19 Burst results for "Brenes"

"brenes" Discussed on Unlocking Us with Brene Brown

Unlocking Us with Brene Brown

05:42 min | Last month

"brenes" Discussed on Unlocking Us with Brene Brown

"Your power as a host to protect and fulfil the purpose for the group to help the group. Do its work. There is no facilitation without generous authority. Correct and it can look a thousand different ways in each of these things. it should reflect you. Like you and steve's wedding it was like it's not replicable it doesn't make sense to to replicate because it was yours so similarly with generous authorities so three kind of jobs if you will as you thinking about bringing people together to protect people to connect them to each other into the purpose and temporarily equalize. So i'll give an example. Actually this from your hometown. The alamo draft house. have you been Yeah of course so. I know it's a movie theater. That is unique in a lot of ways but one of the ways that i love its uniqueness. Is that like other movie theaters. It says prepo vid no texting no talking but all other movie theaters. Amc our lows. If someone behind you is like talking you're chatting up on their phone or texting it's up to you at the other guest to give him at stink or like right so they set a rule but they don't enforce it they can leave you to each other at the alamo draft house. They have a system that's equitable. Which is everybody gets a card because you can also order food or drinks and if you see somebody texting you can write on your card. But they don't know if you're not ordering an ip or saying this person's texting and the person gets a warning from a staff and if they do it again they kicked out and you could say wow. This is really controlling place. But what they've actually doing. If you talk to the ceo's he is protecting the purpose of the alamo which is to bring the magic of going to the movies in an age of string net flicks back to the theater and a lot of things can kill the magic. You understand like people are agreeing to these rules by coming. You don't have to go to the theater but similarly in our gatherings when we wanna be chill chill is a self protective way of not looking like you care in front of your people. And that's neither protecting you nor is it protecting your people. I have to say that. Laura the person who has of the podcasting for us. He's listening right now. Hey laura has put together a conference. It's called mom to oh for a decade now and it's really interesting because we've been friends for that entire decade and this is a big conference where mothers come together with marketers..

Laura alamo steve ceo
"brenes" Discussed on Unlocking Us with Brene Brown

Unlocking Us with Brene Brown

05:07 min | Last month

"brenes" Discussed on Unlocking Us with Brene Brown

"She has worked with a bunch of clients including the museum of modern art. The obama administration the world economic forum. And she's with us today Breaking down what it means to come together. Welcome priya parker okay. Preah i have a million questions for you. And i'm so excited to talk to you during this very challenging time route. So i'm just gonna start with this like how are you. I am and i am. I think what's now being called. Covert good so each day i wake up and i we go my toes and i wiggle my fingers and i check in and say i'm here and actually it's sort of an embodied way the night before the election. I fractured my toe and went to the doctor. And they said. I had a stress fracture and i thought yes sir yes i ab and flow and i tried to focus on what i know to be true and how i can help and then every few weeks fall apart. That sounds exactly right. And then i myself i up vindman dust myself off and try again i i a story that like what if she's floating above all this in like a special art of gathering space that i need to know about but for some reason. I'm really relieved that you are just like the rest of us putting one foot in front of the other feeling good about what you accomplish on some days and some days just falling apart and feeling. Good that you've got through the falling apart. Absolutely i mean i think so. Much of my way of coping navigating. These times is a question that i've always asked myself as a question. My mother would often ask me when. I was trying to make an important decision in my life. Which is what is it that i know how to do whereas the need and how can i help. And it's it's selfish. I mean at some of it's like how can i do the work. Almost have blinders on so that i can just do what i can within reach and then hope that others are doing the same. We give me your mom's questions one more time. What do you know how to do. And where is the need. Join us on the podcast. We really i can just wrap it up right here and we'd all be better. Yeah that's a start starting strong okay. Yeah that's a big one. Okay let me ask you this. Is this this conversation between us a gathering. You describe a gathering as the conscious bringing together people for a reason shaping the way we feel the way we think in the way we make sense of the world so are we in a gathering right now absolutely and yet. It's a very unusual gathering..

priya parker museum of modern art obama administration
"brenes" Discussed on Unlocking Us with Brene Brown

Unlocking Us with Brene Brown

02:04 min | Last month

"brenes" Discussed on Unlocking Us with Brene Brown

"Conversation for you today. I am talking with priya. Parker who is a master facilitator a strategic advisor training conflict resolution. And she is the author of an incredible book that i recommend to pretty much. Everyone i know. And i've sent probably twenty copies of it out to friends and leaders and anyone who gathers people together. The book is called the art of gathering. How we meet and why it matters pre and i are going to dig into what it means to come together. Even virtually right now why connection requires intention and planning and the often invisible structures that are inside of our most meaningful gatherings. Have you ever gone to a gathering or a conference. And you're like this is just so good and you can't really see the structure but there's something that's holding everything together and everything feels purposeful. We're going to talk about how that happens. We're even going to deconstruct. my wedding. Did not expect to talk about this. But i had this kind of crazy wedding to steve in one thousand nine hundred four. That people still today when they see us will say oh my god. Your wedding was so different and weird and fun and unforgettable and it wasn't because it was fancy because it was a low budget wedding it was because we didn't know it then but we had a very serious conversation before we started planning it and we sat these really intentional kind of inclusion and exclusion criteria for. What was going to be okay for our wedding. And so we dig into what happens when we prioritize people and connection over old rules and kind of unwritten or written policies. So you're gonna love this. It's so perfect for right now. I can't wait for you to hear it and meet preah..

strategic advisor Parker
"brenes" Discussed on Unlocking Us with Brene Brown

Unlocking Us with Brene Brown

07:15 min | 2 months ago

"brenes" Discussed on Unlocking Us with Brene Brown

"Wouldn't play that on the radio eight it for guard so for me. They were lifesavers. Now tell you why because all of those stories that you were telling in those songs where things that were unfolding in. My family and things. That i knew were whispers. They were the kind of things you heard about in the grownups card room or things that you heard about through the sheet rock walls and you knew they were happening but you thought something must be really wrong with you because no one would tell the story and then here. You're singing them. Well i can see where that would have made a difference in your life. That's one of the things. I've always been so proud of when people like you. Tell me stories of hammond. Music and my songs have helped damn over some really bad times in their lives. And i'm always fascinated with that and so grateful that i've had the ability to you know to wrap these things for people. Come to me and say you know. I was going through this hard time and i was thinking about committing suicide in our song this year and and it changed my life so i mean i thank. God works through things like that. I think that if you have a gift in your open to those things you get the message and you can get them out there. But i'm so happy that i had a place in your life because you seem turned out all right knowing here and all that stuff. Yeah yeah because. I know what it was. It was like a big big old dose of empathy. It was like a message of. You're not alone like you. Were not afraid to tell a hard story where you know. I wasn't and kind of going back to kind of what you said about your hear those things and they're in your own family. Nearly everything has happened to somebody. I'm hand many families. Do you know the somewhere. In round that some girl has not had child out of wedlock or people that have emotional and mental problem worms or people go through such horrible things whether it's breakup or just their their lives. Whether they're not can't be comfortable in their own skin they might be gay and what accepts him and so many people become suicidal in the song. The bridge i would hear those stories myself growing up. I knew all those things. I would hear things i said through the walls and i knew things were going on in the family. I was writing some really serious heavy-duty duty songs. When i seventy eight years old just from stores at here my mom and my aunts and talking about all. I was nosey. Unlike you i heard everything. I can't like our not listening. I'd be doing something boy hours just honed in on everything so i think that that's one of the gifts about music. Thank for healing don't you oh god yes just to know that. There were problems in there was suffering but we weren't alone. It was shame relief. Well that's a good weapon in it. Yeah that's great well. I'm so happy that i was there for you. You were and i gotta tell you this other story and it's funny because you have this amazing sense of humor and you can make anybody laugh about anything but for me because that was my introduction to you you are always a very serious person to me what i hear other people i kinda joking and laughing and oshii so fun i'd be like oh yeah we're talking about two different parts. I think a dolly parton is like she's on the truth train. She's gonna ride that sucker right into your life. There's no kidding around. So when i was in high school my parents along with three other couples went to go see nine to five and two of the men walked out of the movie theater and when my parents got home my parents thought about that film for two weeks. My mom was like yes. This is exactly what goes on in companies and the women are underestimated and mistreated. And it was like you became an icon in my family. That money talk. No kidding all because of like just the believing that women should be paid equal. Pay giovanni remain. Walkout is too much Women i think it was too much truth about how women are underestimated. Yeah i grew up like that too. I grew up all around all these male. Chauvinist pigs wars racers at however wherever you say they should be and i think that's all good if that's where she wants to me. That's not the only place you can't be or should be so i wasn't Being in that movie trying to make a political statement of any yukon. But we are dressing issues and i think it did a lot of good that movie which still got a long way to go but i thought the movie intercept was very entertaining and can children even enjoyed the movie when restrung up the boss. They didn't know why they're down while funny. But the boss hanging around and the animated far you know that we did our fantasies of what we would do to the walls and all that so it really was entertaining in a lotta ways buck. The base of that was really about the workplace situations and what it really meant for women to be appreciated and will be paid well for equal work and i really thought the movie was really wonderful. I was proud to be part of. It was the first movie i'd ever been in god. It was so. I mean i just wash it recently to prepare for this interview and it has aged. Well it is still as poignant and funny and real as it was in one thousand nine hundred. Eighty one thousand nine hundred one or two years ago this year. How i know isn't that amazing. Yeah forty years ago and is still very relevant in nashville. Play it all the time okay. Let's talk about vulnerability so you may know. I don't know that. I've spent twenty years studying vulnerability and courage shame and we talk about in our research. That vulnerability is the birthplace of courage. And it's the ability to keep your heart open to both pain and joy and matai something this book to everyone listening right now. If you know me you don't need to buy. Because i've already four hundred copies to give his christmas gifts but the book of song yes song. Teller my life and lyrics. Oh god this book. Here's something you right in there as a songwriter and as a person i have to leave myself wide open. I suffer a lot. Because i am open so much. I heard a lot. And when i heard i heard all over because i cannot harden my heart to protect myself i always say that i strengthen the muscles around my heart but i can't harden it. Well that's exactly. How feel a as a human being and as writer. I feel. I have to feel for everybody. And i'm sure you're the same way you have to allow your chef to be open and you can't just shut these doors because you want to prefer to. Maybe but that's not how you're going to become a good quality human being this going to be able to serve humanity in the best ways you can. Has there been a price to keeping your heart open. How it's not that in there. You know when you hurt you heard all over you know. I'm just got a person that rather than lashing out is something that hurts me. I usually cry about it. Pray about it a one not to say that. I can't tell you were put. It don't like where you've got.

hammond giovanni nashville writer
"brenes" Discussed on The Cave of Time

The Cave of Time

04:04 min | 3 months ago

"brenes" Discussed on The Cave of Time

"You know like for a long time, the LGBT movement had kind of a concrete set of ideas of equality things that they wanted to achieve, and they basically cheat them all in the last twenty years. But. The LGBT movement is bigger than it's ever been. Now there's more money being poured into to it than ever. There's more people who sympathize it. There's more activists than ever. There's more people publishing books. There's more people talking on the radio and television getting into the government more than ever. But like why would you need more? L.. Bt activists if you. If you've accomplished all of the goals you set out to achieve and the answer is it's a big propaganda machine like it's a giant propaganda machine that has the keep feeding itself you're. Not. necessarily. I'm not entirely So I. I was I was I was bringing up like what I think might be a difference in how you and I understand what propaganda is. So you would said that these activists describing themselves was a former propaganda. How do you see it that way? Well they. They market themselves as having real knowledge. Would you say would you say that marketing and propaganda are always wanting the same? I would say they go hand in hand maybe not always the same but. The difference is subtle and overlapping like I would say and I think that I think that Edward Brenes would agree is that like you know there's marketing where it's like you know they use this example in the book it's like by my piano my drake's they work well, and they're cheap by pianos on, and then you could also lie about that like you could have shitty pianos and say my pin was are great. Awesome. Yeah. I wouldn't call either those propaganda and I don't think that he would either I think what propaganda is is a rolling how the other person sees your pianos. So in the book, there's the example with this to take this piano thing step further is that..

Edward Brenes
"brenes" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

Problematic Premium Feed

04:16 min | 3 months ago

"brenes" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

"They can get an idea of what you might want to buy and that's. Right and I think one of the reasons why essentially advertising has become the biggest win of the ages is because those of where our values you know be. Making sure that you know the customer can be taken care of and that you have at least some sort of general standpoint that you have everything at your fingertips and empty for spending money in. Let's so much of the economy is built around retail versus you know industry manufacturing, etc, and. We really put all of our resources into to making commodifying making everything is sort of retail experience whether that the health care whether that be higher education. On and on and on, and so it makes sense that you know the sort of the largest. Project for. Concentrating Information People's access to it would ultimately be organically in the service of selling people. Things. I mean, isn't part of the Alfred Brenes plan the you know the the creation of. Marketing? And kind of public manipulation public relations, it does do that and is the ultimate value. The the retail part is a portion of it and the government control of like you know sort of commanding an economy in a sort of way that invisible hand. But then also like controlling what people interpret into get to see through their media but that's the ultimate payoff doesn't really have a military value, but it doesn't. Really influence what you're going to get and like to see the world and the like to create people's desires. Rap Agana. Edited World makes you think you're more freely new actually are while and also one of the sort of things that. You know burn as wanted to see is essentially making. Being a consumer part of a lifestyle, making it an integral part of what it is to exist inside as opposed to the sort of separate thing my refrigerator broke down I have to buy a new refrigerator..

Alfred Brenes
"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

Pick the Brain

05:45 min | 5 months ago

"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

"Unprecedented unprecedented numbers is in my opinion, a direct result of collective society just shoving down there fear shoving down there on certainty not dealing with their pain and guess what it's GonNa come out one way or another. So you choose if you WANNA take the reins and deal with it or will deal with you. In whatever pain far more painful way. Right. Yeah, the will this is why you and I are such big fans of therapy right? Anyone who has any type of? Resistance to getting therapy like and I found myself in that boat as well like I, when I was going through some anxiety times I remember someone very close to me recommended well, maybe you should talk to somebody about it and I was like I don't WanNa do that. Guy. I don't need therapy. I'm not going to I don't want to do it because then it did I'm admitting that I have something wrong with me and I don't I can't go down that road I don't want as you know mental illness scares me to death I. Don't you know say that I have a mental illness I don't want to think about prescription medication I don't want to think about it was just one of those things where it was like. Okay. All right but. Like it's so common when I finally got to the point where I was like, okay. Maybe I should talk to somebody that fear sort of lifted. And then when I did talk to someone in my personal case, it was a coach for a lot of other people like an actual licensed therapist or whatever it is. I got so much freedom from being able to talk about his doesn't mean it was easy. But I was able to address what was going on and find a way to begin to move past because the old approach wasn't working, which was stuff it down don't address it. It'll be fine that would come out in other negative ways especially have control over the didn't have control or didn't have control and I also didn't expect it sometimes it will come out of the blue eyed have no idea where it came from and then I have to go back..

"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

Pick the Brain

04:52 min | 5 months ago

"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

"Done it Roy. All right. The last thing we talked about in the previous episode, we sort of previewed what she was going to say about no one has done great things who hasn't had the scratched their way up from a fall one hundred times, and then she says the key and I was expecting when she said the key. Talking a lot about vulnerability but I was expected she would say you know resilience it was going to be confidence. It was going to be strength whatever she says the key is vulnerability. This is her thing. Yeah, and it's I should've known I should've known she was gonNA. Vulnerability but I think it's one of those things where she has seen that as the foundation for so many things and she's identified it in like we talked about in previous podcast. The real universal truths are the one-stop comeback up time and time again, and in her work from ability comes up a lot yet. I was just having a socially distance coffee with a friend. Yesterday in my backyard and he's a lawyer he was telling me of it at his law firm. He's a partner in the law firm. In this they made a decision to ask everybody what percentage of you would feel comfortable coming back to the office and not a high percentage felt comfortable and he said, but the funny thing is there's a guy that sits next to me. Who has come into the office every single day that the pandemic has been. So he's he's not taking a day off. He's gone into the office every single day on which I don't even know if that's legal but anyways. Just part of his thing and I thought to myself. God. is so sad and his whole attitude was like I'm just GonNa Power through this and I was like this is an unprecedented time. You gotta be vulnerable to it. You've got it examined how scared you are how fragile life seems like the future can seem and what that means lean into the vulnerability of this so that you can grow so that you can expand your potential and I see these little examples all over the place and I feel like this is such an old school way to think like we're just gonNA earn muscle our way through this very outdated and that's why I think that she's had such a tremendous impact and success because this really is the way of the future. This is the way we're GONNA. Have to get through this. is to lean into the vulnerability of not just our own personal path for kind of this collective path in like. Really feel it out for ourselves all of it the ugly scary because otherwise, I don't think what we're doing a sustainable unless we lean into the real, very real mess and what we feel like is the weak part of us, but it's actually the strength the ability to face uncertainty fear rejection all of these things that are just central to complete human experience. Chris Voss is a former FBI negotiator. Had A little content on our show and chatted about negotiating skills but he said that's did I pronounce that negotiating?.

partner Chris Voss Roy
"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

Pick the Brain

04:51 min | 5 months ago

"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

"That you're hurting. That, you're sad. Disappointed grieving feeling shame whatever feeling your end you have to own it. You cannot. We cannot begin again. When we're dragging when we're dragging unspoken and unexplored emotions behind us. We have to be brave in curious into dig into the feelings of a fall. And that's hard when you're faith-based down. Emotional. STOICISM is not tough pretending that you don't have feelings isn't strength. self-awareness. Is Power. Acknowledging emotion and feeling doesn't give a motion and feeling. Power It gives you power. You own the emotions or they own you you own your hurt. Or you're hurt owns you and you in depth working it out on other people or you take it out on your own self worth. Once you get back up acknowledged your hurt. That's when we're free to begin again. But beginning again also takes curiosity and courage. What have I learned from this fall that I can take with me as I begin again And is beginning again mean. that. There's a possibility of volleying again. Yeah. It does. That's why they call it courage. And wrap up. Let me tell you about the secret gift.

"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

Pick the Brain

05:00 min | 5 months ago

"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

"Welcome to the pick the brain podcasts where we picked the brains of the brightest minds in the areas of health self-improvement productivity, and kicking ass at life. I am Jeremy Fisher always alongside my co host Erin Falcon. All right here we are back with Burnett, Brown, we're going to hear part two of the commencement speech that she delivered remotely for the University of Texas. You looking forward to getting back into this one yeah this is great one. All right let's do it. I married. Steve had also Grad who just graduated from ut he started medical school in San Antonio at ut medical school I worked in a residential treatment facility in the hill country between San Antonio. Austin. I kept waiting tables at worked in my bachelor's degree in social work at ut. internship at the State Hospital and another internship child protective services, and I graduated I went straight into my MSW. Stephen I, in Houston I started my PhD program at the University of Houston I was thirty, thirty, two or thirty three at the time. We were ready to have a baby. I got pregnant. I remember coming to school letting people know and some people were happy for me and I think some people were. One person said to me we really thought you'd have career. and. I said, look it's a baby not a lobotomy were good. It turned out I had hyper Mrs and I got really sick and I had to take a leave of absence from school for a semester. Get back up began. I got out graduated with my PhD I wrote a book. I was really excited about it. It was rejected from every single person I mean, I could paper. Greg. Region with rejection letters. Get back up again, borrowed money from my parents self-published the self published book was a was a big hit. Penguin. Big proper publisher. Bought it that book failed. Get back up again. This is the rhythm of my life. And these are the season's every single person I know who has actually changed the world. I've collected over four hundred thousand pieces of data over twenty years, and I've never seen a single person who's built to life a family or a career that did not have to scratch their way up from a fall and begin again. A hundred. Times. What starts here changes the world, but it will not be on your terms and it will not be on your time line. The world will not ready itself our plans..

San Antonio Burnett Jeremy Fisher Erin Falcon lobotomy University of Houston University of Texas Austin Houston Stephen I State Hospital Steve publisher Greg Brown ut.
"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

Pick the Brain

03:33 min | 5 months ago

"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

"Feel like you've mastered your own destiny through trial and error like she was University of Texas absolutely love that story I I almost teared up when the the Dean told her after getting the first first year of community college straight. As note, you're going to have to do more I. Just I know that feeling where your heart just I can't even put it into words but I was just reveling in it. The sentimentality of it for me. Personally. So anyways to even when you start to figure your personal narrative at a little more boom life writ large can knock you off your feet and so it's just so important however, what stage are in life To keep this idea. FRONTON center in your mind, it's not about the plan. It's about again resilience. We've talked about this the resiliency to get back up and keep pushing, keep fighting, get back up and keep pushing, keep fighting and it just works. It just works how many times have. We heard this from a in different ways. She has a particular angle on it, which we'll talk about it a bit I think. Probably in part to around vulnerability, but that it's an age old tale in, so listen to it adopt this idea it just works. There's some things that come up multiple times on this show and the reason they come up multiple times is because they're just true right? Like that's just the thing that it's like re Lee clear really simple universal truths will come up time and time and time again. That's how you know their true. All right. Thank you have a lot of people that have like there's you hear a lot of fads and sort of trends on you know this is the three step secret for Blah Blah Blah, right those kind of come. Away and they might come up again you know maybe fifteen twenty years later and be revisited but then they kind of fade away stuff like get back up again that's timeless. It never goes away. It keeps coming back. It's funny. It's ironic because get back up and begin again gets back up and begins again all the time. It just this ideal has yet to prove itself, wrong yeah, and it just does it just does it's one of those things where it's like you only fail if you stop. So, there's like the two trajectories. There's the success trajectory out of this of it all. But what I think is even maybe the more important thing about this as a mantra or as a way to live or however you want to preface it. Is that it just makes you a better person. There's something in this process that is so catalyzing for the best version of yourself and you get a little closer to it a little closer to it with every little hiccup failure whatever you WANNA call it the ability to dig deep to reach deep into yourself to find the strength to carry on. Starts to just create an unbelievable person forget the success trajectory. That's actually just like the silver lining of it all but you get to step into the fullest most complete version of yourself and you never would have been able to do that without the struggle and you can hear this with every word the Bernard Brown is said you just said, I want to know this person this person just seems like such A. Solid..

Bernard Brown University of Texas Dean Lee
"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

Pick the Brain

04:57 min | 5 months ago

"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

"And I'm going to resign from the company and she looks at me and said. Are you going to be a VJ ON MTV on head Bangers Bowl. which then apparently not so secret ambition turned out I did not get a job offer from MTV to be of EJ on head bangers ball and I said no, and she said, are you going back to school fulltime? Are you going to ut I I wasn't too worried about the one point one GPA that I had. Accumulated over the years past because that was a long time ago and I'd had a successful career at a t and T for several years I had a lot of recommendations at a lot of confidence and I went to the dean of students office admissions and I said, you know, here's my story and left to come here and I've done this great work in. Ut would have no part of it. I. Don't remember his name, but he was in either to the dean of students or our admissions maybe somewhere between. and he said I'll need to see two semesters. Of really good grades from you at a community college before I consider letting you into the University of Texas. And I said, okay I moved to Houston I had not been back since my parents are divorced I lived with my mom, her new husband, my sixteen year old twin sisters and got a job waiting tables at Papa do and I went to community college a year later I had taken twenty seven hours a transferable credit. Out of four point zero. And I said in the waiting room of the same. Guys Office at ut I was puffy proud and ready. He looked at my transcript and he congratulated me on my grades and Sad I'm sorry I'll need to see another semester. At strong grades before I can let you into University of Texas. And I just remember bursting into tears. And Walking Down Twenty Six street I don't think it was called. Dean. Keaton. But walking down twenty six sixth street. Toward where my car was parked. And there was used to be a convenience station there. I found the quarters and called my mom on the payphone. and. told her they said no, they said no, they won't let.

Ut MTV Papa University of Texas Dean Keaton Houston
"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

Pick the Brain

04:59 min | 5 months ago

"brenes" Discussed on Pick the Brain

"Welcome to the pick the brain podcasts where we pick the brains of the brightest minds in the areas of health self-improvement productivity, and kicking ass at life high in Jeremy Fisher always alongside my co host Erin. Falcon. All right air today, we are going to hear from Rene Brown. Feel like I didn't hear anything have any idea who she was, and then like I don't know if it was like three years ago or what but she just blasted onto everything and now everything I see is like Yeah. It's been a little longer I think than three years but yes, she was kind of like one of those overnight successes that took in at twenty years to get there. But she sure Catapulted onto the main stage fast and loud, and there's no question about why? Yeah. And that's an important point you mentioned we've talked about that in the past. There's no such thing as overnight success anybody who splashes onto the screen and seems like I've never heard of Jerry's never heard of her she's been working behind the scenes like you said for a couple decades. So this. Is a speech she delivered at the University of Texas and again she did it remote it actually wasn't at the University of Texas it was to the University of Texas Twenty twenty I know right but got some really important stuff in here this will be a two part episode because there's so much to dig into. Let's go ahead and start with part one from Bernie Brown. Thank you congratulations twenty twenty graduates is wonderful that we're all here tonight virtually. I wish we in person. I wish I was giving a million. Hugs to everyone in every family member but this is this is wonderful. We can do this. We'll thank you for joining us tonight and I know the graduates are so glad to hear from you. So now it's all yours. Thank you. Graduates I again I wish I I wish I was with you I wish we were together I. Wish we're in front of that tower and I know that we will be in short order. Tonight we're going to do virtually..

Rene Brown Jeremy Fisher University of Texas Twenty University of Texas Bernie Brown Jerry
Top New York City ER doc commits suicide, shaken by coronavirus onslaught

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 9 months ago

Top New York City ER doc commits suicide, shaken by coronavirus onslaught

"Very sad news about a frontline medical employee employee was was finding finding the the pandemic pandemic every every day day in in New New York York City City tragedy tragedy hits hits a a New New York York City City medical medical community community with with the the loss loss of of an an E. E. R. R. doctor doctor who who took took her her own own life life Sunday Sunday Charlottesville Charlottesville police confirm that Dr Lorna brain was rushed to you VA hospital where she died from self inflicted injuries brain was the medical director at New York Presbyterian Allen hospital her father told The New York Times that doctor bring contract the corona virus herself and tried to return to work a week and a half later to help our colleagues but he said his daughter couldn't complete her twelve hour shift she then traveled to Virginia to spend time with her family her father said that Dr Brene often talked about work and about the onslaught of corona virus patients her department has seen and the toll the bars took on them her father says he wants her to be remembered as a

Va Hospital Medical Director New York Presbyterian Allen Ho The New York Times Virginia Dr Brene New New York York New York York City City Medical Medical E. E. R. Charlottesville
The Marlboro Woman

Household Name

08:44 min | 11 months ago

The Marlboro Woman

"Before the Marlboro Man. Before the Marlboro woman. Even women didn't really smoke. In fact in some places. It was even illegal to help me tell that story. I wrote Aria Bendix into the studio with me. I'm already so on. It gets toasted here as well too. So cool cool. So why don't we start? Warriors a reporter at business insider. Who's covered the history of smoking and Marlborough? Why don't we start at the turn of the century? What was the association between women and smoking so there was a strong negative association between women and smoking. It was not something that polite woman did. There was a lot of societal disapproval. That was definitely the big thing but there was also a few legal attempts to sort of prohibit women from smoking in public in nineteen. Oh four there was a woman who was actually turned in by her husband for smoking in the presence of her children and she faced thirty days of jail. Time for that and then a few years later There's actually a short-lived ban in New York City that prohibited women from smoking in public. So it really was. Smoking was really seen as not a thing. That a lady. Oh well raised woman would do woman of good moral standing. So then what changed? So what changed was World War One inside the White House. President Woodrow Wilson compared with advisors then signed the proclamation of war against Germany and that was really when women started to take on up. Actually enter the workforce for the first time and take on jobs that were traditionally says he'd with men behind every man or the woman at American women were daintily mightily and they also changed their appearance to reflect that so women started to have shorter hair started to wear pants and then they also started to pick up cigarettes by one thousand. Nine hundred thousand American women had won the right to vote but even within the Feminist Movement for some smoking was taboo. Some of the activists for women's rights actually went to great lengths to distance themselves from women who smoked Lucy. Page Gaston for example was a vocal opponent of smoking and drinking alcohol. She wasn't trying to ally herself with women who were redefining femininity. Instead she wanted to empower women who embodied the old Victorian ideals of womanhood who would use their vote to advocate for temperance and respectability and enforce their high moral standards on the broader population. So where does the story of Marlboro Start? So it starts with Philip Morris which used to be British Tobacco Company in the One thousand nine hundred twenty s they really wanted to get a stronger foothold in the US market so they came up with the idea of the Marlboro Brand and in nineteen twenty four. The introduced it as a cigarette brand for women. Nineteen twenty four was a really tough time for a newcomer to be making a play for the US cigarette market at all. Never Mind Marketing to women. That's because it was already pretty locked down by four big tobacco companies. Actually there used to be one gigantic company a monopoly until the US Supreme Court and a bunch of trust. Busting Congressman. Put a stop to that in the nineteen teens. Anyway by the Nineteen Twenties Marlboro. Was this small fish making its debut and upon full of. I'm just GONNA go with this great white sharks so it set its sights on the other. Small fish in the cigarette pond women and since suffragettes Lucy Page Gaston. Were not going to light up anytime soon. Marlboro had to find a way to make smoking socially acceptable for women. It had to make cigarettes. Which many saw as symbols of vulgarity and promiscuity actually feminine by Victorian Standards So one of the first advertisements that they came out with was this quote unquote mild as May campaign may like the month of May delicate breezy dainty elegant for find polite. And there's something amazing about how Marlboro. Sins that message through these ads. Like if you look at them. The women picture aren't even smoking but it almost doesn't because they look so glamorous every one of them sort of had like this dark lib this perfectly quaffed hair. The secret was sort of daintily hanging off their fingertips looking a little bit seductive but it was also somewhat reminiscent of the Victorian ideals of Amenity. That sort of caring us into the nineteen twenties. You see this sort of stereotype of a lady. A very elegant woman that marble woman is basically like the Modern Day Portland of instagram influence. Our I mean everything that women sort of wanted and aspire to be mild is may was everything. A woman could want in a cigarette. The ads made it look like an essential accessory as natural a woman's hand as the lipstick on her lips. There was a lot of concern that women's lipstick would actually get at the end of their cigarette. So what they did was actually create a grease proof tip that would prevent that and it would keep your lipstick looking nice while you were smoking after that. They also introduced a red rim around the cigarette and that was meant to disguise the lipstick itself. We are miles away from the Marlboro Man. Here that even his Marlboro and its parent company. Philip Morris continued to work on making it cigarette look appealing to women. It had a bigger obstacle to tackle. Most women did not know how to smoke. So Philip Morris sponsored. A lecture series that toured the country and taught women the basics. It hit ladies clubs charm. School's department stores and nurses lounges covering etiquette had opened the packages avoid lipstick smears and prevent fires. Oh my God and slowly but surely marbles efforts started to make inroads so the advertisements are resonating with women Marlboros. Getting letters from women thanking them for the ADS. More women are starting to pick up smoking. But it's actually not doing much for the brand itself. It was pretty much failing as a business they were capturing a miniscule portion of the cigarette market at that time turns out. Marlboro. Wasn't the only cigarette company on the block with the bright idea of advertising to women in fact the American Tobacco Company one of the four giants which used to have a monopoly on cigarettes. It wanted to get women to smoke. Just as badly as Marlboro did and its main brand. Lucky strike was a much bigger name than Marlboro. The president of the American Tobacco Company poured about one point five billion dollars in today's dollars into advertisements in the first decade of the lucky advertisements. So they were funneling money into the brand and that sort of reflected in that sales they were sort of catering to everyone and they saw the same opportunity. Marble did that. They weren't actually targeted advertisements to half of the population which was women so they put out a lot of the same messaging. That Marlboro did a lot of that. Same like feminine ideals of Beauty. They weren't a woman's cigarette brand but they certainly began catering their advertisements to women but nineteen twenty nine both companies had been running ads featuring women for years. Marlboro had even gone so far as to show a woman in one of the advertisements. Actually smoking a cigarette. Just holding it seductively. But even that wasn't enough so to break through the negative by surrounding women in cigarettes once and for all the American Tobacco Company launched another offensive. And this one would below the politics of women's smoking wide. Open the president of the American Tobacco Company calls up this Guy Edward Brenes and he's now known as the father of Public Relations and he was actually fun fact. The nephew Sigmund Freud and so- Bernez comes up with this idea to stage a protest in New York City he recruits all. These debutantes who sort of look like the everyday woman but they're also super elegant and he gets them to basically marched through the streets of New York on the Easter Day parade carrying lit cigarettes in their hand and he called the the torches of freedom so cigarettes were known as the torches of freedom the Easter parade. One of the most important events on New York City's social calendar. Women were there to be seen. They were the newest fashions. Their boldest hats and stranded down Fifth Avenue. Like it was a runway. It was such a cultural touchstone. The American composer Irving Berlin even wrote a song about it and it became the basis for a nineteen thirty three. Judy Garland Fred astaire movie new the grandest Bala Anyway crashing. This event was a big deal and the torches of freedom the woman marching down Fifth Avenue in their finery carrying lit cigarettes. That image caught fire. It was a huge news story and it sort of kicked off the idea of women smoking in public really. Yeah I mean I see it as sort of the fulcrum to change the social tied women in other cities as well not just New York City but now San Francisco and Detroit. Were now taking the streets and smoking their cigarettes or torches a free. They had their own torches. Afraid of

Marlboro New York City American Tobacco Company Philip Morris Lucy Page Gaston President Trump Aria Bendix United States Marlborough President Woodrow Wilson Us Supreme Court Reporter Lucy Irving Berlin British Tobacco Company Instagram Judy Garland Fred Astaire
"brenes" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"brenes" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Brenes. The hand is stone massage stress-free root of the morning. We're mostly stress-free. It's route one in bucks county. I'll tell you why. In a second find one and fifty locations in hand and stone dot com bit quite a delay within the hour southbound route one in Bensalem trying to get to the turnpike the Bensalem interchange. It's cleared out. We'll take the good news. We're west let's continue west on the turnpike risk slow from approaching willow grove at the fort Washington. Nothing wrong. Just a lot of volume here. South on the blue route. We get off the turnpike jammed from approaching the mechanic tolls generally down, south ridge pike for twenty two still pretty busy used to college on. And then to the Schuylkill expressway eastbound direction heavy at the two zero two on ramp and four seventy six to conshohocken inbound. And then beyond that is slow from east of city to Gerard all heading into center city, western Schuylkill expressway, which again is is seventy six jam pass young to around vine and then the boulevard out of the Belmont avenue south on ninety five. Still delays Kaufman down to center city that earlier broken down. Tractor trailer out of the way delays remain. We still have a broken down vehicle north on ninety five at Allegheny north of center city causing delays that's in the right lane. And now we have problems in Delaware County south on I ninety five just below the blue route. That's another broken down vehicle in the right lane. That is new everybody south down south of the blue route north in Delaware County and ninety five usual backup at the Commodore. Barry bridge, upper providence, south to fifty two crawling approaching rose tree park down to the ramp to go Salva route one that is an accident. Northbound forty two freeway Blackwood clementine up to two ninety five the Delaware river bridges for now. Look all right Paco, high speed line running at fifteen minute. Plus delays discovery of a cracked rail earlier this morning all trains will are running both directions. But they're all locals expect overcrowding on top of the delays septa on or close to schedule. From the TruMark financial twenty four hour traffic center, I'm Sam clover. Mariner is to is proudly built by skilled union workers jobs like these are good paying jobs for people to work. I'm numbers wherever the purchase homes vehicles pay college tuition. Mrs just the beginning, Pennsylvania energy Narender east union built.

Delaware County bucks county Delaware river Bensalem willow grove Sam clover TruMark Pennsylvania Kaufman Barry bridge Gerard Allegheny Paco fort Washington twenty four hour fifteen minute
"brenes" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"brenes" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So it will say, you have these pods this, Brian service. This conflict map is whatever, whatever other things. And when he go and upgrade, you can go ahead and upgrade that released a rollback or delete that release and what what those things do is at applies actions to all of the resources that were defined in your release. If you do a hell, install the same chart, and you'll get a different instance of that of that chart and you'll have a different release in a different release name. Does that make things a little more clear? It does, yes. So in practice. Yeah, as I understand, people use helm to install things across their Cooper Netease cluster. So things like Prometheus or influx db or a service mash, for example, what else do people use in their day to day operations for helm, or what aspects of how do they use in their day to day operations? I think you head on the bait wine, right? So they, they use it mainly to install and manage those sets of coup Brenes components that are related which make up your application. I'm, they may also use it to like find charts. Can there's like a search command, seeking search for what charts are out there. You can also e can do more chart management type of actions like create use it to create a chart reposited or some aspects of chart repository. Mitch repository is a thing that it's any any can be any web server that holds. Charts, but it has at the root of it in index file. And so you can use how the how CLI to generate that index file, for example, and you can also use how to scaffold a new chart. So the home create command, the just say, home, create passing. Some name will say my chart and they'll generate this like basic chart for you, and then you can use that to like, you can like, throw in your templates. Are your career is manifest in Kenner get going from there? What I spoke with Ralph, we talked about not just helm, but also draft and brigade. Are you also involved in those projects? Yeah, I am draft was a big big part of my day to day on for a long time, and I still still spent him sometime there. We've been working on a new version of hound. So I've been focusing on on home to these days. The draft is as one of the one of the very interesting more interesting projects I have worked sign. So it is a tool that helps you create and enter iterating on cloud native applications or applications that are going to be deployed to Cooper nineties, but it does all kind of like the things that you need to deploy your application under the hood for you, which is really nice..

Brian service Mitch repository Cooper Netease Cooper Kenner brigade Ralph
"brenes" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"brenes" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Enough is enough the president is. Thinking of revoking the security clearances of that entire criminal Obama cabal Obama's deep state operatives soon could be losing their access, to classified information roll it Britain will the president consider. Senator Paul injector Former director Brennan security yes not only is the president looking to take away, Brennan security clearance he's also looking into the clearances of Komi. Clapper Hayden rice and McCabe the president is exploring the mechanisms to remove security clearance because they've politicized and in some. Cases. Monetize. Their public service and security clearances making baseless accusations of. Improper contact with Russia or being. Influenced by Russia against the president is extremely inappropriate and the fact that people with security clearances are making these baseless charges, provides inappropriate legitimacy to accusations with zero evidence bingo yes Yeah baby it's about freaking time it's about time and I wanna. Give rand Paul all the credit in the world because, he's the one. That actually suggests that it he's the one that I went on and, said do you realize the by the way rand Paul was the only one who defended Trump on in, the mainstream media from all of the accusations of treason and. Being puppy Putin's puppet an agent in Helsinki and then he's the one that then said whoa whoa Brennan's calling Trump. A. Traitor Brenes calling, Trump an agent of Ladimir Kloppers saying that Putin, has dirt on Trump what? And, these. Clowns have a security. Clearance on top, of it all which they're monetize ING making money off to spread these vicious lies and smears woah woh Mr President. Why if they're going to be abusing this and, politicizing this privilege and monetize it making millions, of dollars off of this Mr President why don't you play a little hardball ball and say you know what if you're going to behave like a bunch of losers I'm gonna treat you like a bunch, of, losers, no security clearance for you And Paul was the one who actually I raised the issue now? I know the president's got to look into it's got, a clear it? With his lawyers he's got a jump certain hurdles but, can I ask you in all honesty I wasn't, even aware they kept this I mean I'm like what this has been, going on for how. Many decades why But the one I'm sorry I mean to repeat myself but this one. Just you, to talk, about a mind bender so you get fired from your? Job But you still keep some of the privileges of your job Drew still get to have access to top secret? Information like how does this work like? Really Britney, as this have you? Ever heard, of this before? I mean do we do we I'm sorry. Do I get so I still get security? Clearance for Entercom can I get my. Old Email address back don't really find out what's going on aren't they making a shift from the, midday to the afternoons using Glenn ordway going to the afternoons Or something. Aren't they they're making shift my buddy Glen? Is going in afternoon drive how come. I mean I to find this out in the media how come I have? Top security clearance there I. Should have, top security clearance I should have known about, this before anybody what the hell's going on I mean this is? Really this? Is freaking incredible what about af all the stuff that goes on. Behind the scenes at af how. Come I don't know if top security clearance, about what's going on there I don't think you're on the. Air Britain, you're saying stuff, in front of a. Microphone but nothing's coming across but that's okay so anyway no no no none? Of them? Should have a security clearance it should have been revoked day one I mean if I'm the president how come even told him Mr President they spied on you then they tried. To alter the election. Against you now they're trying to convince everybody. Through leaks that you're actually a tool of, Putin and they want, to impeach you. These same. Clowns, and, they..

president rand Paul Putin Trump Brennan Russia Senator Paul injector Obama Britain Clapper Hayden rice Glenn ordway Komi director Helsinki McCabe A. Traitor Brenes Drew Britney Glen
"brenes" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"brenes" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"My dream dish is sospiri nays or to put an end dish brenes sauce i love rene sauce and i have never been able to do it effectively meter might larger theory and you know i'm a man of many theories chris is that the things that we seek out and tend to fail adam cooking come into kinds one our emotions and the other a what i might call a rations in other words were always struggling to make a perfect hollande's sauce or struggling to make a great souffle those tend to be the kinds of things that people seek and have trouble with because there relatively speaking chemically complicated they have to take the motion can't be close enough it has to be dead on right you're going to handle excuse me for this comment but you think abortions in air rations are also the two things we struggle for in life and made a visit emotion after all and now you see once again chris you've intimidated my ending because we have to generalise the metaphor exactly as you done an all we seek in life is the motion of love and the irritation of parenting and those the two things are headed towards but before we get to the spiritual side of emotion gneration let us pause and spare moment for the pure material and chemicals side of it making emotions work is difficult and we're always going at least i am always going from one instrument to the other one piece of apparatus to the next in the pursuit of the perfect rene sauce which is you know is made.

chris hollande adam