what we can expect from today. Well we're going to have to wait very long. See precisely what the british government's gonna say in this regard. There's gonna be a statement to the house of commons by the northern secretary brandon. Lewis in about half an hour's time where he's also going to publish a government statement on how it sees the future of the brexit deal relating to ireland's but essentially What's happened here. Since brexit took effect is that the uk government regards the checks on goods passing between the mainland of great britain's northern ireland to be fought too onerous. They think the eu interpreting the deal and as far too legalistic away and it's created tensions in northern ireland where the pro uk unionists community very much disliked. The idea of any sort of trade off between northern ireland and the rest of the united kingdom shots background so it and what the government is expected to announce today is it wants to basically get rid of those checks on goods travelling between raping the person in northern ireland. Right much more sort of honesty books. Kind of approach where british Goods thrive in northern ireland. That they'll be some sort of guarantee sticker on the mall. Something saying that. The could should only go into circulation in northern ireland across across the open land border into ireland which of course remains possibly even single market.

Northern Ireland George Parker Britain Westminster Financial Times British Government House Of Commons Brandon George Lewis EU United Kingdom Government
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"You know you're on your unlock monster which we've kind of already done on immigration. Shen and it's very difficult to put it back in the box when he wants you open it up. I mean in my lifetime there being three big Ross the poll tax students and then you know the I'm the shooting and sort of what started as the London riots more recently which we kind of trigger events or policy events. I agree with you but we we. Shouldn't you know what what's that got to do with Brexit Brexit if it's about anything it's about you know the future of the UK but it what it should be about it. What's reports writing. Tim's crazing livelihoods for people across the U K. That's what we should be talking and we're not talking about that at all. We just getting into this very emotive argument of in out and then losing track that she was in palm. What's going to create jobs in the Midland's. What's GONNA create opportunities. I mean that's what drew the trouble. Is that so much so much of the Narrative Arctic compensation is based on what government administers say and at the moment we don't you know we had a speech today marshon every Sierra he could imagine there was no content content to any of it whereas most of the communication is coming from very very senior people in government is incredibly aggressive and incredibly vivid as well to up to the time when people will put out statements to link lynchings and stuff and you don't use these words I did this is not about for way you'd be behaving neutral and so you're always caught in this thing of engage you sort of cement that some in that conversation but if you don't you just allow it just flow out without any restraint but you call you can't this isn't a a UK thing you know. This is right wing. Populism is the same in Brazil. It's the same in the US as in many other parts of the world to you know this is classic poppy populism inaction. you know all message to business right now is the time to speak up because it's not coming from the political arena but I think responding to the political arena isn't helping as to what we've gotTa do show show some leadership and that's what I mean about toning it down and getting into the proper issues and talking through what are the solutions. We know what the issues are. Let's talk about what are the solutions that are actually going to fix those problems. I don't think we should be giving it airtime and I think that would be our view because all that does is just escalated even further other point about young people as well arise which is an interesting one in the context of Brexit because I think it's been very nice but how when I say young people I mean so young adults really how UNIN gazed they've been but in a way there's no surprise about that because many the impacts will full you know way down the road and so I think for me me what's more interesting is not riots. It's about what what would the backlash to that. Be You know when that ten years down the road of already having ten years of All Star L. Steroids not and then having another ten years or twenty of disruption to their own careers and opportunities and then what what will be the outcome of that you know we have to be mindful the to give them an opportunity to is come come back or engage in a later date if they're not engaged right now. We have to be thinking this is not. This isn't one or two Matt roundabouts here. We're not talking about things that have a five year cycle. We're talking about policies that have thirty cycle and that that's the kind of thing we're GONNA be talking about you know to kind of measure the measure the dialogue companion podcast on the House where MP Sam Jeanne Moreau Philip Leeann friends discuss politics appointed. The end of the week is roaring up the podcast charts. If you're looking for an honest inside a take parliament's infinity war than you should check it out. There's a new episode every Friday subscribed on the house on your favorite.

UK Shen Brexit Brexit Sam Jeanne Moreau Philip Leean London Ross US Midland Tim Brazil Matt ten years five year
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"I think that's very very clear you'd be approved Brexit potty and then what are they going to do in the referendum that would follow. Would you say where we're going to now campaign against the deal negotiated for new. You'RE GONNA have to say well. We're going to have to push for it in the referendum to and on that basis I think you'd have to be an unusual remain into that's a deal for me than the Lib Dem one but that was because they were saying that they would whether they okay campaign for remain or not we depend on the deal they gone but that would sweet but that would be weird because then that would mean that there's a possibility of accepting they've come back with a shit deal. That ain't GonNa Campaign Against Weed seems like not great for politician. I wouldn't put it Boscovich with how'd you you've been pushing for this unit for something like this. You know for for a long time I mean how do you feel about it would you would you have gone further. Do you think that Labor cannot completely close the door on the option of respecting the two thousand sixteen result on some magic kind of no downsides circumstances like how did you feel when this when this was announced was like yes or yes but yes but and I think people are looking for three things from Labor clarity consistency and conviction and where we've got to this week I think gives us some clarity and certain extent some consistency in the my relief and it was a genuine feeling of relief is thank God between what is now likely to be the period up to the end of the thirty first October we no longer needs have running weekly battles with our own leadership dragging them kicking and screaming to the right position on these issues. You know we know that whatever deal Boris Johnson comes back with we will vote against it and push for it to go to a public votes where we will campaign. I'm paints to remain. We know that if he tries to push no deal will insist that that option is puts the public and we would campaign to remain so that gives you the clarity and I think everyone would want to get behind sending everyone listens. This would want to get get behind it. The the challenge however is beyond that and and actually between now and October where where I think we were lacking his conviction because why would want the Labor Party say and genuinely understand what Jeremy Corbyn was trying to try and say we don't want to alienate a divided todd country wants to bring people together to chart a way forward look how damaging and divisive disease and and let's not ignore the message that people send us when they voted for Brexit. I accept the sentiment of all of that but the problem is the in in trying to please please everyone. He's pleased no one and we haven't been true to ourselves or true to our voters and most importantly I think true to the national interest even if like me voted trigger article fifty because you thought it was important let the government trying to negotiate something onto show some willingness to accept the result. The last couple of years have been a total horror show every single promise that the brakes tears made hasn't been delivered they can cry foul play as much as they like but the problem is they're all of those promises were made could not have possibly possibly being delivered and Boris Johnson's about fun as to why the Boris Johnson comes back with for sure what was promised during the referendum..

Boris Johnson Brexit Jeremy Corbyn Labor Party
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Let's be let's be honest about that one of the major factors was the new EU Japan trade deal, actually, which means that you don't take the Goshi? Goshi. Quicker than. That the key thing about that. Is that it allows Japan they're four hundred to import into the EU without tariffs. Therefore, the rationale for having a factory in the only next to the U decreases. However and unfolding diesel sales. That's a factor too. And that's frankly, good thing, I'm Saudi fed up with diesels. Poisoning my children because I live with the wrote. But there you go separately. And so that is no consolation to people in Swindon. The fact is although there were a number of things going on here. Brexit was undoubtedly a factor and the Honda leadership were real reluctant to say. So I think because you don't want to criticize a sitting government, and you don't want to especially when you have a particular culture of being very careful. I think about you. Yes. Face exactly not losing face. But the uncertainty that Brexit crates, and particular and supply chains clearly is undoubtedly a factor inner things can be many things at the same time. Right. Who the fuck you thought if you go around, you know, saying that we are going to interrupt, you know, global just in time supply chain for complex manufactured good. You are going to discourage investment in your country with us new people coming in or whether it's people who are ready here where there's a very tenuous plan isn't necessarily making that much money. Choosing to go out, and that can coexist with the effects of a free trade agreements with you know, market concerns with this general sensor on the car industry. The what used to be a manufacturing product with a little bit of Technet is fast becoming tech product in a metal shell. And that means that you'll regulatory lobbying is going to need to be quite hard. And you're not going to do that in fucking Britain. If it's caught between the two great big joins of regulation, which is the US on one side and the EU on the other all of that stuff comes into Place. play. That's why it's so dispiriting to look at the Commons yesterday, Tuesday and business secretary stand up and actually to be fair to him to give food credit really do pretty much say this, and you go, well, it's complicated..

EU Brexit Japan Swindon US secretary Britain Honda
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"The telegraph on LGBT issues and a functioning bricks Hollick. Welcome to our safe-space, Krista. Hello, thank you for having me. It's lovely to be in this dingy dark damp, SoHo basement giving us an idea of the conditions will be living in post the twenty twenty-ninth. Thank you for that. In the mazing on on a scale of say the telegraph to full European army. How Romania call you are. I was a reluctant remainder. I passionate remain. Now. I still don't feel like I know enough to actually have voted on it because I don't believe any of us. I read your article in quite passionately. But I still don't believe, you know, enough to voted in a referendum with in referenda because I don't really believe. Now with hindsight that was the way to solve the problem because we are dealing with thirty or forty years of this sort of drip, drip, dripping away anti sentimen rather than just a yes. Or no question which at the time. I thought it was. I've I've moved positions not become a militant rain in. Which case you are incredibly welcome. You did a piece last week around. What are we missing out on because we're only ever blood? You're talking about Brexit now oversee as remained yaks in this cost. That's all we ever talk about. And we love talking about it. But, but what are the key things you think that the whole country is just put on ice and isn't discussing because John. Take your pig. I mean, we've go there is so much. We are not discussing all we are talking about is Brexit, do you? Remember Theresa May on the steps of Downing Street where she came in as as prime minister. And I was actually quite excited that she was going to be prime minister. I actually have quite sympathetic view to resume in comparison to other people she's on a self many favors. I was really I've always considered myself so center right, ideologically, I don't necessarily love the conservatives who are in power at the moment. But certainly I believe in a free market. I believe that a free market should pay for people should pay taxes on that free market should pay for the public services, we need, and I was really excited when Theresa May was on the steps at Downing Street talking about how if you off from a minority in this country, then you are less likely to do well in education to do. Well in your career, she laid out this great shopping list of. Social change that she was going to to be bringing in as a Tory, and none of that's happened. Because all anyone's been speaking about is Brexit. So that really was what I meant was that we were were supposed to be getting this this socially conscious conservative leader. And we've ended up with someone broke down completely with Brexit who quite possibly ran the worst election campaign in history. I mean who takes a landslide lead. I lose this week. This probably a word. And you getting more hard line people calling into your shows now who are more like give us hard Brexit, right now, you know, different. What are you seem to get an I'm very conscious of the fact that ROY is a bit like this this idea that I am a constant stream of negativity which underneath Brexit for that. Thanks. I could do that on my own. But I I call see the positive in this. I would love I'm waiting desperately for someone to call me. And tell me why we're doing this. Because I still don't know though, I understand the arguments about the certain undemocratic pulse of the EU and the commission and those certain things the all renewing. Yeah. Till I'm blue in the face..

Brexit prime minister Krista European army Romania EU John ROY forty years
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Amazing comes comes out and more and more and more people. Just don't take people whose vote who would just going just fucking still pitting. Wrong again. I I don't have such an optimistic outlook because something would have to happen for tickle fifty to be revoked right? We all know. Like, no one's doing anything. The boulder rolling down the hill. The default option is not ill Brexit. You can say you don't want. No Dilbert says much as you want and parliament. But unless you're willing to take action to stop that we're heading for no deal Brexit. I think Theresa May's going to go to the EU all the EU leaders are going to say no trees may that will be no special yuko to renegotiate the deal. We've already signed off in it. Then she comes back and we've moved closer to know deal breakfast. So then she very tactically has not tactically. But she has then even more starkly to present to the palm it look. It's my deal or no deal on she'll be hoping that those who didn't vote for her deal. The first time around will this time vote for it faced by the barrel of no deal. And if that doesn't get through I think it will be no deal. Brexit right now deal. Brexit oliver. What's your prediction? My production is, unfortunately, I'm going to have to say, I think those are no Brexit. I agree with Nina, a specially half. Halfway melt say I've never been in favour of one. I would I would say I would rather vote remain the no differ. The for no deal. I would rather remain. And then vote for no deal. I think that the consequences of no brutally line into two categories. You have the immediate economic consequences, the, stockpiling and soul. The friction of the boldest crushing of just in time supply chains, and you have the second branch of consequences, which I don't think anybody really talked about on. I don't necessarily I can't necessarily paint a really accurate picture of them. But I think that there are more long-term geopolitical consequences one, oh, do and I think that few future administrations as a result of an ideal maybe weaker, so we may end up coming back to the and getting less in return for bagging. If that makes any sons. The defense agreement on which side are we China Washington brussel of geopolitical element as well. It's not just about food and trade in goods. I think one I have the hoping my mind also fifty will be extended because I wanted to leave with the deal. I'm a leave without Bill. Qian very briefly. What's your prediction? Perfectly realistic. The let's put a slightly more optimistic picture of which I didn't know if it's more likely or less likely, but this is where the chances if this if this it is the look, we know the timeframe we know she's going to go and come back with something amendable before Valentine's Day. She had the fuck and said owned Valentine's Day. Headline rights is across the country. A tremendous. So it's either before buttons own garden tons. They comes like one or two votes now. And that time we know who needs to be convinced. We know the labor bricks does need to be threatened or cajoled or bribed to get on board. We know the Tory. Motorists are not showing up to the degree that they showed. And we know that the motorists around the cabinet table of which there are extensive be supposed to be you know, when over a dozen need to be told this is the NAS fucking chance you do this. Now, they're all no further chances on that basis extension is winnable, but those are the people that need to talk to and they need to be targeted hot. Meanwhile, the way from the comments to mine no deal developments this week nothing to worry about just the British retail consortium morning that no deal will lead to higher prices and Mt..

Brexit oliver EU Theresa May Valentine China Washington brussel Nina Qian Bill Mt
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"I mean to what extent is this? So difficult to understand. This was an agreement that the UK so trees amaze own government agreed and signed off with twenty eight other Member States. So the idea that now this will be reopened the backstop will be removed and there'll be a new deal is just fantasy. And I think what you'll see happening vis-a-vis the EU in the next two weeks is they're gonna play hardball. That'd be okay. So if you want to take this down the line, let's do it. They still haven't been convinced that Theresa May has anything in parliament that can deliver majority. So if a has to be a new deal, it will be a no deal. So all this stuff that Johnson has been spouting about how it takes two to Tango, every would say that wouldn't they the was doesn't have deals. That's that's rubbish and you'll be there. Okay. So of course, there is room for some flexibility, the EU has already clarified that they don't want the backstop to ever come into action either. And that's actually in the withdrawal agreement, you know, veiling alternative arrangements failing this magic tech which hasn't realized failing a trade deal, which means that there's no need for border failing that as an insurance policy. We have the backstop so the eye so that's already there. So I don't know what they can do in order to clarify it more. They can you know, they're definitely not going to remove it from the woods agreement. If that's the red line that the conservatives have moreover, the backstop is a British creation. It is in the withdrawal agreement because that is essentially what the British government asked for. They said, you know, give. That trees amaze speech in Lancaster House, her red lines. Brexit words, we're leaving the customs market, we're leaving the single market, but we cannot have a border. So then the said fine. We'll then we'll have to have in the Irish Sea that was unacceptable. So they had a UK wide customs union as the final outcome for the box, which is something again that the UK asked for so as far as the us concerned, they're like, well, this is your solution. So we're not we're not going to renegotiate it. We have tangled Boris, and you agree to it year ago when he signed up to it, you did say anything, then when your foreign secretary. It's true to say because he was he's on CNN CNN. The Trump don't sky, and they posted thing and the U of just put the specialist you're going we're not going to reopen the Madrid agreement goes, well, you know, it takes two to time go, and you would like the fucking exactly. Right. You've just negated your own argument. So how did labor play on this week? We're going to source on. Told y'all think like Labour's position on anything? Something. I mean, you know, maybe pointing from a lot of voters blabber food is I've took too. I mean, a few people have expressed how tie they all. And you just want to get it over this and have a nice magical break that suddenly to no one knows how to deliver this but labor as they have nothing on the table. Even when they were doing they were making the headlines. It was just absolute void. We will find a way it's just I don't I I used to be quite an admirer of their leader because we such aggressive compaign, but it's been two years of silence, and nothing and and stubbornness, and it's really difficult to grasp for me. Jeremy Corbyn is just as bad as some of the worst liars on the conservative side. And in fact, I found his whole today his say, you know, find the saying I will go and talk to Theresa May really really cynical because that's Oviously after Treasa may his swung behind the ER g and the DP and going for the hardest kind of new deal Brexit or on on on the. Xtop? So now he wants to negotiate with her. So I wouldn't. Well, I it's very cynical. Right. So I I almost see this as his stand in what he can later claimed was a principled opposition to the conservative party decision..

EU Boris Theresa Jeremy Corbyn UK CNN Lancaster House Irish Sea British government Treasa Johnson Trump Madrid secretary Brexit two weeks two years
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Disinformation in technology and a German born British resident who like Joni Mitchell has looked at Brexit from both sides now. Hello. Welcome back. The last time you were here was at the end of November since then we've had one aborted meaningful vote one historic defeat for the government a plan B, that's really planning and a hat now. This did it make any more sense of a distance that it doesn't think of it. Absolutely not. In fact, I don't think we've moved one step forward at all since where we were from before December before any of this happened, and the only step that we've taken forward is actually a step towards no deal Brexit. So looking good for direction hours towards definitely towards no deal. Brexit vive. I don't know if it is my base case scenario, but I think given what happened yesterday, it's certainly more likely, and I think it's more likely than what business and markets have factored in. I mean, I think they still think the deal will get across the line. But if the choice, ultimately is some kind of reopening of the withdrawal agreement to remove the backstop, the annot deal Brexit, it's going to be a no deal Brexit, even if that means. Turn to a hard border in Orland which I think will happen on inclined to agree with you, unfortunately. And in fact, I was tweeting today about what my top six stockpiling items would which has possibly responsible, but. Anyway, anyway. Tinned tomatoes. Yeah. Yeah. Well, I mean, it's not that I called without weeks. You want to do that. It's the most practical thing that Tricia nonperishable nutritious. Obviously, you know, if fresh food is in short supply, you're going to be after something that is pretending to be fresh. So that was my logic. Also, great grated cheese in the freezer. This point is already elevates its. We'll come to. We'll come to that. That's all even if you so I'll be introducing later. Also with a cease and doen't editor of politics dot co dot UK. And as is crisis gets worse. No longer remain yak, but to remain insomniac. Hello, ian. How are you guessing anymore sleep like a baby? I have sort of the Shimer's of morality going through me. Do you get the sense that we're heading somewhere? Now. Even if it's somewhat yet to to oblivion we're heading to oblivion this this week was the worst for me this week, probably the worst. I think I've had. Yeah. Probably for the whole process because everything is so much of my, you know, how you always like the human, but of us as everything goes badly Roman one time bad, you won't again, and you just need hope somewhere. Right. So you always find is that any avenue where there could be hope and to me it was constantly and has been for the last year has been parliament during these growing signs of being prepared to take things on. So quite apart from the actual propositions yesterday stuff that coop was putting forward agreed or anything the site of parliament, just just not having the spine that when the moment because what if not now, then when may wins it going to be, you know, it's not like you're gonna time in the world. And then not doing it spooked me quite body that had been my hope place for about twelve months now. And then I could feed it sort of chiseling away. So not the best week. I wanted your drink and. I would been drinking. One of the saddest most dismal events last week was the site of the European Medicines Agency saying goodbye to their London office and lowering the EU Twenty-eight flags that was pretty upsetting was no yard. It was. And you know, I mean, we can go over. What did you like what the waste is? When you when you were studying on a single European patents? A while back. David one of the things that David Cameron did very very sensibly was to try and make sure that the court that was handling pharmaceuticals within the UK part of the reason for that was because.

Brexit David Cameron Joni Mitchell coop European Medicines Agency Orland Tricia UK editor London twelve months
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

04:35 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"You have all these companies that are doing exactly the same and no-one put the equivalent of a threat to one of their guests saying you can dismiss this one company that it had other reasons, but why are seven of them in the last week leaving the U K for the Netherlands Singapore. We the pattern is much more difficult to dismiss and I think that's with threads becoming credibly useful to me at least I didn't useful to everyone. Now, some some Woodside that Twitter is a toxic how filled with charlatans Nazis. But it seems like the kind of stuff that you did which is always assaultive. Mississippi citizen journalism is using the former and a really good way. Do you think that it's possible when talking about Brexit on Twitter to just? Just sort of concentrate on informing an actual interested debate. Like, how many angry how much time do you have to spend, you know, fending off angry Brexit Brexit's? Or is it do you just sort of almost just ignore that? I spent a lot more time on it last jazz night at the show. This year. I came back and thought, you know, I'm gonna spend less time on Twitter, and we'll I'm writing with her because you can get us. You can't get caught in the normally normally you can you can think our can just bash this ally with one way, and then find out that you can't account look away from this now so attentive avoid engaging unless I can think of something which I think will effectively stop in their tracks. Unfortunately, some is just doesn't and do you think is doing similar work? Who were the who were the who is the Steve analyst Steve analyst. You recommend people follow this what IT Titanic does some very good stuff on. Right Helga has tomatoes on Lorne trade, a staple on a you negotiate in ask you, tell me, you can son and Starlight does on the parliamentary process is probably the strongest point. Yeah. I mean, I sensuously keep very close eye. David hang it does. Largely because I to make sure he's not doing op doing and also athlete from him that that's I I was working in trade certain level where I was looking at stuff, I'm working out. Whether we not we ball sallow what we can do with the margins. I I'm now working in an area of tried. I've never worked with before. And some of it is quite easy to get hold of. And some of you mentioned need experts. So I was I've started to run dry back scouts irregular. Oscar lost year being nauseous is the new punk will read it. She she introduced to some people that are now an hour allowing me sisters of fine the areas where you have to know you have to have the practical just re just reading the theories enough. I mean, I'm looking at something. Now, it's like so what happens in Rotterdam? You know, I actually am finding out the information of the process of Roseanne is article heart unless you speak to some people that have been there and say, yes, okay. So we cannot your question. Do you? Have you followed by any people whose job it is to actually. Enact breaks it to see Brexit ministers popping up in. I liking them. I have been on. Not sure I am at the moment. I think that there was there was somebody are common was he was following me. He resigned. Well, actually that could be many. Doc that doesn't necessarily mean it was more threats that made him resign. Just like there was just reading oh shit. I don't know. If there is. Now, finally eighty question. What do you think is the is the is the most likely? Outcome at the moment with things as they stand where he which do you think because I think the problem we've got is this just kind of juices head of options. I think the withdrawal agreement is probably the likely outcome of this. Because it's it's actually it's it's it's terrible. But it's also common sense as it's the only way forward other than stopping and a Kaisha we do the skin in terms of the fact that nobody that just does not seem to be nothing that will make people stop inside. Okay. We need to rethink this. Even though logically. We should just that that just doesn't seem to be on the cards..

Twitter Brexit Brexit Helga David Netherlands Singapore Mississippi analyst Steve analyst Rotterdam Roseanne Oscar Starlight
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Again question is is this likely to pass? What do you think any know apparently, not last read the soccer? Yeah. Now that apparently this isn't popular. So there's a lot of the others on this one. I'm not sure why. But yeah, apparently is going to be struggling to get through. Well, it's been itching because I I read that's some labor from benches have have sort of had a word with the leader of the opposition's office saying, look if you try and push through a second referendum. I'm we're not happy about that. Actually, the sort of overwhelming support for a people's vote amongst the labor party backbenches is not is not a given. And there have been some very sensible voices. I think people at least Nandy have been consistently. I found very reasonable in debates that I've I've seen her in an Stella crease talking about the alternative of a citizens assembly, which I've been reading about this morning, and the more I read about it, the more I like it. Yeah. It's interesting. I don't know whether the amendment from neighbors is popular or would go through Stephen push the new states and points out of the people's people's vote needs enough Tory rebels council out Labor's referendum opponents plus seven, and he calculates that. That's now stands about thirty because he's counted him out. At least twenty three labor opponents. So he reckons that it's only charges to be the last option standing, and therefore that chance could be blown. If it goes up for a vote an early. Does align with my sense that basically everything else would need to be exhausted before people. He's right in way. What we're saying before that the order in which options are presented his is critical way. He's wrong is that there's nothing to prevent parliament from introducing some different motion in the future alter and the people's vote. It's not a one shot. And then you're done thing. What I what I've sensed to do with all these motions for for quite a few months is that the the official the the official position putting forward something is the kiss of death for it. It needs cross party support. And therefore, it must move from cross party Bank. Ben backbenches that gives it a much better chance. And also more importantly, not just remain as preparing it. And that the moment there aren't enough Bryce is or people. He wanted to leave backing a second referendum backing people's is the messengers that are important here. And so the opposition that's fair enough. But if it's just remain as gunning for it. It's not going to fly, I heart. See how it would. Why would? And what circumstances do you think the prejudice would support a second referendum that? Well, I don't know. But that's that's the would there be a situation if. I don't know that they would in. That's the problem for as well, gene of one Naria if parliament swung behind much softer breaks. Yeah. Then they might actually support a referendum with all three of actions as soft Brexit. No deal or no breaks. Yeah. I mean, I got again into Sapir second vote people's vote territory and a note idea that you can have no deal. I mean, we we talked about this. We have been here. But I, but yeah, I'm increasingly increasingly worried about a God bless. I really have. No, I with good reason. Why you agree? I mean, it's it's yeah. It's it's one of the things I I've had to question, you know, if I don't believe in referendums, I can't I can't then be on the side of another referendum. Look, I agree generally, disagree specifically because the reason we're in this situation is a referendum and eat feelings stink. Typically, like the only way to cancel it out is another horrendo- in in in terms of just balancing it out, whether whether it will happen core bins planning general reminds me do you remember the underpants gnomes from south park where where they go. Our plan is to make profit by collecting underpants resent their plan, and it's like collect underpants question mug, and then prophet. And to the people who say, let's have an election because that will sort Brexit out are a little bit like the underpants gnomes in that they assume if there is an election labour will win it. And then labour will swing behind the remaining option. Neither of these things. Stand up to any scrutiny as far as I two more amendments. From the labour benches Henry for indicative votes on all the various options, including Canada, Norway and Stella Christie's for a citizens assembly..

Labor Nandy Stephen Brexit soccer Bryce cross party Bank official Ben backbenches Stella Christie Canada Norway
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Hey, exactly fun visitors. Exactly. Yeah. How did you end up? Devoting your Pseudonomas life to covering the slo MO disaster. Brexit was sought by accident on Mont business. I was starting to one business down. I wrote. Hello. You not to kingdom. It went viral. Then didn't speak twenty one. And I was meeting up with a friend of mine. He was Dutch coming back from working at Google because of Brexit, the hats if he thinks of Britain's is home and he hats, literally movies family back to Britain. So that he was in Britain. So he knew what would happen. And so he was here and have a chance to to to do what you needed to do. And he was setting up a company, and we we sat down, and we talked and we said look shit. We worked together on this because I'm closed down of still got some money in my business to produce go. And he said we we worked out that actually now I not nothing of what he needed. And then I said look this happened to me this first person must but I haven't smoked to anybody. This happens may of got subtly all these followers of no idea what I'm doing. And he said just show business down and work on this. And that's that's what do, you know? I'm in businesses still running. But it's you know, it's effectively not doing anything. And. Yeah. So this is this is now what I've been doing the government. Yeah. Yeah. So yeah. Hopefully, Camacho get jobs and start making some money again. I'm literally living off the redundancy that I got my start about this is there's no money into its threats. No, well, I might practically nothing that you need to become an Instagram influence there. I have no actually invite somebody went onto the Australia threat. I had somebody that was we compare you to influence, and they said can you contact us? And it's like now, I assume as I do that integrity goes out the window, and I started using one. Influence on Instagram. Looks like is not a beach shots drapes in an e you flag selling all remaining acts mugs Khalifa through thick folder of trade document. With a person selling Prozac. Idea. I'll tell you why they remain a fire festival would have been very well organized. Tediously? Well. We're going to get Ryan to plan equifax be close air quotes in a minute. But first because he's going to be taking a short break from the show after this week here, the.

Britain Brexit Mont business Ryan Instagram Google Camacho Khalifa Australia
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Welcome to the plan. B edition of the maniacs. Completely new podcast. You've not heard before my name is Laurie and dense cake. By the way, it is good to see the times and the telegraph much Twitter picking up moustache glasses gag and running with it. It feels like we finally made some contribution to the national culture this week. Brexit rancor hit my daughter's school. She had a row with brick St. classmate that I will call Danny because it's probably legally suspect or actually name him after lively exchange views, Danny snapped only posh people like politics. Anyway, my daughter replied, Danny? Nobody likes politics. Which is true. But we do like talking about how much we don't like it and joining me to examine another week in national poetry, two of our regulars commentator actor singer cook. And as we discovered last time he was on trained sailor every time he appears he just adds another string to his bow. Hello, Alex shortly that should be Blix a remote. Oh. How about the may pulling the sixty five pound Josh quite for central status. Felt. Yeah. I think it's it's the right gesture to make completely praise her you. You're less impressed this week with BBC news twenty four discussing the settled status scheme without a single EU twenty-seven migrant on the panel because he needs to have him them without a single anything on the handle to be on. You just you know, four white English people. And the subject wasn't what what do you think of the the fee as political commentators, the subject was how do you twenty-seven migrants feel about the settled status scheme and all four of them had very definitive takes as to how you twin seven migrants feel about it. And I thought the discussion might have been enriched by an actual e u twenty seven migrant, but as I was told afterwards, the partner of one is any you twenty seven migrant. Albeit they already have British citizenship some years ago, and apparently that entitles him to say that they think the sixty five pound fees terribly res it's like one of those business panels where they get white men to discuss diversity. Yeah. And the point is I don't think they would do that any more in that kind of program. I think if one of their slated subject was trans rights, they would make sure that community was presented. I see a lot with the twit seven migrants really were quite absent from the debate in big flagship programs like Newsnight, and and politics live. I think there should be more as for UK people living in the U. They're completely whitewashed from the from the entire debate. You never get here from them. Also, this is Ingrid Oliver actor comedian writer director, Halloween good. How are you? On surprisingly calm. And then today to be honest. I what about semi German regulars you were moved by the letter to the times some spread a big fingers from Germany from their probable next Johnson sled to that definite form, national goalkeeper. Does that lets us to go viral? It was why do you know? I love that less. And I did it why the goalkeeper particularly ups was I was sort of holding it together. And then I go to the goalkeepers. I'm bless him. My my boyfriend's an awesome supposed to say he that's that's the thing that really he related to that bit. I he was everyone's we went his actors Senate lessons to Scotland just full era Fernan gang guys, we love you come on man, don't do this. But that was performed referendums. It wasn't too late. Sadly, so one it was welcome and lovely and far more than we deserve. It's sadly, I think too late. It's not just plan. B that's wearing a cunning disguise this week. We have a mystery special guest Steve list is the popular super tweeter and twisted thread starter known for such hits as Hello United Kingdom. It's the United States of America. Here we need to talk. He's a nerd and a regular on our poke costing brothers cake watch. Hello Steve wasn't maniacs. Thank you very much for inviting me. I'm Steven list, you'll wrap name like Lil people's vote. Brexit Sexton Tassio, I'm not even sure what is. Why do you why do you like to stay on? Well, it's because I own a company, and it's it's my my home addresses registers, actually, if you just talk my name to Google it just comes up my dress. That sort of thing. So it puts me off. That's great though, transparency in..

Steve list Danny Josh Twitter Brexit Sexton Tassio Laurie partner BBC Ingrid Oliver Google Senate UK Alex Steven list United States Germany Johnson America Scotland
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"And the only reason it's ever ended up like this is because the government has lost its work in majority on Brexit, if the government's delegates work majority Brexit be BBN non Christian. So that decision of of the house was right? But if you are taking a constitution seriously. Yes. Visa problem after problem? After problem. I'm the Walsum Brexit is who to credit are honest face say, we don't care for for parliament. We want the people's vote to prevail. But for phones, Brexit tears, who was purported to say, oh, we want to bring back control of our laws to our soft empowerment, and until the supreme court when cooling judges enemies of people and putting benches and speaker in on front pages and dividing. What he framing rate here. Do you actually care because if Brexit is going to succeed, we will need an independent civil service to work. We will need independent, which is to your neither legislature to be hell of a lot more effectively. It has been for thirty forty years. Do you? Sincerely, want us to Brexit. If so stock trashing domestic institutions couple of questions about fifty. The fewer hunters. On the on the burger decision of the constitutional people with which to everything in the argument. You just said about the general thing we still quite uncomfortable with on the basis that he was going against the business mission that had been passed by the house. So in other words, he was giving him power that they had sort of signed a way that only ministers could could amend it. When you say, it's right. It was the right time for someone to do something unprecedented on point of principle, or do you think that there was actually a precedent that he was able to? And to the extent and novelty is welcome to the extent him against president is welcome a lot of government a government too often false his free stuff in the back of business motions because they know they can't actually be amended. So good. Taking back control of its own agenda. My other one was what happened with the partisan thing that changed overnight. Always that long slow process of untorn vacation. Social liberal over long. And it was really when Cameron came out against the human voice sounds chilly. This doesn't seem to make sense. Invent been the credit couldn't chap into the realized free. Markets didn't go to CRA Librium achievement towards disagree. Live night put me being partisan anymore. And policy failures. Former lawyer I used to be a lawyer full big huge projects the IT NHS. NHS IT project day cards. I don't think product failures in policy failures in inside. And that fascinates me. That's why I'm not party parties. I'm because it can happen to any party. And so when Brexit happened and morning after the referendum was over. No, you always crying arms going for. This is the most fascinating mess will ever be able to write about because it's so interlocking everything is open here because exit and it still hasn't settled your your surgeon hearing it someone's brain and going guys I've never seen a tumor like this. That could win a prize for this. Before we move on..

Brexit Walsum Brexit CRA NHS president untorn Cameron thirty forty years
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"I'm not sure it would pick up many or indeed any seats in the North Pole. Midland's just not they mentioned him much opposition. Because my loan later that we mentioned the toll on this show. Isn't it to an extent the sort of polling this before labor have chosen? Policy route and made the argument for it is like going into a pizza restaurant and asking table of people there, do you prefer Margarita pepperoni or sushi. And you know, the the the other option is not even in their head because no one has stood up and argued for it. The polling may be very different. If someone actually takes a leadership position and says, I think this is what's right for the country because wise it I know what he's doing now. But Bubby dispute sat in my personal view is Kobe, and if we do have a referendum coping comes off offense and advocates remain. I think this will actually Robbins track from it. But what we can say in these consistence is that's labor voters, maybe voters in the referendum voted around to to remain today. Labor mode is three to one or more pro remain. Believe voters are having second thoughts because it's conservative governments and endeavoured screwing. Up. So we do know that's a monthly and even more labor party members. There is a strong wish for remain. And therefore, however hypothetical question how much you try and aim off in terms of how leaders behave if you have a leader who's doing against the views of eighty percents of his natural supporters on the big issue of the day. That is as as Humphrey Appleby would have said twenty years ago in yes minister, that's courageous. Okay. Moving on to television because there isn't enough Brexit exit go around because is having a Brexit withdrawal symptoms over Christmas. This we we got channel villas Brexit the on civil war featuring Benedict Cumberbatch as the Chevy Sherlock Holmes of leave. Dominic Cummings Britain makes a noise it groans..

Dominic Cummings Britain North Pole Humphrey Appleby Brexit Bubby Midland Benedict Cumberbatch Sherlock Holmes Robbins Chevy Kobe twenty years
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"And it's nice to just know that there are other people out there like you. Yeah. Exactly very much like the people on a small level. But it was just it was festive. There was you made a Christmas tree. Yeah. It was lovely. It was already a tiny Christmas tree. Yeah. But I found out of blue Christmas tree on one thousand yellow stars. Good as I could get see if anything Brexit is making more creative into going to need to be frankly. How are you making Walton pie and snoop and things like that would shavings Dame? Then Jacob out. Burst into tears. Come on. You know, what's keeping on the it was your low points of the Brexit gives you one of the relay points was I was thinking about this now have been a fear so taking but there was say I directed right? This video for best for Britain, which we've mentioned before we, you know, about people screw screw people screaming to camera that they just trying to encourage people to live there in peace, and I pasted Facebook, I'm rarely on Facebook these days because I got so Noida after the two thousand seventeen election when someone accuse me of collaborative damn dams because important who end Brexit accused of robbing labor of votes, and I got so angry if some of the I've known for a long time we still on speaking to. And I so haven't been for a long time because of that. And then I posted this video because once people share it and a neighbor called nine years under it writes, a stream of obscenities. About me in about it. And I had to block him. And I just thought my God, we this. What we've become we descended. It's Brexit is such a divisive issue that we've descended of vitriol and an abuse among people, we know, and that's really sad. So civility is completely disappeared. It's from our political discourse sort of concern is that actually the rage on. The resentment has become the main event now angry because of Brexit angry because of this it's anger as the drug ran populism. And it's yeah, it's scary. Yeah. Hey, let's. Hey did on that was a bad one eight. Yeah. It was what's your what's your what's your hope for twenty nineteen? What are we think's give us something to cling to hear my Ray of hope is that we are? We shun this SUV the the way that this country is going which is the extremes on both sides on the left in the riot. And we just remember that we're sensible country, and that we get God waking up from a dream terrible dream that somehow we'll find a way to unify around as solution that will stop businesses from leaving this country in droves. And that won't make people who voted leave hates people who voted remained vice versa. And. And I'm not sure what that will be. But that's where we have to go because I do believe in the fundamental idea believe the people are fundamentally good idea believe that we from the mentally sensible as a country, I refuse to believe that we're going to we're going to go for no deal. So yeah, everyone just be nice to each other. That's probably a pretty good idea. I would Ingrid give us your your track for the for the for the for the cheer you up playlist might coming up what I've chosen this. Because I love this song. It's a French song natural move. By John new cooled Damasio. French was not mainstream school, which means translated tomorrow will be perfect, and it's really lovely upbeat song. I'm going to be the first course in English. Translation, I want to sing I want to make you forget, your tormented soul. I want to sing. And try to persuade you that tomorrow will be perfect strong sentiments words lift by ultimate from a block looks like the French Pete ducats, you're looking from his videos for that. I can say to do video because it's like there's nothing to poke lips. And then he singing that song to people the pocket survivors, say new deal happens might be very purposeful relatable, contents anger. Thank you very much. What's it gonna get Damasio rapper Fe? They go. Let's listen. Shaw. Donor. Sean..

Brexit Facebook Jacob Noida Pete ducats Britain Shaw Sean Ray Ingrid John nine years
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"I'm Ingrida, and I am very much. The layperson over maniacs. Someone who has been avidly watching Brexit from with horror and no expert, but with a real thirst for knowledge. I've been part of Romania access year has been quite something. I would not describe myself as somebody who's particularly political before two thousand sixteen. But since Brexit's I've been increasingly horrified what's happening to our country. So being possibly maniacs has been an outlet of you felt you your knowledge levels have been raised. Because one of the weirdest thing was the show is at world doing this every week. And even we don't really have a handle on it. If we can't predict the future, and you know, people friends now that now that I'm on remaining people always ask me what's going on with Brexit. And I've even though I read everything I have read everything there is to not read out their apartment withdrawal agreements here that I it's almost impossible to put into words, the so many caveats, and and permutations that you end up feeling like you don't anything about which is the is probably the very night to Brexit of. So yeah, it's been. It's been a quest this year of trion onto stand as much as I can because I think it's incumbent on all of us to do that. But you realize that this Christmas tourism as friends of sanctuaries what's going on with Brexit. She's gonna I I really don't know. I have play it's. But that's I think they're experts within areas of it. But nobody can be an expert on all of it's just it's impossible. It's too. It's too far-reaching. So we can do is try and understand the basics and the fundamentals as much as possible studied is moderate. It is Danny dies. Matt cuddle, man. Yeah. So what what have been your your high points of the Brexit year in? I if such a thing as a high point intermarried year, I think the high point for me was there maniacs show that we did in December because I'd never done live show before with remain ax. And I was love looking on audience is hundreds of people with a pro you t shirts and and their points of beer or having a lovely time. But just sort of genuinely curious engaged and it felt like a catharsis. Yeah. And they were really nice people. And they and they afterwards in the publisher of says people explaining how much it means to them. And you realize that actually we didn't surface most in the future. They'll be making a film like cavalry were just before over terribly wrong. A little tiny podcast remaining, James Graham's gonna writes. Yes maniacs to me before HBO. It'd be very short movie. Very tiny set. I play myself because that would be other team. But it was those shows were pretty fantastic..

Brexit Matt cuddle Romania HBO trion Danny publisher James Graham
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"And I don't choose a political Twitter. Just went crazy was saying it's only choose pick his eight o'clock on the Monday, the number ten spinners Russain. Yes. The voters going ahead tonight and within a couple of hours that had just been so much news ready, and it's only Wednesday. And this is this is a slightly atypical week in the world of Brexit. But it's not last on typical Anya. Brexit time is just crazy. Suffering from news poisoning. I need to have a full news. Yeah. News talk. News talk show. What's your hope for twenty nine and you're not allowed to say people's vote because all which is you know, the one what else is kind of would you look for? And I think that the whole concentrating on remaining and reforming in your and making take back control really really mean something. So I think there's a huge amount to those who tend to censor left politics and counting cells progressives to do a lot more to enhance Representative democracy in starting to talk about how we redistribute wealth. And the proceeds of globalization how we're going to pan for population growth, promoting greater democracy in the workplace. There are always wide ranging constitutional reforms being thrown over as well. So I think I think there is now a real appetite for very very very serious change of the order that radical liberals like there's no Jewish. I come from have long been espousing and been largely ignored. I think the time has come for us to to be able to champion those and actually get caught through. So don't use political calls his usual change by drugstore operating system operating systems change reboots move to twenty first century of some source. That's kind of crap Steve hill would come out with his son goes right now. No me. What's your breakfast island discourse, your tune that you've chosen to to to give up of heart to the listeners for the year to come? Now. This isn't just because the teenage me remains completely in love with Damon o'byrne if you're listening on the show. It's because the lyrics are so powerful. And it's it's the universal by blah for those of you who aren't familiar lyrics, go on about how it really really really could happen and right now recording this in this poker in this because Joe on a cold December Wednesday afternoon with the window sales towards the final say, the number of politicians and celebrities and other influential people have up till now said very little about Brexit, and certainly about coming out for people's vote are now beginning to join our ranks swollen. And the wind is really an ourselves for that. So I do believe that it really really really could happen stick. No, thanks very much happy Christmas. Happy new year. Thank you. Singer..

Brexit Twitter Damon o'byrne Representative Steve hill Joe
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"How's the experience of doing remaining alongside your day job -idn't because been helpful as it helps you cope? I it certainly has. So I've only been doing the job Besser Britain's April this year. So for almost a year during the post, I was in a much less Brexit related role. So the cost provided this amazing outlet for me, all of my frustrations around the direction that the country was headed, and it provided this lovely safe-space every Wednesday afternoon to crowd into very hot malls. And so talks people who feel the same way as I do. What was your are? No. It's been a widow year. What's been your high point of two thousand eighteen on as relates to the world of Brexit? And well, my high point was the labor postie conference when kiss Doma stood up and said, the labor party position just to be clear is to keep every avenue open, including the option to remain in the EU. And he. Got the most enormous, and I'm plummeted stunning vacation from the party faithful. Who of course, as we know are as pro remains, you can get and so that was that was show. Hi point to to see the visual and audible impacts of labor members telling the labor from bench in no one says how thrilled they were the prospective labour changing its position in thinking that he kinda freaked all their Bill not speech because it was reported the few things dropped in kind of proved by lotto. Well, the night before they'd had this funny session. Locked away went on for hours and hours and hours to try and buy shout labor policy motion would be on Brexit, and they emerged with it. And then in the morning Donal dismissed what had actually been contained in that. Which was the that labor would keep the option to remain on the table. And so as far as I'm aware care was. Just upholding what he knew had been agreed the night before and had come out of that room. So he was reinforcing that so whether lotto had approved or not it was certainly what the party faithful had signed up before we're recording this on Wednesday that fateful Wednesday. This also serve we'll we're going to have a relatively manageable. And then the no-confidence motions going forward voted on tonight on the listeners are hearing this in in end of December January so the review hostages to fortune. Hey, what so far has been your low point, Brexit wise? Point for me was almost accounted to my best point which was when it felt like the labor party. We're going to row in and buck the government on delivering Brexit. So if we wind back about six months, or so in those early days of the summer that was probably the lowest point for me person in terms of campaigning to stay in the EU wouldn't just felt like such an uphill struggle. We had eleven liberal Democrat MP's among green MP and a handful of s people that that probably backs opposition. And it just felt almost inevitable because for so long. The campaign has been about convincing the MP's rose about convincing the country. So that stage, I certainly felt very very worried that labor would just going to ruin behind the government to deliver Brexit. Look what we all. Now, it could be anything. He's all up in there. Brexit isn't even dog is whatever is a very short-lived animal packs a load of us into one year. That's what Brexit it's like interstellar. Where Matthew mcconaughey goes close to the black hole and time just accelerates, and it goes back to earth and everybody's dead. Learn grandkids recruiting this on Wednesday..

Brexit Donal labor party EU Besser Britain Doma Matthew mcconaughey Bill six months one year