30 Burst results for "Brennan Center"

Republicans in Nearly Every State Push For Voting Restrictions in the Aftermath of 2020 Election

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

03:15 min | 21 hrs ago

Republicans in Nearly Every State Push For Voting Restrictions in the Aftermath of 2020 Election

"Every state push new voting restrictions in the aftermath of the 2020 election, the U. S. Supreme Court today heard a major case to decide how those rules should be judged under federal civil rights law. Will the court uphold to provision of in Arizona voting law that Democrats argue violate the historic Voting Rights Act? Here's NBC's Alex Push a Well, so the U. S. Supreme Court is looking essentially at a section of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that's meant to combat racial discrimination in state election laws. So after the 2020 presidential election, we've seen a flurry of Republican state legislators that have made laws that essentially have kind of made it harder to vote. This is, according to the Brennan center, They tallied about 215 bills across the country. But so this particular case did the Supreme Court is hearing is added. Arizona and justices Air grappling how to interpret Section Two of the act, which says any measures that result in the denial or bridge mint of voting rights on account of race or color. Is illegal. Now. The details of this Arizona case there, too, to new laws and one deals with how ballots or cat they disqualified Ballots cast out of precinct, Uh, The other Arizona law prohibits third party collection of mail ballots for delivery to state officials. So the court must decide how and what tests should be used to to determine whether or not this violates that section two. Well, Alex. I know there is an opinion express that these regulations make it harder to vote. But then there will be others that will say no. These regulations will ensure against voter fraud. So you have two different Perspectives on these regulations City? Absolutely. And so I mean, I think this this is going to be you know, the biggest tell for the legacy of former President Trump like appointing conservative justices to the court. The court is now mostly conservative, right. And so we're already starting to see the effects of that and in the arguing on day so I can tell you that earlier today Got this bread cabinet. Also justice any Amy Cockney Barrett are saying that essentially, you know, they believe that these laws don't necessarily violate the Voting Rights Act of 1965 where you had Justice Sonia sort of my yours? Who's who's arguing otherwise. But we're months away from a decision in this case, but early on, it looks as though these particular laws out of Arizona will stay intact and I'll tell you why. Um, even the Biden administration has conceded that they may not have run afoul of the Voting Rights Act. It seemed as though that can mean the court, which is majority conservative, also sees it that way. Again. There's a lot of time between now and when this case is a question to be decided, decided, which is the end of June, But but early on, it seems as though uh, these laws will probably be upheld. Okay. It's a B C's Alex per shade in Washington. Thank you, Alex for your time today. Thank you, Kitty. All right. 6 50 our final

U. S. Supreme Court Arizona Alex Push Brennan Center President Trump NBC Amy Cockney Barrett Supreme Court Justice Sonia Alex Biden Administration Cabinet Washington
Supreme Court questions need for restrictive voting laws in Voting Rights Act case

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

01:36 min | 23 hrs ago

Supreme Court questions need for restrictive voting laws in Voting Rights Act case

"Republicans in nearly every state push new voting restrictions in the aftermath of the 2020 election, the U. S Supreme Court today hearing a major case to decide how those rules should be judged under federal civil rights law. Will the court uphold to provision of Arizona voting law there that Democrats argue violate the historic Voting Rights Act? Here's a B C's Alex push a All right, well, so the U. S. Supreme Court is looking essentially at a section of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that's meant to combat racial discrimination in state election laws. So after the 2020 presidential election, we've seen a flurry of Republican state legislators that have made laws that essentially have kind of made it harder to vote. This is, according to the Brennan center, They tallied about 215 bills across the country. But so this particular case the Supreme Court is hearing is out of Arizona and justices. Air grappling how to interpret Section Two of the act, which says any measures that result in the denial or bridge mint of voting rights on account of race or color. Is illegal. Now. The details of this Arizona case there, too, to new laws and one deals with how ballots or cat disqualified ballots cast out of precinct, Uh, The other Arizona law prohibits third party collection of mail ballots for delivery to state officials. So the court must decide how and what tests should be used to to determine whether or not this violate that section two.

U. S Supreme Court U. S. Supreme Court Arizona Brennan Center Alex Supreme Court
Local Democrats Call For An Independent Redistricting Board In Texas

Charlie Parker

00:36 sec | Last month

Local Democrats Call For An Independent Redistricting Board In Texas

"To stay in power. But that may be coming to an end. The Democrats nearly 800 page for the People Act includes Provisioned, calling for a change to the way congressional districts are drawn. It would require that states adopt independent redistricting commissions. Michaeli with the Brennan Center says it would alter the power structure in Texas because the majority would not be able to use their muscle the draw districts to their advantage. What happened in Texas over the course of multiple decades, including 2011 with Texas is maps were found to be intentionally discriminatory. Democrats argued that reforms have give citizens a chance to offer their input. Michael board. NewsRadio 1200 W II,

Michaeli Brennan Center Texas Michael
Republicans see bright spot in voter registration push

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Republicans see bright spot in voter registration push

"Democrat Joe Biden may be leading in most presidential polls but Republicans are pulling ahead in new voter registrations Republican Party leaders are celebrating their progress in signing up voters in key battleground states like Florida Pennsylvania Arizona and others Democrats appear to have hit a stumbling block with the decision to scale back in person voter registration drives during the pandemic with events like street festivals in college gatherings canceled the Brennan center for justice says registrations are thirty eight percent lower than they were during the comparable period in twenty sixteen and that disproportionately hurts young urban and minority voters a trump campaign director says for them the best thing for voter registration isn't doozy Azam for a candid it and the infrastructure Jackie Quinn Washington

Joe Biden Arizona Director Azam Jackie Quinn Washington Republican Party Florida Pennsylvania Brennan Center For Justice
Probe into 'discarded' ballots becomes campaign outrage fuel

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 5 months ago

Probe into 'discarded' ballots becomes campaign outrage fuel

"Some elections experts are raising concerns about president trump's predictions about voter fraud with mail in ballots and they're calling for detailed reports on each incident that arises a federal prosecutor in a Republican Pennsylvania county described nine military ballots in the trash and president trump seized on that to support his contention mail in voting expanded for virus safety will open the door to fraud military ballots that all were for trump everyone was to drop and there were no waste paper basket now we're learning it may have been a mistake by a newly hired workers and not all the ballots apparently work for trump Wendy Weiser but the Brennan center for justice accuses president trump of actively seeking to discredit the election the president rallying in Virginia Friday we don't want to be cheated Jackie Quinn Washington

President Trump Wendy Weiser Brennan Center Virginia Jackie Quinn Washington Pennsylvania
Probe into 'discarded' ballots becomes campaign outrage fuel

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 5 months ago

Probe into 'discarded' ballots becomes campaign outrage fuel

"Some elections experts are raising concerns about president trump's predictions about voter fraud with mail in ballots and they're calling for detailed reports on each incident that arises a federal prosecutor in a Republican Pennsylvania county described nine military ballots in the trash and president trump seized on that to support his contention mail in voting expanded for virus safety will open the door to fraud military ballots that all were for trump everyone was to drop and there were no waste paper basket now we're learning it may have been a mistake by a newly hired workers and not all the ballots apparently work for trump Wendy Weiser but the Brennan center for justice accuses president trump of actively seeking to discredit the election the president rallying in Virginia Friday we don't want to be cheated Jackie Quinn Washington

President Trump Wendy Weiser Brennan Center Virginia Jackie Quinn Washington Pennsylvania
President Trump again refuses to commit to peaceful transition if he loses

The View

04:49 min | 5 months ago

President Trump again refuses to commit to peaceful transition if he loses

"Hello and welcome to the view. Happy Friday to everybody Meghan will be back on Monday Anna. Navarro is here. We're always happy to have her and we WANNA start today by honoring the reason that we're all sitting here actually, which is because of Barbara Barbara Walters Happy Birthday Barbara many more my dear. Nationwide protests. Yes. Nationwide protests continue over the grand jury decision to let cops off the hook for killing Brianna Taylor. Now really that would be calling for calm and unity right right now right But trump is adding fuel to the fire claiming that he's protesting the use of mail in ballots and they may not peacefully transfer power over to Biden if he's voted out, take a look. To See what happens you know that I've been complaining very strongly about the ballots and the ballots are disaster and People are rioting. Do you commit to making sure that there's a little? Blue want to get rid of the ballots and you'll have a very. Very, peaceful, there won't be a transfer, frankly are the election results only legitimate if you win. So we have to be very careful with the ballots, the ballots to hope big scam and we wanna make sure the election is honest and I'm not sure that it can be. I. Don't know that it can be with this whole. Situation unsolicited ballots they're unsolicited million things sent everybody and we'll say. So. I, think he's playing the autocrat just wants to see which Republicans are going to line up behind them like they've done on every other heinous thing he said and done. But what do I know maybe Anna do you know you're a Republican? Do you think they'll fall behind him? Look I think a lot of them are distancing themselves on on this at least you know one thing joy. It's more of the same. Okay. The only thing trump has to offer the American people is fear that's what his campaign is sewing in the hearts of American fear fear of Lalas, fear of socialism fear ballots fear of election results fear of the transition. So this is another attempt at voter suppression. This is another attempt at making Americans fearful of what will happen if he doesn't get. This is another attempt of driving people to some people to the votes out of fear and keeping some people from voting out of fear and it just you know it's not going to work if you see what we saw in Virginia. Where early voting started and people were lining up for blocks and blocks. If people have to walk over molten lava to get to the voting booth I, think many Americans will and the last thing I want to say. Look I fled to Talibanism I've fled communism integral walk in one, thousand, nine, hundred. where I have heard this kind of talk and where I have seen unelected elected leaders try to perpetuate themselves in power is in places like Cuba, where the Castro's have been in power for over sixty years in places like Venezuela with showers and places like Nicaragua with Ortega and with Somoza it's the tater ships that behave this way. It's dictators that behave this way, and this is what Donald Trump is trying to emulate. Yes. It's ironic. Isn't it that they're worried a lot of the people you mentioned a worried about communism but he's the one who's acting like A. Communist. Countries that you're talking about. So Sunday, how how seriously you take in this actually. I'm taking it very seriously and I think we should all take it seriously because this is a president that. says. The quiet part out loud I mean he has no nuance and so he has been challenging the notion of mail in voting from the very beginning even though he submits his ballots by mail in vote. So I think we have to take very seriously and he's been sort of poisoning the well by saying there's going to be this massive voter fraud while I think people need to understand that this has been looked at there is no such thing as massive mailing voter fraud. In fact, the Brennan Center for Justice, it's a non-partisan think tank calculated. The rate of voter fraud and elections at between zero point zero zero, zero, three percent and zero point zero zero to five percent. Okay. Zero percent. So there is no voter fraud, but he's putting it out there and he's been saying it for a long time. So I, think these are the actions of a man who knows that he is going to be outvoted I think he knows he expects to be outvoted, but he wants to hobble that count, and so we have to take him very seriously. We need to take him at his word.

Donald Trump Barbara Barbara Walters Navarro Brianna Taylor Meghan Biden Brennan Center For Justice Anna Virginia Cuba President Trump Nicaragua Ortega Castro Venezuela
"brennan center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:39 min | 6 months ago

"brennan center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Former FBI special agent and a fellow at the Brennan Centers, Liberty and National Security Program. Michael Thanks for joining me, Thanks for having me Also with me is a leech. A Sperry, a journalist at the Intercept covering Justice Alito. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. Michael, Let's start with you. There's been a lot of speculation about the ideology of Kyle Riton house and whether he was connected to any specific far right groups. What do we know so far? Not very much. Frankly, One thing that people have to understand is that there is Is basically no obstacle joining these groups. If you wanted to put on a Hawaiian shirt and a flak jacket over that and carry some heavy weapons, and in public, you would automatically be representing the boogaloo movement. So you know the these organizations don't have Top down organizational structure and ah heavy membership requirements that they're pretty fluid, and that's Both by design. Ah! Practice called leaderless resistance that they used T o because they understand that they're under police scrutiny. But also because there they need members. They need people who will contribute or participate in these events. So if they start having any kind of rigorous screening process, they'll not have very many people showing up with them. Michael in the video of Rittenhouse. He's one of the videos. At least he clearly says that he's there to protect businesses. This in his words, Michael. What is this idea who's deputized these folks? And we're talking largely about white men in these militias who are armed who has deputized them to come around the country and sort of in their own words protect Ah, people in businesses. Well, that's just it. Nobody has and these militants were acting is vigilantes claiming to have a positive mission. During the protests, but again they're completely unregulated. They have no legal authority to be there. And as we see in many of these cases It's not just a business hiring a security guard. You know, most states have licensing requirements for security guards, particularly armed security guards, because Number one. You don't want people who who aren't allowed to have weapons to be carrying out those duties. But also you want to make sure they have proper liability insurance for when they make a mistake. S o that that this is not any sort of a legal operation at all, Which is what's troubling about the police author are allowing this activity happening, and they've done it so much for so long since Over the last couple of years that it's not surprising that people believe that they're authorized to go out and do that, And that's because law enforcement has not been Aggressive in in tackling the legal violations thes in militants engage in while they're out of these protests. Lee Jae, When we see the video of written house, which we described at the very top of the segment here he again is walking hands up in the air has just Ah shot multiple people killed two people. And these armored vehicles or just driving right past him. I mean, this was a stunning display of how Ah law enforcement either you know, willingly or not just ignored this threat. How common Is that a leech? I think my enforcement is quite comfortable with the presence ofthe of individuals like this. And groups like this. And in fact, government has known about you know the threat posed by far right white supremacists, right wing extremists for a long time and hasn't really done a whole lot to address it. And not only that, but we also know that the government institutions and and you know, the F B. I, for instance, have been very much aware off the close ties between these groups and these individuals. And law enforcement itself, And that's something that dip up Lick has rarely been made aware ofthe. It's something that you know the FBI certainly not discussing publicly, even though they are very much an alert about this, that we actually published a report in 2017 leaked FBI internal document that weren't that white supremacist groups and far right? Groups where were actively seeking to infiltrate law enforcement. And you know, the document basically noted that domestic terrorism investigations identified often identified active links between this white supremacist extremist militia extremists. Sovereign state is an extremist. And law enforcement officers. But other than that, and this again was a leaked document. There hasn't been a whole lot of public discussion about this, and there's a reason for that was a political reason there were reports in the past. That that kind of raised the alarm around around his debt, and they were condemned. They were you know, there was AH big upheaval in response to reports the government was forced to to basically walk them back. And so that's why we are seeing a lot of discussions of public discussions about this yet. Michael, too early Chase Point I want to play a clip here from Ah FBI director last year, Christopher Wray talking about the threat of white supremacist violence in the US, I will say. That a majority of the Domestic terrorism. Cases that we've investigated are motivated by some version of what you might call white supremacist violence, but it includes other things as well. Michael are are these militia groups part of what Ray is describing there in terms of ah domestic terror threats and white supremacist domestic terror threats in particular. S O. The FBI divides their domestic terrorism portfolio into a number of different categories on did it had a separate category for white supremacists? When I was working undercover in the 19 nineties, they were one category white supremacist so far right militants because there's a lot of overlap between these groups again with the low barriers of entry. Ah, but they changed that over time and had separate groups for white supremacy, white supremacists and far right militants, and it's It's interesting way that Ray frames that because what we have to understand is that A white supremacist. Far right militants are farm were active than any of the of the other categories of domestic terrorists. That ah that the FBI designates so It's It's a bit of a subterfuge to say We do more investigations against these groups. And that's why in 2017 Senator Durbin introduced a bill at the domestic terrorism Protection Act that would Have required the FBI to produce the data showing the number of What they're considering terrorism incidents and particularly the deaths from those incidents on one side of the ledger and the number of investigations Thie F B I has initiated in each Category..

FBI Michael Justice Alito Sperry Kyle Riton Ray Brennan Centers National Security Program Rittenhouse Senator Durbin Lee Jae Christopher Wray US director
A Low-Turnout Election is Solvable (Even During COVID-19)

Solvable

04:54 min | 8 months ago

A Low-Turnout Election is Solvable (Even During COVID-19)

"The stakes are extremely high for this year's election. Experts had anticipated the largest turn out in a century, states were registering voters and preparing their precincts, and then covid nineteen head. Priority suddenly shifted. You don't want governor being able to say Oh. I'M GONNA postpone an election. I mean we've had elections in this country under all kinds of dire circumstances, wars in fact, pandemics in the past having the paper ballot having that backup so that you can do an audit so that you can see if there was fraud so that you can do a recount that turns out to be the best system of all turn. Is there an argument other than the purely partisan one? That more voting may advantage one versus the other you more likely to be struck by lightning. Than commit in person voter impersonation in the United States. But. There are other real hurdles to this year's election. With millions of Americans vulnerable to a deadly pandemic. Social distancing measure is now a familiar part of life and the country facing what is perhaps the largest economic crisis in its history, the challenge of securing safe election with high rates of participation is huge. We can have an election that is participatory. With robust turn out in twenty twenty. This is a solvable problem. Michael Waldman is the author of the book the fight to vote. He's the president of the Brennan. Center, for Justice at Nyu. It's non-partisan law and Policy Institute that focuses on improving systems of democracy. Waldman's an expert in the practicalities of the democratic process. He's identified some straightforward solutions to this year's election challenges. My solvable is having an election. That is safe and secure and fully participatory in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic and might. We can't really predict what it's going to be like in November. What are the main things we as a country and as states need to do? You're right that we don't know what it's going to be like in November. The line is we need to? Upgrade how we run elections in the United States for twenty twenty, so that people have the option voting by mail so that there are safe in person options and ample early voting, so that people can register to vote safely and so that we count the ballots in a careful way recognizing that everything's changed. Vote by mail seems like a pretty simple and obvious solution. I mean I understand their legal obstacles in some states in their funding obstacles, but in your ideal world. Wouldn't we just send a prepaid? To everybody WHO's registered and encourage them to vote that way? We'll a lot of states already run their elections by vote by mail, Western states especially like a California and Oregon and Washington. And Colorado and Utah. That's pretty much how people vote right now it will be. Impossible to imagine the whole country. Moving to vote by mail in November. What we can do in the meantime is make it so that people are notified of their a opportunity to get a ballot and they don't need an excuse. They don't need a doctor's note, and we have every reason to think that most people right now will WanNa vote that way yeah I mean. You wrote a whole book about the history of voting and the expansion of voting rights in this. This country, the thing I don't understand about it. Older people who tend to be more conservative tend to vote with Republicans are the most in need of remote voting options and the most in jeopardy from having to go out to vote in person yet it seems to be conservatives who were fighting the vote by mail. Thing so, can you explain that to me well? You know there's lots of things. When it comes to voting. That are controversial with have been partisan fights. If you think about something like the debate over what kind of voter makes sense, that's pretty intense and has been. In the kind of Democrat. Republican left right way. Vote by mail has not been one of the controversial things. The further away you get from. The Fox News set or I guess the White House podium, the left part is in. This is trump. I said out loud. What you really not supposed to say, which is oh, we'll get levels voting there so high. That will never win. And then. After a few days he realized he'd gone off script and what he says. Oh I'm very worried about the specter of voter fraud, but he really made clear. The goal was to restrict. The electorate

United States Michael Waldman Twenty Twenty Fraud Policy Institute Fox News Colorado Brennan Utah Washington California Oregon White House
"brennan center" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:48 min | 9 months ago

"brennan center" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Home for original reporting on that paper in New York it has been a familiar sight at stock car events for decades but NASCAR is just decided to do away with the Confederate flag correspondent Jim crystal NASCAR is betting the Confederate flag from its racism properties in a written statement NASCAR said the banner quote runs contrary to our commitment to providing a welcoming and inclusive environment for all finance our competitors and our industry the circuit Sloan black driver Bubba Wallace had called for such a move NASCAR's coarse southern fan base was angered by a similar effort to ban the Confederate flags at racetracks five years ago Jim chrysalis CBS news and this just did house speaker Nancy Pelosi is calling on Congress to immediately take steps to remove eleven Confederate statues from the U. S. capitol correspondent bill Rakoff with more on the emotional plea from George Floyd's brother on Capitol Hill this is twenty twenty enough is enough alone is Floyd the brother of George Floyd told members of the house Judiciary Committee that lawmakers have a responsibility to make sure that his brother's death at the hands of Minneapolis police was not in vain I couldn't take kids on that day he was killed but maybe by speaking with two today I can make sure that his death would not be in vain house Democrats have introduced a bill on police reform but it's something Republicans oppose they accuse Democrats of trying to define the nation's police departments bill break up CBS news to Minneapolis where the police chief called the beginning of changes in his department today starting with the cutting off from police union contract negotiations it follows the death of Floyd at the hands of now former city police officers Lauren Eisen is with the NYU Brennan center it's very hard to hold police accountable because of the vast power.

house Judiciary Committee CBS Jim chrysalis NYU Brennan center Lauren Eisen Minneapolis New York George Floyd bill Rakoff Congress Nancy Pelosi NASCAR Bubba Wallace Jim crystal NASCAR
If virus reaches general election, cost could be 2 billion

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

If virus reaches general election, cost could be 2 billion

"Now if the corona virus is still a concern in November that cost to make it safe to vote in the general election could top two billion dollars that's according to the Brennan center for justice the process of mailing and receiving ballots would cost about six hundred million dollars alone now costs will be incurred in many states from ballot box construction that's a place to go where voters could go and drop off their mail in ballots another big chunk of the cost about two hundred seventy million will go to maintaining and bolstering in person polling places the study says people without internet access those who need language assistance to votes and people with disabilities may become

Brennan Center
"brennan center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"brennan center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Chance to speak we're speaking with Michael Waldman he's the president of Brennan center for justice down and and why you you mention section five of the voting rights act let's talk about that a bring us up to speed on that because it was it was a time that certain states in certain districts had to go to the justice former for approval if they were to change their voting rolls any way shape or form that has been struck down as I understand the Supreme Court one is been the aftermath this is the automatic still is a fact but you don't have to go to the justice department you can bring an action is I understand on the voting rights act they be doing that well the thing you can do now under the voting rights act is after something is all said and done after somebody who maybe got elected he after racial discrimination voting is in office you can sue after the fact that it is not remotely is effective and the voting rights act and it's poignant of course even talk about it as we've learned of the illness of John Lewis who was that the hero one of the heroes in Selma Alabama who was beaten by police and whose struggle and sacrifice help educate the country as to why you need a voting rights act of nineteen sixty five it has been the most effective civil rights law in the country's history it said that states that had a history of racial discrimination in voting if they wanted to change their practices or laws or do things like purge people from the rolls they had to get pre approval in advance from the justice department or federal court and that fact really made a difference it really change the country in a very positive way and what happened was in twenty thirteen Chief Justice Roberts wrote an opinion he said it in Shelby County it was called the said basically that was then this is now we don't have these problems anymore justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote a dissent she said that's like standing in a rain snow or holding an umbrella and not getting wet and therefore concluding you don't need an umbrella you're not wet what happened after that decision was there was a wave in the southern states especially of new laws new practices such as the surgeon purging in in those states and other things that make it harder for some people to vote and so it's unfortunately a even though it's neutral and high tech it's a bit of a throwback and was green lighted by the United States Supreme Court so let's turn the other side of this from and that is a move in some states to allow former felons to vote which originally had been banned we actually have the new Kentucky governors pressure speaking out of this is what he said I believe in the wall as Attorney General I was proud to work with law enforcement to prosecute those that have broken the law and to make sure that we sought justice I also believe in redemption in second chances so what what's the status of that how many states are moving for that what is that prevalent it's a great question because while you have these intense and often partisan fights over here on voting over here you have real heartening progress on something that is a legacy of the Jim crow era which is these laws that different states they're different ways we we don't have one election system in this country we have fifty states in actually thousands of counties doing this that have said in a lot of places if you have a past criminal conviction you can't vote or you have to go through a lot to get your right to vote restored that was Michael Waldman president of the Brennan center for justice at NYU law school coming up twenty twenty marks the decennial U. S. census with the Sun Belt headed toward gains in.

Michael Waldman Brennan center
"brennan center" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"brennan center" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"For often can extend seventy newsradio your listing that Kay and acts in depth summer of archers sitting in for Mike Simpson along with Charles Schulz in the wake of several mass shootings with connections to possible white nationalist extremism there's a new push underway to make domestic terrorism a federal crime Brian Levin directs the center for the study of hate and extremism at cal state San Bernardino what would dread the advantage be or maybe there's a disadvantage I'm not quite sure Brian of making domestic terrorism a federal crime why not just leave it as a state great question I'm my issue I don't want to buy the cereal box into what he would do green label says I think I'm on the positive side on it would it would put this type of terrorism as a priority up for federal law important part you don't necessarily need a statue to do that but there are issues relating to coordination between agencies but then again you don't necessarily need a statute to do it would you also say a friend of mine Mike German who's with the Brennan center New York a former FBI agent against you are and I listen to him he's a smart guy he's he's Northwestern University law grad and and and and and he was a guy and you might remember this back in ninety three broke the fourth Reich skinheads case it was going to try and kill Rodney king and shoot up an African American church so I listen to him arm on worried about a couple things first no we went through the nineteen seventy six Frank church he was a senator from Idaho hearings about issues relating to privacy and Intel gathering it will expose abuses and Meryl in an internet age I think we really have to be careful that also looks we just recently had an incident where the June's clearly for me Ellie charges in excellent reporter did a story about how the LAPD words are investigating a largely peaceful group that being said your or entities out here to try to infiltrate peaceful groups anyway you get what I'm talking about it is a big rubber band ball to one's handle and I just came back from Washington DC and this has been a topic of discussion among a lot of us I think you know she's run she's running for office again he's running for reelection all at so I don't know if I want to have a time frame we were saying Hey what's up a bill we don't know what the heck it is and we don't have hearing sport for certainly open minded but I don't want black lives matter desiccated and things like that there's got to be some kind of mechanisms to protect civil liberties and frankly I'm I'm very skeptical because I want to buy a car choice you the sticker on the window right so it shows in lieu of this possible federal law against domestic terrorism what is there not some focus taking off of white nationalist domestic terrorist threats into focus instead on no overseas terrorism coming to the United States yeah look bottom line is all booked or comedians here but as you know was hit by a terror attack I had a trustworthy for Congress right before that and I said the most prominent threat at that time with the violent selfish you harness and if you look a little after the serial terse judged urges the December twenty fifteen twenty sixteen I'm about sixty five extremist homicides we at the center for the study of heat and extremism a Chelsea sambar did you know count your only three white supremacists slash four right then we went up to thirteen the next year seventeen are you in twenty eighteen and then this year alone this year alone we have more white supremacist homicide then all the streams homicides from all of last year so it's a problem I'm going to Washington again on these issues the government is now paying attention to it at least at the level of folks that I deal with what we gotta do something and we can do something I think is not in a rash way but there's a lot of things we can do with the laws that we have on the books now and with coordination so let's get that started let's hold some congressional hearings let's hold him stinky hearings on this and and looks sorted out but I'm always skeptical during election season when someone says you can get off on something I don't have a label I don't get to how we're going to do we know we already have laws relating to what we send and Brian with and what you know we had in the past few weeks this discussion with many law enforcement types that you know for example the FBI says it wants to be able to get off have more authority to look over social media things like that but even if you were to see a posting that you know expressed all kinds of hideous views short of somebody saying I intend to be at a specific place at a specific time and do a specific thing we're gonna do about it anyway what what what before Congress in ninety five I said the FBI could look it up public citizen they can still do that journal of criminal credit your but bottom line is I don't know if we would need to start you to do that I'm not necessarily opposed to things but I I always hated weren't being put in the position is not but not by you by the way missing in general I thought you know what I get we have all these discussions about it sure exactly what's in the lego box before I buy it because I'm very worried that in a very highly politically polarized the situation we may end up having rogue people a Jew baloney I do not be argued up in San Francisco who investigated me on on nothing because he thought I was gonna walk run against him on some warn Forsman job consortium Riley and I don't want people like that the one that all right thank you realize is Brian Levin directs the center for the study of hate and extremism at cal state San Bernardino KNX indepth continues some of the.

Kay Mike Simpson Charles Schulz
Unequal Outcomes: Most ICE Detainees Held In Rural Areas Where Deportation Risks Soar

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:26 min | 1 year ago

Unequal Outcomes: Most ICE Detainees Held In Rural Areas Where Deportation Risks Soar

"This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like xfinity x. by get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make wifi simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply u._s. Immigration and customs enforcement needs more space to house undocumented immigrants and increasingly the agency is finding it in rural regions and new analysis by n._p._r. Indicates a majority of detainees are held in rural areas but as n._p._r.'s yuki noguchi reports those detained in far flung places also have a much harder time finding lawyers and are far more likely to be deported. It took ten and a half months for you. L. alonzo to meet with a lawyer alonzo had turned himself over to immigration officials in laredo texas seeking asylum from cuba last october since then he's been detained in two rural facilities i in louisiana and now in adams tmz county mississippi about a two hour drive from baton rouge alonzo's wife. Madonna's rodriguez is a permanent u._s. resident. She lives in southern florida with their two children the n._b._a. N._b._a. leary very far from anything. She says too far to afford hiring. A private attorney. Lack of legal help is one of many challenges for undocumented undocumented immigrants and an even bigger problem for those detained in remote locations yet. Ice is adding detention facilities far from cities over half fifty. The two percent of detainees are held in rural areas according to n._p._r.'s analysis of ice data and that rate is increasing. Liz martinez is a board member of advocacy z. Group freedom for immigrants. It's very concerning trend that immigration detention is moving to rural areas remote areas where it makes it so much harder for a person in detention to get the support that they need detainees in urban areas or at least four times more likely to find attorneys to represent them. According to a two thousand fifteen university of pennsylvania ovadia law review study last year the southern poverty law center sudeiss and its parent agency the department of homeland security the civil rights group alleges the government is deliberately liberally detaining people in rural areas far from legal resources is which currently detains nearly fifty six thousand people declined comment on that case in in an emailed statement an ice spokesman says the agency looks at airports healthcare and legal resources when selecting facilities he also says detainees have access to phones and video teleconferencing and can meet with lawyers during visiting hours but many immigration attorneys complained rural facilities lack necessary resources there aren't enough. The phones are translators. Call connections are poor. Visiting hours are too restrictive and it's simply too far to travel. You'll alonzo's wife has been able to visit him. Only only once alonzo was recently diagnosed with lung cancer which makes the weight more excruciating. He eventually found a lawyer one of the rare detainees with free three representation but his wife says his asylum request and to request for parole have been denied grumpy what more could a wife with a sick husband one other seven to be with him at the very least i want to offer him my support and for my children's offer support one of the key reasons detainees are held in remote regions appears to be the money cheap labor cheap land. Lauren rich eisen is acting director of the brennan center justice program. She says many rural areas viewed prisons as job. Engines hundreds hundreds of new facilities were built in the nineteen ninety. S inmate population peaked then declined leaving lots of empty beds. Ice is now contracting with those rural prisons. It needs those beds as it continues to detain more immigrants. Just last week is arrested. Nearly seven hundred workers at food processing plants in mississippi loyola university law professor andrew armstrong says she sees that happening across louisiana win. The criminal justice reforms were enacted that left empty not beds that were ripe for contracting with ice. Those contracts can be lucrative. The state pays local sheriff's twenty four dollars and thirty nine cents a day to house an inmate eight by comparison ice pays five times that an average daily rate of more than one hundred twenty six dollars is confirmed it recently opened eight new detention and facilities seven of which are in louisiana all but one of them are in sparsely-populated areas. Lisa lehner is director of americans for immigrant justice. She represents detainees in glades county florida about one hundred miles from miami. Glades is the state's fourth least populated county surrounded by acres of sugarcane infield. I've never seen immigration attorney up there. You've never seen one never detainees there. She says are tweeted like hardened. Criminals glades aids has been the subject of a number of complaints and lawsuits they allege everything from misuse of pepper spray and solitary confinement to religious persecution later argues conditions are worse in rural facilities in part because fewer people can observe what's happening by contrast. She says when a brooklyn new york ice facility lost not for a week during a cold snap in january there was an outcry and if there's going in and out you would imagine that the people who are detaining immigrants are going to behave in a more careful way. It's not just that treatment might differ immigration courts in rural areas denied. Many more asylum cases sending detainees back back to their home countries. N._p._r.'s analysis of research from syracuse university found judges in rural immigration courts denied eighty seven percent of asylum cases compared to just over half an urban courts. Romi learner is associate director of the immigration clinic at the university of miami's law school. It is an issue because it means if you got a bad bucks. I think the team isn't a certain facility then you're almost guaranteed to be deported mississippi detainee. You'll alonzo hopes to beat those odds. He's appealing feeling his case for asylum and hopes to reunite with his family. You can gucci n._p._r. News this message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor comcast business gig fueled network solutions that help businesses go beyond the expected to do the extraordinary ordinary comcast business beyond fast learn more at comcast business dot com.

L. Alonzo Louisiana N._P._R. Comcast Attorney Florida Lauren Rich Eisen Glades County Florida Adams Tmz County Mississippi Yuki Noguchi Liz Martinez Leary Mississippi University Of Pennsylvania Texas Mississippi Loyola University Religious Persecution Miami Madonna
"brennan center" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"brennan center" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"It makes US policymakers his with a different opinion. I would agree with that on so many other issues and I think that's the thing we haven't done. Well enough in this country is just say no. You're not evil. It's a different opinion but not on this not on this one you are traitors and you are in America so there's a lot more than just basic election security contained in the different bills also has to do with states versus the federal government so that's that's a real concern a realistic concern but beyond that if they really wanted us to be bipartisan they wouldn't have gone through the procedure known as unanimous consent which is what they do to name a post office office. It's what they do. Who What is what are you when no one's what is the what is the objection to paper about the objective paper ballots is that they've already put three hundred eighty million dollars? I think into elections last. When is it enough money but the Brennan Center says it has to be four hundred million more able to do this in a way these are not but then they should they should have measures not tied ending on this thing about how you report? If somebody else comes with foreign dirt I mean this is just sticking a thumb in trump's I. I think it's who's going to enforce this. This is just ridiculous. There's nothing that you can actually do. We caught him doing it. Maybe the next guy if we catch doing it. I think buck is right that Republicans have a longstanding objection to federalizing this stuff but I don't think they've had that objection for good reason they want room for states to do lots of things related to elections reduced turnout and otherwise make the the elections reduce the integrity of the elections I mean they they've been unwilling to fix the Voting Rights Act. They want states to be able to do things that that make it more difficult for people so I don't think this is about Russia. I think it's about generally protecting state election regimes that do not promote high turn out that they think are good for Republican. I think think that's total B._S.. I mean you've got the Senate Intelligence Committee who came out with a report saying every one of the fifty states was hacked everyone one I mean it just came out and the day after this is put on Mitch McConnell's floor and he's he gets somebody to say no. I object this is about first of volt. You've got the help America Vote Act which was a federal act that was passed in two thousand and two where the feds clearly had an impact to try to get election security security and advice to locals about how to run electric if it's totally a ru there's there's two things one people on the right would take all the complaints about elections security more seriously if there wasn't always the voter I._D.. compl the voter I._D.. Complaint from Democrats for one which the Supreme Court. I understand that you're voting secure so when you're you're talking about doing a unanimous key why do that. Why did you see this week? Capital one had a giant data breach capital one yeah. This is Alameda okay. What are my point being? There are bank money's involved to what we care about in this country if they can't protect it you think we can protect the voting. There's no such thing as perfect security. I used to work in the CIA. You can spend endless amounts of money. which shouldn't we try? We did try the point with three hundred eighty million. That's not partisan bill. If they were serious bill they try to pass for the perfect. Let me bring up just a couple of other things. Just just depress you on this point about whether Mitch McConnell and Donald Trump really the security of America at heart security clearances politicized this Guy John Ratcliffe who he appointed pointed. He's withdrawn now. Come on this. Is Your field see Ya..

Mitch McConnell Donald Trump America John Ratcliffe US federal government Brennan Center CIA Senate Intelligence Committee Alameda Supreme Court Russia three hundred eighty million d
"brennan center" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"brennan center" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Older they were twenty years ago fifteen years ago. Why now why would they come out now because I think that women have been traumatized and now feel comfortable in speaking out now, and they now believe that they will be believed. It's a different time. Robert, it's a different time you something and and people feel more comfortable about speaking out. Now, what do you mean? Comfortable. More of the interview on CBS this morning CBS news special report. I'll Matt piper. KCBS news time twelve thirty two election security is becoming a huge problem. Especially after the concerns voiced during the two thousand sixteen presidential election yesterday. A new report by the Brennan center for Justice and N Y you law school shows those concerns real I say that our voting machines are able to cyber attacks or mouth functions on election day to find out more KCBS anchors Jeff bell. And and rising spoke with Larry Norton deputy director of the democracy program. At the Brennan center for Justice and co author of the analysis let's cut to the chase. You're just how vulnerable are these voting machines? Well, there are a couple of big problems one is just that these machines are aging out, and we we surveyed election officials across the country and in thirty one states, we were told by election officials need to a place it's by twenty twenty which is practically tomorrow in the span of these kinds of things. And most of them said they didn't have the money to replace them. Older machines, very often are more vulnerable to failures and also to cyber attacks. And that's particularly true in the twelfth states that continue to use paperless system. There's no paper backup to to be able to catch problems and reconstruct votes. If if there's some problem with the systems, and I wanted to talk a little bit before about the distinction between the two when you're talking about the vulnerabilities in these voting machines. Are you talking about the ones with the paper backups or without or both? Well, look, they're all computers. So and we know not just in elections. But. In in everywhere that. Computers are vulnerable to both cyber-attacks to programming errors to glitches. And the difference is if you have a paper backup, there's a way of reconstructing things catching problems, if they occur you compared to the paper record and major way of reconstructing things to make sure that everybody everybody's vote can count and the twelfth where you don't have that. That's a really big problem because if you you might not notice in the first place, and even if you do you may not be able to to get back people's votes, you mentioned that a number of states dozens I believe would like to upgrade their machines. And yet my understanding from your study is that they don't have the money and perhaps not the time as well. Yeah. That's right there. There are in many states right now. Election officials are saying that they need to replace their equipment, even before the twenty twenty election. And really if they're gonna do that they need to get the ball rolling in the next few months, and so far we haven't seen additional money from from congress. And and for many of the States Congress gave three hundred eighty million dollars last year. But that's a drop in the bucket compared to to to what we need when we're talking about voting machines. How old is old? Well, again, either computers. So you probably wouldn't keep a computer more than ten years. And that's probably a pretty good measure preventing machines. But you know, in some cases, we have machines that are you're talking about twenty years old, even or even older and the problem that you have with them is not just that. They're they they start to break down a little bit more often often it's impossible to find replacement parts, and you have election officials have to go onto EBay believe it or not to find these replacement parts that's probably not good for the ri- boaty. It's also probably at security danger. Larry Norton, deputy director of the democracy program. At the Brennan center for Justice dementia is expected to be a growing healthcare issue as baby boomers, become seniors. But it may not be getting the attention. It deserves CBS news. Correspondent Pam.

Brennan center for Justice deputy director CBS Larry Norton KCBS Matt piper States Congress Robert congress Pam EBay Jeff bell twenty twenty ri twenty years
"brennan center" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"brennan center" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Publishing editorials critical, and there is strong evidence. In this case that the president declared a national emergency because congress exercise the power of the purse, that's a constitutional prerogative of congress that he is trying to undermine with this declaration. And a professor trillions analysis treats congresses at repeated votes against funding the wall as if they were legally legally irrelevant, and I don't believe they are. And I think they could factor in a number of ways. But the one I mentioned just now is one. Okay. Elizabeth with the Brennan center for Justice minister Gerson can you comment on the constitutional problem created by the president's declaration of a national emergency following the considered bipartisan bicameral vote by congress to fund a variety of border security measures other than the wall proposed by the president. Well, that's the that's the constitutional crux. Of our of our argument. That's the point at which it begins. We wouldn't be able to fit into Justice Jackson's third criterion without disobedience of a congressional edict by the executive so that that's that's our starting point. If you're implying agree with me. I'm happy to know that thank you. Thank you very much. You're back. Thank you. Republicans have exhausted their witnesses. And so we're recognized scar SIA from Houston. Thank you, Mr Chairman, and I just wanted to get a little comment here, we keep talking about campaigns and campaign slogans, and I think one of our colleagues a mentioned. Lake article one great again, I think the better button might be just like we had. It's the economy stupid. It should probably be. It's the constitution stupid. But maybe I'll put some money together and get some of those funds that real quick. But I am concerned about the balance of power. I am concerned about separation of powers because I do think that this is a constitutional issue, and I would like to thank everyone for coming today. Particularly humorous Alvarez because obviously you've traveled a long distance you come from my home state. You're from Sita I'm from Blanco which is between Alison king's vill. I grew up in a farm. I don't recall, although I'm not next to the border and close enough that I can tell you that anytime. We always got concerning. We always knew when somebody crossed over our farm 'cause they're either be a fence that was unlocked or so footprints, it'd be some sign that somebody had traversed our property, and I know that that you're are concerned. So tell me again, you've not seen are are of any, rapists. Murderers, drug dealers, human traffickers, or any people trying to do harm to anyone around your property or any of your neighbors properties. Not at all, ma'am. And have you had a chance to visit with any other other property owners joining you to see they share? You're you're concerned about what does propose. While might be doing to your your farm and your livelihood. Yes. Ma'am. I will say I can speak for my community. Most of my community is made out of elders. Who are not very familiar with the issue that have been actually threatened at one point or another to sign over documents and stuff oils their properties will be taken away. Nine to weep people in stark county, and I can speak for myself. And for my area, we do not want this. And we do not see a crisis, especially rapist, gang members or an invasion. Right. And are you the only party in this lawsuit? Or is your a number of other parties in the lawsuit that you mentioned, I'm not familiar with it? I just there's a few other parties there is a few other parties well, in your opinion because you're down there. I mean, do you see a crisis at something? That's as as as one of my colleagues is described of grave concern and a change or something that may be endangering to your area. Not at all. Well, thank you again for coming. I know it's a long distance. And Mr. Gerson, I wanted to I tell you that I take a passive counties in good hands. And I wonder. If you had reviewed or have listened to the recommendations set up put forth in her statement. I in had any reaction to her recommendations are do you have any other recommendations, well that we should consider..

congress president Justice minister Gerson Justice Jackson professor Alison king Chairman Alvarez Brennan center stark county Houston Blanco Elizabeth executive
Donald Trump, Congress And Executive discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

03:55 min | 2 years ago

Donald Trump, Congress And Executive discussed on Trumpcast

"To Trump cost. I'm your among it has from the start being obvious. But Donald Trump does not like the most basic aspects of our political system that he does not accept independent powers. But he doesn't like it. When we press criticizes him that once he became president. He did not think that his power should be limited that it is legitimate for judges to rule against him or congress to rein in his actions. And yet the actions he has taken for the last two years have sometimes felt a little bit like a drill. He talked a big game about the Washington Post and CNN even calling them enemies of the people, but he didn't really take much action in order to stop them from publishing what he consistently called fake news. Well, all of this has changed with his declaration of spuria. National emergency last week national emergencies. Repose a puzzle in political fury since time of Cicero people have recognized that one of the most important tasks of public officials is to protect citizens, and that in moments of genuine, national emergency that might require them to bypass laws that I usually in effect at the same time. They have also recognized that an abuse of emergency powers could allow any politician to turn themselves into a dictator as has repeatedly happened in history. Whether you think of financial Marcos in the Philippines, or classic case out of Hitler in Germany. The United States has withstood the offer Attaran impatient of emergency powers in two ways. First Americans have ready voted for politician or political party with a over Rotarian. Ambitions. And Secondly when American presidents have started to act in an afford Tarrant manner, even own allies have often turned on them. Well, both of those safe safeguards. No longer apply. Donald Trump is clearly attempting to undermine the rule of law in the balance of power and his allies are flopping onto their stomachs. Think of somebody like Mitch McConnell who had claimed inva- last weeks that national emergency would not be acceptable to congress. But now that Trump has caught a national emergency. He has immediately fallen into line and expressed his support. So what's going on? Right now is not a drill. It is very real attempt by the executive to take unconstitutional powerless to override the express will of congress based on. Clearly fake emergency. So what happens at this point really matters will the courts resist this unprecedented attempt to increase the power of the executive will Republicans have the decency to stand up the constitution, and for the powers of the own body congress or will they simply enable Donald Trump once again, this is not a drill. This is of radio giant moment in how we are going to respond to Trump's over Attaran instincts today. I'm talking about a very different topic. I have Dr tat Johnson who's a senior fellow at the Brennan center here to talk about the actual political views of ethnic minorities in this country, and especially African Americans because he August, we often simplify caricature misunderstand their political point of you,

Donald Trump Congress Executive Attaran Cicero Spuria Mitch Mcconnell Washington Post Philippines Dr Tat Johnson United States CNN Tarrant Germany Brennan Center Senior Fellow Hitler Inva Two Years
"brennan center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"brennan center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We're a co production of the BBC World Service PRI and W G B H here in Boston. We are in a national emergency actually more than two dozen of them serious. I'm not talking about Donald Trump declaring a national emergency to get his border wall. Built Trump said today, he's not going to do that immediately. He will leave it to congress. But here's something you might not realize we took a tally, and there are currently thirty one national emergencies still active President Trump declared three of them before that Barack Obama put nine in place. The oldest active one goes back to Jimmy Carter. So how does a national emergency actually work is it an exclusive power of the presidency. Or does congress have a say Andrew boils with the Brennan center for Justice at New York University school of law. Unfortunately, congress does not have to be involved in continuing declarations of national emergency. The president is required to renew national emergency. Every year or they oughta medically expire, you say, unfortunately, congress isn't involved. What do you think? That's unfortunate, my view and the view of the Brennan center is that over the years. The congress has not done its work. There needs to do in order to ensure that its operates sufficient oversight of the president's ability to declare national -mergency to use emergency powers, one fix to that would be to set up a regime, for example, where the president is allowed to initially declared a national emergency. And then it's incumbent on congress to renew those national emergencies after a certain amount of time. Yes. So there are a number. I mean, close to over thirty national emergencies that are still in effect. So what does that mean are they all ongoing and still active, and if they're not why was the original declaration, not rescinded? Yeah. I'm so since the national emergencies act took effect in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight there have been a large number of national emergencies declared as you as you noted thirty one of them are still in effect some of them have been rescinded since that time, and they are essentially renewed every year, the longest.

congress President Trump president Brennan center Brennan center for Justice BBC Barack Obama Boston Jimmy Carter New York University school of Andrew
"brennan center" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"brennan center" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Marco werman. President Trump now says he's not rushing to declare a nationally -mergency over the border wall. But did you know there are thirty one other emergencies in effect right now presidents find the powers that they have under them necessary. And it's easier to just keep renewing the emergency then to get congress to pass legislation. That's just ahead here on the world. I'm Marco werman. This is the world. We're a co production of the BBC World Service PRI in WG be h here in Boston. We are in a national emergency actually more than two dozen of them serious. I'm not talking about Donald Trump declaring a national emergency to get his border wall. Build Trump said today, he's not going to do that immediately. He will leave it to congress. But here's something you might not realize we took a tally, and there are currently thirty one national emergencies still active President Trump declare three of them before that Barack Obama put nine in place. The oldest active one goes back to Jimmy Carter. So how does a national emergency actually work is it an exclusive power of the presidency. Or does congress have say Andrew boils with the Brennan center for Justice at New York University school of law. Unfortunately, congress does not have to be involved in continuing declarations of national emergency. The president is required to renew national emergencies every year, or they automatically expire you say, unfortunately, congresses and involve what do you think? That's unfortunate. My view in the view of the Brennan center is that over the years. The congress has not done its work that it needs to do in order to ensure that it's up rates sufficient oversight of the president's ability to declare national urgency into use emergency powers, one fix to that would be to set up a regime, for example, where the president is allowed to initially declare a national emergency. And then it's incumbent on congress to renew those national emergencies after a certain amount of time. Yes. So there are a number close to over thirty a national emergencies that are still in effect. So what does that mean are they all ongoing and still active, and if they're not why was the original declaration, not rescinded? Yeah. So since the national emergencies act took effect in nineteen seventy eight there. I've been a large number of national emergencies declared, and as you as you noted thirty one of them are still in effect some of them have been rescinded since that time, and they are essentially renewed every year the longest running one is since nineteen seventy nine has been renewed every year because presidents find the powers that they have under them necessary. And it's easier to just keep renewing the emergencies end to get congress to pass legislation. You're that wouldn't seventy nine it was under Jimmy Carter blocking Iranian government property. That's correct. And there are a number of other national emergencies that seem kind of are keen in their detail like blocking property of certain persons who have interest in Somalia, Burundi or Libya, who's paying attention to these. Well, we would we would argue not enough people..

congress President Trump president Marco werman Jimmy Carter Brennan center BBC World Service Brennan center for Justice Barack Obama Boston Somalia Libya Burundi New York University school of Andrew
"brennan center" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"brennan center" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"From the Kremlin. After Russian woman is charged by the Justice department with trying to influence the midterms. Larry Miller reports from London Moscow claims the Russian woman charged by the US with interfering in this year's midterm elections is a fabrication to justify further. Notorious sanctions Elena cushion over was charged with playing key financial role in a Kremlin plan to conduct information warfare against the US. Russia accuses American politicians of waging a slanderous campaign to gain political advantage in the upcoming elections. Larry Miller CBS news US intelligence agency, say not only Russia, China, Iran and other countries are engaged in active efforts to influence voters in vandal Walker is senior counsel at the Brennan center for Justice at NYU law school, and he explains what they're trying to accomplish they have multiple accounts, and they're just saying the exact opposite thing. So they'll be one side saying, you know. Pumping up President Trump and saying he's what we need another side attacking him from the sort of liberal perspective. So they're really not particularly a single viewpoint. What they want is to so division. They want Americans at each other's throats, and they want Americans distrusting our system of democracy that is distrusting the voting booth mistrusting each other each other. Political party. WBZ news time twelve twenty one in California residents may soon be able to get pot delivered to their home. Thanks to a statewide marijuana delivery policy. That's been tentatively approved. It comes about despite the league of California cities and the police chiefs association opposing it cannabis control chief Laurie Ajax says while state law does let local governments banned the retail sales of marijuana bay may not bar deliveries. Meantime here in Massachusetts, the states considering a move that would make recreational pot just a click or call away WBZ Sheri, small explained you can get your favorite, restaurant takeout delivered to your home. Your pharmacy will deliver your prescriptions your grocery store, we'll even drop off your groceries and in Massachusetts, you might soon be able to get pot delivered to your doorstep. The idea proposed by cannabis control Commissioner Britain McBride, she says under her proposal locally owned micro-businesses. The growing process limited amounts of marijuana would handle the delivery, it allows the commission to put into place a strong regulatory structure around delivery to make sure that we are able to enforce those regulation. So at some point in time, maybe expand it the plan still needs formal approval by the commission. Sheri, small WBZ NewsRadio ten thirty three. Lynn residents are facing drug trafficking charges after state police found they were in possession of more than two kilograms of heroin. Now, the three alleged drug dealers were traveling on route.

marijuana US Sheri Larry Miller vandal Walker cannabis California Russia Justice department Massachusetts Commissioner Britain McBride Political party London Moscow Brennan center for Justice Trump Elena senior counsel police chiefs association
"brennan center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:13 min | 2 years ago

"brennan center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro in recent midterm elections about sixty percent of eligible voters did not cast ballots. Some said they don't vote because they're too busy. Or don't think their vote matters others want to vote, but can't they face a range of obstacles from voter ID laws to their own criminal records NPR political correspondent Osma hollered reports back in the year two thousand Jakarta chambers was sent to prison for attempted second degree murder. He was released four years later. This all happened in Florida which bar citizens with felony convictions from voting unless they receive clemency from a state board led by the governor. I assumed that I committed my crime in Florida. So therefore. I thought I would have been disenfranchised forever. An estimated ten percent of adults in Florida cannot vote because of a felony record. But chambers was not a Floridian and zoo those strict rules didn't apply to him husky. I was free over a decade not knowing that I was able to vote chambers was not legally barred from voting in California and later in Nevada where he now lives, but he was confused. Other people don't vote because they're inconvenienced and legal barriers can contribute to that. In two thousand sixteen four percent of registered voters did not vote because of registration problems, according to research center analysis, one of those problems is tied to an upsurge in voter purging states routinely clean up the voting rolls to ensure their records are accurate and they removed people who've moved or died, but according to a report from the Brennan center published this summer, four million more people were purged between two thousand fourteen. And two thousand sixteen than in the equivalent period between two thousand six and two thousand eight Jonathan brighter is one of the authors of this report is to have the effect of making it more difficult for people who are not necessarily the most regular, vulgar. Some southern states have seen a particular uptick. Georgia has already number problematic and controversial voter registration and purging practices over the last few years, Georgia it takes people off the voting rolls. If they don't vote in four consecutive federal elections and do not respond to a letter in the mail Georgia also allows neighbors to challenge one another's eligibility. Supporters of this law say it helps root out voter fraud back in two thousand fifteen these voter challenges were used in mass in Hancock county a rural area about a hundred miles east of Atlanta approximately seventeen percent of all registered voters in Sparta the largest town in the county had their voting eligibility challenged and most of the people on that list. Wore black like merit Hubert. He and his brother were accused of not living at the address on file based off of this. No period that we live Hubert gestures to the yellow mobile home behind him. It's off a dusty side road. And he says he's lived here the whole time even the letter accusing him of not living here came in the mail to this address. Why do you think this happened? Basically. Thanks racism thing. White. The goal. He thinks was voter suppression. In a settlement, the board of elections denied its motive was racial discrimination. The county attorney berry Fleming told the New York Times it was about restoring order to an electoral process tainted by corruption and incompetence still the board agreed to change how it reviews challenges in most people's names, including Hubert's were added back to the voting rolls, but Jonathan brighter with the Brennan center says that may not fix everything when people have bad experiences with voting system. I think, you know, a lot of people react to that by saying, well, you know. It. I'm not gonna do this again. Some people though are like married Hubert. He says this whole experience has made him more determined to vote as Mukalla NPR news, the phrase identity politics has come to be used as a political insult. It's now shorthand for pandering to voters according to demographics. But Francis Fukuyama says that everyone is playing on identity politics now that nationalism radical Islam and other movements are fueled by people wrestling with identity in an economic world order that's leading them down. His new book is called identity. The demand for dignity in the politics of resentment Francis Fukuyama is here to talk more about it. Thank you. Thank you. You're right. That this book may not have been written. If Donald Trump had not been elected president how come well. Yes. Donald Trump disrupted. My personal intellectual agenda. Just like he disrupted a lot of things in politics. These posed a particular challenge not just in terms of policies, but to the very foundations of American democracy. The kind of person he is the kind of demagogic politics that he's promoted, but it's written on the back of identity issues that his core supporters are people that feel that their understanding of traditional American identity is being challenged. That's why immigration has been so important to him. And so this book is really just an attempt to think all of that through. How do you see it playing out in US politics today? And is it playing out for the worst? I think the real problem in American politics is we've shifted from arguing about economic policies to arguing about identities where you have a number of identities rooted and unfortunately in biology on both the left and the right where you really can't compromise negotiate negotiate with something if it is so tightly connected to just who you are fundamentals. Right. You are if it's based on the way, I was born I can't change that. And so you're stuck without identity. And I think that that's really toxic. For democratic politics because it makes communication discussion compromise much more difficult, and it also erodes the necessary commonly held beliefs that are necessary to maintain a democracy. Is it all that surprising that we've reached a point where you would have like white America talking about its identity? I think it's perhaps not surprising. Although I must say that it's very dispiriting. There's been racism and xenophobia for a long time. I think what's unique about this moment is that a lot of people on the alt-right white nationalist borrowed the framing of left. We identity politics to say we want people are an oppressed minority. That's something I think is quite new in our politics. So how does the loss of dignity plan to all this? Where do you see that as something that people aren't paying close enough attention to I think that this is something behind the Trump vote that a lot of the working class people that had lost jobs that we're not living in coastal cities, not connected to the global economy, except as they were victimized by it simply felt ignored by the elites that we're doing very well. And I think it reflected the fundamental economic. Qualities that have appeared over the last thirty years as a result of advances in technology and globalization, and so the real claim I think was being invisible to people that were part of the elite at the end of the day. Is there any way off this kind of path like if it's tied to who we are? And how we feel about ourselves each and every person in voter, it's very hard to kind of lower those steaks. I think it's actually quite possible because we're actually not born with identities are identities aren't necessarily biological we construct identities all the time. And I think one of the tasks is to reconstruct an American national identity that is open to everybody bound together on the basis of political principles like the constitution like the rule of law like the principle of equality in the declaration of independence. That's the kind of constructed identity that we need as an antidote to the kinds of polarizing identities that our politics has fallen prey to Francis. Fukuyama? Thank you so much for speaking with all things considered. Thank you very much..

Francis Fukuyama Donald Trump Florida Hubert Georgia Brennan center Jonathan chambers Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro NPR Jakarta second degree murder Osma US New York Times
Commerce Department upholds tariffs on Canadian newsprint

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

05:25 min | 2 years ago

Commerce Department upholds tariffs on Canadian newsprint

"KCBS, it's Thursday the second day of August twenty eighteen, on KCBS top Trump administration officials warned that Russia's threat to the November elections is real CBS news update coming off I'm generally with early results of a Stanford, project to help kids, with autism understand facial expressions has some concerns today about efforts. To clean up voter rolls. Will Check in with him at about five minutes of Jeff? Bill I'm Patty rising KCBS news time to thirty one, CBS news update foreign meddling in, American elections the president's national, security, team, appearing in, the White House briefing room today to stress that a major efforts underway. To protect the, integrity of upcoming elections director, of national. Intelligence Dan Coats, our focus here, today is, simply to tell the, American people. We acknowledged the threat is real it is continuing and we're doing everything we can to, have a legitimate election that the bear, can people can have trust in Mr. Trump's aides say, Russia is behind pervasive attempts to interfere even. Though President Putin. Denied, meddling, directly to Mr. Trump's face last month. Correspondent at O'Keefe you had the. General head of cyber command there say they've been told if need be they can take actions against actress who may be. Doing this I asked him directly have you been ordered to take offensive operations. Against Russia or anyone else has been doing this he didn't answer, it directly but Certainly. Signaled their perhaps they have done that CBS news update I'm Matt piper KCBS news time to. Thirty two the wearable computer Google glass did not make a great first impression among consumers in general but it is showing promise as a device for children with autism KCBS. Gentlemen reports. On a project at Stanford that aims to help kids recognize. Social cues the researchers call it. The autism glass project it is a combination of Google glass and a smartphone app that displays for. Kids wearing the device information about. The expressions they, see on other people's, spaces in the first impaired kids wear it they like it to kick well to in fact they're the. Ones who called it their superpower which is what makes taken to call it since Dennis, wall is associate professor of paediatrics, psychiatry and biomedical data sciences. At Stanford he says, autism glass is showing promise after a feasibility study so we worked on user design human computer? Interaction components we worked on, games And all of those things went well. What we also worked on was a measurement of their social awareness and we do see improvements in the SRS scores which. Are exciting but we should put them in context that context being they. Did not have a control group in, the first, phase so it's hard to measure, kids improvement, the researchers are working on a randomized control. Trial gentlemen KCBS role familiar with test of the emergency alert system but after recent. Deadly wildfires, so people are again questioning its actual effectiveness more. The story from Vicky more with, our all news sister. Station KNX in LA There according to Richard Rodman he's vice chairman of the state's emergency alert system committee in his opinion the issue is strategy. And management Redman says greater, effort must be paid to coordination of, information, but he also understands. That things can change in an instant when you're talking about a wildfire that can throw an amber a mile away from the source of the fire. Into a fuel supply and start a fire in places that people. Never suspected of higher Redman says in general all, residents should just, be prepared now for evacuation when the call comes somebody notify you that you need to evacuate and you've never gotten. All your important papers and animals and. Family members set to evacuate its less likely to, happen, properly and, Rodman says these days California's fire season is, all year long Vicky more. In southern California US Commerce Department is going ahead with a tax on Canadian newsprint a threat to the already struggling American newspaper Industry the revised tariffs unveiled today are mostly lower than those originally and post. Earlier this year but would still slap an anti-dumping border taxes highs almost. Seventeen percent the tariffs are response to a, complaint from a hedge fund on paper producer in, Washington state which argues that its Canadian competitors are taking advantage of government subsidies to sell their product at unfairly low prices Congress's overwhelmingly opposed to the tariffs KCBS news time to thirty five is we check back with Dave Ross is not just Russia this is Dave Ross the CBS, News Radio network presented by theraworx relief we're all. On the alert for, Russians hacking into voter databases but the other problem is our only lection officials who in their zeal to clean up the voter rolls go far election officials remove people. Without the legal protections required, including those required by federal law Jonathan, breeders, with the Brennan center. For Justice at NYU of course the voter lists have to be cleaned up to account for people who move Commit a felony but before. He can strike name from the, voter rolls you supposed to send out a notice and. Then wait. Until the person misses to elections some states he. Says haven't bothered to, do that so I asked him how. Many qualified voters are actually being turned away he says no one knows one reason is, that a lot of people who show up to the polls and. Aren't on the list even if they should be they just leave that's ridiculous there ought to, at least be a number to call if you're denied your right to vote and it.

CBS Kcbs Russia Stanford Mr. Trump Google Redman Richard Rodman Vicky President Putin Dan Coats Dave Ross California Jeff White House Director Bill Matt Piper President Trump O'keefe
President Trump, NPR and President discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:30 min | 2 years ago

President Trump, NPR and President discussed on The Takeaway

"Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh a. Jury has been seated in the trial of President Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort the panel consists of six men and six women, and opening statements are scheduled this hour NPR's Windsor Johnston reports Manafort is facing more than a dozen counts, of Bank and, tax fraud charges Manafort is accused of laundering tens of millions of dollars. From work on behalf of pro Russian Ukrainian politicians Victoria the study of the Brennan. Center for Justice says the case offers the first public test of special, counsel Robert Muller's investigative, reach, if you can gather this sort of documentation of financial shenanigans on Manafort than. Just imagine the sort, of data and documentation and evidence he's going to be able to gather on President Trump thirty five witnesses are scheduled to. Testify including manafort's longtime business partner Rick gates who Struck a plea deal with prosecutors Windsor Johnston NPR news Washington the president is taking shots at the billionaire conservative coke brothers today Trump. Tweeted quote the. Globalist coke brothers who have become a total joke in. Real Republican circles are, against strong borders and powerful trade he goes on to say I never sought their support because I don't need. Their money or bad ideas they love my tax and regulation cuts judicial picks and more. End quote NPR's Domenico Montanaro says the president's weak comes after the coke brothers network place an, ad criticizing. Trump's, new sheriff's some this split is remarkable I mean let's remember that the cook brothers network has pledged to, spend four hundred million. Dollars on these elections in really key races all across the country now the president says he doesn't need them but his party certainly, does and it really represents how Trump sees his own brand and his survival as separate from the party, NPR's Domenico Montanaro, we should know At. Coke industries the multinational company controlled by the, brothers is, among NPR's, financial. Supporters Turkish media are reporting that a court, in Ishmael has rejected, an appeal, for, the release of US pastor Andrew Brunson NPR's Peter Kenyon. Reports Trump administration has been demanding Brenton's release sentenced Turkish lawyer. Filed the appeal Monday asking, the court to lift the ban on Brenton leaving the country Turkish state media. Report the court denied the appeal after. Being arrested in December two thousand, sixteen Brunson was kept in prison for the better part of two years before being transferred to house arrest this. Month President Trump and other. Officials said, that wasn't enough and demanded Brenton's immediate release Brenton denies the terrorism related charges he's facing which carry a possible thirty five year prison term Trump. Is threaten Turkey with sanctions if Brunson isn't, released and returned to the. US Peter Kenyon NPR news stumbled the Dow is up one hundred twenty nine points at twenty five thousand four thirty six this is NPR from news I'm Tiffany Cam high Lake County authorities say they've arrested half a dozen people in the. Last two, days for crimes committed inside the evacuation zones of. Neighborhoods where residents. Have fled from wildfires the sheriff's office announced this morning that deputies have arrested six people on charges ranging from being in. An authorized unauthorized zone and an evacuation area to prowling. And possession of burglary tools the arrests took place in neighborhoods that became vacant because they were threatened by flames from what's been. Dubbed the Mendocino complex that's the name for two wildfires that burned some seventy five thousand acres and destroyed ten. Structures some, firefighters are battling these blazes even as they themselves faced displacement cake you idiot khloe. Veldman has more the wildfires burning in Mendocino and lake counties have already claimed tens of thousands of acres of forest Tricia Austin is a fire prevention specialists working for. Cal fire Is Mendocino, unit, like a. Few, of her colleagues she's being both professionally. And personally affected by the flames Austin. And her family had to evacuate their home in lake port near the Mendocino national forest over the weekend she arranged for her nephew to take her. Eighty six year old mother to Roseville and her pets, to Sacramento with a, friend once my family was removed from the situation then I was able to focus on my job and. I didn't have to worry Austin says if a house does Ben at least family will be safe I'm khloe Veldman k.. Cutie news.

President Trump NPR Paul Manafort Brenton Khloe Veldman Domenico Montanaro Brunson Peter Kenyon Windsor Johnston Washington Mendocino Coke Brothers Lakshmi Singh Tricia Austin Coke Industries Robert Muller Cook Brothers Network Coke
"brennan center" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"brennan center" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Hill newspaper and i to the point of the question being asked and how often is appeared on the official census when was the last time we saw this particular question according to the brennan center for justice the last time this question showed up on the census was nineteen fifty it hasn't appeared since then although it does appear on some other surveys that the census conduct census bureau is more than just the defending all survey of absolutely everybody who's in the country they conduct more than one hundred and thirty surveys over the course of the years and in some of them yeah they ask about citizenship but not in the sense of why the controversy over this question in what's the reaction been among the states well the the controversy comes because the censuses main job is to count absolute everybody who is in the country whether they're here legally or not whether there you know a felon or not a felony it doesn't matter who you are what your status is that the goal of this particular survey is to cover absolutely everybody and it is the foundation of a lot of the spending that the federal government does whether it's on health care or homeland security or pretty much anything that the federal government would grant to the states education at that in comes through census numbers and the fact is if you don't count absolutely everybody you're not gonna know how many people are taking advantage of particular services or who need to be taken care of by the federal government and with a question on citizenship a lot of civil rights groups and democrats say that they risk being they risk a serious undercount not actually getting a hold of everybody who's in the entire country.

brennan center federal government official
"brennan center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"brennan center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pope francis used his christmas message today to call for a negotiated twostate solution in the middle east he said the children there continue to suffer because of the growing tension between israelis and palestinians the trump administration has rescinded an obama era policy that sought to reduce the number of people held in jail because of court fees and fines npr's martin kosti has more back in 2016 the obama justice department launched an effort to reform the way local courts often demand fees and fines from lowincome people than jail them when they can't pay warned brooke ice it of the brennan center for justice says the reform efforts have faltered under president trump the current truckers department had not on the map ashamed at arab out at all and yet in monterey are shown because there was significant momentum under the obama administration's you improve the lives of so many people across the country who were just too poor to pay the fees and fines which originally jeff sessions rescinded the court sees reform policy on thursday as part of a larger effort to council policies left over from previous administrations which he calls outdated or improper martin kosti npr news this is npr news from washington the president of guatemala's says his country will move its embassy in israel to jerusalem last week the united nations voted overwhelmingly for a nonbinding resolution denouncing president trump's recognition of jerusalem as israel's capital guatemala was one of the few nations that voted against it president jimmy morale is said he decided to move the embassy after consulting with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu he did not say when that would happen the department of agriculture says eggnog sales have skyrocketed in the last fifty years despite limited availability npr's emily selvyn reports the drink is only on store shelves for two months out.

jimmy morale department of agriculture prime minister washington npr jeff sessions obama trump christmas Pope francis emily selvyn benjamin netanyahu martin kosti jerusalem united nations israel guatemala obama administration monterey president brennan center brooke obama justice department fifty years two months
"brennan center" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"brennan center" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Support for this npr podcast and the following message come from go to meeting businesses count on go to meeting for simple reliable online meetings with nearly sixty million friction lists meeting supported each year go to meeting is where real work gets done at goto meeting dot com i have from npr news in washington i'm jim hark the trump administration has rescinded an obama era policy that sought to reduce the number of people held in jail because of court fees and fines and pierre's martin custody has more back in 2016 the obama justice department launched an effort to reform the way local courts often demand fees and fines from lowincome people than jail them when they can't pay lauren brooke ice and of the brennan center for justice says the reform efforts have faltered under president trump but currents are not on the kedo oh carveout at all and that's a real shame because there was significant momentum under the obama administration you improve the lives of so many people across the country who were just too poor to pay the fees and fines which are general jeff sessions rescinded the court sees reform policy up thursday as part of a larger effort to cancel policies left over from previous administrations which he calls outdated or improper martin kosti npr news and that's the ice thing has resulted in the arrest of a california tow truck driver and the irs amy held reports the 26yearold former marine is facing charges of attempting to provide material support to a foreign terrorist organization with its views of the bay alcatraz and sea lions pierre thirty nine attracts huge crowds and that is why everett aaron jameson wanted to targeted according to an fbi affidavit for weeks jameson had been communicating with someone he thought was a senior isis official but was actually an undercover agent.

washington jim hark pierre obama justice department brennan center obama administration jeff sessions irs everett aaron jameson official npr obama president california fbi
"brennan center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"brennan center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dots on their problematic on this issue last week there was a conversation in the bay area but the fact that allah to county hosts urban shield which is large conference where police agencies and other law enforcement agencies come to get military equipment militarization training and do so in exercises that freak when we position muslims and others as criminals over and over again law enforcement being trained in alameda county to see our communities in this way and they're hosting other agencies to do that so it's one other problem with alameda county sheriff another problem with alameda county sheriff is that i believe that they are scott their allotted to receive over four one hundred thousand dollars from the department of homeland security's countering violent extremism program which is a programme that was launched during the obama administration really problematic and criticized for focusing solely on violence emanating from muslim communities was widely criticised by the brennan center for justice the aclu care and others they meet the grants at the end of the obama administration but didn't actually pay them out and when trump was elected a number of organizations who had applied and really shouldn't have still said now we see the problem we won't take the trump administration's money last week the trump administration finalized the list alameda county sheriff's office is going to receive something in the range of four hundred five hundred thousand dollars to target our communities to counter violent extremism in in muslim communities and so i wanted to raise that just so that we can see that where there is one type of problem coming from a law enforcement or other city county agency it's usually also that they're problematic on other issues too well just in terms of how the community is faring one of the things that we are hearing about most recently was the death of a young teenage girl in virginia ray who was there's seeing right now among virginia authorities said they believe that it was an active road rage of some kind but there are also investigating it for a hate crime they haven't determined that that in fact was not what happened a short time ago we had the situation in.

law enforcement agencies law enforcement alameda county obama administration brennan center trump virginia military equipment scott department of homeland securit four hundred five hundred thou four one hundred thousand doll
"brennan center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"brennan center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And election management system one of these ballot programming computers if i can infect hit with malicious software i can have that malicious software spread to the individual machines on the memory cards and then change votes on election day there's absolutely no evidence that happened last last year but him notes that some or all electronic voting machines and fourteen states have no paper ballot backups that can be checked to make sure there was no tampering state local election officials insist such an attack would be extremely difficult if not impossible because of tight security measures such as restrictions on who has access to voting machines still connecticut election director peggy reeves told a panel on voting technology earlier this week that many local election officials are illequipped to handle cybersecurity threats many of our towns actually have no local at support seriously they don't have i've an it director in their town they might have a consultant that they call on if they have an issue so they look to us but we are a pretty small division she says the best protection against hackers is probably the fact that the nation's voting system is so decentralised larry norton an election technology expert with the brennan center agrees but he's worried that last year's intruders were laying the groundwork for more serious attacks in the future this is a real threat it's not going away and if anything foreign adversaries even people at home might be emboldened to do this more going forward and and to me it is a real call all that we have to do more soon as possible to security systems he would like all voting machines to have paper records and for all states to conduct routine audits to make sure that the electron it results match the paper ones pam fast ler npr news.

malicious software election day director consultant larry norton brennan center electronic voting connecticut peggy reeves voting technology npr
"brennan center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 4 years ago

"brennan center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Computers if i can infect it with malicious software i can have that malicious software spread to the individual machines on the memory cards and then change votes on election day there's absolutely no evidence that happen last year but hold him in notes that some or all electronic voting machines in fourteen states have no paper ballot backups that can be checked to make sure there was no tampering state local election officials insist such an attack would be extremely difficult if not impossible because of tight security measures such as restrictions on who has access to voting machines still connecticut election director peggy reeves told a panel on voting technology earlier this week that many local election officials are illequipped to handle cybersecurity threats many of our towns actually have no local at support seriously they don't have have an it director in their town they might have a consultant that they call on if they have an issue so they look to us but we're a pretty small division she says the best protection against hackers is probably the fact that the nation's voting system is so decentralised larry nordin an election technology expert with the brennan center agrees but he's worried that last year's intruders were laying the groundwork for more serious attacks in the future this is a real threat it's not going away and if anything foreign adversaries even people at home might be emboldened to do this more going forward and to me it is a real call that we have to do more soon as possible to security systems he would like all voting machines to have paper records and for all states to conduct routine audits to make sure that the electronc results match the paper ones pam fess ler npr news it's npr news the former senator confirmed by them as attorney general now get the view follow up question suggest that abbot of painted in any collusion to undermine the integrity of our democratic process is name hauling and the task the vaal block colmey trump and jeff sessions role of the doj a hot than a real as next time on the take weekday afternoons at three on 939 fm support.

malicious software election day director consultant brennan center senator jeff doj electronic voting connecticut peggy reeves voting technology larry nordin npr attorney