19 Burst results for "Brewster Kahle"

"brewster kahle" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

02:51 min | 10 months ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on This Week In Google

"A big update oldies. They love it a teased it last month. But now it's it's ready to go So you create videos and editing videos and you get to maximize the power of 'em one and Do some some video stabilization right there inside the app wanna on a ipad is pretty pretty on. It's a paid app. I think to abbas thirty bucks. I believe But you get all the updates after that. So yeah it's worth worth a look and lastly make sure you go check out the wanderers photo workshop workshop. I'll be teaching at here in october. down in new orleans go to wanders photo dot com and sign up to hang out with myself mississippi brazo freddie clock in andrus viney. We're going to be doing a hang out here pretty soon. Virtual hang out or just going to sit back and chitchat and drink some whisky and talk about photography. And other get into know you kind of stuff. Things twit dot tv slash up from mr pruitt and the fabulous hands on photography. I've got two picks for you. One from ways which is a google product and i give credit to Paul for coming up with this one. If you go to my ways you can now drive with master chief. There's a halo time. So there's a master chief voice or you could be this scar. You can also do the your car could be award hog or the ghost and you can have turn by turn directions for master chief and i'll give you an idea of how they sound. Let's let's Let's go home here. We'll have have Have have this nick navigate home safe if i got the sound on Turn up the sound. Come on master chief where ready to roll dry turn left and then turn right. Okay so mind. Yeah master chief. Nice when i first turn it on. He's made some comments about my car. And then the and then the second pick Which just came from the chat room internet archive. We love the internet archive. This is their twenty fifth anniversary year. And of course. We'll talk about that later in the year when they actually hit twenty-five but thank you brewster kahle for creating the internet archive nice. They have remastered the first four hours of mtv. So you can you can watch mtv. Go live is my sound coming through here. It is the rockets. You could play this down..

andrus viney mr pruitt abbas new orleans mississippi Paul google nick brewster kahle mtv
"brewster kahle" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

15:08 min | 1 year ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Welcome to the show. . Thank you. . You're on the Internet Archive. . What does the Internet archive do. . That's a great question. . Deterrent archive is the world's largest digital library, , and whereas most people may know of us because of the way back machine, , which is this really rather needs tool that allows you to go back in time and kind of see what web pages used to look like. . We really are fully-fledged online is the library and that we have different types of media types. . We hold texts and television and audio images, , movies, , all sorts of things and yeah, , the introduce archive you can think of as this huge repository of Internet. . When did you start working there? ? I started here in two thousand sixteen. . So. We've . been yeah for years. . And what do you work on their today? ? Well, , I work on the books. . That's mostly what I would I have always been on. . I'm spending the bits inside of this. . So usually when we think about our media types, , we think of in terms of bits and bits out how we procured them, , and how we distribute them. . My specialty is working on the book bits in saw in order to build up our collection of almost four million books we have Candan, , and my job is to sort of keep running the whole pipeline that allows us to do that. . So over the last four years, , we've my team, , I built it. . And now we achieved over our objective of being able to digitize million books per year which we're doing, , and it's pretty interesting challenge so far. . So you work on book digitisation and I WanNa talk about that. But . first, , let's talk more about the Internet archive at a high level. . He told me about what is being stored across the Internet archive and who pays for it, , and how do people use it just share a little bit more about the Internet Archive. . Yeah. . That's a great question. . So I'm going to start from a WHO pays for it because I think that's the result of depth and that question Internet Archive. . If you think about it as a repository, , it's just essentially a bunch of hard drives spinning connected to the Internet. . Somebody's GONNA. . Pay For both danger and connection and hard drives and the electricity and all of that largely you can think. . Of of our revenues in treated front weight. . So we're a nonprofit and we don't really run for profit businesses. . We don't benefit in any way of the data that comes on on our servers. . We do benefit from your donations and so by and large, , we are a community funded effort, , and so if you type slash donate, , we actually just added integration with apple pay so people will not help us. . That'd be great. . So we receive a fair amount of money that we we need to run from patrons, , Cintas like people who supported us. . On the side, , we do have some some small some businesses. . So we have our archive it. . Our arm where essentially contract alto were machine capabilities and we we are maintaining a very large amount of curated website collections. . In fact, , we I, , think we have about seven hundred can ization that are that are partnering with us to create these collections and if you tens of billions euros that have been collected for for our partners, , and so they pay us to do the service and we do it for them and same is true for books. . digitisation. . So as we have built up to large infrastructure that is required to do this kind of tasks, , we have to an extent, , the ability to contract out to third parties, , and so we do get some <hes> some revenue streams that way not anything particularly substantial in terms of like our ability to to sustain ourselves. . But you know every little bit helps and then obviously throughout the twenty twenty, , five years of our existence, , our founder Brewster Kahle has. . Chipped in here in Deir a significant amount, , I guess over the years to to keep us running. . So we have donations we have a little bit of our non for profit business, , and then we have brewster who is there so This is in terms of who pays for it, , but the question would be I guess who benefits from it. . Right and that's a very, , very large segment of the Internet. . We're not the biggest website on the Internet. . They think we are. . We're ranking about two hundred and something the Alexa rank. . But since we've been around for a long time, , the users that that lovers the Lavas like I, , every day I am in contact with people who tell me their story about how they use the Internet archive for their specific need always always amazed by the depth and breadth of. . The of the use cases user spring to us. . So it it spans from teachers to researchers, , journalists to lawyers Theresa very, , very large diversity also in terms of the country's from the backgrounds from from when users from. . So it's kind of hard to to to paint them with the same brush but in general I want to say they are people who have some degree of laugh for knowledge and you may know our our motto, , our slogan our mission is Universal Access to all knowledge, , and so I guess people who have an interest in that eventually land on on our website. . Okay. . Well, , let's talk about book digitisation as a particular project that is under the auspices of the Internet Archive. . What is book digitisation? ? So, , books digitisation is the effort of transforming physical books into digital artifacts. . So that's the definition can take it forms. . You know if you are if you have a scanner in your home and your scanning document in a way, , that's obviously that's digitisation if you take pictures of the book. . That's a book book digitization. . So the definition that needs to be applied to the use case at hand, , there have been other efforts at large scale of books. . This decision famously Google had one but dare. . Different From Ours, for , instance, , where they did distractive digitisation so they would pull the spines from books and and turn dot process into a <hes> sort of sensitive. . Kind of problem we do non destructive book dissertation and I think non-destructive bit. . It's just a little bit as important in the Beth nation as the fact that we're these books digitizing them so that we can keep them so that we don't destroy them. . So the process by which we turn books into bits and then returned books to wherever they came from or wherever they need to go. . So Why would I want to digitize a book and how many books get digitized each day just tell me more about the volume that's going through this. . I'm very happy to answer this. . So the reason why you would want to digitize book there's multiple. . So think about for instance, , the first thing that comes to mind is obviously preservation if famous birtherism is that accessibility drives preservation so if you don't have something. . It's almost like it doesn't exist especially in this age of information, , we do have immediate access to all of all of these resources and so if we if you actually think about this, , if you have to go to the library to to procure a certain book chances are you won't, , and if the if the record of that book actually doesn't exist, , you may never get to it and were. . This is a problem is for all of this huge amount of books that were printed in the twentieth century for which there is really no digital equivalent books nowadays that are published like currently obviously, , they have a book artifacts. . That stuff is not to get lost. . and. . That stuff is searchable and it's reachable but we have. . Tens of millions of books that are unaccounted for and as time progresses getting lost, , and if we if somebody doesn't save them, , they will be lost forever and that's that would be a pity and huge loss of human effort and so but first of all, , I think important to scope the problem I think the D estimates that there is about one hundred, , million books out there. . Give or take unique unique books and. . Scanning them we're, , probably not gonNA scan all all one hundred of them first of all because. . You would be able to source and that's my fire the hardest thing. . So we tried to scope down the problem and trying to figure out. . Okay. . How can we do this in a way that is useful for people so first of all, , I think we had to come up with a list of books that we wanted to get into we knew. . Books that are important and we need to can these first so that? ? We'll. . We'll get. . We'll get into to people and this will be evidently immediately useful and a good place for us to start was freaky Pedia, , which is collected. . A long list of SPN's the where commonly cited in Wikipedia compiled the list came out to a few hundred, , thousand books, , and so whenever we we come upon one of those sourcing process, , we make sure that we get. . We can talk about the senator sourcing, , Proxima, , little bit later but in general, , we do have a little bit of a concept of priority or at least we did this was the first million million and a half. . And then the problem was that we started running out of books you would be surprised how hard it is to source books by by the half a million you know and if you if you do it by your smaller scale, , it doesn't really make sense to to us in terms of maintaining our our economic scale. . So the whole system works only if you scan at huge volume and time and but huge volume, , we're talking about a million bucks a year, , which is about three thousand books day some things some days we'll do thirty, , five somedays. . We'll do twenty five on a seven days week averages houses about. . Between Twenty to twenty, twenty, , , five, , thousand books. . Every book is about three hundred pages so that. . COMES OUT PRETTY NEAT about million million pages per day five to seven million pages per week and you know that's not a huge amount of data in total. . I wouldn't be surprised I. think . like last time I checked it was about between ten and fifteen terabytes of data week. . So we're not talking about huge amounts but it's not a small amount eater and we can talk about the challenges of Piping data over the Internet in a reliable way later but it's a significant volume and this operation is running you know twenty, , four seven. . And so. . In terms of why even do this? ? So I called for the first part, which , is obviously people want to get to the books. . There is a second benefit in having digitize books, , and that it's a wholly new format, , it allows you to interact with the body of knowledge in a way that you never have before if you have. . A physical book artifact, , it has some very desirable properties, , for instance, , very low random access time and doesn't depend on the battery. . It's very, , very hard to censor, , and these are not properties of digital artifact but this is the active factor searchable, , and in fact that we have like it's pretty amazing next search engine where you can instantly search all forty million text items that we have. . So that's a million books plus all of the patents papers I'll all sorts of stuff and you can search that instantly that was just not possible with the previous format. . So I don't think this is dwell ISM in any way I think books. . Digital format and books their physical format will continue to coexist. . They just help each other out, , and in fact, , if we are able to digitize them in the first place is because of the properties of. . Physical artifacts that they don't just disappear. . If we find one, , we can scan it. . Well. . Those are great summary of what you do and I can tell how excited you are about it. . Let's talk a little bit more about the high level, , and then we'll get into the engineering. . So can you describe the steps of digitisation in more detail if I have a book how am I digitized it? ? Yeah. . So, , the books that position pipeline is predecing people and it's like in a way if you're an engineer I think is kind of what to expect so I D-. . A physical sorting. . Step where your book is ingested into the system. . It's given ID and it's it's placed in a container. . So we know that the the exists. . So to speak the second step is it gets to a scanner. . The scanner picks it up within the in the machine loads up the data necessary whereby The books method data we can. . We're going to have to talk about that. . I, , guess it's pretty interesting facet of it all and then proceeded to actually scan it, , which means they turned the pages page by page and they take pictures of the pages, , and once this process done they click upload and the book vanishes into the ether and so at this point, , we have a fork the digital artifact goes into our servers divisible artifacts either goes back to the person who gave it to us in the first place or it goes into our warehouse. . and. . This largely depends on what kind of book it is. . So obviously, , the recent larger conversation to be had about copyright and like what books is it is it okay to scan and under what guys it is but suppose we are just you know scanning Yearbook Jeff and you you just wrote the book and you want to have it digitized to risk no claim on it just wanted back at the end. . So after we're done scanning it, , we're handing it back to you with slip inside which will tell you the Internet archive identifier and the. . Or is just the name of the item on the Internet Archive. . Everything is an item and you're just going go to type slash details, , slash your identifier and <hes> a few hours. . Later, , you will find her book. . Wile you wait the second part of the pipeline is GONNA kick off. . So That's the digital server side stuff and it's divided essentially three phases. . We have a first phase which it's a preprocessing stage where we get a look this images that came raw from the camera we'll look at them crop firm we discovered them and we just make sure that everything is is ready to go. . There was a second phase of Manual Review Sa- currently all books that we upload have to be checked by a human for correctness, , and so this is a step were. . Reviewer just goes through the images in shorts that everything is fine and then when this is done, , they kick off the third stage of the pipeline, , which is A. . Is the real processing stage where we take all of these files and compiled them in such a way that they are suitable for consumption by our web front end what we call book reader and from their wheel derive. . We call them to rotate formats such as PDF, , Abi e POB and either a text file. . So CR it all happens at at this stage. . This is kind of like the bird I view of the of the books that decision pipeline. .

Internet Archive Brewster Kahle Cintas Candan Alexa Google twenty twenty apple senator Theresa Wikipedia founder
Internet Archive Book Scanning with Davide Semenzin

Software Engineering Daily

15:08 min | 1 year ago

Internet Archive Book Scanning with Davide Semenzin

"Welcome to the show. Thank you. You're on the Internet Archive. What does the Internet archive do. That's a great question. Deterrent archive is the world's largest digital library, and whereas most people may know of us because of the way back machine, which is this really rather needs tool that allows you to go back in time and kind of see what web pages used to look like. We really are fully-fledged online is the library and that we have different types of media types. We hold texts and television and audio images, movies, all sorts of things and yeah, the introduce archive you can think of as this huge repository of Internet. When did you start working there? I started here in two thousand sixteen. So. We've been yeah for years. And what do you work on their today? Well, I work on the books. That's mostly what I would I have always been on. I'm spending the bits inside of this. So usually when we think about our media types, we think of in terms of bits and bits out how we procured them, and how we distribute them. My specialty is working on the book bits in saw in order to build up our collection of almost four million books we have Candan, and my job is to sort of keep running the whole pipeline that allows us to do that. So over the last four years, we've my team, I built it. And now we achieved over our objective of being able to digitize million books per year which we're doing, and it's pretty interesting challenge so far. So you work on book digitisation and I WanNa talk about that. But first, let's talk more about the Internet archive at a high level. He told me about what is being stored across the Internet archive and who pays for it, and how do people use it just share a little bit more about the Internet Archive. Yeah. That's a great question. So I'm going to start from a WHO pays for it because I think that's the result of depth and that question Internet Archive. If you think about it as a repository, it's just essentially a bunch of hard drives spinning connected to the Internet. Somebody's GONNA. Pay For both danger and connection and hard drives and the electricity and all of that largely you can think. Of of our revenues in treated front weight. So we're a nonprofit and we don't really run for profit businesses. We don't benefit in any way of the data that comes on on our servers. We do benefit from your donations and so by and large, we are a community funded effort, and so if you type slash donate, we actually just added integration with apple pay so people will not help us. That'd be great. So we receive a fair amount of money that we we need to run from patrons, Cintas like people who supported us. On the side, we do have some some small some businesses. So we have our archive it. Our arm where essentially contract alto were machine capabilities and we we are maintaining a very large amount of curated website collections. In fact, we I, think we have about seven hundred can ization that are that are partnering with us to create these collections and if you tens of billions euros that have been collected for for our partners, and so they pay us to do the service and we do it for them and same is true for books. digitisation. So as we have built up to large infrastructure that is required to do this kind of tasks, we have to an extent, the ability to contract out to third parties, and so we do get some some revenue streams that way not anything particularly substantial in terms of like our ability to to sustain ourselves. But you know every little bit helps and then obviously throughout the twenty twenty, five years of our existence, our founder Brewster Kahle has. Chipped in here in Deir a significant amount, I guess over the years to to keep us running. So we have donations we have a little bit of our non for profit business, and then we have brewster who is there so This is in terms of who pays for it, but the question would be I guess who benefits from it. Right and that's a very, very large segment of the Internet. We're not the biggest website on the Internet. They think we are. We're ranking about two hundred and something the Alexa rank. But since we've been around for a long time, the users that that lovers the Lavas like I, every day I am in contact with people who tell me their story about how they use the Internet archive for their specific need always always amazed by the depth and breadth of. The of the use cases user spring to us. So it it spans from teachers to researchers, journalists to lawyers Theresa very, very large diversity also in terms of the country's from the backgrounds from from when users from. So it's kind of hard to to to paint them with the same brush but in general I want to say they are people who have some degree of laugh for knowledge and you may know our our motto, our slogan our mission is Universal Access to all knowledge, and so I guess people who have an interest in that eventually land on on our website. Okay. Well, let's talk about book digitisation as a particular project that is under the auspices of the Internet Archive. What is book digitisation? So, books digitisation is the effort of transforming physical books into digital artifacts. So that's the definition can take it forms. You know if you are if you have a scanner in your home and your scanning document in a way, that's obviously that's digitisation if you take pictures of the book. That's a book book digitization. So the definition that needs to be applied to the use case at hand, there have been other efforts at large scale of books. This decision famously Google had one but dare. Different From Ours, for instance, where they did distractive digitisation so they would pull the spines from books and and turn dot process into a sort of sensitive. Kind of problem we do non destructive book dissertation and I think non-destructive bit. It's just a little bit as important in the Beth nation as the fact that we're these books digitizing them so that we can keep them so that we don't destroy them. So the process by which we turn books into bits and then returned books to wherever they came from or wherever they need to go. So Why would I want to digitize a book and how many books get digitized each day just tell me more about the volume that's going through this. I'm very happy to answer this. So the reason why you would want to digitize book there's multiple. So think about for instance, the first thing that comes to mind is obviously preservation if famous birtherism is that accessibility drives preservation so if you don't have something. It's almost like it doesn't exist especially in this age of information, we do have immediate access to all of all of these resources and so if we if you actually think about this, if you have to go to the library to to procure a certain book chances are you won't, and if the if the record of that book actually doesn't exist, you may never get to it and were. This is a problem is for all of this huge amount of books that were printed in the twentieth century for which there is really no digital equivalent books nowadays that are published like currently obviously, they have a book artifacts. That stuff is not to get lost. and. That stuff is searchable and it's reachable but we have. Tens of millions of books that are unaccounted for and as time progresses getting lost, and if we if somebody doesn't save them, they will be lost forever and that's that would be a pity and huge loss of human effort and so but first of all, I think important to scope the problem I think the D estimates that there is about one hundred, million books out there. Give or take unique unique books and. Scanning them we're, probably not gonNA scan all all one hundred of them first of all because. You would be able to source and that's my fire the hardest thing. So we tried to scope down the problem and trying to figure out. Okay. How can we do this in a way that is useful for people so first of all, I think we had to come up with a list of books that we wanted to get into we knew. Books that are important and we need to can these first so that? We'll. We'll get. We'll get into to people and this will be evidently immediately useful and a good place for us to start was freaky Pedia, which is collected. A long list of SPN's the where commonly cited in Wikipedia compiled the list came out to a few hundred, thousand books, and so whenever we we come upon one of those sourcing process, we make sure that we get. We can talk about the senator sourcing, Proxima, little bit later but in general, we do have a little bit of a concept of priority or at least we did this was the first million million and a half. And then the problem was that we started running out of books you would be surprised how hard it is to source books by by the half a million you know and if you if you do it by your smaller scale, it doesn't really make sense to to us in terms of maintaining our our economic scale. So the whole system works only if you scan at huge volume and time and but huge volume, we're talking about a million bucks a year, which is about three thousand books day some things some days we'll do thirty, five somedays. We'll do twenty five on a seven days week averages houses about. Between Twenty to twenty, twenty, five, thousand books. Every book is about three hundred pages so that. COMES OUT PRETTY NEAT about million million pages per day five to seven million pages per week and you know that's not a huge amount of data in total. I wouldn't be surprised I. think like last time I checked it was about between ten and fifteen terabytes of data week. So we're not talking about huge amounts but it's not a small amount eater and we can talk about the challenges of Piping data over the Internet in a reliable way later but it's a significant volume and this operation is running you know twenty, four seven. And so. In terms of why even do this? So I called for the first part, which is obviously people want to get to the books. There is a second benefit in having digitize books, and that it's a wholly new format, it allows you to interact with the body of knowledge in a way that you never have before if you have. A physical book artifact, it has some very desirable properties, for instance, very low random access time and doesn't depend on the battery. It's very, very hard to censor, and these are not properties of digital artifact but this is the active factor searchable, and in fact that we have like it's pretty amazing next search engine where you can instantly search all forty million text items that we have. So that's a million books plus all of the patents papers I'll all sorts of stuff and you can search that instantly that was just not possible with the previous format. So I don't think this is dwell ISM in any way I think books. Digital format and books their physical format will continue to coexist. They just help each other out, and in fact, if we are able to digitize them in the first place is because of the properties of. Physical artifacts that they don't just disappear. If we find one, we can scan it. Well. Those are great summary of what you do and I can tell how excited you are about it. Let's talk a little bit more about the high level, and then we'll get into the engineering. So can you describe the steps of digitisation in more detail if I have a book how am I digitized it? Yeah. So, the books that position pipeline is predecing people and it's like in a way if you're an engineer I think is kind of what to expect so I D-. A physical sorting. Step where your book is ingested into the system. It's given ID and it's it's placed in a container. So we know that the the exists. So to speak the second step is it gets to a scanner. The scanner picks it up within the in the machine loads up the data necessary whereby The books method data we can. We're going to have to talk about that. I, guess it's pretty interesting facet of it all and then proceeded to actually scan it, which means they turned the pages page by page and they take pictures of the pages, and once this process done they click upload and the book vanishes into the ether and so at this point, we have a fork the digital artifact goes into our servers divisible artifacts either goes back to the person who gave it to us in the first place or it goes into our warehouse. and. This largely depends on what kind of book it is. So obviously, the recent larger conversation to be had about copyright and like what books is it is it okay to scan and under what guys it is but suppose we are just you know scanning Yearbook Jeff and you you just wrote the book and you want to have it digitized to risk no claim on it just wanted back at the end. So after we're done scanning it, we're handing it back to you with slip inside which will tell you the Internet archive identifier and the. Or is just the name of the item on the Internet Archive. Everything is an item and you're just going go to type slash details, slash your identifier and a few hours. Later, you will find her book. Wile you wait the second part of the pipeline is GONNA kick off. So That's the digital server side stuff and it's divided essentially three phases. We have a first phase which it's a preprocessing stage where we get a look this images that came raw from the camera we'll look at them crop firm we discovered them and we just make sure that everything is is ready to go. There was a second phase of Manual Review Sa- currently all books that we upload have to be checked by a human for correctness, and so this is a step were. Reviewer just goes through the images in shorts that everything is fine and then when this is done, they kick off the third stage of the pipeline, which is A. Is the real processing stage where we take all of these files and compiled them in such a way that they are suitable for consumption by our web front end what we call book reader and from their wheel derive. We call them to rotate formats such as PDF, Abi e POB and either a text file. So CR it all happens at at this stage. This is kind of like the bird I view of the of the books that decision pipeline.

Internet Archive Twenty Twenty Brewster Kahle Cintas Internet Google Alexa Candan Apple Theresa Manual Review Sa Senator Wikipedia Founder Engineer
"brewster kahle" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"But he's the guy that figure out how to get video to actually work on the net, and they invented the protocols like RTSP and other protocols that are currently being used to to stream and form the basis for things like like SIP is protocol used for Internet Telephone Calls and so they they really were the folks that started it all and what I was doing. I was just watching what they were doing and they were the ones I called when I couldn't get. Get the lines working at the Lincoln Center. For example, it was van Jacobson sitting out in California that when tap tap tap tap tap on his computer and he said Oh, you have a limit on your router on port number three type this in and it'll all work. Right. You know he was the guy that could sit there thousand miles away in like figure out what you were doing wrong So they made an amazing contribution. This was a time when it wasn't just audio. Applications. Were starting to happen on the Internet. So the Internet had been a place that was email and and file transfer protocol but you know Tim. Burners. Lee was sitting in in in Switzerland and invented this thing called the web and when I saw the way bus at asked never going to work, it will never scale. But you know turns out really did work a brewster Kahle had invented the first search engine on called ways which was used to do searches of bases on the Internet, and he actually sold that AOL, and that's how he got his first money to move onto. You know what? What ended up being the Internet archive at the end of that path. Electronic Mail went all multimedia because before that it was not international. So things like you know accents on your name or not possible, right? You couldn't have an e with an accent. Images in your email, you couldn't have html in your email, and so the folks that were doing email protocols develop that significant changes in the domain name system with people like Paul Vicky, Paul Maka petuous and others that were kind of pioneers in that area, and so they were building the infrastructure that allowed the Internet to scale exponentially for a period of twenty years after that and without that fundamental underpinning. Wouldn't have worked, and in fact, there was another Internet in those days. It was called open systems interconnection. and. It's what what the big boys thought was going to be the future of the net. It's what the telephone companies and the, International. Standards Organization and IBM, and the US defense. Department they thought that was gonna be the net that we would use, and that telephone companies would would sell you services on an example. That is, is SMS texting, which was twenty cents a text, and that was their model of the Internet..

van Jacobson brewster Kahle Internet Lincoln Center IBM Paul Maka petuous Switzerland US AOL Lee Paul Vicky California Tim
"brewster kahle" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"Think it was low power, but there was actually an NPR station on campus as well, and so I spent some time over there we had a lot of famous people coming to campus, and so I recorded interviews with a whole bunch of like famous poets and put those online a online on the radio. We weren't online in those days. This is nineteen eighty raiders. Seven seventy, five, seventy yeah. Yeah. So, early on I mean, I did it. It was fun. It was my minor I've learned a little bit about radio. I don't know how good I was. But but I learned a little bit about it. So I had some interest in college. I didn't do that. I didn't join the local radio station. Indiana University, but But I had some early exposure to. It if. If it's all right. and. Eric. Could I ask a question? Please please. It's more than all right android. Two questions related going back to the to the Internet multitasking service days. and. That sort of period from ninety, three to ninety six. When you were active there with Internet radio, I guess The first is just you know what? What would you say? You're most proud of maybe even particularly beyond the larger kind of apparatus. Were there any particular program or channel or? Or even interview that you did that you think is just really stands out in your memory as being a. Particularly of standout moment that you're, you're still to this day. Well, Press Club was amazing I mean press club. I was Larry King. It was. It was Al. Gore was the Dalai Lama. I got to see Salman Rushdie. You know because he had just broken his his quarantine after the after the issues with Iran. Yeah. The choir, and so he showed up at the Press Club to do an interview I. Happened to be there and I brought my recorder up and interview in and recorded him so I was. Was Very pleased that Harper audio worked out great We help get the Kennedy Center online with original programming and that was again Mardi Lucas, a Lotta that heavy lifting, but but getting them online with great. I was also pretty proud of Geek of the week, which was a big stretch for me because I wasn't like a radio guy and I was talking to a lot of people who are very technical and not necessarily reaching out to a general audience. So the fact we were actually able to do. Those interviews with people that many of them brewster Kahle and Tim. Burners Lee and others ended up like going places. So, now, it was fun doing it getting my congressional press credentials..

Salman Rushdie Press Club raiders brewster Kahle NPR Harper audio Larry King Mardi Lucas Indiana University Eric Lee Gore Kennedy Center Iran Tim
"brewster kahle" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"And I wanted to do it. We even had a twenty four by seven rock and roll station on the Internet because we actually got a BMI provisional license and because they DMI's organization. Songwriter's royalties. And because they didn't know what the Internet was I, I was able to, basically you know demand that they give me a public radio. Streaming, and so we were we were doing live streaming rock and roll, but it was very clear that was going to be a very small audience whereas the time shifting thing, the record it to disc. Let people listen to it when they want had a substantial effect, and like I said, there were hundreds of people listening to of the week episodes. Even today I'm getting hundreds of people per week listening to. Internet archive, right. This is all still available for folks. Thank you to the amazing people, of course at the Internet Archive. Still a little known. Sorry I then I'm sorry to cut you off brewster. Kahle who runs the Internet archive came up to me and nineteen ninety-six instant Carl I want to archive the. Web. And I was like, okay. Well, that's pretty ambitious even in those days and he goes, well, do you have any hardware and I happen to have a tape jukebox that we use for the Securities Exchange Commission data and I didn't need it anymore because the SEC was online and so I gave brewster first hardware. For what ended up becoming the Internet Archive. So I, I've known burster for ages and ages. I love the work. He does. He is an amazing story of someone dedicating his winnings from dot com where he did very well. To a life of public service and he is built something. Just amazing. Absolutely amazing. A whole different scale than I. Operate at. I mean, this is major league. Andrew, did you have a question the? Answer. Andrew Bottomley. I was just going to say Carlos. It's interesting that you're saying right there that you're most proud of the a synchronous radio. Time, shifted that you are doing from ninety, three and ninety four. I think if I'm not mistaken, it was January ninety five when you started doing the live streaming. With the RTFM in the music program that you're talking about and funny enough. Right. That's really for the rest of the nineties, most folks who were working in the Internet radio or streaming audio space we're doing steph. Live streamed I. mean there was some programming that was like archives online for for later listening but. Most of it until really the early two thousands when people like Dave winer come along with you know audio blogging that became casting. You know it was..

Internet archive Andrew Bottomley brewster SEC Carl DMI Dave winer Kahle Carlos
"brewster kahle" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Extrapolate up these tech headlines for the week that was. CISCO CEO Chuck Robbins, announcing a YouTube video that the company would postponed Cisco Live, which was scheduled to start Wednesday this week. Robin said that people across the US and the world are dealing with so much pain. Frustration and anger wants to give you space this week to do what you need to do within your own organizations and communities. Sony says postponing its playstation five event as well. That was scheduled for Thursday June fourth due to the ongoing protests, companies official account tweeted while we understand gamers, worldwide or excited to see PS. Five Games. We do not feel that right. Now is a time for a celebration, and for now we went to stand back and allow more important voices to be heard. So. He didn't give details on new date for the PS five event. EA also delayed its madden NFL. twenty-one events scheduled for Tuesday and Google delayed its android eleven Beta announcement. Zing announce agreed to by the Turkish mobile gamemaker peak in a deal worth one point eight billion dollars. The deal will provide Zingo with popular puzzle games tune blast and toy blast. An estimated to grows and daily active users by sixty percent largely through its expanded international audience Zinger previously. Bought Peaks Mobile Card Game Studio in twenty seventeen from one hundred million dollars. The financial. Times reports that tracking APP maker Tile has sent a letter to Europe's competition commissioner, asking for an investigation into apple tile complains that apple made tracking default off for tracking APPS, but leaves it on for Apple's owned find my app tile also complained that APP store placement. An apple stopped selling the towel tags apple stores. Apple denies allegations of uncompetitive behaviour. Tireless filed similar complaints in the US. The New York Times reports a lawsuit filed on behalf of Publishers Hatchet. Harpercollins, John, Wiley and sons and penguin random, house is suing the Internet archive over its library free e books, claiming the Internet should not be allowed to have one point three million titles up for free for anyone to download previously available to borrow at a time in March the Internet archive lifted that restriction to serve displaced learners amidst the coronavirus pandemic Internet archive founder Brewster Kahle has fended the Internet archive's actions, saying it was practically acting as a digital library when public libraries inaccessible and any author who wants to work taken down can get in touch with the organization. On zooms earning call CEO Eric Yoon said true end to end encryption will only roll out for paid users of Zoom Zoom previously described. It serves as having an encryption, though an actually provided transport encryption which protects the calls, but leaves the possibility that Jim could see the data if they wanted to. That kind of lesser encryption will remain for Free Accounts Yoon said the stronger end corruption would not be provided to free users because the company wants to work together with FBI with local law enforcement. In case, some people use them for a bad purpose. Zoom advisor Alex. stamos clarified that organizations a free business plan like schools will also get an end encryption. Nine to five. Mac obtained an early bill. Fourteen includes a translator built into safari till it, users choose to translate any web page or automatically translate. Other languages are detected. Translation is also being tested with APPs like the APP store for descriptions, the translations happened locally so no Internet connection would be needed nine to five. Mac also found full support for Apple. Pencil input on websites I was fourteen. We'll be introduced ww, DC June twenty second. Google confirmed its rolling out. Support for lending featured snippets from search after testing the feature for years when using Google search that shows a snippet of content. Clicking on that snip will load the page automatically scrolled down to that snippet with the tax highlighted. Google says no markup is needed by webmasters enable the feature and browsers that don't support the feature. We'll simply load the page normally. Snapchat made a decision to stop promoting the president of the United States is snapchat account in the discover tab or snapchat chooses to highlight post from celebrities and influencers in a statement snapped, told the verge the decision was made because the president's tweets promoted violence. President Snapchat Post will remain available in search and those who followed the account directly. In an emailed. Technica, instagram stated that does not provide a copyright license display embedded images on websites to users of its embedding API. Company company says that while their terms of service allow them to grant sub licenses. Our Platform Policies require third parties to have the necessary rights from applicable rightsholders. Instagram says it's exploring the possibility of giving users more control over photograph and bedding. Currently users can only block embedding by taking account private. And finally facebook is rolling labels that identify media that is state controlled owned. Those will no longer be able to buy advertisements on facebook in the US starting this summer. facebook used outside experts to classify state controlled media based on multiple factors. Outlets can appeal the label if they feel. It was applied by mistake..

apple United States Google facebook instagram CEO Internet archive Mac Eric Yoon CISCO Sony YouTube gamemaker peak Robin president official Snapchat Post Chuck Robbins
"brewster kahle" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Extrapolate up these tech headlines for the week that was. CISCO CEO Chuck Robbins announcing a Youtube video that the company would postponed Cisco Live, which was scheduled to start Wednesday this week. Robin said that people across the US and the world are dealing with so much pain. Frustration and anger wants to give you space this week to do what you need to do within your own organizations and communities. Sony says postponing its playstation five event as well. That was scheduled for Thursday June fourth due to the ongoing protests, companies official account tweeted while we understand gamers, worldwide or excited to see PS. Five Games. We do not feel that right now is a time for a celebration, and for now we went to stand back and allow more important voices to be heard. So. He didn't give details on new date for the PS five event. EA also delayed its madden NFL. twenty-one events scheduled for Tuesday. And Google delayed its android eleven Beta announcement. Zing announce agreed to by the Turkish mobile gamemaker peak in a deal worth one point eight billion dollars. The deal will provide Zingo with popular puzzle games tune, blast and toy blast, an estimated to grows and daily active users by sixty percent largely through its expanded international. Audience Zinger previously bought peaks. Mobile Card game studio in twenty seventeen from one hundred million dollars. The Financial Times reports that tracking APP maker. Tile has sent a letter to Europe's competition commissioner, asking for an investigation into apple tile complains that apple made tracking default off for tracking APPS, but leaves it on for Apple's owned find my app tile also complained that APP store placement. An apple stopped selling the towel tags apple stores. Apple denies allegations of uncompetitive behaviour. Tireless filed similar complaints in the US. The New York Times reports a lawsuit filed on behalf of Publishers Hatchet Harpercollins. John Wiley and sons and penguin random. House is suing the Internet archive over its library. Free e books, claiming the Internet should not be allowed to have one point three million titles up for free for anyone to download previously available to borrow at a time in March. The Internet archive lifted that restriction to serve displaced learners amidst the coronavirus pandemic Internet archive founder Brewster Kahle has ended the Internet archive's actions, saying it was practically acting as a digital library when public libraries inaccessible and any author who wants to work taken down can get in touch with the organization. On zooms earning call CEO Eric. Yoon said true end to end encryption will only roll out for paid users of Zoom Zoom. Previously described it serves as having an encryption, though an actually provided transport encryption which protects the calls, but leaves the possibility that Jim could see the data if they wanted to. That kind of lesser encryption will remain for free accounts, Yoon said the stronger end corruption would not be provided to free users because the company wants to work together with FBI with local law enforcement. In case, some people use them for a bad purpose. Zoom advisor Alex Stamos clarified that organizations. A free business plan like schools will also get an end encryption. Nine to five Mac obtained an early bill. Fourteen includes a translator built into safari till it, users choose to translate any web page or automatically translate. Other languages are detected. Translation is also being tested with APPs like the APP store for descriptions, the translations happened locally, so no Internet connection would be needed. Nine to five Mac, also found full support for Apple. Pencil input on websites I was fourteen. We'll be introduced ww DC June twenty second. Google confirmed its rolling out support for lending featured snippets from search after testing the feature for years when using Google search that shows a snippet of content. Clicking on that snip will load the page automatically scrolled down to that snippet with the tax highlighted Google says no markup is needed by webmasters to enable the feature and browsers that don't support the feature. We'll simply load the page normally. Snapchat made a decision to stop promoting the president of the United States is snapchat account in the discover tab or snapchat chooses to highlight post from celebrities and influencers in a statement snapped, told the verge the decision was made because the president's tweets promoted violence. President. SNAPCHAT post will remain available in search and those who followed the account directly. In an emailed Technica instagram stated that does not provide a copyright license display embedded images on websites to users of its embedding. API, company company says that while their terms of service allow them to grant sub licenses, our platform policies require third parties to have the necessary rights from applicable rightsholders. Instagram says it's exploring the possibility of giving users more control over photograph and bedding. Currently users can only block embedding by taking account private. And finally facebook is rolling labels that identify media that is state controlled owned. Those outlets will no longer be able to buy advertisements on facebook in the US starting this summer. facebook used outside experts to classify state controlled media based on multiple factors. Outlets can appeal the label if they feel. It was applied by mistake..

apple United States Google Internet archive facebook CEO Mac CISCO Sony Youtube gamemaker peak Yoon Robin Instagram president Financial Times official Chuck Robbins
"brewster kahle" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Q. One of twenty nineteen, the only top five company to do so at and T. confirmed to the verge that it's HBO. Max Streaming Service. Will Will Not contribute to at and T.'s traditional data, caps and soft data caps on unlimited plans, the competing services like Netflix or Disney will a verge source says the HBO Max is using at and T.'s sponsored data system, which technically should allow any company to pay to excuse it services from data caps, which would mean it's HBO. Max's expense and eighteen. Mobility's review in this case and And without net neutrality in the United, states at and T. is allowed to do this and finally the New York Times reports, a lawsuit filed on behalf of Publishers Checks Harpercollins. John Wiley and sons and Penguin Random House is suing the Internet archive over its library of free e books, claiming that the Internet archive should not be allowed to have one point three million titles up for. For free for anyone to download previously available to one borrower at a time back in March, the archive lifted that restriction to serve displaced learners amidst the coronavirus pandemic, Internet archive founder, brewster kahle has defended the Internet archive actions saying that it was practically acting as digital library while public libraries were inaccessible, and that any author who wants there were taken down can get in touch. More discussion of the news of the day subscribe to daily Tech News Show Dot Com. You can find and links to all our headlines. There's well I'm Sarah Lane thanks Villa's listening. Next time..

"brewster kahle" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"These are the daily Tech Headlines for Tuesday June second twenty twenty. I'm Sarah Lane. CISCO CEO Chuck Robbins announced in a Youtube video that the company will postponed Cisco Live, which was scheduled to start on Wednesday rob, said that quote people across the US and the world or dealing with so much pain, frustration and anger. We want to give you space this week to do you need to do within your own stations and communities. Sony is also postponing its playstation five event that was scheduled for Thursday June fourth, due to ongoing protests as well. The company's official account tweeted quote while we understand Gamers, world wider excited to CPS five games. We do not feel that right now. Now is the time for celebration, and for now we want to stand back. Allow more important voices to be heard, so he didn't give details on a new date for the PS. Five event EA also delayed its Madden NFL twenty one events scheduled for Tuesday and Google has delayed its android eleven. Beta announcement Google did announce new features for its pixel line of android phones. Adaptive battery predicts when your battery will run out the recorder. APP now has Google assistant integration. New Features for bedtime are designed to help you sleep better and the personal safety app gets more features as well Google. Bedtime tools in android itself last month, but today's new bedtime tab in the clock APP is exclusive to Pixel. Phones come into all android phones later this summer. Apple released IOS thirteen point five point one to the public Monday following last month's release of Iowa. Thirteen point five, which the company says provides that new important security updates including patch for the vulnerability used by the uncovered jailbreak apple also released watch os six point two point six to the public I've had thirteen point five point, one and updates to both home, pot and Apple TV. TV Samsung forty-three inch four K. Q. Lead Ciro TV that rotates between landscape and portrait modes, is now on sale in the US for two thousand dollars and the UK for sixteen hundred pounds. The Sierra was previously available in Korea, but back at sea es twenty twenty Samsung did announced it would be bringing the TV to the US and other global markets if you have a compatible. Compatible phones such as Samsung's own galaxy phone. You can tap it against the frame and launch screen marine, and the TV will automatically rotate to match the phones orientation. You can also use a remote voice command, or the smart things apt to manually rotate the TV an airplane to support it. New Data from Gartner shows global sales of smartphones declined to twenty point, two percent and the. The first quarter of twenty twenty, due to global coronavirus pandemic Samsung smartphone sales declined twenty two point seven percent in that first quarter, but the company kept the number one spot with eighteen point, five percent of the market way recorded a decline of twenty seven point three percent year over year to forty two point five million units, but was still in the number two position with fourteen. Fourteen point two percent of the market apple's iphone sales declined to eight point, two percent, forty one million units and Apas smartphone sales fell nineteen point one percent strong sales of jammies. Red Meat Devices actually led the company to a gain over Q, one of twenty nineteen, the only top five company to do so at and T. confirmed to the verge that it's Hbo Max Streaming Service. Service will not contribute to at and T.'s traditional data, caps and soft data caps on unlimited plans, the competing services like Netflix or Disney will a verge source says the HBO Max is using at and T.'s sponsored data system, which technically should allow any company to pay to excuse it services from data caps, which would mean, it's Hbo Max's expense and Eighteen Mobility's review in this case. Case and without net neutrality in the united. States at and T. is allowed to do this. And finally the New York Times reports a lawsuit filed on behalf of publishers checks. Harpercollins John Wiley and sons and penguin random. House is suing the Internet archive over its library of free e books claiming that the Internet archive should not be allowed to have one point three million titles up. Up for free for anyone to download previously available to one borrower at a time back in March the archive lifted that restriction to serve displaced learners amidst the coronavirus pandemic Internet archive founder. Brewster Kahle has defended the Internet archive actions saying that it was practically acting as digital library while public libraries were inaccessible, and that any author who wants there were taken down can get in touch..

Google Samsung US Apple T. CISCO Internet Hbo twenty twenty New York Times Sarah Lane Internet archive Brewster Kahle Youtube Sony NFL Chuck Robbins Ciro TV
"brewster kahle" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

13:35 min | 2 years ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"Are you know thank you librarian ship? You know it's the whole face of contextualising information of understanding information of putting the right book into the right hands of understanding the relationship of information to power. I mean these are the these are the emissions of libraries to say nothing of archiving. I mean brewster. Kahle is a great hero of the Internet. Age who founded the Internet Archive Which hosts the way back machine you know he's on a mission to archive everything if you have old. Vhs CASSETTES WHATEVER IS ON THEM. You can send them to him and he'll digitize them and put them in this archive. He has climate control. Warehouses shipping containers with one of every book ever published. And he scans them all and the ones that are in copyright he lends so there's dram and you'd can lend it. Only one person can have the time. The ones that are not are freely available to all people and he he of course makes a copy of the web every one or two days and host them in a way back machine you can go and look at any version of any webpage since the ninety s and that kind of archiving is spectacular. Important piece of how we are going to understand this moment that we're in Charlie's tross calls this moment the beginning of history. You know most of what we know about history. We know from tapestries and saw books that recorded the doings of people who are completely unrepresentative. Excuse me I turn my phone off. And it's not off. Is that a loon. That is a loon Canadian Canadian. I did put my phone on. Do not disturb it. Isn't you know what I'm on? Do not disturb it. Has the if you get a phone call from someone in your favorites list? That was my wife all right. So where was I a brewster? Kahle archiving Oh the beginning of the history so these people who are like unbelievably on representative of their moment right. It would be like trying to understand the year. Twenty twenty by watching keeping up with the Kardashians right an almost everything we know about history. We learned by digging up garbage piles where poor people dump things right today. We make a lot of fun of instagram. And people taking fun of their food and stuff we know almost nothing about what people eight hundreds of years ago our descendants will know everything about how we ate they will know about the moment to moment minutiae and because digital will be able to make sense of it in ways that we can. We'll be able to use computational techniques. There's brilliant book this year by Gretchen. Mcculloch Canadian linguist called because Internet and she talks about the fact that people who study vernacular have long. Struggled to do computational analysis because the way that you would do it as you would record people talking to each other. And then you pay Grad students to transcribe it. And then you would try to computational analysis on it you had these tiny corpses but we have vernacular language in written form for the first time in great quantities. And we're able to do these. These brilliant studies on how language is changing although I got approached by the English language Corpus Project to ask if they could put my work in that they do these. Big Corpus's for computational analysis of English spoken in Canada the UK. Australia the US and so on but they disqualified me because I lived in the UK for too long and they said your English is no longer properly Canadian so we can't use it all right. Got Questions you want to pick who you sure. Bring them microphone over. Thank you for raising your hand there. Thank you Andrew. Thank you hi. I'm a member of the precarious working in human rights. Most of my life and and a lot of that time working with organizing other precarious workers from farmworkers in Canada to justice janitors in Silicon Valley. And I wanted to thank you for joining in your new book. The term the unnecessary. It totally made my day. Thank you and I read your books because you are one of the few SCIFI writers that I follow who actually directly address class issues inequality and the power of solidarity. Can you speak to some of the movements that inspire you? That are taking advantage of transformative opportunities. Today it's a great question. Thank you and thank you for the work. You're doing that. Sounds really important. The thing that's really inspiring to me because of where I said and like the stuff I'm interested in what's happened with tech workers in the last couple of years. Tech workers are really interesting bunch because they're among the only workers who are operating in a massive labor shortage and they have an enormous amount of bargaining power with their employers. There's a movement called tech won't build it. That's founded on the premise. That like when you have a sufficient talent shortage if some people say I'm sorry I'm just not writing drone drone software for warfare. It may never get built like literally. There just might not be anyone else to do it and there's an AI. Scientists in Toronto who quit Google over there censored Chinese search engine who's leading a guy works on machine learning and search and they may not be able to him that he might actually hamstring their efforts. Twenty thousand Google's walked off the job. Last year there have been tech uprisings at Microsoft Google Amazon salesforce largely around immigration issues and ice but also around other issues facial recognition law enforcement and so on so there is a real moment underway right now. What's also really interesting? Is the extent to which those movements explicitly in solidarity with more traditional mainline social justice movements right there the overlap between people who care about These issues and say the black lives matter is pretty strong. They're very few people in the in the in the Google walkout who would say I'm not a supporter of black lives matter. They may not be activist members of it. And you know groups like Oakland. Privacy really fused the two. They passed the first ever ordinance in the US requiring a police department to do public consultation before buying new surveillance gear because there is this like completely out of control off. The books. Police procurement process all over the world. Where these griffey vendors are selling cameras with Recognitions automatic license plate recognition software. Predictive policing tools and remember Predictive policing predicts but the police will do it does not predict the crime will be and so it's just a way of Algorithm Mickley empiricism watching washing racism right. You take racist policing practices you feed it into an algorithm and say what should we do? Next surprise. Surprise tells you to do what you've been doing all along but this time tells you that it's based on objective computation and not on human by issue. No garbage in garbage out has been an iron of computing. Since the early days it was not repealed by unsupervised machine learning you know so that has been an amazing thing to watch right. There's this orwell line if there is hope it is in the roles you know we have a weird class thing going on where you have. These affluent workers who are nevertheless in short supply. And who are recognizing. In a way that is I think challenging to some people on the main line traditional class oriented left to one as to who are skeptical of Intersectional Ism and that kind of critique of of power because I think that a lot of it comes out of Inter sectionalism like I think that they are saying. We are struggle as Tech Workers Inter Inter Inter Inter sex struggles for racial justice economic justice. And so on so it is pretty interesting the next book that I've got coming out in October. The third little brother book is about a young woman. Masha who's at the beginning of the end of the other two books who is on the wrong side. She works for a private intelligence company as a contractor. Doing surveillance and in some ways. It was my way of trying to work through what goes through the heads of those people who go to work on building predictive policing tools and facial recognition tools for law enforcement and so on and how they talk to themselves about what their job is you know we talk a lot about oppenheimer as someone who's like a great hero but Oppenheimer didn't decide. It was a mistake to build nuclear bombs until after he built one. I think we want we want early. Stage Oppenheimer's right. We want to get our oppenheimer moment and beforehand. You know the person who realizes it was state to drive drunk. After they've run someone over has made an important realization. But I think we would all be happier if they'd made that realization before they got behind the wheel. Thank you very much for that question. Anybody else anyone who identifies as a matter. No monitoring you up here Andrew Andrew. I was GONNA ask a nerdy question about your books. But because we're talking somewhere else. We were talking about libraries and technology and stuff and what came to my mind. Just now is this battle going on between Macmillan and the libraries with the e books and I thought if there's somebody who could talk to that it would be you. I wish they weren't doing that. All of the big five publishers are doing things that I think are ridiculous with libraries. I'm not a fan of it. It is above my pay grade to stop. Mcmillan is in many ways very good about these policies. They're the only family owned of the big publishers. So they're not beholden to their shareholders. The way that other companies are owned by like one dude a guy named Stefan spring because a perfectly lovely German man whose family has been publishing for hundreds of years and for folks who might not asked. Mcmillan has a punitive policies regarding E book lending where books and early release are only made available on a very limited basis. Where you can only by a small number of copies. I believe it's one or maybe two initially as an e book a per- system now their argument and I'll give you their best argument. Their best argument is comes in two or three parts the first one is overdrive is a giant rapacious hedge fund and private equity owned lending system. And they have gone out and specifically targeted affluent readers who would otherwise buy books to convince them to install the APP and get books for free and whether or not that's true. I think that part I think the part about them being owned by Repurchase Hedge Fund is totally true Kkr's at terrible company. They bought a bunch of hospitals in America and took the doctors out of the insurance plans. So when you go to the Er you get surprised bills for thousands of dollars and you can't shop around because you're literally in the back of an ambulance on your way right. There grotesque war criminals right so fine. Right that part's true. The part that I thoroughly disagree with is like middle class. People using libraries is not a problem. And so that part. I'm skeptical of the other part of their argument. And this is this part is slightly more credible is that the majority of library systems in America could not only ever bought one or two copies of a new release that we think of library systems. We think a big consortium like the regional consortium that this one is part of or big cities like Toronto. That's not the majority of libraries that are doing eba position and what they did was dramatically. Lower the cost of those those new release titles but also dramatically limited the availability. And so if you live in a big city it's a raw deal but most library systems are not big city library systems and what they did. Was they kind of Said? Well you know. We're losing our E book sales library books circulation is going up. Both of those things are true. What can we do? That's more equitable to the people who disadvantaged all along and remember rural library system surpport more disadvantaged populations therefore blah blah blah blah. And you know what? These are. Not like terrible arguments. But they're also not great ones. And you know if I were a library and trying to hold the publishers trying to get them onside. I would make argument. That goes like this where there's one bookseller left online of any size to in Canada. If you count if you kind of chapters into go they are also publisher. They compete directly with you. They have real time intelligence on book reading and Book Habits. I don't know if you saw the dump from a kindle under the New California Privacy Law the kindle records and sends to Amazon every time you touch it literally every tap where you touched it what you were doing you know if there's location sensors on it if it's got a Sim chip where you were all of that stuff. They claim that they use it to improve it. They store it indefinitely so they have this incredibly fine grain detail about reading habits. They know that people who searched for this book. End Up buying that book even if it's two different publishers. Publishers don't know any of that they know when person who reads this book reads that book through different publishers publishers. Get none of that. There's only one other institution in the world that has that data electric books in its libraries. And so if I were libraries I will go to them. Look what you should really do to fight. Amazon is the Department of Justice to break them up but While we're waiting for that jam yesterday. Jam Tomorrow Jam..

Canada oppenheimer Tech Workers Inter Inter Inter Kahle brewster Google Andrew Andrew US Toronto publisher America Internet Archive Amazon UK Mcmillan Charlie Book Habits Microsoft Kardashians
How Does the Wayback Machine Work?

BrainStuff

04:49 min | 2 years ago

How Does the Wayback Machine Work?

"If a tree falls in a forest does it really make a sound and if a website light changes overnight did its previous homepage ever really exist in the first place because so much of our world is increasingly digital and ephemeral. It's not just a philosophical question. It's also simple matter of history. That's why the way back machine which features snapshots of websites as they age. Change is such a fascinating glimpse into the dusty corners of the web. The way back machine is a massive digital archive meant to preserve webpages that would otherwise be permanently. Lost Time without this horde quarter of data every time a page was updated or deleted it would simply vanish as if it had never been there mark Graham. The director of the way back machine noted in Two Thousand Sixteen entrepreneur article that the average life expectancy of a web page is about one hundred days. There are a multitude of reasons why these web pages disappear site creators move onto other projects web hosting companies. Go bankrupt or maybe the pages moved or replaced with new data and content. One place you may have seen the way back. Machines work ask more than eleven million web pages referenced in we kapiti articles have gone bad over the years. In other words they never turn a four zero four or page not found error because they've been archived in the way back machine technicians. There were able to edit those wikipedia pages so the references now point to archived versions of those defunct. Url's the way back. Machine is the brain child of brewster. Kahle and Bruce Gilliat who also founded the Internet archive which is Digital Library of websites books audio and video recordings hoardings and software. Both projects are San Francisco based nonprofits a Kaelin Gilliat also created Alexa Internet which analyzes web traffic patterns and was sold to Amazon Project Director. Graham said by email Vais Kaelin Gilliat had started to archive web pages in one thousand nine hundred six and in two two thousand one launched the way back machine to support discovery and playback of those archived web resources and yes. The name was inspired by the Nineteen Sixties Cartoon Series The Rock Doc in Bull Winkle show in the cartoon the way back. WABC machine was a plot device. used to transport the characters Mister peabody and Sherman back in time to visit important events in human history in a world where there are more than one point seven billion websites with the numbers climbing dramatically by the day. How can anyone possibly hope to catalog? So many web pages the way back machine uses what's called crawlers a type of software that automatically moves through the web taking snapshots shots of billions of sites as it goes. Some of the process is automated. But many of the requests are generated manually by a network of Librarians who prioritize certain types types of sites that they think are important to preserve passivity and for future generations. The crawlers don't capture every iteration of sites the frequency Linzie of snapshots differs by these sites. Importance very significant sites might be recorded every few hours others might be logged weeks or months apart most aren't logged it all so don't worry that embarrassing fan website. You made it high. School is probably long gone by now. The way back machine aims to capture snapshots of important content tent. Say the breaking news. Headlines created by major media companies. Furthermore it doesn't necessarily recreate the entire site and it doesn't preserve the data in a away the eat experience it with your browser. It may only capture a few images of a few pages and not preserved content that's linked to other sites outside of the domain but on a more practical level you've probably had the experience of clicking on a link on our web page and getting a four page not found notation. Now you're wondering wondering what was on the page originally. That's where the way back machine can help to use the way back machine go to archive dot org slash web. Type the euro at the site. You want to investigate in the browser history search bar in the results you'll see a chronological bar graph. That shows how many times the site was crawled and saved in a given year. You're click the year and blow. You'll see a twelve month. Calendar with various dates highlighted blue highlights mean. The site was saved properly. Red Means it was not click one of the highlight of dates and the site. Stop shots will appear click on one of those snapshots end just like that. You've traveled back in time to that older version of the site. If you want to make sure that a particular site is recorded to archive you can do so manually. Use The save page now option to save specific page. What's but realized that doing so? Only save that one page entire website and it doesn't guarantee that the site will be crawled in the future and if content owners want their material excluded from the way back machine and they can submit a request by sending an email to info at archive dot org.

Mark Graham Nineteen Sixties Cartoon Serie Internet Archive Director Alexa Internet Brewster Bruce Gilliat Vais Kaelin Gilliat Amazon Wabc Bull Winkle Kahle Digital Library Kaelin Gilliat San Francisco Mister Peabody Sherman
"brewster kahle" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on Techdirt

"Exactly, exactly. But you know. Get your existential. So perfect in so many ways. But, but you know, one of the things that isn't that agreement which you know, I think a lot of people celebrate is that there is this sort of intermediate liability protection element that was included in an agreement. And what's funny is then I saw like the RA AA people whining about like, how dare they put this into an international trade agreements. Like, you guys spent oh really you don't want to do. Mediate live in. Exactly it was. How'd you get the? Yeah. Exactly. And so I mean for people who are listening who don't like, you know, the art in another people have like flat out admitted that the way they got the DMCA done. Would they tried to get congress to pass that law originally and it failed? And then as they said, and I'm this is almost a direct quote. You know, like we ran to Geneva to get it into a trade to then go back to to DC and say now, we have this international obligation, which you know, they put in themselves to get congress to do what it didn't want to do in the first place. So like the fact that they would then wine that somebody else is doing the exact same thing that they pioneered seems a little bit hypocritical. Anyway. A little background for the. Yes. The three of us on this podcast. Have have lived these things for for many. But I'm assuming not everybody listening. So let let's let's let's talk. Let's go back to to sort of the positives of of of last Friday's event and some of the excitement around it. And so, you know, there were I think, you know, what was fun and nicer all these different examples of these works that are suddenly available again in that people can can do stuff with. Now, I'm realizing I was just saying we're going back to the fun and good stuff. And I'm actually not going to do that. Because one of the things that was was very early on was this guy. Michael Wolff who was talking about works that didn't make it into the public domain in that they basically, you know, disappeared from from the world between nineteen Twenty-three in today, and don't exist and might otherwise have existed if they had gone into the public domain earlier. And I think that's that's a big concern that doesn't get nearly enough. Attention. Yeah. As as like now that I'm really much more in scottsd- in the library world working at the internet archive. I've come to understand the site DEA of obsolete formats and formats that just kind of fall apart in your hands. If you know if you touch them, right? So the Mike wolfs presentation focused a lot on film. But one of the formats that my boss Brewster Kahle is particularly passionate about our seventy eight RPM regards, which are the shellac records that predate the vinyl OPE's, and they are riddle. And if you drop them may will shatter until one of the things that you know, we have been working on is finding ways to preserve these works before. Four they are gone like if we were to wait until twenty sixty seven which is the date that these works were set to go into the public domain prior to the music modernization act, which is actually is some more good news around the public domain. You know, we waited till twenty sixty seven these things would not they would not be there. They will be gone. So I think that is a really important concept and one of the roles that libraries have archives have at museums. Right. These cultural institutions have historically played to shepherd these works through when a lot of times, you know. The rights holders aren't interested in doing though. Yeah. I've heard people call it the twentieth century black hole too. You know, and brewster's presentation. It was so stark, you know, he showed a graph of of things going into the public domain based on year..

Brewster Kahle congress Mike wolfs Michael Wolff Geneva DMCA DEA scottsd internet
"brewster kahle" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

05:51 min | 3 years ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Interviewed a guy this past week for commando on demand podcast, which is not the Kim commander show. These are our special commando podcasts. Extended interviews and tech news. And I spent an hour on the phone with a gentleman by the name of Brewster Kahle ever heard about I or kale. I did. When I listened to the podcast wasn't that? A great podcast was so interesting and Brewster is in charge of archive dot org. So can you go to archive dot org right now, and you can type in for example, commando dot com, and what Brewster wants to do is create a digital copy of everything on the internet. I mean, every single webpage any television show any audio recording any book any photo any video that is on the entire internet. He is backing it up in the cloud and making it searchable. Yes. I just said every single web page it goes on and on. And he's also does something unique like if you want a TV show, and that's in the archive you can hit a couple of buttons. And then he'll male T on DVD, and you can rent it for about a week. So did you find us do Kim commander dot com or just commander dot com? And then you can see what our website looked like a nineteen Ninety-six. Ulta vista. Did you see my hair? What do you think that here? Nice. Nice gorgeous. Yes. So our podcast time travel the internet with the way back we've seen the internet archive to learn more about what brewster's doing how you can participate too. So if you have a book and e book a photo video, whatever may be and you wanted to be part of the internet archive. Yes. You can go ahead and be part of that too. That's one commando on demand podcast the second one because we always have new releases on Wednesdays and Fridays is the best Google search alternatives. So it's not just Google. There's also just watch go watch. It there's jiffy I mean, there's just a whole bunch of different websites. And so you don't wanna miss the where we get your podcast whether it's on apple podcast, Google podcasts. Spotify Pandora just search for commander with a K. Of course, while you're there give us a great five star rating. And right if you. Words because that helps us boost the ratings of our commando on demand podcast you ever become successful with this web page. What do you mean what zoom the harassing nineteen Ninety-six? Couldn't. Okay. What's the lead story Kim in print searched the computer clinic computer, spelled with a K and sorry about that. Yeah. Commando computer clinic. Now, Kim commandos computer clinic four case for case. No wonder why you're not Bill Gates. Thank you. Can in Las Vegas. Hi there. Ken. All right. Welcome. Thank you for taking my call. What's going on? External hard drive, but apparently cells and crash because what took it to a local place to get it fixed. You stuck with scope up against it and said listen to this. Said shot. A couple of places and they're expensive. I was hoping you could help me get it recovered for a little bit out of pocket. But by the lot got about forty thousand. I need to get back. Okay. So you have an external hard drive with forty thousand photos easily and it just died. Because hard drives die. They do unfortunately in. And you've never heard me talk about having a cloud backup. I listened to you local Vegas when you're on. Sporadic? So. Say tobacco up, and I was actually in the process of back ended up when boom it went. Well, you are going to be our poster child for online backup. Data forensics is not easy. And it's not, unfortunately, it's not an expensive and it's very expensive. But how much did they don't you? Was anywhere from seven hundred all the way up to five thousand seem to seem to be a medium about twelve. I I was gonna guess be. I was gonna guess about two thousand and where to get all this data back somewhere in the range of fifteen hundred to two thousand dollars, and even then they can't guarantee that everything's gonna come back, right? Ironically enough in two thousand fourteen my desktop car. Drive died, and it had just a nearly three hundred thirty three or thirty three thousand three hundred photographs on them. So it's been four years. I'm pretty sure I'm up to about the forty thousand marking grandchildren. Children's your mom dad's family. Yeah. You don't you? Don't have a lot of good luck. At this. No. This is not what you know. But you're a little bit ahead of the bell curve. If you've ever been ahead of the bell curve in your life. The meantime between failure on hard drives typically five years. So okay. So you're you're always getting you've always been at the head of the class. I can tell. There's really not a lot. I can help you with as far as you know, things that you can try. I mean, if the drive is making the clicking sounds. That's the they called the click death. Okay. Right. And then for good reason. I would look at trying to find a good data recovery service in Vegas. I'm sure you can find one and and looking at their BBB reviews yelp reviews things like that. And then whatever you do make sure that you signed a contract with them. And so you want a fix to bid. Okay. And or at least they're going to call you this is like going to the craps table because they're gonna call and say, hey, listen, we got one hundred photos. Do you want us and more nearly okay? Yeah. Okay. Okay. And they call got five hundred dollars. You wanna keep going? Okay. Before you know, it you're sitting there like with a Bill for like five grand. So that's why you want to go. And in the beginning say how much going gonna cause? And.

Brewster Kahle commander Kim Las Vegas Google internet Bill Gates Spotify Drive apple Ken five hundred dollars two thousand dollars five years four years
"brewster kahle" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

06:16 min | 3 years ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"The truth. Okay. So if you wanna try something, that's really fun. Andrew you should try this for us right now. I interviewed a guy this past week for a commando on-demand podcast, which is not the Kim commander show. These are our special commando podcasts. Extended interviews and tech news. And I spent an hour on the phone with a gentleman by the name of Brewster Kahle ever heard about I your kale. I did. When I listened to the podcast wasn't that? A great podcast was so interesting and Brewster is in charge of archive dot org. So can you go to archive dot org right now, and you can type in for example, commando dot com, and what Brewster wants to do is create a digital copy of everything on the internet. I mean, every single webpage any television show any audio recording any book any photo any video that is on the entire internet. He is backing it up in the cloud and making it searchable. Yes. I just said every single web page goes on and on. And he's also does something unique like if you want a TV show, and that's in the archive you can hit a couple of buttons. And then he'll mail. On DVD, and you can rent it for about a week. Did you find us do Kim commander dot com? Just commander dot com. And then, but you can see what our website looked like a nineteen Ninety-six. Ulta vista ended. Did you see my hair? What do you think that here? Nice. Nice gorgeous. Yes. So our podcast time travel the internet with the way back we've seen the internet archive. Gonna learn more about what brewster's doing how you can participate too. So if you have a book and e book a photo video, whatever may be and you wanted to be part of the internet archive. Yes. You can go ahead and be part of that too. That's one commando on demand podcast the second one because we always have new releases on Wednesdays and Fridays is the best Google search alternatives. So it's not just Google. There's also just watch go watch. It there's jiffy I mean, there's just a whole bunch of different websites. And so you don't wanna miss the where we get your podcast whether it's on apple podcast, Google podcasts. Spotify Pandora just search for commander with a K, of course, while you're. Are there? It gives us a great five star rating and write a few nice words because that helps us boost the ratings of our commando on demand podcast you ever become successful with this web page. What do you mean what? That was in nineteen Ninety-six. Good. Okay. What's the lead story Kim in print searched the computer clinic, computer, spelled with a K? I'm sorry about that. Yeah. Said Kommando computer clinic. No, Kim commandos computer clinic four case for case. No wonder why you're not Bill Gates. Thank you. Ken in Las Vegas. Hi there. Ken. Hi, welcome. Thank you for taking my call. What's going on? External hard drive, but apparently fell and crashed because to a local place to get it fixed scope up against and said listen to this. Your cooking shot. Recommended a couple of places and expensive. I was hoping you can help me. Get it recovered for a little bit out of pocket, but a lot I got about forty thousand. I need to get back. Okay. So you have an external hard drive with forty thousand photos easily and it just died. Hard drives die. They do. Unfortunately in and you've never heard me talk about having a cloud backup. I listened to you locally Vegas when you're on. And it's it's sporadic. So I have heard you say to back it up, and I was actually in the process of back ended up when it went. Well, you aren't going to be our poster child for online backup. Okay. Data forensics is not easy. And it's not unfortunately, it's not an expensive very expensive. But how much did they don't you? Was anywhere from seven hundred all the way up to five thousand seem to seem to be a medium about twelve. I would I was gonna guess be. I was gonna guess about two thousand in order to get all this data back somewhere in the range of fifteen hundred to two thousand dollars, and even then they can't guarantee that everything's going to come back, right? Ironically, end up in two thousand fourteen my desktop hard-drive died, and it had just a merely three hundred and thirty three or thirty three thousand three hundred photographs on him. So it's been four years. I'm pretty sure I'm up to about the forty thousand Mark grandchildren. Children's your mom dad's family. Yeah. You know, you don't have a lot of good luck. At this. This is not what you know. But you're a little bit ahead of the bell curve. If you've ever been ahead of the bell curve in your life that meantime between failure on hard drives typically five years. So okay. So you're you're always you've always been at the head of the class. I can tell. There's really not a lot. I can help you with as far as you know, things that you can try. I mean, if the drive is making the clicking sounds. That's the they called the click death. Okay. Right. And then for good reason. I would look at trying to find a good data recovery service in Vegas. I'm sure you can find one and and looking at their BBB reviews yelp reviews things like that. And then whatever you do make sure that you signed a contract with them. And so you want a fixed bid, okay? And or at least they're going to call you this is like going to the craps table because they're gonna call you say, hey, listen, we got one hundred photos. Do you want to know that you want us to more nearly okay? Yeah. Okay. Okay. And they call it like a five hundred more photos. You wanna keep going? Okay. Before you know, it you're like sitting there like with a Bill for like five grand. So that's why you want to go. And in the beginning say how much going to cost and then.

Brewster Kahle commander Las Vegas Kim Google internet Ken Bill Gates Andrew Spotify Kommando apple two thousand dollars five years four years
"brewster kahle" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:36 min | 3 years ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Tomorrow on Colorado's morning news. We'll have the latest out of DC and check in with our delegation after a weekend warm up another blast of winter to start the workweek, and what you need to know for your taxes. If you donate it to charity last year. Join us on KOA NewsRadio the tools to face the day like traffic because I need to get to and from work every day with KOA NewsRadio. Okay. So if you wanna try something, that's really fun. Andrew you should try this for us right now. I interviewed a guy this past week for a commando on demand podcast, which is not the Kim commander show. These are our special commando podcasts. Extended interviews in tech news. And I spent an hour on the phone with a gentleman by the name of Brewster Kahle ever heard about I your kale. I did. When I listened to the podcast wasn't that a great podcast. So interesting and Brewster is in charge of archive dot org. So can you go to archive dot org right now, and you can type in for example, commando dot com, and what Brewster wants to do is create a digital copy of everything on the internet. I mean, every single webpage any television show any audio recording any book any photo any video that is on the entire internet. He is backing it up in the cloud and making it searchable. Yes. I just said every single web page it goes on and on. And he's also does something unique. Like if you want to. TV show, and that's in the archive. You can hit a couple of buttons. And then he'll mail to you on DVD, and you can rent it for about a week. So did you find us do Kim commander dot com or just commander dot com? And then, but you can see what our website looked like a nineteen Ninety-six. Ulta vista. Did you see my hair? What do you think about hair? Nice. Nice gorgeous. Yes. So our podcast time travel the internet with the way back we've seen the internet archive. Gonna learn more about what brewster's doing how you can participate too. So if you have a book and e book a photo video, whatever may be and you wanted to be part of the internet archive. Yes. You can go ahead and be part of that too. That's one commando on demand podcast the second one because we always have new releases on Wednesdays and Fridays is the best Google search alternatives. And so it's not just Google. There's also just watch go watch. It there's jiffy I mean, there's just a whole bunch of different websites. And so you don't wanna miss the wherever you get your podcast whether it's on apple podcast, Google podcasts. Spotify Pandora just search for commander with a K. Of course, you. Are there? It gives great five star rating and write a few nice words because that helps us boost the ratings of our commando on demand podcast you ever become successful with this web page. What do you mean what? Harassing that was in nineteen Ninety-six. Couldn't okay. What's the lead story Kim in print surge? The computer clinic computer spelled with a K. I'm sorry about that. Yeah. Said Kommando computer clinic now, Kim commandos computer clinic four case for case. No wonder why you're not Bill Gates. Thank you. Can in Las Vegas. Hi there. Ken. All right. Welcome. Thank you for taking my call. What's going on? External hard drive, but apparently cells and crash because when I took it to a local place to get it fixed. She up scope up against and said listen to this. Clicking shot. Recommended a couple of places and they're expensive. I was hoping you can help me. Get it recovered for a little bit out of pocket. But by a lot got about forty thousand. I need to get back. Okay. So you have an external hard drive with forty thousand photos easily. Okay. Then it just died. Hard drives die. They do. Unfortunately in and you've never heard me talk about having a cloud backup. I listened to you local your Vegas when you're on. And it's it's sporadic. So. Halford USA to back it up, and I was actually in the process of back ended up when boom it went. Well, you aren't going to be our poster child for online backup. Okay. Data forensics is not easy. And it's not, unfortunately, it's not an expensive and it's very expensive. But how much did they don't you? Was anywhere from seven hundred all the way up to five thousand seem to seem to be a medium about twelve. I would I was gonna guess I was gonna guess about two thousand in where to get all this data back somewhere in the range of fifteen hundred to two thousand dollars, and even then they can't guarantee that everything's gonna come back, right? Ironically, end up in two thousand fourteen my desktop hard-drive died, and it had just nearly three hundred and thirty three or thirty three thousand three hundred photographs on it. So it's been four years. I'm pretty sure I'm up to about two forty thousand. It's grandchildren. Children's your mom dad's family. Yeah. You don't have a lot of good luck. At this. No. This is not what you know. But you're a little bit ahead of the bell curve. If you've ever been ahead of the bell curve in your life that meantime between failure on hard drives is typically five years. So okay. So you're you're always you've always been at the head of the class. I can tell. There's really not a lot. I can help you with as far as you know, things that you can try. I mean, if the drive is making the clicking sounds, that's the they called the click of death. Right. And then for good reason. I would look at trying to find a good data recovery service in Vegas. I'm sure you can find one and and looking at their BBB reviews yelp reviews things like that. And then whatever you do make sure that you signed a contract with them. And so you want a fixed bid, okay? Or at least they're going to call you. This is going to the craps table because they're gonna call. You say endless. We got one hundred photos. Do you wanna know more nearly okay? Yeah. Okay. Okay. And they call five hundred more photos you want to keep going. Okay. Before you know, it you're like sitting there like with Bill for like five grand. So that's why you want to go. And in the beginning say how much going to cost and then.

Brewster Kahle commander Kim Bill Gates Google KOA Vegas internet Colorado Las Vegas Andrew Spotify apple Kommando Halford USA Ken
"brewster kahle" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

06:08 min | 3 years ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Wanna try something, that's really fun. Andrew you should try this for us right now. I interviewed a guy this past week for a commando on demand podcast, which is not the Kim commander show. These are our special commando podcasts. Extended interviews in tech news. And I spent an hour on the phone with a gentleman by the name of Brewster Kahle you ever heard about I kale. I did. When I listened to the podcast wasn't that a great podcast, so interesting and Brewster is in charge of archive dot org. So if he can you go to archive dot org right now, and you can type in for example, commando dot com, and what Brewster wants to do is create a digital copy of everything on the internet. I mean, every single webpage any television show any audio recording any book any photo any video that is on the entire internet. He is backing it up in the cloud and making it searchable. Yes. I just said every single web page it goes on and on. And he's. Also does something unique like if you wanna TV show, and that's in the archive you can hit a couple of buttons. And then he'll mail to you on DVD, and you can rent it for about a week. Did you find us do Kim commander dot com or just commanded dot com? And then, but you can see what our website looked like a nineteen Ninety-six. Ulta vista bend. Did you see my hair? What he's thinking that hair? Nice. Nice gorgeous. Yes. So our podcast time travel the internet with the way back we've seen the internet archive. Learn more about what brewster's doing how you can participate too. So if you have a book and e book a photo video, whatever may be an and you wanted to be part of the internet archive. Yes. You can go ahead and be part of that too. That's one commando on demand podcast the second one because we always have new releases on Wednesdays and Fridays is the best Google search alternatives. So it's not just Google. There's also just watch go watch. It there's jiffy I mean, there's just a whole bunch of different websites. And so you don't wanna miss the wherever you get your podcast whether it's on apple podcast, Google podcasts. Spotify Pandora just search for commando with a K, of course. And while you're. There. It gives us a great five star rating and write a few nice words because that helps us boost the ratings of our commando on demand cod cast you ever become successful with this web page. What do you mean what? Harassing that was in nineteen Ninety-six. Good. Okay. What's the lead story came in print surge? The computer clinic computer spelled with a K. I'm sorry about that. Yeah. Said Kommando computer clinic now, Kim commandos computer clinic four case for case. No wonder why you're not Bill Gates. Thank you. Can in Las Vegas. Hi there. Ken. All right. Welcome. Thank you for taking my call. What's going on? External hard drive, but apparently, sell and crash because what took it to a local place to get it fixed scope up against it and said listen to this. Clicking shot. Recommended a couple of places and they're expensive. I was hoping you can help me. Get it recovered for a little bit out of pocket, but not a lot got about forty thousand. I need to get back. Okay. So you have an external hard drive with forty thousand photos easily. Okay. And it just died. Hard drives die. They do. Unfortunately in and you've never heard me talk about having a cloud backup. I listen to you locally here in Vegas when you're on. And it's it's sporadic. So I heard you say to back it up, and I was actually in the process of back ended up when it went. Well, you aren't going to be our poster child for online backup. Data forensics is not easy. And it's not unfortunately, it's not an expensive. It's very expensive. How much did they don't you? Was anywhere from seven hundred all the way up to five thousand seem to seem to be a medium about twelve. I would I was gonna be I was gonna guess about two thousand in. Where'd you get all this data back somewhere in the range of fifteen hundred to two thousand dollars, and even then they can't guarantee that everything's gonna come back, right? Ironically, end up in two thousand fourteen my desktop hard-drive died, and it had just a merely three hundred and thirty three or thirty three thousand three hundred photographs on him. So it's been four years. I'm pretty sure I'm up to about the forty thousand marking grandchildren's shoulders your mom, dad family. Yeah. You don't have a lot of good luck. At this. No. Every four years. This is not what you know. You're a little bit ahead of the bell curve. If you've ever been ahead of the bell curve in your life. The meantime between failure on hard drives us typically five years. So okay. So you're you're always you've always been at the head of the class. I can tell. There's really not a lot. I can help you with as far as you know, things that you can try. I mean, if the drive is making the clicking sounds. That's why they call it the click of death. Okay. Right. And then for good reason. I would look at trying to find a good data recovery service in Vegas. I'm sure you can find one and and looking at their BBB reviews yelp reviews things like that. And then whatever you do make sure that you sign a contract with them. And so you want a fixed bid, okay? And or at least they're going to call you this is like going to the craps table because they're gonna call you say aimless, we got one hundred photos. Do you want know some more nearly okay? Yeah. Okay. Okay. And they call us at five hundred more. Do you want to keep going? Okay. Before you know, it you're like sitting there like with a Bill for like five grand. So that's why you want to go in in the beginning say how much it's gonna cost. And then.

Brewster Kahle Las Vegas Google commander Kim internet Bill Gates Andrew Spotify apple Kommando Ken four years two thousand dollars five years
"brewster kahle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:42 min | 3 years ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Work Cuanto Pia. Hamas also known as DJ spooky. And in addition to doing Cuanto Pierre he's written based on Antarctic weather patterns. He's remixed DWI Griffith's film birth of a nation, and he currently scores Jeremy scales intercepted political podcast talk a little bit about that. In terms of working on on intercepted. How do you approach scoring political podcast podcast are the new everything? They it's incredible how they've absorbed almost all aspects of media. They kind of like between radio YouTube channels, and like this idea of sort of media on demand, anywhere anytime. So I wanted to figure out music that would work for giving Jeremy's, I think a pretty brilliant thinker about the way, politics and surveillance and other kinds of issues because his coverage of the Iraq war. I thought was really important his book dirty wars, which was also a documentary that was really incredible. So I've scored films. I've also worked with we had people like Martin Scorsese back. A film project did recently on the history of African American cinema. And for me, a movie is kind of like a open palette like you can always come up with these different textures to paint in sound how you would highlight a scene, but so are podcast, and I put as much detail attention to detail and to podcasts as to a film score. And Jeremy's always got some pretty intense, topics. On the intercept. You know, these days, it's it's a seems like it's a never ending parade of wild things happening. So. Not have foreseen are predicted. Yeah. So how do you make music for the age of ever ever present shock? Yeah. Well, we've got some calls coming in. And I wanna start with Danny in San Francisco. Hi, danny. Hey, how's it going? Great. I I was I just bought an MP from tied the other day, and you can download these expansion packs, and I believe DJ spooky had made one. And that I downloaded it maybe getting the name wrong. But in it was him. I'd already made a song with it. I just think it's really interesting that someone New York can create you know, these samples that you can put on the internet. And then I'm over here in San Francisco and having just bought the machine like, but the samples into the computer use the computer with the like analog machines that have and then create a song with it would you did great. And so I just wanted to comment about that Danny thanks that's part of the appeal for you, isn't it popular? And for those who are out there who don't know the empty is a legendary old school hip hop device. Amusing. After I note of the internet was called the IMP. So it stands for internet message processor, and that was by Dr Leonard Kline rock at UCLA. And again, he's there's a very famous film that Verna Herzog did called lo and behold about the history of the internet where he goes to the room where the first internet hub was so they empty is kind of like that for hypothesis. I. You tap on a kind of a series of small pads and make a beat. But yeah, I mean, I make elements that I actually will put online as open source material that people can sample. I'm a firm believer and free music, free culture. But you know, there's there's different ways to approach that. And I'm very respectful of people like Lawrence Lessig up at Harvard who's been doing a series of things about share shareware culture. So when the gentleman who just called I was talking about. I was like probably maybe point one percent of the audience will. Oh. But that was cool to hear that. And. Yeah, the material that is generated for the concert is all done with software. That's more current. So I use. We did data analytics and how much data's going through the internet. We looked at the beginning. And literally was the internet was just two hubs between certain section of California in nineteen sixty nine. And it could barely carry any messages at all. And it kept crashing. So they had to figure out how to compress information to fit in these cables, and you've got to imagine like mathematicians engineers, scientists all of them had to work on that. So twenty nine hundred also the thirtieth anniversary of the web, which is different than the internet. So maybe that could be riffle in for tell me how it's different and why we don't usually make that distinction. Okay. Magin if you have a house, and you have the structure of the house the bones. The beams the. Bits and pieces that make up the structure, that's the internet. The web is all the stuff that would go over the the kind of architecture of it. So, sir. Tim burners Lee was at Cernan, Switzerland, which is a quantum physics research area. And he needed to be able to come up with a way to compress a large amount of information to share between scientists when they're working on their experiments, and so he he made up what you call hypertext markup language HTML. Yes. Which of course, he's made websites but back then it was meant to be sharing and being able to exchange academic papers quickly amusingly enough. If if you say that the internet's fifty years old people are shocked like what the internet hasn't been at that. Then if you save the web is thirty then that even takes some even into a different space as well. So fifty years ago hundred sixty nine was you had some summer of love, you know, which is a wild scene here. California's far as I've heard we also have people landing on the moon. We had Woodstock we had. Had all sorts of wild stuff happening. Meanwhile, these scientists and major figures here in California. Working garages and working into small quirky spaces and academic. Forums to come up with this. This incredible innovation the internet, and that's what I'm celebrated. Well, as I listen to you. I you are filled with so much information in history about the internet, and I feel compelled to ask how you came up with the name DJ spooky. Sorry. What you're sharing in terms of your knowledge of the internet. Okay. Well, I went to bowdoin college in Maine, both my parents were sort of professors. My father was dean of Howard university's law school. In the late sixties, and my mother, Rosemary Reed Miller was a historian of design, and she's written books about the history of women's fashion. One was called threads of time five hundred years of women designers. So both parents were big inspirations for my thinking about political, activism and music. I did one degree in philosophy and the other degree in French literature. All totally useless. But but I d- Jiang was a side hobby that kinda took over. So, you know, it's still fun to add information music, and to me music isn't music. It's information. So spooky was an apt. Name spooky was kind of like when you press play. And there's nobody there, but all this information floating around. So I just it was a sense of humor. And I never in my wildest imagination and thought I would. Jiang this. I've been detained globally for the last twenty years. I can't believe time is flying into the nineties until now. Nine hundred ninety seven. Was my first album came out, and I've just been gone ever since. Oh, well, let's hear from more listeners Sandra in San Francisco. Hi, sandra. Oh, hello. I just wondered how you chose what to sample off of the internet archive in this competition, and I'll take my Ossoff. Yeah. Thanks and just reminded quickly with the internet archive Brewster Kahle who is also another San Francisco kind of amazing figure here. He started the internet archive is a way of preserving the internet over the years, and they came up with a material called the way back machine, which documents the entire as we know it, and it's got I think millions of billions of pages, and they have a whole bunch of supercomputer centers where they've got pretty much every page ever made. And they are one of the backers of the projects that we've been using their material and going through it kind of lyrically so to speak and also will you work with Hewlett foundation, which is associated with Hewlett Packard. So. And you ever Buena center is sponsoring the concert. So but internet archive has so much information that we were like it's not about one specific. Web page RJ pag or MP three or any file that you could imagine. But the guest off the overall sheer volume of data, and we're gonna have a conversation about that at Katherine Clark gallery on Saturday after the concert about playing with the world of big numbers making music out of huge amounts of data. So internet archive loved their stuff, and they're very committed to open source and freeware as well. Yes. So Morgan asks will DJ spooky sonic, celebrating be recorded. So people who don't live in San Francisco inexperienced. Yeah. It's going to be an album, and we're probably going to circle back to a couple of other versions of it. Because it's of course, is the internet. Why not have remixes mixes and mashups in? So the first version is gonna be you ever win a center and there's going to be other versions that are going to go to museums galleries, and so on celebrating a kind of a year long celebration of fifty years of the internet. So yes, there will be an album, and it's really a celebration. Meaning that you you see it as an incredibly positive thing. That's yeah. I mean the internet. I mean, if you really think about it our society, accelerated once people were able to compare exchange and really have a more robust conversation. And that's what democracy is about the way in the internet is a perfect and eerily uncanny reflection of the of the sort of chaotic entropy that our society kind of has its underbelly because there's the dark side to which is that people will abuse anything, and you could you could have the cleanest most interesting thing and somebody will find a way to mess it up and do some crazy stuff with it. It feels like you're reminding us of the best can be in human hands. Henry Rian Santa Clara, join us. Thank you. You are brilliant. I've been listening to your stuff for years, brilliant, brilliant. Thank you. And I just wanted to throw it a random tidbit that number logic space, 0 and information are somewhat the categories that you can discover in math as explained by really record information is the one that has a little different quality next. And Celeste wants to know, what do you think of electronic music composed by a robot? That's that's kind of the next couple of steps here. I mean artificial intelligence, I think is going to be a tool not to be feared, but to be useful as a kind of a way of enhancing creativity. And I just want to say thanks to everybody's been calling in. It's really heartwarming to be here. These are somewhat dark cynical times. And I would say music is the anti wall. It's the open space, and is that what you hope people get out of the show today year, and that we all kind of can compare and contrast information, but yeah, the gentleman who just called about math. That's a universal language to and math has no walls. DJ spooky Paul Miller. Thanks for joining us this morning. Show Cuanto Pia premieres at your Buena.

San Francisco internet archive California Danny Cuanto Pia Jeremy scales Hamas Martin Scorsese YouTube Cuanto Pierre Iraq internet Griffith Jiang Lawrence Lessig New York Rosemary Reed Miller sandra Verna Herzog UCLA
"brewster kahle" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"brewster kahle" Discussed on Recode Decode

"So so people without money have to put up with shit like it was kind of an interesting. But that's what he thinks. Like, he's giving you all this great stuff. So put up or shut up, you know, kind of thing. I think so too. I mean, you know, increasingly, you know, there's certainly a lot of work to be done to put pressure on Facebook to be better. Most of the pressure that we put on them is to empower users, right? And one of the best Westwood ways you? power users is to let them go. I kind of have been saying that Facebook doesn't really have users or customers they have hostages at this point. And and and you know, letting people go giving them the tools so that they can take their data and leave and go somewhere else or use open API is. I mean, I think the other thing that we all really need to resist is the idea that there there is only one network are only two networks we need to develop. You know, this is some of the work that my friend Brewster Kahle is doing the internet archives to build a decentralized web. So that we don't have to put so much pressure on Facebook because people can Lear the NAR platforms. Yeah. There are other good options. This, you know, this idea that there's five giant platforms and everything is there too. Well, it depends on what you're platforming for talk about Amazon, which is the bad. So. Yes, okay. Yeah. The things. Yes. That the problem that you know, that I think is is most we're talking about is like well, first of all how do we get hair because the internet was designed to be the great descended. And we're gonna talk about that next year. And then how do we get out? All right. Are we can we get back when you talk more about this really terrific issue of mcsweeney as it's called the end of trust. We're here it was Cindy Cohn. The executive director of the traffic frontier foundation EFF as what better known and clear boil the managing editor of Mick Sweeney's quarterly concern, we're here. It was Cindy Cohen the executive director of the electron frontier foundation and Claire boil the managing editor of mcsweeney quarterly concern. We're talking about a new issue of mcsween ease that EFF worked on with them called the end of trust in this about all kinds of issues with different writers discussing seven we talked about some of it cluding, techniques and other things I went to a little bit more about the issue and some more stuff Claire talk about some more of the stuff. And then I want to get into these bigger. She's about what you just brought up Cindy about five platforms or whatever. How many I think there's two you think there's I do agree with you that possibly there's three and where we go from here and how it devolved into this. Sure. So we got a great piece with Snowden which yet Ord Snowden in which his lawyer at the. ACS attorney at the ACLU. Ben Wisner interviews him, and it's this really endearing conversation. So the concept is that Snowden is explaining blockchain to nuclear. But they also have this just really great dynamic because they're they have a closeness that you can tell through the interview..

Facebook Ord Snowden Claire Cindy Cohn Brewster Kahle executive director managing editor Ben Wisner Cindy Cohen mcsweeney Cindy Westwood ACLU EFF Amazon NAR ACS Mick Sweeney attorney