2 Burst results for "Brett Consol"

"brett consol" Discussed on Alexa in Canada

Alexa in Canada

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"brett consol" Discussed on Alexa in Canada

"Depression, when any can start to alert you or your care provider about these things that is absolutely in rentable in my mind, so we're not there yet. But that's what's coming down the pipe in. In, in the future. And I don't think it's going to be too long before we start to see some real amazing applications. That's cool. Well, I love that and your, your angle as a physician on the space. I think it's, it's really good for the entire industry to, to, to have your perspective and love hearing your predictions, Terry. Well, this has been a lot of fun for me. It's a it's a it's a wonderful way to start a Friday. And I know it's a it's a very early Friday night. I appreciate you getting up early and accommodating and, and having this discussion. So, so let's let's meet up in Newark and have some fun. And by the way, so the voice, the voice house band, sonic truth is going to happen. I'm going to call you also got my, my sister, Christy and brother-in-law, Steve Smith. They own the Seattle drums, school of music. They teach more than fifteen disciplines. They're easy amazing amazing business there in Seattle. Yeah. They've been a stalwart. Work in the music industry there for thirty years. They're coming out to voice summit to join us amazing. There's going to be a lot of music. And we actually have a special announcement that we'll be making another musician. That's going to be a part of, of a voice summit. We can't release that yet. But a musician turned entrepreneur, let's just put it that way. Yeah, it's gonna be a lot of fun. There's going to be a lot of music involved. You know, we see voice as, as so as representing so many different aspects from the technology that speaking to us now but also our human voices spoken word the performing word and the singing word we're really excited about that. So Terry a lot of fun for me to chat with you today. Thanks so much for being a part of what we're doing an important part of this community. And let's go have some fun in July. Showy. Absolutely. Well, I'm really glad to hear about the van that's going to be awesome. So I'm gonna make sure I pack my drumsticks and stick. So I'll make sure we get a kit. Awesome, awesome. And hey, then likewise, this has been a lot of fun. It's a really fun way to do a podcast and just have a chat back and forth before we let you go. Just tell my listeners if they don't know where can they go to find out more about what you're doing and learn more about voice of it? Absolutely. So voice summit dot AI is going to have all the information for you there and just to kinda reiterate the programming. It's a four day. Then we have a days zero event on Monday, July twenty. Second. What we call days zero is we have a hacker. Thon. We have our pre conference workshops Brett Consol is going to give a three hour strategy workshop anybody that wants to understand this space would be very well served to take Brits workshop, but Wally Brill from Google and out of a Levin and just highly low. Heidi Culbertson the folks that are giving the long form workshops. I mean, just what a wealth of information and a chance to sit down for three hours with somebody in the space. So our pre conference workshops are on Monday, July twenty second. And then we've got a whole slate on Tuesday Wednesday, Thursday, keynotes talks panels, networking, and fun. We've got our startup expo on Tuesday night, Tuesday afternoon and evening as well more than one hundred startups joining us from around the world. So it's gonna be a crazy few days at the end of July. But again, anybody that's curious. This is the spot, basically get caught up on this. Taste good voice, some dot A I and check it out. Tickets are very forcible. We made made the entry level affordable for most folks. But if people need a scholarship we also have scholarships for students or folks that are transitioning jobs, or need some assistance. We are there to help you and give you access to the space. So definitely apply to a scholarship as well. Fantastic. All right, Pete. Well, like I said, it's always spend a chat with you. And I can't wait to see you there in Newark and place in tunes. Amen, gummy loud, fun, Terry. Thanks, a lot take. There you go. Fun fun chat. That was a really neat conversation that I had with Pete. I had a lot of fun doing that. I'd love to hear your feedback on that. By the way, if you've got some thoughts about that type of podcast. Please let me know. All right. I got a couple of links to tell you about first of all, for voice summit, if you want to join us in Newark, then I encourage you to do so. And I've.

Terry Newark Pete Seattle Depression Heidi Culbertson Google Brett Consol Christy Steve Smith Wally Brill Levin twenty second thirty years three hours three hour four day
"brett consol" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

20:33 min | 2 years ago

"brett consol" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"World are really important for brands. You know, monetize ING, and and and I took has a fantastic technology base for that. I could speak at at length about it. But I was on the sort of the categories of venture that we're interested in cats. And I said, hey, I and voice for sure and a are in video and data, and there's, you know, number internet of things there's a number of the vectors that a more general purpose VC is interested in also intact thought, we're interested in those factors across the brand. Yeah. For specific application, so what is the fertile human? Well, we're on a trajectory where ultimately will be interacting pr-. Probably on a device, but it might also be a hologram. You know, standing posed in front of us in the in space of a rendering of something that is so photo realistic and intelligent that. It'll be very hard to distinguish it from a real human. So, you know, I'm talking to Brett Consol, but I might be talking to your avatar, but not just the cartoon in standardization of, you know, your face, and and so forth, but some some manifestation of this technology that has it hard for me to distinguish whether it's actually really you live in the moment, or your virtual is that the key application like to replicate things like people's that are already living, or is it to like create things that look like real people because we see that with like some of the some of the genitive models that we were talking about f- fair. Adversarial networks. Recent aired her earlier before we got on. And so they'll create these things that look it's a picture of human, but that humid doesn't exist. And but you look at you like, oh, that's a person. Well, that's a whole category onto itself. There's three categories really there's the the human that never existed is not not real. But is equivalent functionally. You've not just looks. But maybe interactivity college only the human that does exist. But you're really double if you will. And then the human that's dead. Is the legacy case? And some people is kind of more of a maybe it'll turn out to be quite gratifying. But could I continue to have a conversation with my father who's been deceased for six or seven years, and what I value that. And what I want my kids to have access to that. And my grandkids and who've never met him. I it's a use case of that. But it's all as up to I've had conversations about that just yesterday. Really because it's changed Palo's. You wrote that book talk to me he before he did that he created dad bought. And so is this chap that was basically well chat bots manifestation of his father. But that that got him into this idea of saying, oh, we could do all these things. Yeah. But it may or may not be charming to people who experienced that later on in life or not. I don't know. That's a we'll find out. I wouldn't personally be ready to build a business on that. Use case read some people will the the generalization is. Is that these virtual humans will be so realistic and intelligent, not just that they look real. But when you engage with them conversationally, you're kind of on the level of of real conversation by the reference again, knowledge navigator, this video totally an instance of a real person talking to a virtual human in that case. It's it's got a combination of personal assistant research assistant friend, very interesting imagination that they showed so early on that this is coming fully believe, it's I we've made investments that are in this direction and further along most people have imagined or so how does virtual human so virtual Hillman. Well, let's just talk about it. So it's this rendering. But then there's also this. Was a dialogue system. And there's an base. Let's say there's a knowledge base. There's house right. So you can interact with you know, as it's supposed to pass the turing test and somewhere, right? Okay. So from a brand standpoint, which is where you focus, right? The idea here is it would be a concierge for that brand or something or an ambassador something the first case that I think is probably going to emerge a celebrity. So if you think about it was in there's two categories, maybe there's the Hollywood celebrity that somebody might have an affinity for be a fan. And then there's the influence or, you know, there's this category of influence or marketing where YouTube celebrities, yes and pitched products, and and that's a big business in the brand world already. We've investments in influence or marketing platforms and creators companies. And that has emerged as significant. It's kind of share of voice if you will this is not just Mark. It. Sure. But our people talking about you, and our people listening to those who have influence over their decisions and consumer choices. So the first use case might be what is the criminals celebrity endorsement, but where I can actually talk to the celebrity, and the the beauty of virtual humans is that people are a single person is not scalable, so that they can talk all five million fans in a day. But a virtual version of them can talk to five million of their fans today when the the delivery of the technology is above a satisfactory level that I feel gratified action talking to that person even though I know it's a virtual version of Madonna ultra. Yeah, it's not a lady could still have a good experience knowing that it's not sort of the real thing. Is there an uncanny valley issue with virtual humans? I know there is so it's the same as like robots. Yes. Okay. So how do you over come that? You get to the other side of the valley. That's a real fair enough. It's a real thing. Most most of the humanoid robots that we see today have not gotten past that. Well, if they if they are stuck in it. It's a problem if they're pre the valley. It's okay, we we can live with that. Yeah. I don't think it's it doesn't realize the full potential of where we're going. But I don't have any doubt that we will get through that valley. And what I don't know for sure is whether universally we're going to like the world, we live in of virtual humans that we know aren't the real per cent. Yeah. But we're, but we're, but they're close enough that we're not in the creepy stage. So we use the term voices system allied in. That's an important terminology. Although the the broader categories rarely virtual assistant, right? So people would say never knew that which is which is. Personal agent personal assistant virtual assistant, which is the center, which is all of the above are used and often misapplied, right? But I think there has been people for a long time talking about this idea of virtual assistant, and that could be a chat bot. It could be voice system could be lots of different things voices are virtual systems, maybe most of the time, at least virtual systems are not necessarily voice assistance because they don't have to be. But if I think about this idea of virtual assistant, and then I have a virtual human, right? So the key difference is you're just giving some sort of projected physical form of that. And the the value of that is what? So it's not Star Trek, right computer was never embodied. Right. That thing. Well, look at it more like data. I guess it's it's broader than what I'm going to say. But I'm going to answer your question by making reference to the brand tech category. Brands interested in. And the the driver for almost all media in in brand advertising, brand marketing brand content creative is engagement. And so the question is am I more likely to fee to me engagement implies emotional connection? Not just how many minutes or seconds. Do. I spend in a dialogue system fair now. But I'm emotionally triggered in a way that I care. And so Yes, What's the benefit of this more realistic looking human presence by comparison to a virtual assistant or personal agent. That's a cartoon character rendered in simple drawing form or or disembodied like just just completely about it. Yeah. Well, I think I'm more likely I said, it might invoke some negative emotion. But I'm more likely to achieve some degree of connection and engagement and emotional trigger with something that is more human also mutual friend of ours. Kathy Perot's on the podcast year ago. If she and I had. Many conversations. Fact, I'm going to see her tomorrow. She was working at sensibly, and they found that when they introduced this avatar which crude compared to what you're talking about, obviously. But, you know, socially, something on the screen that the patient engagement with their system went up significantly. Well, the research at USC in ICT lab that supports that people. Are you know, they they do a lot of contract work for the government the army and so forth, and they have therapeutic treatment avatars agents that that people suffering post traumatic stress are more comfortable, trusting a anonymous human than a real human. It actually works to the benefit of the therapy. So there's definitely use cases where that's true Kathy's case. You know, you're talking about cens- leaves a medical application. What we don't know is from a social purely, social right point of view is if it's an option at work. Yeah. In a way that we're we're we're. Delighted or is it going to work in a way that we're, you know, the we might be at risk of of extending the uncanny valley even further out on the well. Yeah. Because the tolerance might be lower rate. If it's not something is deemed essential. Although in this day and age, maybe interacting with celebrities is deemed essential. It really depends. So it's making me think about this idea, though, that we have let's say we had a virtual assistant which was Chapa, and the that's going to maybe be a fairly low level of emotional engagement. We can see tax can you can express through chap personality and certain types of ways. And but maybe the engagement won't be there. Because it's it's clearly not human like when we get to voice assistant, so disembodied in this case. Actually with some of the systems that we have today, they do seem kind of human like, and we are at least triggering the oral senses of being able to hear and to and through that process, like, express, empathy and personality through the tone tender timber voice, all these things that we think about and then if you move to the virtual human, you would think that it carries all of the things the personality the voice, and then you give visual manifestation to to as long as you stay out of the candy valley. You could see how that would create even more of an engagement and peop- if there's engagement we had brands are gonna want that. Yes. Make sense. So what else are you seeing in sort of the voice space that is you think is really intriguing for brand marketers, for example. I don't know we we just wrapped our arms around a pretty big part of the the puzzle. I mean, I, you know, if you the virtual human challenge includes lots of sub technology pieces, I mean emotion perception, for example, we see in the brand space a number of companies that are finding ways to measure the response of the of the consumer in real time, either by tracking their eyes or facial jet facial responses, not just facial recognition, but are you smiling or frowning, and and all that? So presumably brands are interested in that it's found its way into the creative process. So not just I care about you know, what your reaction is. And did my ad worker. My my content work, but actually I'm going to use it to decide which content to create or which Reinhardt of the the AB testing. But at the extreme where I've lot more Sutter. Not obey versus be isn't just red versus green. It's it's, you know, who's the persona, and how are they expressing themselves in what are the script be, and and what content is registering and so forth. So it's going to what we're what we're seeing is sort of more of a full circle connection between data which used to be an after the fact thing like analyze and give me the performance metrics on what might into a full life cycle where the data is captured after the fact, but also infuses before the fact the creative decision making. And then by the way, the distribution question of where do I buy my my my inventory, where do I display my ads or show my video, or how do I target is is a very data driven determination that when the program know much about the programmatic advertising world, but all these things are getting more and more tightly linked coming more. Eligible more algorithm Mickley driven. I mean, we have a company called Elsie that does media planning which used to be a very spreadsheet driven decide how much radio time I wanna buy and how much TV time and billboards and print and so forth. Now, they have all of the possible outcomes in a database, you know, the knowledge system with an algorithm. Ick driver of the plan, and it's gonna lead to a much higher performance. But also going to be linked into the actual programmatic. Purchase of the media eventually, and then it'll be linked into the results and be tracking how well things do and that'll feed back into the into the creative side. And so all those pieces are are coming together. Not all at once. And maybe not even the next three to six months, but they're all evolving and finding where they they connect to the other pieces of this advertising marketing ecosystem so for the. Actual human to sort of go back to that. I've been thinking about that. So for an organization that has a persona that they're already associated with Quaker Oats has the has the Quaker flow for progressive. Maybe does AKIs used to have most interesting man in the world is sorta semi retired him and bring back. They gotta do most interesting that, but you could see how they this virtual human could be sort of an interesting play on that. But you think most brands are going to do that like Nike's they can have this is Budweiser gonna have this virtual human that represents the brand or or are they going to use it as these are representatives of the brand it's easier with celebrities. Right because we understand what that as you're a carbon copy. But if I've got something more abstract like a consumer brand you mentioned Nike, which is sports brand. And in sports. I mean, they they market like crazy through celebrity sports. So your idea would be they would have Michael. Jordan. Yeah. They would have LeBron or Tiger Woods or something. It's happening. It's happening. Okay. It's happening. The hint. So so that makes sense for them. They don't have to do that. But like so anybody who uses celebrities, I guess it's pretty that would be part of the dorsal processes over gonna create a virtual yet. But even that's just a specific case. I mean as a broad case in in the. In the Hollywood and sports celebrity side of things. But and I don't even the Mr Clean or Cheryl or. Yeah. Quaker? You know, the Quaker I I don't think it even needs to be limited to that. I think you know, you just need a empathetic relationship with spokes human that could be like, it could be the equivalent of having someone at the retail store like, you know, so at the at the Nike store the under armor store, right? There's a there is a sales Representative or retail person who will like answer questions for you talk to you about the different things that are coming up and encourage you, and your workout regimen or something like that. So could just be that person with logo wear on. And they they represent the company, and you know, it's just someone who sort of works for the company, although they only virtually work for it. Yeah. Well, it turns out that purchase decisions are often influenced by expert advisers, and we have a company called automats that sort of started in the days when everybody. Was going to be a chat bot business, and we found out that just chat bots by themselves. We're maybe not going to be the next wave that they're sort of expected, and they avert the volved to be conversational AI business with messenger based you know, the chat bought lives in the messenger communications channel. But they've evolved in the beauty space, for example with with an app to virtual skin-care advisors. So you turns out cosmetics or skin care products in the cosmetic field are very much. A function of the personal conditions of your skin the advice, you get about it. From an expert, you go to cosmetics counter in a department store in cosmetics store, and you're gonna listen to what that person tells you about their analysis after you tell the issues you're having with your skin. Well, that's being done. And so any kind of adviser right, which I think is essentially example, also there was a advice on. Medical they might. But I think it's that particular application talking was more about collection collecting data from the from the patients. Okay. So it increase their adherence to actually providing the data was needed example. But all those expertise guidance consultation categories don't need they don't need a celebrity to deliver them. They just need a human sort of pull this back to voice. Can you express? The empathy. Without a spoken voice coming across to the no. It's essential and the the human face and the the. Gestures of the face or the reflexes responses of the face. Yeah. It's human right. It will human like Willie say, I think it's further along than than than we know. I think I needed them out. At some point. So Ron crown. This was excellent. This was we we talked for a long time. It was great. I thought we would we would have a lot of things to talk about. I really appreciate taking some time to share some of the history. So that least listeners of this podcast will have that context that this world didn't start in two thousand fourteen or two thousand sixteen whatever they THEO. I came across it. It turns out it didn't start in nineteen Ninety-four either true founded, but there's a really rich history. That was that. That's as good a starting point is is is any maybe not the best for me for. Sure. Yeah. Absolutely. That was your starting point. And this story has been about your story your perspective. So I appreciate that. How can the voice by listeners keep track of what you're doing? Well, I'm active on Twitter. My my style on Twitter is more to reach wheat the things that I think are really meritorious less volume less quantity more like, wait. There's a reason why Ron thought this was interesting. I don't always narrate that. But that's that's one place and then. My activity in the voice world was a bit in abeyance. And now, I'm I'm more present. So you'll see me at conferences. And and speaking as we did yesterday. Absolutely. Okay. Great. So we'll put that in the show notes that people can know how to keep track of what rods doing Ron crown. Thank you very much for joining the voice about podcast. Thank you.

virtual assistant Nike Ron crown personal assistant Hollywood Twitter Brett Consol Kathy Perot YouTube f USC Palo Mark Sutter Quaker Oats