40 Burst results for "Brexit"

Fresh "Brexit" from WJR Programming

WJR Programming

01:10 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh "Brexit" from WJR Programming

"The, uh, chairs? Yeah. Like a clear coat. The rubber. I'm gonna scrape off, you know, like Ken said you could keep him painted a primer. Yeah, but you might also self adhesive. Strips that you might use around, you know, gas. Getting material for Windows or doors might be a good thing to keep a couple rolls of that handy and re apply it to the bottom legs or feet of those chairs. And then, like I said, ceiling that Cancri will make so that rust is not it will make a hard Brexit could be foolproof, But it's bad. Exactly. Yeah. Recommendation on sealer. Well, there's one night like clouds called Vex Can ve ex CEO and it's a water based sealer. And basically, if you go to their website, I know where you can pick it up here in Southeast Michigan, But if you go to their website, they'll tell you where you can pick one up. That's reasonable. Yes, Sailor? Yes. Which is very important. Yes. So water based, breathe a bull is what I want to be focused on. Yes..

Southeast Michigan KEN Brexit Cancri Vex Can Ve Ex One Night Sailor Couple Rolls ONE
Fresh update on "brexit" discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

03:20 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "brexit" discussed on The Rubin Report

"It's like is he going to run does he. You know what. I've been trying to tell people to me. It seems like the best thing he could do is is basically be the outsider taking the fire and then you get a guy like to santa's to just run right through. That seems to make sense to me but trump obviously does whatever whatever trump Yeah i've spent some time with him on this trip and that's a meeting of friends. Basically we have become friends. I i said this is what i said to okay. I won't say what he said. But this is what i said to him. I said look. We've got the external threat of the chinese communist party. Getting and more aggressive. And who's to say. In taiwan or elsewhere what might occur over the course of the next few years the internal threat which causes cancel culture and the threats that represents a free speech and everything else and i said to him. I don't see anybody who's got the courage or the career. All the charisma to fight those things now. If somebody else comes along who's got the big charisma that can do the job. The can rally people in those working class communities to go out maybe for the first time. Vote republican if that person comes along then fine but you know something. Donald trump people like him. Don't come along very often. I mean the guy has an incredible animal magnetism. And he's shown more courage as alita any global leader. I've seen in my lifetime. That guy was under relentless assault from day. One just as they tried to stop brexit. They tried to de-legitimize him. And it never stopped because ease back on his palaces. They would have eased back on the pressure but he didn't. He's got the courage of alah now. Look he's got his volts of coffee house. We've all got off oats but in his heart does he with these instincts. Does he stand with the right things. I truly believe that he does so. Let's see what happens as the next couple of years. Roll out. But i you know what i saw him. He's lost a little weight. He's playing loads gulf. Taken loads of exercise. He looks younger than he looked. Twenty i mean most american presidents age barring coat. See them graying. Before your eyes and the fact that he's gonna be seventy eight next time round. Well who knows but go willing if he's in the same kind of shape that he's in now there's nothing to stop him from doing it and i the other point here. That's worth mentioning. I went to the it was eight of the rallies in the run-up to the november election. All over america. I want to tell you something. I've never seen enthusiasm. I know i've never ever seen anything like it. They admire this man. They love this man. I i would say to those those in a position of power within the policy. If you really think you can find someone better than this well good luck to you know. It's kind of funny. Because i remember when i met you for breakfast one morning. We took a picture. And i posted the picture and then people were sowell. Look you're with that racist racist. Meanwhile we sat there for two hours..

Two Hours Donald Trump Taiwan Republican Twenty America First Time Seventy Eight One Morning November Election Next Few Years Next Couple Of Years ONE Eight Of The Rallies Santa Brexit Chinese Communist Party American
Fresh update on "brexit" discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

03:08 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "brexit" discussed on The Rubin Report

"Left in the uk as well because your your labor party really went bananas under corbin and sort of became what is so obvious to me is becoming right is happening right now to our democratic party so the british labor party has its roots. Way back to one thousand nine hundred. It was working class movement. It was quite strongly methodist as well so the low church hijack the taller is no church for labor was cut how it was and it was genuinely a working class movement but about a patriotic working class movement. Labor party you know whatever socialist policies they brought in post ninety forty five. They believed in the country clement. Atlee it was the prime minister that berlin the welfare state on his own said clement motley. He was proud of the first world. War service that he'd given and what has happened to belabor party is it's become a policy of the globalist metropolitan elite. It's become a policy predominantly of the upper middle classes. People born into relative sort of champagne. Socialist i guess is the phrase that we would use a globalist view means. They're ashamed of saying anything vaguely patriotic. They wouldn't be seen dead with a union. Jack ord english crosses george because they they they don't like any of the symbolism on brexit. They have completely oscillate. Turn their back on brexit. In every way they lost they lost a special election. A by-election england. It had been a labour seat forever. They pick someone to stand who thinks we should rejoin the european union. They just don't get it but the key and this is where. I think the crossover could be very interesting. The key is this when he started to pick out millions of votes. It wasn't just middle class. Conservatives voting for nigel farage. No it was patriotic working class. People living in the north of england a lot of men all of england and people who believed that mass uncontrolled immigration was driving down their wages changing their communities says beyond all recognition. And that doesn't make these people racist. It makes them want to keep their towns that communities their families in some shape that is recognizable and they were the people that came to me. And i said something to the labor party at the center. Basically thinks we're all global citizens. We can all go wherever they want. So labor has lost. Its voters on brexit. It's lost its voters on open borders. It scared his voters. Jeremy corbyn pretty much anti semite. Well was its leader and the labor vote now is collapsing. So look what. Look what's happening on the border. I'll bet you if we had dinner tonight with see now. That sounds pretty unlikely david..

Jeremy Corbyn Tonight UK David Atlee One Thousand Millions Of Votes Labor Party North Of England British Labor Party Belabor Brexit Berlin English Nigel Farage Nine Hundred Ninety Forty Five Jack Ord Conservatives England
Fresh update on "brexit" discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

02:45 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "brexit" discussed on The Rubin Report

"Used a motion of confidence to get this treaty portions road and i couldn't believe it but you've been telling me guys. The if this treaty goes through we lose our independence and yet when it came to it. You decided to put your career. You decided to put your policy above the interests of the country. And i realized that that the so-called tory eurosceptics frankly a bunch of chin lewis wonders a bunch of losers. None of them have the stomach for the fight. I said he'd ninety-three. I'm going to do this. I don't care if people laugh at me. I didn't care about the votes for me. I wanna fight this and do this as a matter of principle and frankly that at that moment spelt the next twenty seven years ago and i d. Did you have any idea the opposition that you were gonna come against. I mean when. I was in london last time when i saw you was during the tour with jordan peterson and it was in the middle of brexit. But there was still a huge feeling. Like maybe it's not going to happen. And maybe the bureaucrats still take over or do some last minute tricks and then of course it was framed that all the people that support it we're racists and bigots and all the rest of it it's just an endless machine that we now all see that has been so exposed and in many ways from an american perspective thanks. Donald trump was so exposed. Did you realize how crazy that machine was going to be. And what it was going to do to you and your supporters gandhi of the campaign for india to leave the british empire and to get his independence ghandi once said first they ignore you then they laugh at you then they attack you and then you win and i went through one of those full stages of the beginning of was big ignored completely when they couldn't ignore me. I think i was the most cartoon. The maze lampooned person on comedy shows. It was as if i was sort of patron saint of lost causes and then and then the moment that it really changed was in two thousand and four eight and then ten former communist countries joined the european union with total rights of free movement and this led to millions of people coming into the united kingdom. It was too much too quickly. It was out of control. And that was the moment. When i linked the immigration issue with the sovereignty issue the independence issue and that was the moment that the establishment turned on and they spent basically the next fifteen years trying to tell anyone. That would listen that i was a racist leading dark dangerous movement heart back to the nineteen thirties. I mean nothing could have been david. Nothing could have been further from the truth. That is what they tried to do. I have to tell you in all honesty..

London Jordan Peterson TEN Donald Trump David Ninety-Three Ghandi European Union Millions Of People First Next Twenty Seven Years Ago Two Thousand And Nineteen Thirties Gandhi Next Fifteen Years India Brexit Four Eight British American
Fresh update on "brexit" discussed on The Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

03:05 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "brexit" discussed on The Rubin Report

"Ruben joining me today is a british activist commentator former leader of the uk independence party as well as the former leader of the brexit party. And now he's on tour right here in the us. A nigel farage. I don't how we haven't done this before. Finally welcome to the rubin report. But i'm delighted to be here and yeah i. I've come actually with a very optimistic message because know a lot of conservatives are really down at the moment down that the guy got seventy five million votes and somehow didn't win down about what's going on in all cities with a deliberate attempt to divide black and white people which renders and down about what biden might do. Is he going to pack the calls. That i mean all these things and my sense from my american friends is some of them are down to the point of being disillusioned. Add digital disillusion movements pessimistic. Movements don't win so the message i've come with is this week voted brexit june twenty third two thousand sixteen a great historic night three years later. Guess what our contract our contract to leave or march twenty nine twenty nine hundred eighteen. We woke up march. Thirtieth not only not only have we not left. It looked like there was no prospect of is leaving and yet we lead a grass roots rebellion. Fightback we've smashed the establishment we've won we've got brexit. The socialist party in the uk who were heavily on the remain side and heavily pro open borders are literally being crushed. Electorally week by week. My message is i love about it. Looks actually this administration of making terrible mistakes. What is happening on the border effectively tends every state into a border state. So my message is don't be down. Don't get dobie mad. There's a big challenge here for a massive victory. Twenty twenty two as an even bigger one in twenty twenty four but the right in america needs to unite needs to have some common messaging. Just wanted to less egos around. The place might be quite helpful. But doting it look if we if we could beat the global establishment and get brexit back over the line. You can do so. I love the message. Obviously there's something kind of funny. You're coming to america bring less ego. That's that that's that's a tough one. That's a tough one. But you're one of the things that i love about you and we've gotten to know each other over the years we've had a couple of gin and tonics together once or twice but you're the type of politician that actually does instead of just talks. Can you talk a little bit about what that is. Because i think most people see politicians at this point basically just as bureaucrats much just take their money and do nothing or maybe locked them in their homes. But you actually make things happen and that's got to be very different than most of the people that you're around often or have been around over the years so in june ninety nine against the flow totally unpredicted..

Ruben March UK Today Twice Seventy Five Million Votes Three Years Later America Once This Week March Twenty Nine Twenty Nine Uk Independence Party June Ninety Nine Twenty Twenty Four Twenty Twenty Two British June Twenty Third One Of Thirtieth ONE
France, Jersey Trade Barbs in Post-Brexit Fishing Dispute

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

France, Jersey Trade Barbs in Post-Brexit Fishing Dispute

"Tension has mounted between the UK and France admitted speeds over fishing rights following Britain's departure from the European Union French maritime minister I need to know about them warned that France would retaliate off to the keys jazzy of stalling initialing fishing licenses the French bases agreed in the post brexit trade deal I don't have to go see on television up and I by going as far as Jesse's command on it never mind for example of electricity transportation by undersea cables so we have the name of it again even if you were caught doing it and we will do it if we have to E. the external affairs minister for Jesse Ingalls said Jesse was refining the licenses according to new rules that recently took effect cool said the threat to cut off electricity seem to disproportionate retaliation for a few days Karen Thomas London

European Union French Maritime France Britain Jesse UK Jesse Ingalls Karen Thomas London
Northern Ireland Adds to Pressures on the UK Union

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:42 min | Last week

Northern Ireland Adds to Pressures on the UK Union

"Uk's northern ireland secretary brandon lewis is in dublin today to hold talks with ireland's foreign minister. Simon coveney. it comes at a time. When relations between the two neighbors are being tested daily as a recent burst of violence in loyalist areas of belfast and a continued objection to the northern ireland protocol. The part of the brexit deal aimed at avoiding a heart border between the north and the republic for which imposes some trade barriers between the former and great britain. Well to examine what the two men have to talk about. And what progress can make. I'm joined by belfast. Based journalist rebecca black good morning rebecca. Good to have you with us. Good morning thanks. So just this is now. It's a month now since i'm in. Coney went to london to try to begin to sort out the problems. Just give us a little bit of context. What circumstances mr lewis. Mr coveney meeting and well i suppose to a meeting amid a lot of uncertainty of minutes and the husband calls for for for more formal talks to be To be brought but so far the thousand quite listen to that so we take the middle road of them having sort of individual talks with different parties instead so many other meet today. There's lot of uncertainty following the resignation of already foster. There's two people are should come forward in terms of trying to succeed her I suppose with any party dealership called pass things. Become a little more predictable. People will say things appealed to party members on particularly the party. Membership up minute. Which is reflecting susan. Mid within unions and those with a lot of discomfort over the brexit brexit arranged into the

Brandon Lewis Simon Coveney Northern Ireland Belfast Mr Lewis Mr Coveney Dublin Rebecca Black Ireland Coney UK Rebecca Britain London Susan
G7 Leaders to Meet in Person for First Time in Two Years

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:33 min | Last week

G7 Leaders to Meet in Person for First Time in Two Years

"Seven leaders will meet face to face in london for the first time in two years with representatives from india south africa australia south korea and the european union attending well to unpack this a little bit more much to discuss on this. I'm joined by reporter. Also very regular voice monocle twenty. Four vincent vinnie said hi vincit. Let's maybe look and and look forward to june I guess a couple of things come to mind. I mean i the symbolism around this the symbolism of of course the uk well and truly out of of the eu. also this first face-to-face summit Of course coming out of of the pandemic how much of this is going to be. Also just a showpiece. Aside from the fact that this is not going to be a g. Seven as usual traditionally we. We really do see countries from time to time. Pull out the stops. How much is this is going to be a a real sort of set and showpiece for the uk. Well there's a huge opportunity for the u k to combat the idea that we've become an isolationist and that is now little outside of the eu. It's also boris johnson's really first. Big step onto the world stage. Because for most of his premiership he's been dealing with the pandemic he's been doing meetings by zoom of this challenge to try and use some of the chums allegedly has and he was voted in for on other world leaders because all of these world leaders attending he also needs to do post. Brexit trade deals with There are other issues to deal with the u. k. Hosting the cop twenty six later in the year and so they need to get agreements across the least the g. seven and those extra invited parties in order to deal with nations like india and china later in the. Yeah

Vincent Vinnie EU South Korea South Africa UK India London Australia Boris Johnson China
The Irish Border, Why Is It There, What's It Like?

Rear Vision

02:00 min | Last month

The Irish Border, Why Is It There, What's It Like?

"Hello i'm at about grint on this. Revision carey phillips revisits. A journey along the irish border twin on the message and dommage into political games and antics of the tories in london northern ireland park if the single market for goods that means you. Import procedures are applied on products. Arriving from the rest of the uk on the springfield road. Several dozen republican youths attacked police vehicles spin increasing unease about the brexit arrangements for northern ireland's loyalist seeing a treat border with the rest of the uk as diminishing their british identity. The last two weeks have seen violence erupting on the streets of northern ireland unions. Fear the bricks at agreement which leaves northern ireland following e you customs. Rules will undermine their place in the united kingdom. The arrangement agreed to by all sides during the brexit. Negotiations is to protect the land border dividing the republic of ireland and he yuma nba and northern ireland. Part of the uk from any customs infrastructure. Like cameras aboard posts. The five hundred kilometer border is considered an absolute priority for the northern on pay steal the good friday agreement and needs to be protected at all costs but this raises an interesting historical question. Why is there a border across the island of ireland and had it northern ireland become part of the united kingdom kerry picks up the story in the seventeenth century when all and was essentially part of the british empire. The british ascendancy in ireland supported by the arrival of thousands of

Ireland Carey Phillips Ireland Park Grint London United Kingdom Republic Of Ireland NBA Kerry
The Ghosts of Northern Ireland’s Troubles Are Back

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:28 min | Last month

The Ghosts of Northern Ireland’s Troubles Are Back

"To northern ireland now where violent protests have grit the region for almost two weeks. That's the sound of rioting which has involved children as young as twelve throwing bricks fireworks and petrol bombs at lines of police officers and vehicles in the last week. Ninety officers have been injured. This unrest relates back to brexit and today a court in belfast will decide whether to hear a legal challenge to the northern ireland protocol. That was part of the. Uk's brexit deal that imposed trade barriers between the region and the rest of britain to allow trade to continue seamlessly on the island of ireland. The bbc's john campbell has more on that story from belfast. Basically you have unionists. One of the men political groupings in northern ireland at the core of their politics is the desire to remain part of the united kingdom and to resist any attempt to reunite with the other part of ireland the republic of ireland. They want a judge to rule. Brexit deal for northern ireland would be unconstitutional. And they hope that would force the uk government to go and renegotiated. And what they are. Trying to argue is that the brexit dale breaches the good friday agreement. Peace accord because it changes northern ireland's constitutional position without the consent of a vote on the also says it breaches a much older law known as the act of union which says there shouldn't be any customs borders within the uk

Ireland Belfast UK John Campbell Britain BBC Brexit Dale Republic Of Ireland
Northern Ireland Leaders Call for Calm After Night of Rioting

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last month

Northern Ireland Leaders Call for Calm After Night of Rioting

"The recent violence largely in loyalist Protestant areas displayed amid rising tensions over post brexit trade rules phenomenon and found worsening relations between the parties in the Protestant Catholic powersharing bill false government wouldn't split from the EU has renewed tensions over no on and status and disturb the political balance in the region with some people identify as British I want to stay part of the U. K. while others see themselves as Irish and seek unity with the neighboring Republic of Ireland an E. U. member Katie Haigh wood a politics professor at queen's university Belfast says unionists may feel the normal mom's place is under threat in the union on this week's violence she adds it's really easy to see how it could escalate Charles Taylor this month London

E. U. Katie Haigh Wood Queen's University Belfast EU U. Republic Of Ireland Charles Taylor London
Northern Ireland assembly meets after sixth night of unrest

Monocle 24: The Briefing

10:11 min | Last month

Northern Ireland assembly meets after sixth night of unrest

"Edition of the briefing with me. Andrew mueller last night for the sixth consecutive night northern ireland witnessed scenes of the kind of violence likely to prompt considerable agitation in observers with long enough memories. More than fifty. Five police officers are known to have been injured in the last week and considerable damage done to buildings and vehicles. The worst of the most recent disturbances occurred around one of these so-called peace walls which separate nationalist and loyalist communities in west belfast. The northern ireland assembly has been recalled for an emergency session at stormont today on joined with more on this by lord. Peter hain former secretary of state for northern ireland lord as you would know better than most people the good agreement did not end sectarian tension in northern ireland. There has been sporadic tension and violence over the decades since but measured against that scale. How bad is what we're seeing. Now was nothing like as you indicate the level of bombing and assassination and horror at the said. He has also troubles brought to northern ireland. Whistle the terrorism but It is serious and it needs to be addressed not just by northern ireland's leaders who displaying frankly a lack of leadership which is really disturbing but also by trade minister boris johnson and state for northern ireland who've been pretty absent from the scene in northern ireland now full quite a while and especially over this. What's your read of what's behind this because there is always the trap of reading significance which might not exist into what might just be a bunch of board young men looking for trouble. No this is that there are elements of that and they're a variety of other factors but the main problem has arisen over frustration amongst the unionist community the protestant community over the fact that there are checks and controls in for businesses doing trade. With great britain with england scotland or wales across the irish sea northern ireland of course is on an island with the republic of ireland to the cells and also within the united kingdom and within the united kingdom the rest of the united kingdom there are no barriers to trade of any kind between scotland. And or between wales and england for that matter scotland wales but they're on house result of brexit across the irish sea between england scotland and wales to northern ireland for the first time and that is the reason because the type of brexit that boris johnson. The prime minister pursued which was to break any real alignment with the european trade and customs arrangements and to go for at entirely separate of great britain but in order to make sure that the good friday peace process and the stability which has brought since ninety nine hundred was maintained. The irish border had to be kept open. Let's say the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland to itself as it has been now for decades and has become invisible with all sorts of human activity. Crossing it in their efforts not had the toxic role played a toxic role. Because it's been invisible it did in generations gone by and that's that's also the good if however that's it become the external frontier customs frontier of the european union. Then it could have ignited all those old problems that had beset and an bedeviled northern ireland. So instead what boris johnson agreed to was to keep the border open that men the northern ireland remained in the european union's customs union and it's trading markets but that's Inevitably because the united kingdom was leaving Great britain would be outside those arrangements so they have to be checks across the irish sea between northern ireland and great britain. of course. The prime minister denied this in his normal airy way At the beginning on the unionists and loyalists in particular who some of the most hardline involved feel betrayed. Because he didn't he wasn't straight with them way. Do you save in the causal connection between that dissatisfaction with the post brexit arrangements. And what we've seen in west belfast. Is it possible that there are people who are or were associated with loyalist paramilitarism. Who are leveraging that discontent to cause trouble. Yes there are and they're also criminals amongst them who drug. Traffic is and so on who've presented a police crackdown which has been quite effective in their communities to try and get rid of this drug trafficking problem and bought ignited. Not because of that so much though it's fit into it but also but primarily because suddenly loyalist protestant unionists suddenly found that Country what boris johnson told them. There are actually checks and controls strangling a lot of northern ireland businesses in a mountain of tape and naturally they see that as a break within the united kingdom because which puts northern ireland in a different place from say england scotland or wales and so they feel that their fundamental beliefs in the the union of the united kingdom northern ireland. Being within that is being threatened. And that is what ignites it. There was none of this until that issue suddenly arose around new year because the prime minister frankly say told a lot of porky's on us and didn't level with the unionist community and they suddenly found themselves in this predicament and had created Insecurity and understandable anxiety out of which these other factors criminality usa Vandalism and so on out of which that's fed you mentioned earlier a an absence of leadership both in northern ireland and in the united kingdom what would a constructive response from especially northern irish politicians. At this point look like presumably not like the one We saw her on twitter from arlene foster who went and it is a a term with which you will be familiar. Full water battery Suggesting that the violence will die quote. Take the focus off the real lawbreakers incheon. Fine that's probably not the most helpful into intercession. She could have made at this point. Is it well when you become first minister which is effective northern ireland as she is Although it's an unusual arrangement that she has joins us with the deputy minister. Michelle neil who's a shouldn't fain leader when you reach these positions you've got to speak for the whole of the community promises and president presidents naturally have their own party agendas to follow in their own party members to satisfy in any country in any democratic system. But you're trying to speak for the whole nation and that for the whole nation as well once you assume those positions and what has been disappointing about both of them and especially in recent days. Me aline fosters utterances. She's not adopted that role. She's effective acting as a party politician. A democratic unionist party rather than speaking for the whole of the the the the community across northern ireland and across the religious and political divides that have bedeviled for so many generations. And i think that's the kind of leadership we need. And we have gossips equally across the water London has been virtually silent on northern ireland. Now full rarely ever since David cameron and the conservatives came to power in two thousand ten under make this point on a on a party. Basis is a leave a politician and also it was labor secretary of state for northern ireland. A because it's traditionally been a nonpartisan issue between both the major parties. I make it. Because i'm genuinely an i've being hugely critical of the the absence of of number ten downing street of the prime minister in a way. That's attorney blend. Gordon brown were in vogue. John major's conservative prime minister before them. playing an honest broker role effectively. What they've done is said will not you know the the good friday process the peace settlement that i helped to negotiate in two thousand seven that brought the old enemies to share power together. That that's all done and dusted and therefore we can concentrate on the other pressures of government and that was fatal So we only seen a couple of sentences from the prime minister over the last few days when parts of belfast up in flames and a couple of tweets from the northern ireland secretary of state. Frankly that's not good enough. They should be convening all party. Talks in person to try and resolve these as labor shattered secretary. St louis hague has called for And they should be on the case all the time instead of effectively absence without leave as has been the case over northern ireland now sadly for a number of years lord haein. Thank you as always for joining us. You're listening to the briefing. Here is markle's ailing goffin. With the days of the headlines. Thanks andrew in the serum institute.

Ireland Boris Johnson United Kingdom Wales Scotland Irish Sea Andrew Mueller England Republic Of Ireland Belfast Northern Ireland Assembly Peter Hain European Union's Customs Union Stormont Britain United Kingdom Northern Arlene Foster Michelle Neil European Union Great Britain
Northern Ireland Sees Three Nights of Violence as Tensions Mount

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:03 min | Last month

Northern Ireland Sees Three Nights of Violence as Tensions Mount

"Easter weekend so renewed violence in northern ireland with petrol bombs thrown and cars hijacked and set alight. The police called for calm after unionists engaged in a so called night of disorder in a suburb. In the city of belfast. The police federation for northern ireland said destroying urine communities was not the way to protest or event or for more on this when are joined by rebecca black. Who's a journalist with press. Association based in belfast. Good morning rebecca. Good to have you with us. Good morning thanks for having me so just recap what happened at the weekend. I mean we're now getting reports that more than forty police officers were injured. And yes i suppose it. Sorta stretch back to last week and there was a stevenson started breaking in londonderry last week they continued on for think. Seven or eight consecutive nights. Ny and then there was also some disturbances on nights. Skirts of belfast. As you'd neutered in the headline and i mean brexit as a part of this however at some more should have complex picture on the grind. Anger has been building within the union. Loyalist communities over the last year over brexit and this week in northern protocol was negotiated to keep northern ireland within the rules to avoid a hard border island the violent and so the system of tech support system i regarded as a border in the irish sea. And there's also anger in the loyalist community which sits back further over what they regard as to tear. Police said this was exasperated. Further last week and the public prosecution public prosecution service took the decision not to pursue not to pursue prosecutions and twenty four members of cimpian for attending the funeral of a senior republican last jin municipal during a period of ed lockdown. When in new was meant to be gathering but estimated two thousand people including leadership of champagne gathered mice. West belfast so the decision to prosecute exasperated that sort of regard to police

Belfast Police Federation For Northern Rebecca Black Northern Ireland Londonderry Rebecca Stevenson Irish Sea Ireland West Belfast
Northern Ireland police appeal for calm after violent unrest

New Sounds

00:54 sec | Last month

Northern Ireland police appeal for calm after violent unrest

"Came under attack last night in a second night of violence and semi autonomous Northern Ireland. Vicki Barker reports from London a week of mounting tensions erupted into violence on Friday night as 27 police officers were injured in protests in Belfast and Londonderry. Saturday night. The unrest continued when riot police and armored vehicles surrounded cars that have been set a light by protesters who also threw bricks and Molotov cocktails. Some in the Protestant community believe Post Brexit trading barriers are cutting Northern Ireland off from the Britain to which they feel loyalty. Protesters were also angered by a decision not to prosecute 24 shin faint politicians for attending the funeral of Bobby's Story of former senior leader of the IRA in violation of covert 19 restrictions for

Vicki Barker Northern Ireland Londonderry Belfast London Britain Bobby IRA
Failures Of State Review: The Inside Story Of Britain’s Battle With Coronavirus

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

02:08 min | Last month

Failures Of State Review: The Inside Story Of Britain’s Battle With Coronavirus

"George and jonathan. Many thanks for for coming onto the show. This book came out of an article that you wrote. When did you first realize that. Actually this was being horrifically mishandled from the top. We were asked in a roundabout kind of the end of march. Actually less jia to have a look at why things to be so badly in the uk compared to other places why we seem to be the case. The infections arising Had ridden said quickly. We seem to be on so many deaths. And if you remember that time you know kind of everyone kind of looked across which you've been the first to be hit by the pandemic and they sort of said well whenever going to be a spot as easily and quickly and we were and we started off with the kind of question which was what was the prime minister during and what was his government doing to tackle the patent democ in those early days. And so we. We worked on this Our initial article review weeks and at the end of april. We rented story which was about the government's that gate lost days in In tackling the virus. And i think as we were going through the research It became clear clear and clearer time. The threats has not been taken seriously even the winnings with that and that we were in a very very pull state of preparedness anyway than people who claim that we were one of the best countries equipped to tackle a virus in in the world. We will fall from it because will years. We'll stay on t. And the kind of concentration on emergency planning for a noble brexit deal. It meant that we were actually wiki statement. It came so what what was vital was when when the news came out china it was awful virus which was spreading quickly and jamming hospitals in in china. Already that we needed to hit the ground running. And i think what we found in our initial research was government. Just didn't do

JIA Jonathan George UK Government China
Export-control panel: the EU meets on vaccines

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:21 min | Last month

Export-control panel: the EU meets on vaccines

"Today. European union leaders will hold a virtual summit to discuss improvements to the bloc's vaccine roll out. The most contentious topic will be plans to increase europe's ability to block exports of vaccines. The proposed legislation was unveiled yesterday by the train chief valdez dombrowski's commission has adopted and implementing revelation To adopt an expert authorization mechanism for vaccine was aim of preserving security of our supply chains. The wording is general of the intent specific. The proposal comes as a battle plays out between the eu and the british swedish company astra zeneca which has been accused of failing to honor its supply contract with europe. The move marks a sharp escalation in the us response to a floundering vaccination rollout at home beset by delivery delays supply issues and a third wave of the disease. Britain would be hard hit by those new rules because so far. It's benefited the most. From europe's vaccine exports but yesterday britain and the e u issued a joint statement. Aiming for a win win situation that would boost supplies for both that might sound like a cooling of tensions but the vaccine row has been long in coming and marks another jolt on an already bumpy road to a post brexit relationship.

Valdez Dombrowski European Union Astra Zeneca Europe Britain United States
EU, U.K. Seek to End Vaccine Fight as Bloc Broadens Export Controls

BBC World Service

00:57 sec | Last month

EU, U.K. Seek to End Vaccine Fight as Bloc Broadens Export Controls

"Union leaders are toe hold virtual talks on how to boost Corona virus vaccine supplies as a third wave of the pandemic gathers momentum. The European Commission wants them to back plans to tighten controls on vaccine exports. Katya Adler reports from Brussels. You politicians are under increasing public pressure. Many voters blamed their government and Brussels for a vaccine rollout that lags far behind the U. K. The European Commission blames pharmaceutical companies, primarily AstraZeneca for not delivering jobs promised to the EU. But leaders are divided over proposals for new restrictions on vaccine exports out of the bloc to boost domestic supply. Some fear that could disrupt global supply chains needed to manufacture vaccines on damage already strained relations with the U. K. After Brexit late on Wednesday, Britain and the U said they would seek a win win deal to increase supplies.

Katya Adler Brussels U. K. The European Commission European Commission Astrazeneca EU U. Britain
Biden urges UK and EU to preserve Northern Irish peace amid Brexit row

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:38 min | Last month

Biden urges UK and EU to preserve Northern Irish peace amid Brexit row

"Good. Friday agreement of nineteen ninety-eight ended thirty years of conflicts between mostly catholic nationalists fighting for a united ireland and mostly protestant loyalists who want northern ireland to stay part of the united kingdom. But now the accord is in jeopardy. According to david campbell chairman of the loyalist community's council. He's calling for dialogue with the eu and island to change the northern irish protocol. That he believes has breached fundamental principles of the original deal. This follows an announcement from loyalist paramilitary groups that they were temporarily withdrawing support for the peace agreement due to concerns over the brexit deal but it has further repercussions beyond europe to has been mcevoy news a political reporter and monocle twenty four regular and has been covering. The story is here to tell us. Good morning to you. Vinian thanks for joining us at. This is clearly a big problem. Here in britain and for the eu. Why is it resonating across the atlantic. Good morning yet has huge resignation across the atlantic you have a massive irish diaspora in america. One in ten americans consider themselves to be from irish descent. You go to the half american presidents having lineage and the man in the white house now is probably the most closely itunes irish issues. That has been since john f. kennedy and so we've now got the brexit arrangement in place in old nada and there was a reason why the northern irish people voted most strongly than any nation in the united kingdom to remain in the eu. Because it is a self-described post conflict society. Those wounds were still hearing and brexit has opened them up and caused issues and as well as the united kingdom and the eu the us will say played a big role in achieving peace in northern ireland. And it is worried that the westminster government has been to a reckless in its handling of northern ireland and things could start to come upon say loyalists particularly angry. We have to remember over the course of brexit with theresa may. She didn't have a majority off to the two thousand seventeen election. so she's struck this alliance with dp which is the main loyalist party. She gave them all kinds of funding for that backing To get her brexit deal through it contains something cold the irish back stock which they became unhappy with that it would have prevented having border arrangements of they were the ones who encouraged conservative backbenchers to keep looking at so now the situation is that. Despite bar johnson's promises he is betrayed. Loyalist parties in northern ireland in that he has allowed the creation of an irish seaboard between nineteen noland and the rest of the united kingdom. And so it is that that has enraged loyalists because they think that it is a barrier between them and the rest of the u. k. That isolates them and that it leads to more synchronization with the republican violence because north non has stayed in single markets and not go on with the rest of the united kingdom. So of course. We know that the have been major power players struggling currently with the brexit rules and their supporters. What does this mean for northern. Ireland's devolved government. Yeah we have to remember. The nolansville government was actually suspended for three years until january loss. If it had been an independent country it would have been the longest in europe to not have to working governments But what it means now is that we've had them up running for a year and all kinds of problems are coming up. So you know the prime minister. Boris johnson traveled. Auden's elliott this This month he actually didn't meet with chimp Sane the other main partners in that power sharing agreement that has said waves. That says you know. The the westminster copy relied on his effect on governors of. What's going on there. It's only dealing with one of the parties but the loyalists themselves having problems in their ranks. Because of this seaboard you had a administer effectively northern ireland a playing a sort of unilaterally moves late on friday nights a few weeks ago where he sort of blocks the construction of the border checks at poets and the hiring of staff unilaterally and that really set things off because they're just trying to frustrate the creation of this border which brussels assigned up to the uk has signed up to in law and for the first time last week the biden white house made clear that it supports the northern ireland tricycle. And that everyone else. Apart from the loyalist consider this now a settled issue to move on

United Kingdom EU Northern Ireland Loyalist Community's Council United Ireland Westminster Government David Campbell Main Loyalist Party John F Europe White House Atlantic Nolansville Government America Britain Kennedy Theresa Noland Johnson Boris Johnson
A Culinary Tour Of Brexit

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:45 min | 2 months ago

A Culinary Tour Of Brexit

"Joined today by frank langfitt. Npr's lennon correspondent. Frank hi. hey it's great to be here. Cardiff great to have you so frank from what i understand. You are about to take us on a kind of culinary tour of brexit. Today's yes that's right so quick. Refresher on brexit cardiff. Uk voted to leave the you to escape red tape in brussels. So they'd be free to cut new free trade deals. This was like a number of years ago. Two thousand sixteen. The uk finally completely got out of the eu on new year's eve which means different things to different sectors here but today we're just going to focus on one of the hardest hit that's food as specifically we're look at wasters cheese and wine because we found his each item tells a different story about the real world consequences of brexit so far. So that's our plan. And here's the menu wine cheese or oysters cardiff if you want to start with. I don't know frank. I think i'm in the mood for oysters. Let's start there good choice. We're surrounded by water here in britain so the story of oysters is that when you suddenly face new regulations doing business is so much harder and no one is feeling this more than this. Fisherman that i met is his name. Is jonathan bailey very way this is late this is this is just rain rain water. I'll get some jonathan harvest oysters on a river in the southwest of england on the day that i met him. It was raining so we were bailing out his robot. Yeah i'm assuming Frank jonathan exports his own to europe. And that's why you're talking to him so a one eight tells how that's going for him now. That brexit is reality. Things are going really badly. So before brexit when the uk was in the eu there was seamless trade like between the states in the us and jonathan dredged up his oysters. They were shipped to europe and then they were cleaned which worked out just fine now. After brexit. Those british oysters are subject to eu rules about imports. Just like any other country outside the eu. so jonathan's wasters now have to be cleaned here on this side of the english channel. And i know this doesn't really sound like a big deal but if you're in the business it is and that's because it adds costs and it means there's less time to get those oysters on a european plates before they die. A bottom line are going to die in transit so this and other changes because of brexit have really hurt the fishing industry in fact shellfish and fish exports to the eu just in january. We're down more than eighty percent year-on-year now. The government likes to call this just teething problems in trade volumes overall are already rebounding. And that is. I gotta say a staggering dropped eighty percent plus. It is dead always tres and frank. I'm no expert on this. But i mean dead. Oysters are not good tasty oysters. No and you can't any money off them. Obviously so jonathan is one of like more than forty fishermen and women around here who are pretty much out of work. This season and i asked him when we're out on his boat like how he thinks it's going to impact them in the long run. Do you think that you'll keep fishing. Or i'm sixty six. I'm wondering whether this is the moment to say the. How would you feel about not fishing anymore. I would be very very very very upset. Okay so frank. Things clearly not looking good for the fishermen on the english coast. What's next on the menu where we're headed next in in our brexit tour so next off the whales for wine and then the northwest of england for cheese wine and cheese nice pairing classic traditional. Let's do that right after a quick break. This message comes from. Npr sponsor interactive brokers the professionals gateway to the world's markets. Their clients enjoy lowest cost access to stocks options futures and fixed income from a single integrated account. Learn more at i b. k. r. dot com. This message comes from npr sponsor. Microsoft teams helping priority. Bicycles transform. the way they work when the pandemic hit they started doing virtual visits on teams. Now people worldwide can come into their showroom more at microsoft dot com slash teams. Okay frank we're done with the delicious oyster chorus. So let's continue on with this brexit culinary tour and frank. I could really use a bevy. So what were you saying about. Wine is a really good example of a frankly how brexit can cost you in the checkout line. So let's head to wales and we're gonna meet daniel lambert who imports wine. So this is all little warehouse so daniel reports tens of thousands of cases of wine each year most of it of course from europe and for daniel. This used to be really easy. We used to just have to one very very simple simplistic but now because the uk's outside of the u. it's brexit. There's so much more. I have to send the order to the producer. The producer then produces pro forma invoice which they sent back to me on the pro forma invoice. They have two quite mild a number so hunting trip daniel down a bit because he actually went on. For more than a minute but describing. The avalanche of confusing forms now has to fill out. He said each separate set of forms cost seventy five bucks so scale of one to ten. How much are you enjoying this new system. Yeah it makes sense. I mean everybody hates paperwork. Super annoying. But frank did you ask him you know what about the real impact on his business. What he said is paperwork. Costs will be passed on to consumers but some small retailers won't be able to afford the extra paperwork cost ordering different kinds of wine so in the end that's actually going to mean less variety on the shelves.

EU Frank UK Frank Langfitt Frank Hi Cardiff Jonathan Bailey Jonathan Harvest Frank Jonathan Jonathan Europe Lennon NPR Brussels Britain English Coast Daniel Lambert Microsoft
Europe Says Britain Is Violating International Law Over Northern Ireland

Monocle 24: The Globalist

00:22 sec | 2 months ago

Europe Says Britain Is Violating International Law Over Northern Ireland

"The eu has begun legal action against the united kingdom over its alleged breach of the northern ireland protocol part of the brexit. Deal the uk change the way it's implemented without the eu agreeing to that change is delayed. The introduction of new sea border checks on food parcels and and moved unilaterally to ease the trade in horticultural products across from great britain to northern

EU Northern Ireland United Kingdom UK Great Britain
Ireland Suspends Use of AstraZeneca's Vaccine

All Things Considered

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

Ireland Suspends Use of AstraZeneca's Vaccine

"Temporarily suspending use of AstraZeneca's Corona virus. Vaccine show. Mike Poland reports Irish health leaders are concerned about reports of blood clotting in Norway. The Irish government is pressing the pause button on the controversial vaccine after receiving a warning from their Norwegian counterparts. The report sight for very serious, very rare cases of blood clotting in vaccine recipients, one in which the patient died. They're concerned with where the clots air happening, and that those getting the cloths are under the age of 50. The European Medicines Agency is also investigating the clotting incidents, but for now says the vaccines benefits outweigh the risks. You countries like Ireland already faced a shortfall of the British made vaccine in part due to bad blood from contentious Brexit negotiations for NPR News I'm show make Poland in Dublin.

Mike Poland Astrazeneca Irish Government Norway European Medicines Agency Ireland Npr News Poland Dublin
What the monarchy means to the English

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:41 min | 2 months ago

What the monarchy means to the English

"Early this week a retired british army officer explained that he and his wife weren't getting onto with a few members of his immediate family. I had three conversations with my grandmother and two conversations with my father before. Still taking my calls of listeners will already have spotted what we're doing here which is to say that yes. This is going to be one of those things. Where a high falutin media route rises piously above commenting directly on the actual thing and instead loftily pontificates over stapled fingers about what it all means before we get to superciliously anthropological about be teeth demolishing and garment rending currently besetting britain. This does seem a good time to recognize a truth. Rarely acknowledged by the media. Which is that. most people. Don't really care about most things. Doubtless they are many millions of subjects of the septa dials. Who responded to for winfrey's interview with the duke and duchess of sussex in these sign and proper manner i e by muttering and proceeding with a day. Doing our job. But we're both just trying to hold on to that quite and we'll just now eat a nice big slice of cake which we are also having when a substantial lure at least voluble demographic of a given country freaks all the way out about a given thing it assuredly mean something if often nothing good. I'm angry to the point of bowling over today. I'm sickened alive. Just sat to watch out. Which and yes. I will be arriving shortly hanging there. We should also be clear regarding which specific given country. We're talking about because this isn't really about the united kingdom or even great britain there is pretty solidly entrenched resentment of the royal family in wales and scotland. Then they may take and obviously outright kathy in portions of northern ireland. What we are witnessing is a certain segment of england having a nervous breakdown about history identity and tradition which may remind you of a recent referendum and several ensuing years of ethically political melodrama. The couldn't reason a mess manet to about owned independence behind it fast. Staff inc post interview polling does indeed suggest a congruence between views on this latest royal related hullaballoo and views on brexit. Those who voted leave are overwhelmingly unsympathetic to the duke and duchess those who voted remain more understanding but also much likely still to be undecided or interested also as with brexit views sorted by age break. Absolutely as you'd expect where one strata of england is concerned it's hard not to see a certain displaced anxiety in play here at some point in the next few years. Different face will begin appearing on british stamps and banknotes. It is difficult to overstate how strange this will be queen. Elizabeth second has reigned for sixty nine years a stalled and reliable fixture during a period in which her country and its role in the world has otherwise changed beyond recognition as may be gauged by among many other metrics comparing her first prime minister winston churchill on the beaches with the rather less figure likely to be her lost. We'd have had the consolation of watching. The speaker being forced to kangaroo testicle or by noting that her father king george the sixth also answered to the title of emperor of india nevertheless while so much else about britain has been utterly transformed. There is outside those four referenced portions of northern ireland which have other ambitions negligible serious republican sentiment at lodge in uk politics whether they realize that own not those english people happier in the past than the present may already have begun to grieve. They may also have taken prince. Harry's recent decisions personally. Harry scholey was supposed to be the guy the jack. The laddish royster who later served his country's military with distinction fighting. The taliban in afghanistan now married to some foreign actress and talking about his feelings to americans

Britain British Army Winfrey Sussex UK Northern Ireland Bowling Kathy United Kingdom Wales Scotland Winston Churchill Elizabeth King George Harry Scholey India Royster Harry Taliban Afghanistan
Cuomo addresses harassment claims vowing to stay in office

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:36 min | 2 months ago

Cuomo addresses harassment claims vowing to stay in office

"And easy. You and britain clash again in latest post. Brexit spat. it's thursday march fall. I'm anthony davis new york governor. Andrew cuomo on wednesday said he intends to remain in office in the face of sexual harassment. Allegations that have weakened his support and led to calls for his resignation. The democratic governor speaking some believe in his first public appearance since three women accused him of inappropriate touching and defensive remarks apologized and said that he learned an important lesson about his behavior around women. I now understand that. I acted in a way that made people feel uncomfortable. Cuomo said it was unintentional. And i truly and deeply apologize for. It asked about kohl's for him to step aside. The third term governor said. I wasn't elected by politicians. I was elected by the people of the state of new york. I am not going to resign. Coma acknowledged sensitivities have changed and behavior has changed and what he considers his customary greeting an old world approach. That often involved kisses and hugs is no longer acceptable. But the allegations against the governor go beyond aggressive greetings former eight lindsay boylan accused cuomo of having harassed her throughout her employment and said he wants suggested a game of strip poker

Anthony Davis Andrew Cuomo Britain New York Cuomo Kohl Coma Lindsay Boylan
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

12:50 min | 1 year ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"The exit mystery vortex had its politics dot code at UK He's finishing his book how to be a liberal not forget about this he's been hiding from the miseries of Brexit by watching joker a cautionary town in which a narcissistic sociopathic weird floppy head thinks he's a lot funnier than he really is. unleashes chaos and anarchy on his community there's all areas hello Ian Brexit Britain Gaul some city same thing right it doesn't it feels it feels alarming earthen did you enjoy reporting on what you called them the first mythical Queen's speech faulkner so depressing because it was the as you report on it and not just when you wrote about it but when you do it has to be treated like Quin speech there so what was in the bills so you know what what was going on with health and you know to even give it that is to play his fucking gain you not to even go into the content of which frankly it doesn't really sound as much scrutiny anyway is to do what he wants is oh he's really doing is putting my own of the fucking pump and British constitutional trappings he can on what is a fucking press release and yet I can't believe that was many days ago by the way it was like it was about time and yet but on Monday that's what you have to do the whole way through is I mean that was really really fucking depressing Hyundai which has been matched only by the days which are followed right I'm how did the Queen Look she brought to her expression but she needs to get progressively more I believe year as far as I can say is that the thing is that we just sort of project onto her what your thinking so I kept on just tim this raised eyebrows she was pissy reading out but I think that is just me and the genie surpassed presents us hope for window maybe she couldn't depictions she's like a hundred yeah well I mean that is a recurring maybe no figs moan something fiamma she did seem she did but I do think that that's just me wanting to be the case I'm just desperate for to stand up and as you know what like fuck this shit you want to put up with any longer than last year also with Alexandra political commentator cook an actor currently on tour in Mozart's Seraglio Alex has been all over Britain with this excellent production on Friday he'll be introducing Durham to his Pasha Salim I've got the flu so I must apologise listeners for intermittent nays blowing light sneezing that may be gotten microphone and that's dominic coming is country Durham do you think he'll turn up and shout get brexit done open lease led him that how would have passed salim deal with Cummings I end one scene with the line follow me as I will give you instructions for his torture too uh-huh an actual line from the thing you enjoyed the state opening of parliament to cal pomp and circumstance and pretty hats approach is going to survive brexit does it look a bit silly now look I have I was gonna say I have nothing against it but actually I do I have plenty against it I think part of the political problems we have is because of the lack of modernisation in the actual thirty gotcha I mean that really sincerely I'm not being facetious I think setting up you know at the opposing sides actually sitting opposite each other in a chamber with no electronic means of voting which means they have to get up and turn to division rooms makes everything take hours longer and I think it contributes to an adversarial climate having said that I don't mind if once a year visit a little bit of silliness going on I mean I'm Greek you know have you seen the soldiers outside our parliament But on this occasion it did fail ridiculous because with two weeks to go to actual doom for us to stop and suddenly put on a fucking Gilbert and Sullivan Operetta it just seems ludicrous a special guests this week is writer and broadcaster Mike Butcher editor at large at the tech and be news source tech crunch he's regularly named as one of the most influential people in European Tech and he's also founder of the grassroots per pro final say movement tech for UK which acts as a nexus for anti brexit forces in the tech world and it builds on and tools frontier brexit campaigners tack the UK is behind many of those automated campaigning sites you'll have seen like stop the coup which helped organize anti probation tests and my you it shows you how the U is invested in your in Your Area Holly Mike Welcome to the maniacs thanks very much pleasure to be here lobbies have you too remover in Shaker technology and you're you're not having an affair with Bruce Johnson I know that was quite a key around the block on roundabout twenty thirteen and the pole dancing you wouldn't believe it was amazing flattened see the poll at all I think obviously jot like Jennifer curiae refuse to answer on in case it can I say that you know if you were a bit like the sixties if you were there you know if you remember that you weren't and about sexy UK later but what is it and how does it work briefly well The technology industry tech geeks on engineers developers designers all the polling in the industry for a couple of years well for months shall we say before the referendum the people wanted to stand the EU and it's an incredibly international industry something like a third of most tech startups and contain people from Internet national the international people and an huge numbers from the EU for obvious reasons and official bodies like oddly enough tech up I was simply standing on the fence like a lot of business organizations and so we thought in a slightly trolled them and we'd made tech for UK because we you wanted to say that there really was a tech industry movement in favor of of the and also to not just sort of say that but also to build tech as well it's been a couple of weeks in social media facebook effectively wash their hands of responsibility for truth and political advertising it seems like very bad look for platform that already has serious trust issues doesn't yeah FACEBOOK has an enormous issues will pretty wear of that felling the revelation about things like Cambridge Analytica is very tough I think to some extent if you want to sort of say that there's something positive that on our side the organic nature of facebook groups specially You know pro you groups is very powerful because you can't advertising is you WANNA balance you can't buy those thousands of people in those groups active in activating and doing things like getting out in streets etc but it can work the other ways Countess of bewildered pellet late absolutely yeah yeah we'll get into the knife edge state of the Brexit non-negotiations later and what if anything we can expect parliament on Saturday plus how are you holding up for even the most dedicated Romania has been a tough month or two we'll talk about how remain is keeping their heads while all about using bags all that and more after some reminders from Alex we're very excited to announce with a special guests for maniacs live in Manchester on Saturday the second of November will be the Great Rob Ford Professor of politics at the University of Manchester and one of the most lucid and fascinating voices on the whole brexit mess Raub we'll be joining joining in rows and Dorian Linski for two PM Grand Matinee show at the lowry theatre on sulfur keys yes yes we know. Sulphur does not strictly speaking Munster but allows a little geographical life on the first weekend after we supposedly leave the European Union we'll leave the European Union tickets are selling fast so get us now at the lowry dot com of course patron Becker's still get discounts as well as mugs t-shirts and early access to the podcast so check your Patriot homepage to find out more meanwhile Arrow Naomi Smith is of the U. Summit in Brussels today we across Party delegation of MP's led by Dominic Grieve and David Lamey there joining remain in now and pro euro to show a European partners at Britain has changed it's mind Boris Johnson doesn't speak for Britain and will use any extension well to get either another vote or a general election can help Naomi has asked us to remind listeners to write to your MP's yet again to tell them to back a final say go to best for Britain dot Org Forward Slash it it doesn't matter if you've written to them before the levers are out in force and MP's need to hear from us again and again go to best for Britain dot org forward slash right and we'll see it remains live at the lowry Manchester at two PM on Saturday the second of November very excited about that so here we go again fifteen days to go at the time we're recording this nothing concrete on the table yet Boris Johnson scheduled Saturday session for parliament even though Nobody any idea of what they're supposed to be talking about although maybe they'll be talking about Northern Ireland in we keep being told a dealer insight because Boris Johnson has made major concessions is is that right fuck knows So I mean I paul on with assault onto everything I say I think basically everything that anyone says for next hour because we we just don't know very lightly not me I'm going to be bang on especially unacceptable but you know this is a very good ones that it'll be sort of wrong literally by the time you're hearing this Barbara and we've had two or three days now of something going on things going forwards and backwards especially people with different sources replaces coming to different responses because of course there's various centers of power even within Europe let alone you know when you start to consider what's happening in the UK as well obviously in the UK parliament than have you know the Labor guys and of the DP the G. and even on that basis you got different people were talking in different ways something clearly happening if I had to put money on something I would say that he will come back with some sort of piece of paper shortly I think deal because it is not going to be a illegal treaty we're going to have the details and this is the crux of the whole thing the details when being is really ultimately it's in the details of this thing we die but I I think it's quite likely now than they do come back with head of terms she's going to be pretty broad outline of where they want to go with a surface level of detail and the probably it's it's likely that the EU and UK will want to have some sort of indicative vote process on that on Saturday now that would not if this is what happens that would not be signing the joint agreement because we would not exist the legal document would not exist what it would do would be try and create a sort of sense of moral force rounded acceptance if you remember the way they talked about what the hell that man that looks like he's like a human version of like certification of nostril hair the Brady and then do you remember like the Brady Amendment and when that came out the way people acted about it was like it was fucking Moses just come down from the mountain with some great new way forward I think that they'll do that they would then extend very short extension they would try to do the details on the other side of that that is my guess of how this will go but I'm only sesame wrong everything right now is very very chopping you so I know it's difficult is up in the air but it's really a numbers game isn't it it's whether the DP come aboard we're hearing today we heard rumors today that they had board with this deal then Arlene Foster said the sources were talking nonsense sorry I can't hear non rush accident when we need yeah exactly so it's.

European Union Brexit Munster fifteen days three days two weeks
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

09:51 min | 1 year ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"I'm Richard. We keeping told the Johnson is looking for creative solution to the backstop but outgoing minister amber rudd I will get to later basically said this was this was nonsense. Does do you believe that there is any kind of negotiation coming on or is it just Is it just a pretense. No I don't believe if there is any kind of real meaningful negotiation going on. I'd always believed that new deal would never happen under Theresa. May I thought it was just a a toxic toxic under Boris Johnson. I think the strategy has been deliberately to run down the clock to force US out without a deal to get an election before that period in order that either the conservative secure victory or alternatively which just pushed over the cliff with because the election date is moved which has been you know the reason that we haven't supported it. I'm having an October election because it'll be nothing to stop. The date of the election being shifted after the point at which an election has been called. I think voters are pretty good at sussing out whether they believe the motives of politicians and what they're arguing for and I think you look back to the twenty seventeen general election where you had a prime minister going into the election saying whole host of things about why the election was necessary and the voters decided actually they weren't entirely show that the election was necessary but also that the reasons given in the prime minister at that point Theresa May argue that she needed to have a strong negotiating hand to deal with Brexit. I mean that was a brexit election for all of about a week week and then we moved onto a whole host of things I see no reason to believe that general election now in similar circumstances wouldn't really be about brexit in any meaningful sense which I think Kinney's right that we try and resolve the issues around brexit. I believe in the form of a referendum before we then move onto a general election because general elections are rarely about single issues the rally but what politicians want to make them about. I'm in the number of things that happen. Gernot 2017 election campaign not least you know the terrorist attacks that we suffered in this country that very very quickly meant we were talking about the whole host of other issues not just about brexit and we had a general election was predicated on. Let's try and resolve brexit and it didn't do any of that didn't resolve brexit. We've had general election since the referendum so when Tori MP's will say you know you're not respecting the mandate and and so on we have actually had a big electoral event after that referendum in two thousand sixteen. It's you know it's a different parliament. A different set of people that did or didn't didn't vote to regard article fifteen taken a whole host of decisions after twenty seventeen. It's different people with a different mandate from their constituents who believe that they have to do the right thing and that yes we look to the 2016 referendum come referendums. There's no ignoring it but it's not the only thing that's happened since very close to the Tom Watson soon views not as he said today there'd be it needs to be a distinct thing that really happens before an election to unlock than having an election shen on normal election issues that make sense. I think Tom's absolutely right because you know in the course of a general election I would want to talk about a whole host all challenges that my community face whether it's the fact that fought in many people are still out of work that you know. I've seen a massive increase in the number of children in poverty law she because of universal credit our transport infrastructure is chronic chronic. I could go on and on about the challenges we face and I'm just not convinced that we would fully resolved brexit in those circumstances nor am I convinced it would actually get to talk about all of the other problems as we face as a country which means the fundamental problem with Brexit. Were not going to talk about any of the big challenges we face as a country because brexit's going to go on for at least the next decade and that means we can't solve child poverty or make sure that we're sorting adult social care or making sure that we got enough nurses and the NHL has all of that is going to just fall by the wayside as brexit drags on and and I think that's one of the key arguments that needs to be made in terms of trying to persuade people why we do need to just stay in the European Union move on talking about the things I do. You understand that argument. I'm a bit concerned thereby that Tom Watson idea because I if you have a referendum now before an election now this is arguable but frankly there isn't a mandate for it. Now we're talking about is whether you need that mandate and I'm not you one could argue that you don't but at the moment it's not that Labor didn't run under another election when during the last big apartment other than when when it lost had an election year so then even putting that to one side the numbers on their in parliament in order to get the referendum or be able to pass legislation nation on how you would hold the referendum without people being able to sort of sabotage so even if you get rid of the principal argument. You don't have a practical argument by that stage you sort of think. I don't see that that's ago. I see that it could be a guy with a changing debate within the Labour party to a better position. I think it works for that but in terms of actual position of having a referendum before and other election I justin see how the numbers still not fair because I look at the last vote in which the idea of a second referendum got the high number of very I totally wasn't the narrowest margin and I add a number of those twenty one tore impeach who have been thrown out of the party and wearing the cabinets at the time and couldn't vote on the issue and I I'm not sure they're still exactly the same you might the furthest edges be able to just a bowel and I didn't think you would just about squeak through a proposition for it to do it in order to pass legislation to get it through subject. Today I see it surviving I mostly I think that those new votes there's repertory and peas and the new Labour impis actually most dangerous in in the push for a for a deal if anything comes back when you look at what Neil Kinnock's just doing it Monday the biggest movement in the Commons right. Now who might now supports did if it came forward referendum. I don't see very little chatter about at at the moment and I think you need to have an election to lock up sure just finally just looked kind of pitiful next to leave. Radka doing rumblings handing these kind of bizarre sort of calisthenics like he wasn't from the camera in his usual just like only me stick but he did seem to be sort of under quite a lot of of pressure and there seems to be this feeling that he's hired Dominic Cummings to be as attack dog. The attack dog has now mauling him and he's basically being forced somebody who basically likes to be liked the whole thing about Boris Johnson. It's just like you may not agree with everything but I'm a good guy and he's being made to do things which make him very much not a good guy and sort of standing out sort of threatening to dislike. Maybe I'll go to jail for ignoring the law do you think Ingrid that he has sort of become something of a sort of hostage to his adviser. That was interesting that was when when he was sitting next to live raccoon on an extra on the podium next to him and he's sort of things. W- it yeah like stretching of his chest and it wasn't for me that seemed like a classic Macho Maneuver. It's almost like I'm not really even listening. I'm not that bothered. I'm humbled by I've got time to do exercise in the same way. It's just a complete lack of pricey. The lack of respect to the person that is standing next to you and talking he was supposed to be actually listen to answer giving giving respect by maintaining the only cow contacts or whatever and it reminded me of Jacob smoggy in Coleman's prostrating himself on the bench in a in a manner that I found genuinely disgusting actually and I was talking to my dad last night's and he's heated in Germany German and he's. I've been watching everything that's been going on in live parliamentary television in Germany every talk show at the moment. Every every news item is about brexit people as obsessed with almost mrs we are and he said I said. Do you have that in house. Apartment is that behavior that you would recognize it would they do the Bundestag for example and he's an absolutely not and on and that is it is embarrassing what happened on Monday night. I could barely watch I watched all twenty five thousand dollars but I felt sick because because the behavior and again it comes from that sort of not knowing not prising where you are not understanding the job job you have is incredibly important and very lucky to have it and it's it's a it's a position of state and to behave in that way absolutely disgusting and I'm embarrassed about it and so for me John Sort of fossil charming ca fossil is despicable and I you know yet another reason why I was on my members of the toy party because it doesn't it shouldn't he's the leader of our country for God's sakes stand next to the stand up stand up straight and and I you think in in a very real way that's their undoing actually because they have put all their eggs in one electoral basket. They've said it doesn't matter if we lose seats. It's in London doesn't matter if we leave seats in the south doesn't matter if who leads seats in Scotland because we're GonNa win those northern seats and let me tell you Jacob rees-mogg blind down like that will be the poster that goes up in the north and the fact that he's brother resigned people may not pay attention to the details details but there's something really deeply ingrained in in northern Labor voters that you can't trust the Tories and you add on top of that Boris the fact that not even his own family trusts him and that sort of thing does have cut through cut through and I don't think they will convert enough traditional traditional Labour voters over to their cause in order to make up for the losses they will suffer in the south in Scotland. They just went to it..

Brexit Boris Johnson Tom Watson John Sort Theresa Germany amber rudd Labour party prime minister US brexit Neil Kinnock Labor Tori MP Kinney Macho Maneuver Jacob rees-mogg NHL
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"Now, if breaks it if a deal passed, or even if we had no deal do you feel that populism within with that was sort of burn itself out? Because you can tell Farraj is invested in it, nor earning itself out, even though he because I'm retiring. Oh, go on, then I'll do another rally. Do you see this as something that's going to be kind of that there is there is going to be a sort of post Brexit form of populism? So. So I'm going to start with the thing, which I think is, is easy because it's impossible, right? So no, no deal. If it happens is like the Mitchells striking the stripe. No one would win the meat hit go. I wonder what species is going to replace the dinosaurs. He's going to be the water voles survivors are going to be that a handful of you just go will this is this is the cockpit. I, I think I know he's become a joke because it is funny, but he's actually an entirely this is a country where people cooled the police when KFC ran out of chicken, these only did I in an advanced economy by has never in the life anyone here in an occupation. Whoa fascist dictatorship or communist dictatorship? He's not going to be an e-p-o-c-h shaking political event, if Sainsbury's runs out of food, which it would, if we had no deal in October, the only way that you could absorb no deal would be every supermarket decided to spend a year preparing for it, which there is never going to be a situation in which the allows pen extension that is long enough for it to. Lose its its forces. So I think no deal. There's no point kind of going, what happens to populism off towards because politics will be profoundly different after after Brexit, if it were to happen. I mean, in terms of this is why I find it impossible to separate my feelings about Brexit being a calamity for my political analysis, because my assumption is is that. Because there will not be a Brexit dividend. Particularly that will not be a Brexit dividend for the people who voted for Brexit. Yeah. I don't mean that in each not really true to say the people who work for Brexit were were economic left behind, actually, on an economic perspective back tracks equally across both remain. I leave. But ultimately if you're one of the majority of farmers who voted for Brexit, prompts, not going to work out that wealthy? If you want a pension overthrew, the Brexit problems, not going to work, right? Well for you. So the, the, the sense and breaks Brexit has been a breakfast, the mandate, and ever be betrayed. It can be betrayed by not happening..

Brexit Farraj Sainsbury
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"All, I think Paula VI's to take populists seriously to only give them exposure. Once they have shown they have earned the ballot box. And I also think that there is no reason not to do interviews all live to tape, you know, edited, but simply so you can go this wasn't true, instead of that thing, where someone can say something into your doesn't pull them up on get the kind of imperfections like there is there is no argument for those more interviews to be live other than the theater, and I wouldn't be only south on the theater was good enough to justify and. Komo things about the, the Brexit party Alexandria thinks that we should stop energizing his base by talking about them and concentrate on getting out own turnout up because Farraj is only ever succeeded in low turnout elections. I'm that actually you do. See it on Twitter, for example, people really getting quite depressed and kind of remains just thinking, you know, just how can we possibly defeat the armies of garage? So should we should we be at this point? But basically just desperately trying to get out the vote and, and sort of restore some optimism as opposed to turning it all into like a Farraj show. I think for remainders the elections might turn out to be a bit of a dump squib in that, you know, we remain are sold this huge kind of swell optimism earlier in the year, when you had the petition to revoke article fifty, you know, the March through London, and I think it's fair to say that the European elections are not going to be meant like that. And. Part because the kind of remain parties are pretty disorganized. They're split. They can't decide on which toback and whether or not even to, you know support one independent candidate together having said that. I don't think it's necessarily a reason for massive depression as ready mentioned. If Farraj does as a current polls project him to do with his Brexit party. That's not too far off their performance in two thousand fourteen. It's similar levels to how anti-establishment kind of quote unquote, populist parties perform in Europe. That's not to say that these parties was a whole don't have an impact in the European parliament. We'll get to that later. They certainly will. But in terms of the macro picture, where does that leave Britain, vis-a-vis Brexit? I think even is absolutely right in the sense that, you know, the longer there is no majority for one course. I think Brexit becomes more unlikely if there is no majority, especially for, you know, a no deal Brexit. Or we certainly know that there's no joy. For Theresa May's Brexit which is actually a really hard Brexit. Right. So then I think the possibility that there's no Brexit old becomes higher and also in terms of de delusion. I think that if Farage's party does, well, what you might end up seeing is that the Tory party are instructed by, oh, my go- that to take as instruction say, oh, my God, we need to push hard to Brexit. We need to push for new deal Brexit, and try to go back to the EU remember the time we this extension runs. I know ctober, so if they take that as a sign off to the elections to go back and try renegotiate, we know how that's going to end. Right. It's not going to end well and those fundamental decisions that the UK is still not willing to take. They will have to be addressed at some point, whether it's a dealer or no deal Brexit. So I think if you look at the bigger picture, if you look at the Brexit party coming first in the elections, I don't think that really fundamentally changes the UK's position reasonably the EU finally, in what does forage want apart from. Attention and more racism bean talks that, you know there's been a lot of talk about what happened in Canada. You know, and saying that the Brexit party was sort of effectively takeover Tory party often may goes is that. Is that likely? And is that what Farraj really wants because so much of his message, of course, is based on not being the party that has to carry the can and have policies, and such you used to be coy open about this used to say, what are the purpose of you is to influence to report reporters, and the thing for lodge?.

Brexit Brexit party Alexandria Tory party Farraj Paula VI Twitter EU UK Theresa May Canada Europe London Britain Farage
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"She then embraced the kind of zeal of a convert. I'm went full on fancy. Brexit ignored reality pretended that the economy didn't really exist said albacore soms union outlet single market. And you know, the team in Brussels was sort of saying, well, what are we supposed to be negotiating for you? So you don't wanna think that like? Logical rational place. Then what you saw was in twenty suddenly reality interjected itself as the entire business community mobilized and said one earthy you thinking are you out of your mind, and then having made that massive strategic mistake of embracing the hard Brexit is kind of fancy vision to then have to work backwards from from there. And so she's ended up in this sort of dogs breakfast Brexit, where it's neither a hard Brexit. Nora soft, Brexit, it's some sort of mess in between. Right. So the withdrawal agreement contains a customs union, we'll pretend it doesn't contain a customs union, but the conditions in the withdrawal may as well say the after bring up, you know, jar magic beans to the Commissioner arrive on a flying carpet for their not to be a customs union. So she's already moved to a sort of semi soft bricks flaccid BreX if you will whereas Kuban erects it not exit. Exit Kuban on the other side. Right. I think I think he's he's sincere. I think it's pretty clear he's always been eurosceptic letting people deny that I think he's genuinely opposed what he sees as Tory Brexit. So I wouldn't underestimate the degree to which is committed to not a Tory version of Brexit. That said I think what he wants and seal is a is a soft Brexit because he thinks that we should leave because there was a referendum, and if thinks soft Brexit secure things that he cares about so in that sense. Yes, there is some overlap, but politically they're in such different positions that you know, there's never going to be a media minds on this isn't the danger in maybe me can can say something that isn't the danger that we end up with Corbin supporting withdrawal greement on the property jammed more. And then we get a new Englander inventory party. Just because I can't think of a way to secure that legally where other than people's vote and so. To meet seems it would be foolish for Corbin to accept anything that doesn't contain the lock of referenda at the tail end of it because there's no other legal way to to bolted down. Absolutely. We've been saying that final say referendum is. It's not an option. It's the solution is the only thing that can really get any of these people out of this situation that they find themselves whether it's Kuban whether it's may whether it's others and you're right. What he hopefully will be calculating. Is that no matter what he does agree with her. The knives are out for her her days on number. I know we felt like we've been saying this for a couple of years in the documentary was stupider saying months ago while she can resign which you now it's one of her speech is indeed. So you know, now that the clock really is running down for her. And it looks highly likely whoever replaces her is going to be you know, to the rights of her certain you on the issue of Europe. And and you know, he can't rely on any of them. What would it be worth? But also the labor movement. I don't think is going to put up with with something that doesn't liver a minimum a customs union alignment on. Work is why it's varmints protections. And and I think a confirmation votes. So I think even if there isn't a tempt to get to a compromise position. I think the the white labor movement will react pretty strongly to that. Because. Corpus Sesto by customs union, so strongly the trade unions of very committed on the point of worker rights in particular in hell, those are protected and then the wider membership Carolina about a confirmation revote. So you've got actually the labor movement, the means of corbin's room from anew. I think is relatively relatively. But the point is how do we get the technically because the moment you sign the withdrawal.

Corbin Tory Brexit Kuban Brexit Nora soft Brussels Commissioner Europe Carolina
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs - the Brexit Podcast

"And the only reason it's ever ended up like this is because the government has lost its work in majority on Brexit, if the government's delegates work majority Brexit be BBN non Christian. So that decision of of the house was right? But if you are taking a constitution seriously. Yes. Visa problem after problem? After problem. I'm the Walsum Brexit is who to credit are honest face say, we don't care for for parliament. We want the people's vote to prevail. But for phones, Brexit tears, who was purported to say, oh, we want to bring back control of our laws to our soft empowerment, and until the supreme court when cooling judges enemies of people and putting benches and speaker in on front pages and dividing. What he framing rate here. Do you actually care because if Brexit is going to succeed, we will need an independent civil service to work. We will need independent, which is to your neither legislature to be hell of a lot more effectively. It has been for thirty forty years. Do you? Sincerely, want us to Brexit. If so stock trashing domestic institutions couple of questions about fifty. The fewer hunters. On the on the burger decision of the constitutional people with which to everything in the argument. You just said about the general thing we still quite uncomfortable with on the basis that he was going against the business mission that had been passed by the house. So in other words, he was giving him power that they had sort of signed a way that only ministers could could amend it. When you say, it's right. It was the right time for someone to do something unprecedented on point of principle, or do you think that there was actually a precedent that he was able to? And to the extent and novelty is welcome to the extent him against president is welcome a lot of government a government too often false his free stuff in the back of business motions because they know they can't actually be amended. So good. Taking back control of its own agenda. My other one was what happened with the partisan thing that changed overnight. Always that long slow process of untorn vacation. Social liberal over long. And it was really when Cameron came out against the human voice sounds chilly. This doesn't seem to make sense. Invent been the credit couldn't chap into the realized free. Markets didn't go to CRA Librium achievement towards disagree. Live night put me being partisan anymore. And policy failures. Former lawyer I used to be a lawyer full big huge projects the IT NHS. NHS IT project day cards. I don't think product failures in policy failures in inside. And that fascinates me. That's why I'm not party parties. I'm because it can happen to any party. And so when Brexit happened and morning after the referendum was over. No, you always crying arms going for. This is the most fascinating mess will ever be able to write about because it's so interlocking everything is open here because exit and it still hasn't settled your your surgeon hearing it someone's brain and going guys I've never seen a tumor like this. That could win a prize for this. Before we move on..

Brexit Walsum Brexit CRA NHS president untorn Cameron thirty forty years
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"They don't want to have bias. I think you have to point that out because it's fair. I do think that it is related to women's issues because, for example, if you look at the Brexit movement, one of the main things that associated with Brexit, for example, all Brexit, tears, hate the European Convention on human rights, right? Even though it has nothing to do with the EU. Which I don't think they've quite figured out, but there we go. So I think this is important to raise because every time you see the clamping down or taking with civil liberties, especially on women or other marginalized group, which seems to come hand in hand with movements like this, where always shocked to find that things that we thought were universal truths, liberties, and rights that we fought for which are now ours that cannot be taken away. The line immediately starts getting blurred. So it's not only women. It's also minorities. It's many marginalized communities that seemed to be associated with the politics of Brexit. And of course, that is not only true for the UK that's true in many other countries. If you look at what's associated to Trumpian politics. Again, you see similar themes on women and abortion minority rights. So I absolutely think that you know Brexit politics. The politics of Brexit are is fundamentally linked to the taking away of civil civil liberties and rights for groups that have been marginal. Within the rest of the year. I wonder what counterfactual hair without the across Europe. What would the situation for women this minority rights be like without the convention of human rights without the work of the, if it was all out to individual countries. Do you think that there would be saying much greater disparities in the rights between the countries that currently in the? No. I mean, like if you again, you have to make the case that I think in Switzerland. Women only got the vote in the seventies. And again, I think breakfast found a way for the to blame the EU for that, which is okay. It's nonsense nonetheless, of course, if you have a supranational body body or institutions that guarantee basic fundamental rights than mining that away is not going to be helpful to the cause. So of course you can say, well, you know, Britain, we would up uphold those rights even if we weren't in the EU, but then you're denying irrefutable evidence that Brexit tears tend to want to leave the European Convention on human rights, which is incidentally British idea, sir. I think came from Winston Churchill after the second World War. So there's a link there, but it's like, like you say, with the problem with the left wing conspiracy pricey contingent is that it's all based on the assumption that there will be a left-wing government, a labour government in perpetuity. You know, the idea that actually you're leaving everything on the table and that if it's the wrong kind of Tory government allow me to say they're older on kind of potentially wrong Zora government. The naturally, you know rights can be stripped away or at least the scaled back. Perhaps I'd imagine they're just going to come in. I mean, I don't, I think data dictatorship, but that's the least bad thing about the lexin position that the next that position is is kind of ill formed as far as I'm concerned as Boris don't since position. You know, I mean, I, I was having an argument with some hardcore exterior that I took him out. Regional immigration targets under a left-wing. Government will have regional immigration and you can decide, you know, if you'll learn the southeast, you can. Side have free movement like wait what he won't wanna border between London and Liverpool. I mean, does that mean I get free movement, but never puddle in doesn't. This doesn't work tool. You know, it's just known since on stills, individual fiefdoms, will they Lehrer case serious proposition has has been put forward as viable? Are they very much depends so much, much stronger, regional governments than we have now. So you know, obviously we got Wales Scotland, but then there would be like a southwest region and there will be a Midlands region and it would be very, very different. We would be a completely different type of country and it will be tied to work visas. So you wouldn't have the permission to work basically unless you would only get mission to work if you're working in x. x. area. But yeah, I agree with you..

Brexit EU Boris Winston Churchill Europe UK Switzerland Lehrer Wales Britain Scotland London Liverpool
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"I don't think it's an unreasonable position, but I don't think giving them the Brexit. They want stop stop-start. I mean, the truth is if we, if we deliver them there no deal at all, they Armegeddon Brexit it. Everybody's gonna get poorer and being poor is not a well known south to political anger. I think you do have to think about this in terms of what people are actually voting for and what the anger is. I think a lot of the younger is legitimate, but you don't, you know, if you vote for something that doesn't really meet your needs because you're angry about something else, then being given the thing you voted for isn't going to help. Noon. What do you think of the the specter of civil unrest being kind of raised but bayside by by different people as a kind of. I mean, it seems. I mean, do you think it's on necessarily. Is it so hysterical, or do you think there's some validity? I think there's -bility certainly. I grew up in South Asia and we often saw civil unrest there. You know, that's when you really live in a state where the state isn't functioning. So there's kind of no trust or bond between citizens and government. Then you can see how this veneer of civilization is actually very thin and can break down very quickly. You know the same. What happened in London. Let's say that the cashpoints weren't giving out cash for a few days or there wasn't food in the supermarkets. It would very quickly breakdown. And of course, those of the scenarios that are plausible under the worst kind of no deal Brexit where the flip the planes aren't flying. There's no food in the supermarket, which by the way, the government is really planning for, you know, really making contingency plans that we're not just making it up. So I think it isn't historical. It's certainly true, but I think longer term does a much more important question here and that is about trust and public institutions, and this whole exercise I guarantee you is going to make people. On whatever side you stand, whether you're remainder or Brexit here, you're going to the trust in the British government and institutions has been so undermined that I think long term there has much more malign perhaps less dramatic Lee visible effect, but one that will play out for many years to come the, I think that's true. And I also think that you know there there is no Brexit that that somebody weren't exploit as no enough Brexit. So wherever kind of Brexit, we got Boris Johnson, oh, somebody like him would say, well, the reason this isn't working is because it wasn't Brexit enough. We'll live on particularly the far. I mean, the whole point of the foul right is the really far to the right. And it's very, very hard and you can never please. Now, it's just like any immigration is too much. Anybody won't be enough, and I didn't wanna live in a country that would please them. So I don't know why be afraid of angering them. And I think there's traditionally been a mistake at least with the British government or the conservative party that they're going to appease the far right by giving them a little. And that has certainly not. Ross this, these kind of fairly hair raising stories. Are they cutting through? Do you expect. Operation Yellowhammer to be sort of shifting any Li voters, or are we facing a problem where a lot of people have to basically shut their ears and unless you're literally like smashing down their door and rating their fridge, they're not gonna worry. Now, I think we'll probably fundamentally is that British people like the idea of a bit of civil unrest. I don't actually like it when it happens, then they get Tokyo hysterical. But when the idea of a bit of upset is quite appealing, you saw this recently with Julia burchell. She gave an interview saying she eventually Brexit because she liked to, you know, like night to shake, things happened. She use that word..

Brexit British government Julia burchell South Asia Boris Johnson London Tokyo Ross Lee
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"To things Nina open wide, its Brexit us. Firstly, the Tory writer declared this to be smashed check as week, which is interesting. Considering that figures as diverse as Peter Mandelson our banks, Michelle Vanni and the inevitable mug have already declared Theresa May's proposal to be a pile of matchwood anyway, that didn't deter Boris Johnson describing checkers as a suicide vest, which Allen Dunkin MP described as the most disgusting moment in modern British politics, Mazzotta competition for that Weldon Johnson, nor did it discourage former minister, Steve Baker from threatening yet. Again, that up to eighty Tory MP's would rebel to defeat it. Rose. The deal seems to be. Unworkable anyway, why the working so hard to destroy it? Is it a sort of symbolic target? Yeah, because it it was a step towards a slightly more reasonable Brexit posture and therefore it must be kicked down. I mean, Michigan show Barney was not one hundred percent next for about it. Although in recent days he's made it quite clear that it's not going to be a runner. Nonetheless, he welcomed it as a move in the right direction. Therefore, we're has to be toppled over and the basically realized that they, they were being criticized for not putting any Ford any ideas of their own. So what we've seen this week is a bit of a a flush of lovely new ideas, except they're not new ideas according to the algae for dealing with in particular, the Northern Irish border problem, but also generally the problem of trade and what happens to adopt Brexit the don't, they'll good with answers that are, they know that's that's wonderful bits from the booklets Berkeley that they put out yesterday on free trade. They communists retrained and you know, they're there. One word answers to some of the questions like this mean. Huge disruption in Trey, no. Which is know it's a few. So, yeah. So you've written about how the language around Brexit creates confusion. That's the sort of useful to the idealogues. What do you think checkers means to to people in the country? Do you think it's a widely understood? It's interesting, isn't it? Because it went straight from a kind of right complex document that people were kind of struggling to get their heads around into a were at for soft and also rubbish Brexit and that and that process I don't think was developed enough. So I don't think it went from this complex document and we digested it understood it and then started calling it checkers and think it just see straight into checkers. I don't think the, I'm actually quite grateful to the l. a. g. because I think actually it's a terrible idea. You know, it's a soft Brexit is if anything worse than the worst case scenario, because it delivers absolutely nothing and and severs a huge mountain. That's important. So I'm kind of I, but. I don't think mainstream politicians would have resisted of Brexit. I think the tendency is they love to look like people who have caught up with a new reality. And I think this time of year ago, the new reality was democracy is spoken and the realists were saying, let's find the least harmful possible Brexit and get on with it. Now, if those people had kind of dominated, I think we would have just sailed into soft Brexit and the fact that it was actually highly contested. The purpose for it was so was was so ideological and so pointless it. We wouldn't have had any space to say, hang on a second is this, does this resemble in any way the kind of control that people were saying they wanted, we would have just had to, you know, you would have been outside reasonable opinion if you had wanted no soft Brexit now, because the g. resisting it so hard, it kind of leaves the space open for us to also resist it and say, actually bizarre on April Johnson is right. You know, he's not right with his Islam phobic mass force. He's not. Right in his in any of his behavior, but he is right that soft Brexit, it's completely pointless. So you know is is actually quite useful to have that space still open because we haven't traditionally been very good at keeping it open for ourselves and he's right because the soft Brexit that what what we call Brexit now is not what we recording. Soft Brexit Brexit. Two years ago is taking the single market now. So Brexit is an unworkable fudge. You know, I, it's extraordinary..

Brexit Brexit Brexit Boris Johnson Peter Mandelson Theresa May Weldon Johnson writer Barney Rose Allen Dunkin Steve Baker Ford April Johnson Trey Michelle Vanni Michigan Berkeley one hundred percent
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"Finally, it's the return of us remain ax. We offer listeners and social media for this for that question's gonna field. Some of the best ones money from Belgium asks outside the UK political bubble. What are the biggest factors determining Brexit's outcome of any significant ones. Well, obviously the EU has many other issues on its plate in Brexit is not the most important issue. If you look across the continent, if you look across the Atlantic, what's happening in the United States, and then also what is happening in Russia, vis-a-vis Russian interference in the US election also in many European elections, and the kind of rise of the populace right across Europe is first and foremost on the minds of many European politicians. So I think it's very, very unfortunate for Britain. Particularly at this time, you know when it decides to cut ties with one pillar of its foreign policy, the EU at the same time, the second pillar of the United States is also going up in flames. So I think. Despite are kind of obsession with Brexit in this country. The sad reality for a Brits is that Brexit simply is not the most important issue at a time when the whole world is in severe geopolitical crisis, Tanya Jane, poke on Facebook asks what push action can remain living in a constituency with the Brexit tear MP do. This is my predicament. Most I do correspond with my MP. I feel there's nothing I can do to change her mind on Brexit. So me answering, I would say, pleased. Honey, Jane get all of your friends and family that live in other constituencies to be in very regular contact with their MP as much as possible, letting them know that there is a chance to stop Brexit and they would appreciate their MP doing so inviting the right way when when the Bill comes back to the Commons later in the air, but maybe maybe a few choice words, if somebody living with an MP who's firm you'll Neil decide. I think it depends how firmly, you know if if they are pretty pretty soon. Brexit. It's pretty smallest breaks. It's pretty, it's pretty hard to to move them. I mean, it's it's almost a religion. It is. It's a religion. He goes beyond any rational logic in most cases. So I I think the trick is to make sure that you'll turn to other conservatives and showing them the actually they are not alone as our polling showed four million conservative voters who are remains and that's really without having had any voice supporting them for the last two years. So they.

Brexit EU United States Tanya Jane Neil Belgium Facebook Europe UK Britain Russia two years
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"So if you'll just come out and put that down on the side debate for 'em release it publicly, even though everyone already knows it, it undermines your negotiating position. It doesn't strengthen that. Another areas you do want to resolve something even though we know, let's say, for instance, in mutual recognition of qualification. We will do that. Okay. For the same reason that we will not be deporting millions of Europeans, we need them here work ten percents of doctors in this country of relying on those e you qualification. So we're not just going to say that doesn't count anymore. You've gotta get out ten percents of the doctors in this country. Obviously, we're going to recognize it. But again, you don't want to put that down the piece of paper when you're halfway through negotiation because it undermines your position. So the whole exercise, whether there was some kind of political reasoning behind it does come across as very, very city and counterproductive according to the independent and the patriots are expected to employ mishit language to avoid criticism previously. The government is weaponising the idea of no deal Brexit. Wittman is in a time bomb, right? So radio weapon, it's already dangerous. You weaponising the gun that you're about to shoot into your own face Russian, really, except all barrel. Miller. Right. I'm Nina. The government always looks at this through the prism of damaged UK business and infrastructure. Does the rest of your care about own internal preparations? Not really. Well, I mean they care to an extent, but like a good example of this. If you look at the no deal scenario, you know the estimates are it could affect up to four percent of UK GDP and the next country that's affected the most as Arlen many. If you look at countries like France or Germany, it's point two percent something like thought. So in Germany, for example, they the government does not even if there is a no deal scenario. They don't think they need to have a centrally planned contingency backup. Right. So for all the talk about German car manufacturers or Italian protector pursue perspective, producers offering, you know quaking in their boots in the event of a new deal Brexit. The fundamental reality is that it hits the UK the hardest and thereafter land the it is not my base case scenario precisely because of the Arlen issue because if there is no deal than there is a hard border in Orland. So I think that eventually we'll be some kind of deal, but you can imagine talking again about, you know, speaking policy other, how ludicrous it looks. When. Minister. Often minister goes on. A Europe tour starts talking about how terrible no deal is going for the rest of Europe. It's just not the same. So I mean, what? What's your view on how to like t- no deal Brexit is within the Kosovo posse of people. So saying this as a way to get check is check his light through, or do you think actually they, they genuinely l. preparing for it. I mean, I think he is right. The government is don't Zuma head of a pin because on the one hand, they have to try and convince the no deal is a viable alternative for Britain on on the other hand, trunk events, parliament that it isn't, which is quite hauled. Crash do actually read British newspaper. Speaking so toss is almost impossible on actually most worried about new deal breaks, but about no deal yet bricks. In other words, they they saw out somehow island, probably with a fudge. I'm not sure how, but but let's say they do and you end up reading very heads of terms as to what happens off to leave. I'm Paul in desperation, passes that and conservative remains let it through on the grounds that he would end up with a soft Brexit. Forgetting that the day we leave the Brexit is will start this. I can put down any deal. The Theresa May negotiate and we'll probably try and get rid of Theresa May starting on the thirtieth of March. Next, I Suppose suppose..

government UK Brexit Arlen Theresa May Germany Europe Paul Wittman Miller France Kosovo Orland Zuma Britain four percent two percent one hand
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"Moti thinks blind. Well, first, we thought we hoped it might just be an administrative era, possibly an overzealous Brexit member of staff. But we, we've into Brandon Lewis for confirmation. Philip who was I think the speaker at both our events to Brandon Lewis. I think just in greening who's also going to speak at our event had also has also now sent him a note. We haven't had any reply the any reply. We've had from the party as if by confirmation that it wasn't an accident is an Email saying, we're going to send you your money back. So perhaps a little bit ahead. Three hundred and sixty pounds to the good. But I think it's pretty shocking to the party that has always championed free speech and has had some Frank, you pretty wacky people talking fringe meetings over the years. Twenty conservative party conferences is now basically trying to stop its members going to listen to to people who were until recently ministers talking about probably the biggest issue of the day, indeed getting back to citizens for Britain. What we tell us a bit more about it. Hi, how you get vote in it. Okay. I mean, you know, I, I've been long authority party activist. I stood for parliament and one went to Thailand in two thousand and eight to work and came back in two thousand thirteen. Only to find. We were still as David Cameron would have put it banging on about Europe wasn't going to get particularly involved and then to get involved in the referendum and and having stopped being involved since and after the referendum, we were pretty shocked that so many Tory MP's kinda went. Yeah, they lied. They cheated, but that's politics and what we have to live with. Yeah. And we thought, no, that that's not right MP's in Westminster may think that, but ordinary citizens don't. If you're a company director or a doctor or a teacher, you have ethical standards you have to meet. And if you break them, you lose your job, you might even go to prison. So we don't think it's okay for politicians to have that view, but we realized that a straight anti Brexit message wasn't really very resonating. It struck stroke. People too much is remaining. So we, we did won't you equal citizens for Britain, which was a little bit of a takeoff, all for Britain groups. At the other side, have. And initially we did have a campaign Tories against Brexit and that's still there. And we, we have a few followers, but it's been a little bit to direct for many MP's and it's not great to be just against some. So we launched two months ago as a conservatives flora people's vote. Eight is obviously Stoff primarily by remains, but we don't see any reason why levers might not at some point, also come round to supporting a people's vote because at the end of the day they had a squeaking, the narrow victory won by famines and some foul, and to be honest with the young generation entirely against, they need a little bit more of an endorsement and they don't have it. So even if they win or do you think they're gonna win? They should be supporting it. That presumes of decency that I'm not entirely sure you will find. Well, I have to say you talk about decency. I think all the people who have joined conservatives for people's votes. And I mean, we now have significant support from MEP's from peers and from MP's I think they've all been absolutely taken aback by what the government seems to be doing in terms of censoring the publicity around this fringe meeting, and you know you have to ask, is it part of a pattern? You know you had a government that didn't want parliament to vote on article fifty. The didn't want parliament have a meaningful vote at the end of the process that. Appears possibly to have cheated on pairing that has allowed its MP's even its ministers to slag off the house of lords as an independent source of power..

Brandon Lewis Britain Brexit Moti Philip Europe Frank David Cameron director Thailand sixty pounds two months
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"All you to to food. Hey, me too. I mean, we need, we need a new. We need a new term because not it's just, I think semantics Brexit a very important. I think I'm probably alone in this view, but I think that Brexit only happen because of the word Brexit. I actually think that once they solidified and they came up with a concrete concept which meant leaving the European Union called it Brexit Bennett became more possible in people's minds, and I think that it's almost the same with no deal because no deal is there if you like, then of course, it's okay because people wouldn't be talking about if it wasn't. Okay, obviously, and we need an different phrase identical. That phrase is because I don't know what could possibly can Fay the the shit storm that comes after Brexit, but but something that is not. If okay, game show would be a good start. There was another really weird poll. I thought it said large numbers of people don't care what sort of Brexit forget they just wanted to be done with which is seventy. Five cents believes and forty eight centers remains. But again, I mean just looking at that's forty, eight hundred remain. That's not maybe. No deal is fine. I mean, it just seems like what? What is the point I come into the polling companies, singling them out here, delta delta. But I mean not seems like moronic -ly phrased because of course, if you just, would you like to stop thinking about Brexit? I'm surprised only that number said, yes, please. I mean, most people in the country. Maybe even some people in this room right now. I'm on my hand. I would love to stop thinking about Brexit, but that's not something that you know is going to produce an an interesting poll. We know this is what gives me hope. And I actually think Brexit support is a lot softer than some people make it out to be a lot of people make out to be. I think there is a hardcore Brexit supporters, who would be genuine devastated. We didn't do Brexit. I think the rest would be like, oh, well, whatever. If some, if there was thirty of scenario, and if you came up with a vision for this country that actually improves some of the things I worried about which nobody is bloodied doing because we're so preoccupied with Brexit. We can't tackle all the other stuff. Then people. Oh yeah, we waste. The thing is cost fallacy thing as well going on, which is the sun cross fallacies that if you spent a load of money on something, then you might as well ahead and do it even if it's even if it's a total mistake to do it, and that is yeah. Yeah, exactly. And that is also problem. But if in some way you can persuade people that actually turning back now would not be as expensive as carrying on then. I think I still have hope that we can reverse this thing I still have. Well, it's kind of quiet news, a parliamentary news. We still to fill up the news. Are there for the prospect of no deal to sort of like sits there like third in into lated room. Is this something I, it seems that every every week we come up, you know, there's more talking about more warnings, more pieces of evidence, more industry bodies saying this is going to be awful and they're still doesn't seem to be enough movement against it. Is there anything that we can we can do like to to sort of listeners here to kind of stop people from thinking that no deal is kind of a legitimate solution? Or do you think it's a case of as in said, it's just again as seems to be the case, you just have to wait until I think it's a war of Trish in. I think the more of the stuff that is revealed, a few minds will be changed each time..

Brexit Bennett Brexit delta delta European Union Fay Trish
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"In this situation with brexit is that they you know it's not just they're going to lease since right so that the freedom of movement with that they will also lose their right probably say probably because again you know to fight in local elections and in european elections so they become completely politically disenfranchised and i think that that is one of the things that is prompting people to apply for citizenship in the places that they live because actually the idea of not being able to vote for anything anywhere is quite upsetting to democracies yes and i think that we are seeing a report citation of these british populations living abroad that starts fundamentally clear and i know that you've had i think you've had some of the remain groups and talk about about that but it is quite it's quite remarkable so when we go and we look at these transcripts from the hunt saad reports where british populations overseas have been discussed normally in the overseas votes it's absolutely littered with onto standing on both sides pro know anyone who's pro the overseas fate or against the misunderstandings are rife so you know oh well you know we shouldn't give representation to people who don't pay tax well a lot of british since he live overseas including pensioners he might receive kusuma pensions for example are actually paying tax in the uk say let's just get rid of that one the numbers for the you know they trade on this idea that you know these people who've given so much for the country so they talk about pensioners lot very old people who you know four to no whore something so it's quite it's not it doesn't help the debate i think is what i'm trying to say that those misunderstandings there and that eighty percents of people who are you know of working agent below rarely gets a look in there and i think that really given the extent of the purchased asper and i should say anyone anyone listening thinks copy that many.

brexit uk asper saad
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"That would be very very difficult for all of those mp's here said well it's gonna meet these tests so whatever whatever the bill gets put before the ms is pretty similar to ours but these also say men peace have been going on about yes we need a people's vote and i think you could end up in a situation where you get soft brexit i know people's votes and i think that's a big risk because british people are smart that would be effectively us walking away with all the pay no say which just isn't a sustainable course of action and do we really think that the daily mail on the re smokes of this world are going to keep quiet during a transition period where we're in a soft brexit scenario i don't think they will they will stop and i think we will continue to have this horribly divided country with almost nobody being happy and so soft brexit will yes delay economic disaster but i think also probably delays a hard brexit and and so we have to get we will remain everyone listening to this as a romanian with fighting to stay inside a reformed europe and that means guessing you're mp to vote down the meaningful vote so that we can have a final say on public so yes i'm pleased to see the lord's showing their muscle but i'm also a big concern now that we are getting very comfortably walking tools off breaks that's the funny part is those allowances come in there will be more if there's progress though they'll be more divisions in because i instinctively don't agree with anything to send my thing is you you try whenever presented with any kind of uncertain scenario i want to get the best possible worst outcome i want to get rid of the most pernicious dangerous so you get rid of no deal when i assume brexit's happening so you get rid of the most dangerous parts of extends singlemarket stand the customs union and that quite conservative strategy is very different to your high risk strategy which is we'll go to the vote and then we would basically be able to sort of.

europe brexit
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"If you want to say that jeremy kobe was a bit leftwing now hof your audience ago well he's not really and you go wow i can't even do a really basic privately level gag and it kinda tells you hands behind your back doing anything more nuance than that and you end up just reaching who's fat news thin and it's not much fun so you also co roads those two books about some of the strange and less visited tourist attraction brexit then far from the southern crowd bolivar talents brexit and the reason i ask is we're now to get the brexit museum who experts on this what do you think should be worshipped let's go from the star shall we right if i can't think of three words more likely to make me want to ralph up a fucking is the museum of sovereignty revolting nick clegg again this huma fails well you should put the you should put the just bus in the in the full might not being funny about that was a fucking live we rule so let's stop joking about it with something unique series in can giggly into the sea cooks thing go what we're going the museum of so what it should be the millennium it should be a lot of discussion about what goes in there and then nothing should go in it should go in there and it should just be a monument to committee thinking somebody from open britain's suggested one of the prime exhibit should be boris johnson's lost moral compass.

jeremy kobe brexit museum nick clegg britain boris johnson
"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"brexit" Discussed on Remainiacs – the Brexit Podcast

"Is that for me if you look at what we export to europe and other places actually food and drink is very low even though scott whiskey is the pricing big or not surprising neat benny looked food is a really small proportion manufacturing farmer all these things much much bigger but symbolically it's hugely important and that's why you find everyone even quite ardent brexit is getting a pooled at the idea that people might be able to make a pass st that we called cordish when it isn't and the it's it's very it's it's it's one of the things that does cut through with brexit here's and that's why i have a little bit of kind of hope maybe that this might be one of the things even that that changes people's minds because food cut through in a way that when you talk about farmer exports it doesn't all supply chains it doesn't know for food nationalism exactly nationalism what larry things is that you know in the heartlands of brexit the the one thing that will suddenly very upset about is that it's going to mean the removal of the certificates in systems that define products as being geographic significance all recipe significance after personally i've always lose what bollocks because misunderstanding of how food his food history works the idea that there's a defined recipe for anything is complete cobblers but so you've got these out and brexit here's who are who are deeply worried about the loss of this tippett's from melton mowbray pulled pies what's interesting also is that you know you'd think the brexit as if the head any principles would now be saying look the has all these faults even j rainey's has a long list of faults remain with the we can sweep all that away what we will do is we'll go for an american style system of insurance we will stop paying rich landowners just to land and actually stopped taxing them which you know paps many people.

scott whiskey benny tippett melton mowbray europe j rainey