40 Burst results for "Breast Cancer"

Fresh update on "breast cancer" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:55 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "breast cancer" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"Support the principles of the Fair Housing Act and Equal Opportunity Act like the number of New York 1099125737. It's Dr Liederman, speaking with Jean about her breast cancers. They all suggested the same thing that I needed to get the surgery and I needed to get radiation and chemo there, But she didn't want chemo and she didn't want surgery. Anyone off you those options. No. What did you say? I thought Well, that would be great. If it works came to us learning that you could if you wish. Avoid the surgery. Avoid the chemo. 10. You chose that standard radiation years ago on the left press, and then you have our radiation on the right breast. And what was the difference? Well, I didn't have any burning. I had Nothing. I couldn't believe it. I had a very good experience being here. Our treatment was working in the cancer's in remission. For more breast cancer information. Call Dr Liederman two and two choices to and two choices. Most insurance is accepted. 13 80 for Broadway. Called to 12 choices for free breast cancer booklet. DVD W R News Time is 105 in W R Sports. The Yanks won 12 to 3 in Cleveland last night during the start of the MLB wild card round, and Adam Gaze says he's doing all he can to tune out the negative talk. And criticisms aimed directly at him. With the Jets off to a second straight.

Chemo Dr Liederman Jean Adam Gaze New York Yanks MLB Jets Cleveland
Shannen Doherty shares update on her health

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:50 min | 15 hrs ago

Shannen Doherty shares update on her health

"Hills, 902 Ano start Shannen Doherty. Earlier this year, she announced she was battling breast cancer. Now she's talking about what it's like fighting the disease during the covert 19 pandemic. Mohr for maybe sees Amy Robach in an exclusive interview with Elle magazine, Doherty revealing she's been quarantining at her Malibu home, saying, I feel like I'm a very, very healthy human being. It's hard to wrap up your affairs. When you feel like you're going to live another 10 or 15 years after three decades in the Hollywood spotlight, I'll protect you. Can't the Beverly Hills 90 to winnow actresses, lens has shifted focus. She now spends her days tending to her sprawling vegetable garden with her husband, saying, I tried to treasure all the small moments that most people don't really see or take for granted. The small things are magnified for me. Doherty also mentally cataloging her possessions, but says she hasn't sat down to record video messages or write letters to her loved ones. There are things I need to say to my mom. I want my husband to know what he's meant to me, but whatever it comes time for me to do it. It feels so final. It feels like you're signing off. And I'm not signing off Doherty's mother and husband at the forefront of her mind when I sat down exclusively with her in February to reveal her metastatic breast cancer diagnosis, it's a Bitter pill to swallow and a lot of ways. It's not fair. Why don't I make a cz? Where I say why me? And then I go? Why not me? Who else? You know Who else besides me deserves this. None of US two and I would say that my first reaction is always concerned about how am I going to tell My mom, my husband. You're worried about everyone else around you. So For now, Doherty is looking forward developing several projects, including a new television show and advocacy work for other metastatic breast cancer patients. She

Shannen Doherty Metastatic Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Beverly Hills Elle Magazine United States Amy Robach Hollywood Mohr Malibu
Fresh update on "breast cancer" discussed on The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

01:34 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "breast cancer" discussed on The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

"At UC Davis health for its unique properties. And when those cells come back from the laboratory, we then infuse them back into the patient in a single ivy infusion and those cells and seek out and hone in on the cancer as white blood cells and immunologically attacked in the same way that your immune system would attack cell that was infected with a flu virus. UC Davis health treated the first patient with this therapy last year, But Dr Jacobson says this innovative treatment has been yielding promising results. Therapies leaves her missions and a majority of patients, and many of those were emissions are quite durable, where we've now follow patients out multiple years and haven't seen their cancer come back. And Dr Jacobson says that their treatment advancements will hopefully extend to be on blood cancer One day right now we're treating a handful of certain types of leukemia, lymphoma. But what we've learned from from these therapies will invariably translate into being able to offer this to other types of leukemias and lymphomas, as well as to other types of cancer like breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer. Man you could hear more from Dr Jacobson and read more about that whole story in Cape okay dot com. The afternoon news with Kitty O'Neil Well. The news Duke University will rename one of its campus buildings after one of the first black women to become an undergraduate at school. Sarah Bartlett has that story. The university's board of trustees voted unanimously to change the name of the sociology psychology building to the Reuben Cook Building. After Will Amina Reuben Cook, she enrolled a Duke in 1963 as part of the first five, a group of black undergraduates who were the first to attend traditionally segregated classrooms. The South Carolina native who passed away in 29 Thine is the first black woman to have a campus building, named after her Sarah Bartlett News, 93.1 kfbk and Coming Up on Our Afternoon news will check your top stories, traffic and weather. We're also going to get a preview of tonight's debate. Just a little over a half hour away is when that starts. Which will have life for you here on news 93.1 kfbk and life everywhere on the I Heart radio at Coney.

Dr Jacobson Uc Davis Sarah Bartlett Duke University Reuben Cook Building Amina Reuben Cook FLU Coney Lymphoma South Carolina
Shannen Doherty shares update on her health

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:35 sec | 19 hrs ago

Shannen Doherty shares update on her health

"Doherty says she's been treasuring the small moment since learning her cancer was back. 49 year old actress when public that her breast cancer had returned and spread to her spine. She recently told Elle magazine that having stage four cancer forced her to re examine her life in her connection with others. You're still thinks she wants to do, she says, Like, tell her mother and her husband about how much they mean to her majority isn't ready to write those letters yet because it feels too much like signing off, she says. It's hard to wrap things up. When you feel like you're going to live another 10 to 15 years, saying quote, I'm not ready for pasture. I've got a life a lot of life left in me.

Doherty Elle Magazine
Fresh update on "breast cancer" discussed on News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

01:25 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "breast cancer" discussed on News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

"A Bitter pill to swallow and a lot of ways. It's not fair. Why don't I make a cz where I say why me? And then I go. Why not me? Who else? You know who else besides me deserves this. None of us do. And I would say that my first reaction is always concerned about how my going to tell My mom has been worried about everyone else around you. So For now, Doherty is looking forward developing several projects, including a new television show and advocacy work for other metastatic breast cancer patients. She says that anyone facing a stage for diagnosis has a lot of people. Truth. Um like They're ready to be put out to pasture. And she told our writer. I'm not ready to be put out to pasture. I still have a lot of life in me a sentiment she also touched on during our interview. When you tell people You have stage for metastatic breast cancer. Everything changes the way people treat. You changes the way people look at your changes. Yeah, I mean, they look at you. Like you're a dead man walking basically, um, and that they need to say their goodbyes to you or something. And also work dries up. Here she is. I enjoy working and working gives me just another reason to wake up every morning. It's another reason Tio fight to stay alive. Her story is in this October issue of Elle on newsstands. October 6th at ABC is Amy Robach, a new resource coming to help those in Hollywood report sexual harassment Almost three years after the me to movement ripped through Hollywood, There's been a lot of talk about change. But many field there hasn't been any actual change that, according to a new survey by the Hollywood Commission on eliminating sexual harassment and advancing the quality led by Anita Hill, the commission is launching a platform to allow workers to report sexual harassment. The feeling is that victims will be more comfortable speaking out to a third party. Rather than their employer, The survey found. Reporting harassment is one of the biggest issues so he'll feels the new tool will more easily allowed the industry to identify and eliminate repeat offenders. Jason Heathens and ABC NEWS Hollywood Come on news. Time to 50 Time for your Propel insurance money Update..

Harassment Metastatic Breast Cancer Doherty Hollywood Commission Amy Robach Hollywood Jason Heathens TIO ABC Anita Hill Writer
Meet Jerri Evans, The Turning Natural Juice Bar Founder Transforming Lives in the Black Community

Side Hustle Pro

06:51 min | 4 d ago

Meet Jerri Evans, The Turning Natural Juice Bar Founder Transforming Lives in the Black Community

"So welcome to the guest chair Jerry. Thank you for having me I'm so happy to have you here as I mentioned I was in the juice bar on h street the other day, and I was like this is so yummy. This is amazing I'd love to know more about your story. So first and foremost what was your career path before becoming the owner of turning natural juice bars. So prior to juicing, I was an air nautical engineer I worked for a major company which is probably the main companies in the Department of Defence Specialty was F twenty, two fighter jets. So Bess, literally my background I didn't WanNA been engineer at first I wanted to go to fashion but we had a career fair in highschool they separated all the boys of jobs that they believe men become in they separated the girls with like nursing and teaching and I didn't know you know to be feminist then I just wanted to go with the boys and so went with boys and this guy from NASA's Guy Actually said women do not become engineered. Yet I was so offended I went home and that's home. My Mama say what I only WanNa do fashion anymore I wanNA become an engineer and she's like. Bass drastic. So I just kind of looked into what types of engineering I would potentially enjoy in to be truthfully honest none of them were remotely interesting. I just knew that airplanes was probably the most interesting to me and I ended up majoring in Tennessee State University. So you were on that path and what did you envision your life looking like before this whole entrepreneurship thing happened. My first internship with with Nasser in our member calling my mom during that year that summer I was like. Do this every single day for like sixty five years. There's no way. This could be life, and so I knew that I was going to work for a while I. Just knew that couldn't be that person that worked until retirement indigenous. No hope to petty pitch whatever they decided I I earn so. Actually, GonNa. Probably be engineer for a while. Then I had no idea. So, walk us through what was the motivation behind starting turning natural. While two thousand, one by MOM was diagnosed with Stage two breast cancer and even though Stage two is roads of we early at that time cancelled as like a death sentence, everyone was so afraid of being diagnosed in, you know all the people that we had known to be diagnosed like my aunt who was diagnosed with stage four she passed away shortly after being diagnosed in. So our live drastically changed a mom went from a meat eater to vegetarian to Vegan and. Nine and a half years she was cancer free. Very healthy life in we found out in two thousand ten that cancer I came back. When it came back, it was much more aggressive. It's spread to her bones and then it went to her liver was in like two weeks of out that it came back my mom transition and so you'll never really hear me say my mom died I think super aggressive word. In it helps me cope to say she transition because I believe is energy. Redo that guy we just exist in another space and so shortly after my mom passed a believe that very next summer I quit my job and has started going to grief counseling When my mom transition, they give you this pamphlet that tells you what morning is GonNa look like in one minute you're GONNA be happy. One Minute you're going to be said and you're going to be depressed. That you're going to be angry. and. I was just angry I was angry for a very, very hard time. A MOM's a super spiritual woman. I was very angry with guy. Stop believing in any and everything in ages I'm already an introvert. So I literally practice. introverts space like no one could get in my space in. A really good friend of my recommended grief counseling which even made me angrier. Like I don't want to go to counselling I don't want another person to tell me to be absent from the bodies to be present with guy like that didn't make sense to me and I didn't want someone else to say I'm sorry for your loss because I really don't know how to respond to that. I don't WanNa say thank you that you're sorry for my law. So I was just in a very angry space in a started going to counseling. It was difficult because everyone that I had talked to a new mom. So I never had to explain my mother in the way that I had to explain to this counselor. and. She told me that morning isn't linear. You're not going to feel one way today, and then the next day is the next phase in pampering. You're gonNA fill multiple things on multiple days. And that was probably the single best advice that I could have gotten after my mom transition. So I'm sitting at my desk at my job at the time when I'm still in engineer and I hear my mother's voice and she said, why are you still here now in my mind I'm like I read about this this is the point where my mind I'm going crazy because if I turn around my mom is standing here I am not Right anymore. and. So I stopped what I was doing and I turned around I. Heard it again of course, she was there but I knew that Mitt like you don't WanNa do this anymore you not fulfil. You're just doing it because you're good at it. and. So I went to my boss's office and. told him as saying, Hey, you know I can't do this anymore. And you know at the time I was doing about equipment. The workload that I had was equivalent to two or three people job title. And so he said, don't worry. We're interviewing people were going to get you some help You don't understand I don't want to do this job at all anymore So I quit.

Engineer Jerry Nasa Bess Department Of Defence Specialt Tennessee State University Nasser Mitt
Fresh update on "breast cancer" discussed on The BosBabes

The BosBabes

00:59 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "breast cancer" discussed on The BosBabes

"Christmas or a birthday gifts. So our girl right here her name is mallory she's a Boston Pride defender. We're GONNA be talking more about hockey shortly before we get into that guy speed subscribe and listen to us WanNa find it's. Now listening to the boss faves I'm your host Brittany Baldy but our girl is not only super athletic and chill she is Dang smart. So she attended Yale University. She is currently getting her master's degree which we're GONNA talk about shortly but you went to Undergrad at Yale also played four years of hockey there. Why did you jump into the medical field? Yeah I. Man Gail was just I don't know if it was a dream come true I never really saw myself going to such an incredible institution in having such a great experience air in all aspects from hockey and in school and meeting all my friends who I would. Pretty much all my family now. I got into I always knew I kind of wanted to do math and science I was really good at math so I liked when I was good at something. So real we liked that and I really was fascinated with science and with the body I love doing the little owl pellet dissections in third grade, really low key but I loved that and seeing all below. It was a little gross, but I love doing that or the little the frog dissection. or the pig or the chicken like all different types of stuff like that I I really enjoyed that and so from there I knew I wanted to do something you know math and science whether it's you know biology or Viacom or something like that. And I found this field biomedical engineering and it was perfect. It was perfect balance of science and math and physics camp all of the science things all the things. And, but the goal was to. Discover and develop things to make people's lives lives easier from you know medical devices to prosthetics to cancer drug treatments, which is what I'm into now. And I'm so so glad to be in the cancer field My Grandmother Actually had breast cancer was probably I was probably thirteen with double mastectomy and she eventually actually had got brain cancer that had metastasized from her previous case of breast cancer. So unfortunately, she passed away from battling that actually gotten pneumonia. So that was really unfortunate. and. Having my grandma battle breast cancer at a young age was kind of. Probably the turning point where I knew like I really to get into that really wanted to get into cancer and I was really fascinated as I got older and learned more and understood more about cancer and its impact on the body and how difficult it is and why we don't have a one single universal treatment for cancer because every single person's different. So. It's pretty cool to be involved now in the cancer. Field. and. I know you actually, I don't know too much of the medical field. Of course, we're going to have mallory sort of explain it as best as she can without using the crazy scientist. Try. But before we actually get interviews today, she was driving back from the lab she was actually doing some experiments. So what are you currently working on now? Again, we do know that you are working with Cancer Treatments, and helping get things out to clinical trials and whatnot. So what exactly do do if you can try to?.

Cancer Cancer Treatments Breast Cancer Hockey Brain Cancer Yale University Boston Brittany Baldy Gail Viacom Mallory Pneumonia Scientist
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | Last week

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Fresh update on "breast cancer" discussed on News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:40 sec | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "breast cancer" discussed on News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

"Developing several projects, including a new television show and advocacy work for other metastatic breast cancer patients. She says that anyone facing a stage for diagnosis has a lot of people treat them like They're ready to be put out to pasture. And she told our writer. I'm not ready to be put out to pasture. I still have a lot of life in me a sentiment she also touched on during our interview. When you tell people You have stage for metastatic breast cancer. Everything changes the way people treat. You changes the way people look at your changes. Yeah, I mean, they look at you. Like you're a dead man walking basically, um, and that they need to say their goodbyes to you or something. And also work dries up..

Metastatic Breast Cancer Writer
Verizon to Buy TracFone in Deal Valued at Up to $7 Billion

Lynne Hayes-Freeland

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

Verizon to Buy TracFone in Deal Valued at Up to $7 Billion

"A Bloomberg money minute merger Monday, Dealnews lifting the markets, The Dow is up 380 points one and a third percent. The S and P. S of 1.6%. The NASDAQ is 1.8% higher. Stock of immuno medics has doubled. The cancer drug maker is being acquired by Gilead Sciences. Gilead's paying about $21 Billion for, um, you know medics, which recently reported a breakthrough in treating breast cancer. Other deals include the biggest chip deal ever in video is buying Softbank's chip division for 40 billion and a big wireless deal. Verizon is buying Trac phone.

Gilead Sciences Gilead Breast Cancer Bloomberg Verizon Trac Dealnews Softbank
Merck to Invest $1 Billion in Seattle Genetics

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:54 sec | 2 weeks ago

Merck to Invest $1 Billion in Seattle Genetics

"Which is more than doubled up 106%. This company makes the cancer drug traditional V had accepted a $21 billion takeover offer from Gilead Sciences now tried. L ve won. US clears in April to treat triple negative breast cancer and immuno medics plans to seek broader approval later this year. You've also got Merc moving into breast cancer treatments as well. A Seattle genetics up 9% after Merck agreed to invest a billion dollars in the drugmaker. At $200 a share as 33% higher than last week's close. The purchase is part of a Siri's of deals worth as much as $4.5 billion for two breast cancer drives, and indeed one of them Treats triple negative breast cancer, so you'll have a competition to Gillian A. Merc in that segment of the drug industry varieties is up.

Gillian A. Merc United States Gilead Sciences Siri Merck Seattle
Metro Atlanta sterilization companies hit with wave of lawsuits over ethylene oxide

Clark Howard

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Metro Atlanta sterilization companies hit with wave of lawsuits over ethylene oxide

"Sue to medical sterilization plants on behalf of the half dozen cancer patients they have lived. Did school in close proximity to either stare genetics or barn for a Pallone linked time years and each of these persons have been diagnosed with either lymphoma. Leukemia or breast cancer attorney Kill calmly says they'll be able to prove the company's ethylene oxide, a known carcinogen made their clients ill and some 200 others have been diagnosed. Sarah Gen X and barred insists their levels of E T O are safe. WSB news time is 11 03.

Pallone Sarah Gen WSB SUE Lymphoma Leukemia Attorney
Honeybee venom 'kills some breast cancer cells'

Kottke Ride Home

02:16 min | Last month

Honeybee venom 'kills some breast cancer cells'

"Australian. Researchers have discovered that honeybee venom can quickly kill aggressive breast cancer cells. This new research comes from the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research in Perth and was published in the journal Nature Precision Oncology. In addition to killing one hundred percent of triple negative breast cancer and H. E. R. to enriched breast cancer cells within an hour. The specific concentration of the venom was also found to reduce the growth of tumors in mice when combined with existing chemotherapy drugs. The key element in the venom is called Mulligan and actor Sierra Duffy. Search as part of her PhD told ABC quote what the military does is actually enters the surface or the plasma membrane and forms holes or pores, and it just causes the cell to die and quotes. Duffy has found that honeybees from other parts of the world produced similar results, but that bumblebees did nuts. In addition to extracting the venom from honeybees they put to sleep. The scientists also experimented with creating a synthetic form of bulletin which had the same affects. And we'll scientists asked about the research. Agree it's an exciting development Dr Duffy. Herself is quick to caution that it is far from being considered any type of treatment or breakthrough. She said quotes there's a long way to go in terms of how we would deliver it in the body and you know looking at toxicities maximum tolerated doses before it ever went further and quotes. And interesting footnote here, April therapy or the use of bees for medicinal purposes has been on the rise. In recent years. It technically dates back to hippocrates prescription of be things to treat various maladies around four hundred, sixty BC. But took off again as a form of alternative medicine a few years ago and when I say Alternative Medicine, I mean Moseley people getting intentionally stung just like hippocrates in the hopes that it would treat any manner of ailments. And just because medical scientists are now experimenting with the use of Melinda for various treatments even beyond just this one study that doesn't mean it has actually been proven as safe or effective use. Especially when it's not being extracted and prescribed in the lab. So please don't go try to get intentionally stung or at least don't blame me if you do.

Dr Duffy Harry Perkins Institute Of Med Duffy Sierra Duffy Melinda Nature Precision Oncology Mulligan Perth ABC Moseley H. E. R.
Remembering Chadwick Boseman

Daily Pop

02:52 min | Last month

Remembering Chadwick Boseman

"The world is still shocked and heartbroken over the death of Black Panther Star Chadwick. He inspired millions of fans with his work while privately battling colon cancer. He died Friday at the very young age of forty three, and while we all struggle to process this news, one thing is very, very clear. Chadwick was a true hero. Settlement. There's no way back. We Sat. To me, it's always about who will you get to be on screen with you get to work with everyday. Give me beautiful. Give me a number on my back. Give. You the. There was an honor to be able to trade as man and. To be able to do something that matters. There's no reason why you would think you would. Ever, get to do a superhero movies I mean be especially as a black actor and certainly not the lead of a superhero movie. King still. Hurts. Pressure but I feel like that's the thing I like the most about today. C., kids come up and say that he's my favorite character. Chadwick's passing shock to everyone including those who knew him best like Panther Director Ryan Kugler spent the year writing Black Panther too he had. No did not seem to know that Chadwick was sick at all. It's just amazing to me how he was able to. Keep. Something like this such. A secret nobody knew how much he was suffering I think not to take away from Cherbourg for a minute, but I think when you think about celebrities and you'll think back on it there have been a lot of celebrities that I've kept their cancer diagnoses a secret. You know we just had Kelly Preston who died from breast cancer David Bowie kept his illness a secret until he died Steve Jobs same thing I think what Chadwick Bozeman really wanted to do was live his life to the fullest and he didn't want anybody to. Pity him? He wasn't that guy you know what I mean and I think that he is and will always be pitted me of strength when it comes to me because he's always had held his head high, he's always represented himself and my community in the highest regard and I just I think you'll be remembered for that for the rest of his life. I don't think he wanted people to see him go through that struggle and make the last four months of his life about the illness.

Chadwick Bozeman Chadwick Colon Cancer Panther David Bowie Kelly Preston King Ryan Kugler Cherbourg Steve Jobs Director
Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

06:00 min | Last month

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Hi I'm Nora mcnerney and this is terrible. Thanks for asking. In Our last episode we met Brit, and if you have not listened to that episode, you are not allowed to listen to this episode of not letting you. I will pause it with my own fingers reach through your phone. You're listening device I will hit pause you can't listen to this. There's not a lot of rules at this podcast and mostly nothing is in chronological order go nuts skip around. But in this case, you will want to listen to the previous episode which is called untying knots so don't listen to this one if you haven't listened to that one, but if you did listen to that episode welcome back. When we left off, it was twenty sixteen and Brit and her husband Sonny have just had one of those fights adum fight where looking back you can't really remember even what it was about just that you were mad and you're probably right. And in that moment, Brit calls of all people that she can ask for relationship. Advice. Harry. She calls hairy. The Guy who was married when he got Brits mom pregnant the guy who told Brit that he would never claim her as a child. She calls that guy. Who isn't that guy anymore because? He's dead now. So she calls her Dad and he tells her look nobody's. Sunny is not perfect. You have to talk to him you need to work it out. With his was his advice. Good. Did. It work it. Did and and even if it didn't, it's just by he gave some you know what I mean. It's something I felt like I was waiting for my whole life and finally something that he was able to give but it was just so interesting to me that that was the first person that I reached out to. It's not just the advice that matters. It's the fact that she thought to call her dad at all. It's the fact that he answered the fact that he listened. It's the fact that it's just Britain and her mom against the world she has her husband Sunny and she has a dad she has a sister and she has her dad's family this whole network of people that she didn't have before. How had your growing a relationship with your dad? What did your mother think that I think she was actually happy about that part of me thinks that she's just like well, this guy has nothing on me because he really wasn't around. So this is cute what they got going on, but it doesn't compare to the relationship that you know me and my daughter have 'cause I raised her but I think she was very supportive of it and she was very happy that you know we were talking and she would even say or ask me like, Hey, like did you talk to Harry and so yeah, I, I think she was very supportive of that relationship. Sweet. Yeah like she got what she. Wanted from like walking into that diner right? You know like exactly. So it's like mission accomplished. So many missions have been accomplished in Brits Life so far her mother Marva has recovered from breast, cancer. Brit, has finished her masters in mental health counseling and she started a private counseling practice. She and her husband Sonny or married, and they're ready for kids. After childhood of stress and anxiety and anger over her biological father abandoning her things for Brit were not terrible at all. Brit had spent her teen years resenting and sometimes raging at her dad. But now she gets to spend time getting to know him, which is also a way of getting to know herself. was able to learn a lot of I am as a person that came from him like he's a very chill laid back person and. I feel the same about myself. You know it's it's cool to kind of be able to say like I'm just like my dad because I've I've never been able to say that prior to that conversation. So we were really able to get to know each other he was very excited about. Me Getting married he was very excited about the prospect of him being a grandfather to potentially a grandson because he already has a granddaughter my niece. Sunny and Brit are not pregnant yet but you know dad's excited and he's ready to order grandson. Dad has also well, he's not retired, but he's supposed to be retired because he's old enough and everyone is telling him to just. Stay home. Do a crossword. But he's still working and one day in June. He has a fall on the job and he's taken to the hospital. Brit, sister calls to let Britain know and it's not a huge deal she says, and so they were like running tests finding out what was going on. So I was talking with my back and forth with my sister back and forth with you know a few cousins on that side of the family and just kinda getting updates and information in a I. Think I felt like, do I need to come in? So my sister's like I don't think you need to come you know everything is pre. Okay. He's just kind of banged up from the fall. So I think as time. Sorry to go by they started to kind of find things they found like a blood clot I. believe. I'm not sure where exactly it was in after finding the blood clot things just kinda rapidly started happening. Brit gets developments from her sister and from her cousins and they assure her that she doesn't need to fly out dad will be fine and then a few days later, the phone rings again, and it's not fine. Brits Dad is dead.

Brit Sunny Harry Sonny Nora Mcnerney Britain Marva
Mark Toft  How to Build an Authentic Brand in an Insincere Age

The $100 MBA Show

09:59 min | Last month

Mark Toft How to Build an Authentic Brand in an Insincere Age

"Guests. Teacher is mark. Toft and marked off is going to be teaching you how to build an authentic brand in an insincere age. Everybody is trying to project their brand on social media on Youtube with Webinars, beating their chests with bravado, and it's just falling on deaf ears how you stand out when everybody's trying to brand themselves and. Look like they're winning will that's why we brought on Mark Toft to teach you how to build a branding strategy. The actually works that's real and Authentic Marta is a chief strategy officer and Co founder of the narrator group and he's an absolute branding expert. He was the lead digital writer on the staples easy and project. He has over twenty five years of experience in business and branding, and he wants to give you a gift today a great lesson on how to focus and craft a brand that matters into these noisy world. We got a lot to cover in today's guest lessons. So let's get into it. Let's get down to business. This message is brought to you by windows and HP everyone has a different way to work whether it's typing on a computer sketching out notes with a pen or accessing all your stuff on your phone with windows HP. You'll have all the tools you need to work the way you want. So whatever you do, make it you with windows and HP see how windows dot com slash HP. We brought on Mark Toft today to teach you a great lesson on building an authentic brand a brand that stands out brand people talk about a brand that really has a message and resonates with people they say brand or your brand is what other people say about you when you're not around, let's make sure they say, well, we want them to say it's your job to craft that narrative. So GonNA, hinder over a mark to t shoe his guests lesson on doing just that. Back, to rally the lesson, give my takeaways but for now, take it away mark. Hello everyone. This is mark talked I'm grateful join me today I'll be teaching you about why brand authenticity is critical to success and three things that all authentic brands do. So let's get down to business. Before we dive in. Let's pause on that word branding a lot of businesses get knotted up by especially start-ups. Here's a helpful and pragmatic way to think about it. If you pulled five people aside at your company and ask them what you do and why you. Would you get five different answers? This. Is the kind of challenge branding solve. But the truth is at a lot of what passes for branding materials and consultation are thickening agents meant to make businesses feel they've paid for something substantial complex defying an order to profit Tim Ferriss has called it. But branding is in fact, very simple. You don't need pages of charts and graphs to define it just a few words or a sentence. Branding. Is what you stand for and what people experience from your products and services. It's not what you claim to be. It's what you are. Your brand is your purpose advertising takes that purpose and assembles it into compelling story. That's twenty five years of frontline branding and advertising experience packed into a few words. But why is authenticity important to branding? Because the temptation to tweet or share things on social media in order to be accepted has never been greater. In a sense, we're all performing for each other like never before. Judging by our music or movies social media, not to mention her branding and advertising being true to ourselves. As novel we're after we want to seem to be true to ourselves want the appearance of authenticity. Than the fact. The wise words of Simon Sinek provide good corrective branding is an exercise and trust building. He says when we fake our way to trust that trust will eventually collapse. One level of brand authenticity relates facts. Is that cookie made with natural ingredients is that watch rolex a knockoff? Now this kind of authenticity isn't unimportant. But it's only a starting point. It's like telling people your height or your eye color. These details don't penetrate to who you are were to who your brand really is. It's easy for companies to get hung up and telling the history of their founding. In exacting detail they feel they have to recite information about their origins founded in this year by these two people humble beginnings in a garage or basement. I'm not saying these things should be hidden, but they frequently don't matter. When you think of authenticity branding, think of it, this way brand authenticity is believing in and delivering on what you claim about yourself and your products and services. It's your brand's essence not it's facts or its features. And this gets us to the first thing that all authentic brands do they're built on a clear purpose. In the movie office space and Unhappy Employees named Peter Gibbons, guts, sufficient his cubicle and fights the desire to throttle the CO worker who tells him must be having a case of the Mondays. It's funny because many of us have had jobs like peters bad jobs jobs that seem to have no function other than to make us move paper around in dream of the day will quit. Meaninglessness is deadly for brands because humans are wired for purpose, employees leave jobs when they don't find sufficient meaning pay and benefits are rarely the cause. You can't capture your purpose with long mission statement and pages of brand strategy employees and customers need something clear simple and true. They can go back to again and again. My partners and I call it the hill you defend it's the first and the final ground on which you stake the life your business. Their other popular ways to describe the same basic idea. Jim Collins argues that all successful companies adhere to a hedgehog concept. They succeed by finding and focusing on one thing that they do really well. Simon Sinek talks about the golden circle and starting with why The center of the Golden Circle is a brands reason for being it's why. Don't be afraid to embrace a seemingly humble purpose that you can actually live out rather than a high falutin purpose that has little relation to the products or services you provide. One Young Entrepreneur I met was launching a firm dedicated to sustainable architecture, her passion and her intelligence. Clear. Although. Her purpose was staring right in the face building better buildings that is buildings that are more affordable and more beautiful and friendlier to the environment. She was clinging to a phrase that she had fallen in love with. We're going to change the vernacular architecture. She told me do you know what that means? Neither do I. Should be more likely to find her company's authentic purpose by thinking of it this way. Could someone call her office and say? Hello I'd like to buy a change in architectural vernacular please. nope. But they could call and say I like to commission a building that's better and more efficiently designed. A strong purpose answers a lot of questions and even help inform business decisions. Why should we design packages this way? Why are we expanding into these markets or reaching out to these customers? Why are we aging our cheese like this? Or for employees, why do they perform their work this way or not another way? Because that's what a company dedicated to. This purpose would do. Think of Fedex with their purpose of guaranteed on time delivery. United. Airlines being the friendlier line. Now they've lost their way it seems in recent years but that purpose at one time catapulted them to being the number one carrier in the world. The second thing that all authentic brands do is they seek conflict. As. Social creatures most of us try to avoid or minimise conflict that's perfectly rational but conflict is at the heart of good stories and it's also at the heart of effective branding and advertising. Most products and companies are created out of conflict. To take a prosaic example, a busy parent is confronted by an unhappy teenager whose favourite redshirt is fading in the wash. It's a problem that needs to be solved. Tied Color Guard offers a solution, a detergent that doesn't fade reds and other bright colors even after multiple loads of laundry. The importance of conflict and branding and advertising is often overlooked. Ultimately, address in resolving conflict is why people will pay for your products or services. Conflict interestingly can help you locate and focus your brand purpose if you're struggling to pinpoint. If you're not sure how to express your brands purpose think of the conflict or the problem solve for customers. Finally the third thing that authentic brands do is they cause with caution. Not long ago people greeted with this news KFC announces buckets for. The Cure. You don't really need to learn more details to sense the approaching doom. Kentucky Fried Chicken Partner with Susan G Komen to donate fifty cents to cancer research for every bucket of chicken ordered. Funding, breast cancer research is, of course a noble cause. KFC simply wasn't the brand to do it at least not in this way. Maybe they could have donated money directly without making it depends on the consumption of fried chicken. The campaign was met with House of disapproval and was quickly withdrawn. The public is onto brands looking for cheap grace. Your customers. Dishonesty sensors are set to high. They're quick to see self interest masquerading as selflessness, and they're ready to pounce on publicize instances of inauthentic.

Mark Toft HP Simon Sinek KFC Toft Youtube Chief Strategy Officer Writer Tim Ferriss Jim Collins Fedex Co Founder Peter Gibbons Kentucky Peters House Susan G Komen
LUCAS RUWE :A POSITIVE SOAP STORY

THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

05:59 min | Last month

LUCAS RUWE :A POSITIVE SOAP STORY

"My guest today is a gentleman by the name of Lucas Rui. Lucas is a veteran of the air force and after he got out of the Air Force, he well, he's going to tell you what happened then but he has created a company co founded a company called the hero soap company where they make very healthy soaps and scrubs and a portion of that. Those prophets go to helping homeless veterans, which is a big part of his mission, and his mission is also about entrepreneurship in bringing strength back to the country with individuals creating businesses, and he's tell you how he did that. And, how his personal mission to help homeless vets was was actually a big part of that. So here he is. This is Lucas Really of the hero soap company. Let's just go a little do a little background, your military background and how you then how you segue into having this hero soap company which sounds really interesting. I WANNA find out more about that automobile. Thanks for having me on your Bob So my background I grew up. On, a farm in northeast Nebraska. Living candidate in the middle of nowhere, and then I joined the Air Force shortly after I graduated high school. I did four years. They're mistakes data Omaha doubt one tour over. No Mon that was a pretty fun time. Nothing too crazy over there. And then once I got out. Move Down There Zona came. Issue and I I was instantly blown away by the amount of homeless vets that were all over the streets under the viaducts. It's just kind of heartbreaking and it doesn't seem like those numbers have been going down to the last nine years that I've been here so One of my buddies, his his background, his brother owns a company that's in the hygiene space innings. He's got a fancy for making soap. And I had this burning desire to to make some change and a I actually graduated with a liberal arts degree which doesn't necessarily really line up with my personality at all. And I see. So many of my peers get involved in activism and they were doing so by really just making a lot of noise. I'm not really putting any solutions forward. and. I I didn't necessarily agree with that not that you know it's a bad thing to do or anything, but it just didn't seem like the most effective way to make change. And with zero. So we kinda created this activism through capitalism. In were blessed capitalism in America or we can flourish and. Is like what why not do something for the community can pull whole more away from those big stores that have the monopoly over everything really you know bring up small business gazette is our economy and then give back to those causes. It people believe in had pretty amazing response from the American people so far it's actually brought a lot back to me. I've seen how how many great patriots are actually out there who who do realize a the issues that America's going through right now and trying to make that shift to to really build a strong against that's been a huge blessing to see that. Amazing response from everyone well congratulations I mean the idea of actually doing something rather than as you were saying, making a lot of noise noise is a great way to start and get some information out there. But if you're not actually, you know cleaning up some little corner of Your Life you know what really gets done. So I really applaud that that that idea of of course you know capitalism and money really makes things turn and that's you know it's a huge motivator for people to earn a living and to end and the idea of giving some a portion of that back to people less fortunate is certainly you know a high calling in my opinion. So, tell me about the soap and because I'm. I'm interested. I like like great healthy product. So we talk about that. You know it's promote your company a little bit. It's got a good cause behind it too. Yeah. So I might. Send my my partner. He is always had a thing for making soap in some background in the hygiene space in my wife She's a holistic nutritionist oh. Okay. So she's she's really come into my life and. Cleaned out the shelves said speak and really got in a natural products. Everywhere, in our life at this point and. I saw the changes in my skin, my health by implementing those things in. That, you know this is the kind of product that we need to. Deliver back I've seen such good results by using those products that you'd recommend that more full of all the chemicals. So we decided, hey, let's create a product like this that we can. Give to the people and so we use A. Natural Goat, milk? So Essential oils in the natural colorants from the earth such as charcoal or to marriage. To give the coloring and. We chose to go that route because. Deisel have different chemicals in it that we're putting into our skin that's getting absorbed in the allowed the mainstream soaps they use what's called parabens. In the FDA recording to their site. Parabens are found in breast biopsy, Breast Cancer Biopsies and cosmetic reproductive. Issues. And Those are two things I'd like to

Lucas Rui Air Force America Omaha FDA Nebraska Lucas Partner
'Rona's Report

Yeah, We Said It

05:32 min | Last month

'Rona's Report

"All, right we back. Welcome to yeah. We said it Ronas report part one. We still hear you know. Don. L.. How're you doing? On well, I can't complain not sick and tired of being in the house but you know it is what it is. relatable relatable for everybody. Florida also today you heard from him last year for our Wimbledon episode. Welcome back and thanks for joining us to talk some myths today. I'm always here to talk Thank said. For letting me letting me comeback art. Right So there's a lot of news. It's been seven months. So With a lot of stuff. Okay. Right at the end of January, that's right January. Former world number-one player estimates year announced that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. So that was very sad I checked her social media when I was writing this down because like I said, this is in January to see if she had anything else. About. How things are going I didn't see anything on twitter. But. I saw some other stuff that she was like promoting and everything. So I'm I'm hoping that he's Okay I haven't heard anything since January either. the bad news just kept coming as a few days after that one Martina Poacher underwent yet another knee surgery after the previous procedure was unsuccessful. Just recently stated that he's begun slowly re acclimating himself to the tennis court. Once again. This is just the last couple of weeks. Yeah. That's to hear about Walmart being but esther is an absolute lack of the sport. I don't really think she gets the the the amount than do that she should be. Layers. By like five hundred state matches without almost. Like years. Absolute legend She deserves all this lowers possibly get. and also conversely I feel like Walmart game. She he his almost underachieve like e e should he also did a lot of flowers but Injuries. Yeah every time he really starts to get on a roll and starts plans to get back into the top ten like here comes into the freak injury. So yeah, really unfortunate. It's crazy but he he always manages to find his way back into the top ten and back you know making deep runs in the slams in in in winning title. So it's kind of amazing to see him being able to bounce back similar times I mean he obviously was supported the sport because we seem people who have gone through last Mike give it up and he just keeps doing his best to come back again it's gotta be super. duper difficult frustrating. Definitely. We discussed on our pre Australian Open episode that Robert Farah had been provisionally suspended on a doping charge. Short. Time later, he saw that suspension lifted as it was determined that he bears no fault or negligence would be allowed to compete again immediately. Of, course competition ended soon after but he's been very active actively thirst trapping on instagram der Rona for which I am. Very thankful. We. All Know Cedric Cubans trying all of those instagrams Lissette, a meal blast like that Yes i. Yeah, I mean I'm sure he knows they. Let me move on? Roger Federer also had yet another knee operation. This past spring he planned to be up to the French Open, but it turns out. This might have been the best time for him to have such a procedure. So yeah. He's I. I saw some stuff where he since stated data like he doesn't really know. What's going to happen next as far as is concerned right now. Yeah I was I. was that he picked the exact right time disappear. Yeah. He did for sure you know he had not coming bed. Yeah. This is a great time. So if he does come back, it's you know it's not like you superior behind what everybody else is dying but. Get his ranking and stuff will still be pretty secure. So. Obviously. Back in his thirty ninth birthday the other day. So you know happy belated or whatever. Yeah, I guess up. Have you heard about him being like more more injured than what he lets us know. I didn't really it was. It was like some sort of a quote where he said something to the effect of he wasn't sure if he would be back like he was he just wasn't sure right now. Like. He wasn't sure if he's coming back at all that's that's what I read. I. Don't know was voted the way I would. Scream. Scream but I I mean I could buy it because you know spending all this time at home with his family and his wife and kids and everything. And to have achieved everything that he's achieved, I don't know if I'd come back either.

Roger Federer Robert Farah Esther Cedric Cubans Walmart DON Twitter Tennis Martina Poacher Florida Mike
Betty Ford's Healing Legacy: A Conversation with Susan Ford Bales

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:47 min | 2 months ago

Betty Ford's Healing Legacy: A Conversation with Susan Ford Bales

"Today, we're joined by Susan Ford Welcome. Susan. You are aid author, photo journalist. The youngest of four children to President and Mrs Ford. We are appropriately here at the Betty Ford Center, where you're also on the board of trustees of the Hazel Betty. Ford Foundation. Your mother's legacy. was as a breast cancer survivor and advocate, and as a woman in recovery, and as an advocate for being a woman in recovery. How has the legacy of your mother? Affected your role here at the Betty, Ford? Center. Wow Her shoes were really big to fill your So when she stepped down from the board and I became chairman. I. Think it was harder than living in the White House actually because. We mother and I come from two different parts of recovery. She is a patient and the family member. So we have very different opinions of things than and what's important to us One of the things that she made me do, which was extremely painful with sit on every city every single committee. And participate on my witness finance. Finance. But I learned it. Sure. And so I feel like she did a great job of preparing me to be chairman. So it's it's just we come at it from a different angle in a different perspective family and children's services is extremely important to me because that's how I was affected by this disease. Did you come to the the role of being the chair here at Betty? Ford, did you come to that reluctantly? No because I had been on the board for cheese, probably fifteen years I'm it had just been a long process Mother was gracious and allowed me to raise my children before I came on the board because I was pregnant when the. Betty. Ford. Center open. So. I don't think I came on the board until my youngest was first grade or second grade, and so she gave me some time to get my children raised in at least in school because it required several days travel and all of that in childcare and all the complications that we go through to participate in something like that. Let's go back a little bit and talk about the history of the Betty, Ford Center there's a lot of people who think that when your mother found her own recovery in the late seventy s, she went to the Betty Ford Center. It wasn't even here now was, how did the Betty Ford Center come to be. Johnson from Eisenhower Medical Center decided that. They wanted to have a treatment and it had been in the plan at Eisenhower for some time, they wanted to have an alcoholic treatment center on the campus. and. So Leonard firestone mother's dear, friend was also on the board of Eisenhower. And so Johnson Leonard. Kinda. Tag. Team. Durham. and. She was really in a recovery about four years. But she agreed and I and I thought that was a very courageous step to be so early recovery. So she came to all of us children and she said. When I'm long gone. You're the ones that are going to have to live with the fact that your mother had A. Drug and alcohol treatment. Centre, named after you. How do you feel about that? Wow, and we also we don't care. I mean. It's what a great Lexi you know. She was one of the first to step out and and share her story So once we got past that it was just a matter of mother and Leonard Raising the money. To get this place started and of course. Way? Back, then in the early nineteen, Eighty S. The Hazel and foundation played a role also in the birthplace. Can you share just a little bit about that? Well, mother spent quite a bit a time when to Hazelton, because Hazelton had done it. So well, they were probably the leaders in the in the sense that they had been around the longest And it was successful There's lots of treatment centers that haven't been successful. Some other went back and spent probably close to a week there visiting with counselors visiting with a staff talking, how do you do this? What did you do? Right? What did you do on? Why? What makes Hazelton successful because we basically wanted to copy what they had done, but in a different location sure who would have ever imagined decades later. The two organizations would come together and I WANNA to come back to that in just a minute. But First Susan I want to address an issue that. Always bothers me and then set the the Betty Ford. Center is seen as a place for. The rich and famous for the exclusive for those who can pay out of pocket. But that's not at all what's happening here is no and less than one percent of the patients here are what we would think of as celebrities. Yes. We've had some celebrities, but so was Hazelton I mean. So as other places everybody needs treatment, it doesn't matter what you do that determines you need treatment. So, and they don't get treated any different than. My Mother didn't get treated any different Long Beach. The women, she shared a room with. So it's the same.

Betty Ford Center Hazel Betty Ford Susan Ford Hazelton Ford Foundation Betty Ford Ford Center Mrs Ford Johnson Leonard Chairman Durham. Eisenhower Medical Center Lexi Leonard Firestone Eisenhower President Trump Long Beach White House A. Drug
Breaking Through at CVRx

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:33 min | 2 months ago

Breaking Through at CVRx

"Welcome to the MED tech talk podcast your host Pardo and I'm very excited to welcome the deem yard CEO CRX to this edition of the podcast Nadeem has had the lustrous career starting at GE and then his GM of MEDTRONIC's navigation business but his biggest and most important challenges come CPR which we're going to focus on today for full disclosure. I've had the pleasure to get to know Nadeem over the past eight plus years, and for the last four I've been on the beam sport and killed as an investor in Cebu. Rx. and. I'm really looking forward to the conversation today. Deem it is great to have you on cats. Thank you jeff it's great to be with you today. Terrific will good what we have a lot of things to cover today and really want to focus on CBS which is turning into I think an incredibly exciting story. But of course, their their roots to the CRX story and maybe you can take us through that a little bit the genesis of. Both. The CRT is therapy in heart failure but also barracks. Absolutely Jeff. So I talk about heart failure it is. A devastating disease. Very expensive from a cost perspective, but also from the human side of things, patients unfortunately suffering from heart failure, end up having those episodes of congestive offense way as they feel that drowning, it's like a continuous waterboarding expedient just how painful that is right and unfortunately one of those episodes could lead to their death and. In the United States hot figure is the second most expensive disease. If we consider cancer as one disease, if you stopped separating cancer between breast cancer by cancer sets that hot figure becomes unfortunately the most expensive disease in the US. What is hot forget? It's. When the heart over the years of. Insult or injury to starts becoming larger the walls of the heart becoming thinner. And the heart's ability to pump blood to the system is compromised. And that's. Compromise happening in multiple forms. One of them is called synchrony when the left side and the right side of the heart start becoming disconnected from each other. So think about it like a car. Engine where have the cylinders not kill into properly? Than the COD would not produce horsepower that you need. You need to tune the car that is what's Artie Cardiac. Surgery synchronization therapy. Was designed to do they. You know put two pacemakers right now it's only one pacemaker with two wires. That's why they call it by basic they based both ventricles and they tried to synchronize the left and right side. That works wild if the heart is distinct honest. However in heart failure. Only thirty to forty percent of the patients have synchrony. That s of the patient's heart become lodged the world's thinner. But the left and right sides are still beating in harmony but not strong enough. And for those patients, unfortunately crt devices did not produce the results that WHO, hoping for. Ten fifteen years ago when we're testing them. And that is where our approach berry. Flex. Therapy comes into play. The genesis of this therapy goes back multiple decades not gonna go to the whole history with Dr Professor Bronwyn than his wife and everything, but nevertheless indie. Let me take one paper from Dr. Abraham. From nineteen ninety nine and that is about CRT devices. In this paper that was published in the New England. Journal of Medicine Dr Abraham demonstrated the sustained. That's or the sustained benefit of CRT. Comes from the fact that when you should denies the left side on the right side of the heart, the pulse pressure of the volume of the blood leaving the heart. Activates the Beverly Flex. In the cutouts dodgy. Trusting. Right. So those patients with this synchrony, you recent combined the left and the right. Now you're sending a pulse pressure strong enough you activate the battery flex let a convoluted way to do it. How did you see that actually signed to do it well? Alex secrets wandered in the body we went with a Wyatt directly into those better receptors in the. Wall and activate though cells. Jackie with. Why go all around right now, our device would work in all forms of heart failure, but we have to go in developed the evidence one by one and demonstrates and in our first. Quote Unquote. beachhead strategy. We selected a large segment of patients who are not able to be treated by CIT devices. Why not the eligible for Siasi devices? Those patients are those who do not have distinctly. Right. So they left the right side of the heart beating in synchrony, but heart is not strong enough. The walls fin the muscles of the heart are tired at the. Pump, the blood.

Jeff Nadeem Cancer United States Dr. Abraham Ceo Crx Medtronic Journal Of Medicine Cebu GE Pardo CBS Dr Professor Bronwyn Artie Cardiac GM New England Jackie Alex Wyatt
Viruses dont discriminate, but health care often does

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:12 min | 2 months ago

Viruses dont discriminate, but health care often does

"Tech were reporting on the innovations that will help us transition to a post pandemic feature, and some that might create even more inequality. A paper published in June. In the new, England Journal of Medicine, looked at how artificial intelligence is used to determine treatments and care. It found that many of the algorithms used in medicine use race as a variable. For example, many doctors use algorithms to estimate how well a patient's kidneys are functioning, because that's hard to test directly. Those algorithms use several factors including race to make these guesses Leo Eisenstein is a position and why you and Bellevue hospitals and one of the authors of the paper. We're seeing differences in outcomes not because. People who are black, have essentially different bodies, but their experience of being black in this country is essentially different, but encoded in the world of healthcare is the idea that black and brown bodies are different and as a result there's an excuse for why there are inequalities of health in the notion that these are produced naturally by racial differences Dorothy Roberts is a professor at the University of Pennsylvania who wrote a book about race in science and medicine, people will say black race predicts for some bad outcome when it's actually structural racism that's operating to put people in A. A vulnerable position where they are at risk Roberts talks about one study that examined why Black Women in Chicago started dying from breast cancer at a much higher rate than white women. Beginning in the nineteen ninety S, researchers concluded it was not because black women's health got worse. It was because there had been huge advances in breast, cancer, detection and treatment over those twenty years, and the best machines are located in private hospitals where more advantage people go Robert said that history makes her deeply worried about the distribution of life saving technology to treat or prevent covid nineteen. There are ways in which racism is built into the. He's rationing guidelines. which are based on a premise that scarce resources shouldn't be wasted on someone who might die at the hospital now because we live in a society that is structured by racism. This tool is systematically going to discriminate against black patients because they have already experienced a society that is set up in a way to produce lower life expectancy for them. Dorothy Roberts is a professor at the University of Pennsylvania. And now for some related links, there's more reading about systemic bias and medical treatment at our website marketplace. Tech Dot Org. The nonprofit science and Tech magazine dark has a long piece out this week. About how systemic bias is probably leading to disproportionately higher death rates among black and Brown people in the US, not just because of CO morbidity is associated with poverty or increased exposure to pollution say, but because researchers found that black and indigenous people in particular may also beginning turned away from hospitals or denied testing until it's too late. Yesterday we talked about vaccine innovations also Monday one of the leading. Vaccine Research Companies Madeira announced that it will start one of the biggest vaccine trial in the world, enrolling some thirty thousand people to test out its Kobe vaccine candidate. The maderno vaccine uses the method we talked about yesterday called M. R., n., A. The Viral Messenger that then uses the body's own cells to create antibodies to the fragment of viral particles. I'm Ali would and that's marketplace tech.

Dorothy Roberts University Of Pennsylvania Professor England Journal Of Medicine Leo Eisenstein Tech Magazine United States ALI Chicago Bellevue Robert M. R.
Kelly Preston, actress and John Travolta's wife, has died at 57

KNX Evening News

01:16 min | 2 months ago

Kelly Preston, actress and John Travolta's wife, has died at 57

"Hollywood is in shock following an announcement from John Travolta that his wife, actress Kelly Preston, has died from breast cancer at the age of 57. Jerry There is a sensitivity thing that some people have I don't have it. Kelly Preston's role in the movie Jerry Maguire may still be one of her most memorable. I'm too strong for you, Loser from a decades long acting career, I baked you some cookies here to dance. I know how to dance, but it was a screen test for the 1989 film the experts that changed her life. That's when she first met John Travolta. They were married two years later in Paris while expecting their first son, Jett. Their daughter, Ella, was bored in 2000 and second son Benjamin in 2010. A year after jet died of a seizure at the family's vacation home in the Bahamas On Sunday, Preston just 57 years old, died of breast cancer. Battle hidden from public view until her husband made the announcement on Instagram. It is with a very heavy heart that I inform you that my beautiful wife, Kelly has lost her two year battle with breast cancer. Her daughter, Ella, also posted saying she has never met anyone as courageous, strong, beautiful and loving as

Kelly Preston Breast Cancer John Travolta Ella Jerry There Jerry Maguire Hollywood Bahamas Jett Paris Benjamin
Actress Kelly Preston, John Travolta's wife, dies aged 57

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 2 months ago

Actress Kelly Preston, John Travolta's wife, dies aged 57

"Actress Kelly Preston has died. She was 57. It was Kelly Preston's husband, John Travolta, who is confirming the sad news he posted on Instagram late last night that his wife died yesterday after a two year battle with breast cancer. Travolta says he is passing on the news with a very heavy heart and that his wife of 28 years for a courageous fight against the

Kelly Preston John Travolta Breast Cancer
"breast cancer" Discussed on Menopause Management

Menopause Management

03:15 min | 3 months ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Menopause Management

"The dichotomy. According to the World Health Organization seven times more women die of heart attack. At briskets. Almost fifty percent of female. Are Due to heart attack. So there is an imbalance in the scope of heart attacks and attend the attention that society pace to them especially in women. Heart. Attacks have no geographic or socio economic boundaries. And nine out of ten women. Exhibit at least one risk factor for heart attack. Part of the a symmetry is due to the predominance of fundraising for Breast Cancer. There are nonstop corporate sponsored fundraisers for breast. Cancer runs for breast. Cancer Walks for breast cancer. Even Baseball Games for breast cancer. Even though baseball is a game played in watched primarily by men. It has a breast cancer day. So the fundraising doesn't target just win. Rest cancer. Research. Receives more money. than any other disease, despite the fact that it causes only about seven percent of cancer related deaths. As a result of the fundraising focus on breast cancer women have the misconception that breast cancer is the greatest risk. Balls! But did you know? There are actually campaigns focused on women for heart attack to. Have you ever heard of the red? Dress campaign. It's all about heart attacks. It's been around for over fifteen years and has doubled the awareness of heart attacks in women. But how frequently? Do. You see red dresses. Did you even know redresses signify heart attacks in women. What about the P campaign? You're probably more familiar with it. Then you are with the readdress campaign. The peak ribbon rest, cancer awareness symbol receive tremendous public incorporate support. How often you see pink ribbons. You probably see them everywhere on cars unplugging on products. You buy at the grocery store so they're. Wear. So the preponderance of pink ribbons and the Paucity of red dresses. Has You leaving that breast? Cancer is your biggest risk it is. Now, Campaigns aren't the only problematic area. Hospital funds are inequitable to. Where reciprocal dull that hospital spend on heart attacks, they spend twelve dollars..

Breast Cancer World Health Organization baseball
"breast cancer" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"So you know what's normal for you and then you can identify something untoward and I think in clinic obviously I see women who have concerns and I'll always ask the question. Do you regularly check your own breasts so women day when that's great and they feel confident and I don't interfere without without often. The case is no because I don't really know how to so that's an opportunity for me as I'm examining them to talk them through how to do it both turn but I think that's the thing I think people. Perhaps overcomplicating never mind thinking they don't know how to do it and actually no woman should be not checking their breast because of lack of confidence or over embarrassment. which is something else that came up in the study? We need to eliminate that and I think we all have an opportunity in this room to contribute towards that happening in previous previous episodes of the Pokonos when we've talked about breast health the phrase is come up. Several Times know what your normal is not your normal. How vital is that. I think it's okay because you know when I did from which totally by accident. I didn't know how long you've been because I wasn't checking my breasts and I left it for a whole month before then actually like when actually it's not my menstrual cycle. This country needs needs examining and if you're not checking it regularly is like we have this big show about breast cancer. Don't be journal Tober messaging but it's no good. We're not checking regularly. You don't know what you normally. You're not checking regularly a so. I actually going to do it without now. Chris longer was in the audience agents from Copperfield. They have a fantastic service to remind you. Check your breasts. Absolutely no excuses that any single one of you in this room.

breast cancer Copperfield Tober Chris
"breast cancer" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"Just in Layman's terms breast cancer used to be viewed as one disease breast cancer people now know through research that there are many different types of breast cancer all of which respond to different drugs so for example twenty five years ago. Perhaps everyone with breast cancer would be blasted with the same drugs that doesn't happen anymore. There have I've been great improvements and it's through funding research that they will be even more improvements so he was too long winded. No that's absolutely whichever's. Remind maybe people in the room and also also listeners at home. How you became involved with the campaign. I became involved because when I started working for the estimated companies in one thousand nine hundred five Evelyn Lauder came to tell me about campaign she just started and the research foundation she'd started and she asked me if I'd help and at that time it was a very small organization. Nobody knew really much about breast cancer. She only just co invented the pink ribbon with the then editor of self magazine Alexandra Penney and and she wanted to spread the word and use the media very much her partners to do that to tell women more about breast cancer and tell them how they should look after their own breasts and how they should try and raise money to put an end to the disease now estee lauder companies have conducted a huge survey of women under forty and came back and said that one in five women have never checked breasts at home for signs of breast cancer and Laura and I can imagine that's a statistic. Eq- find quite upsetting to change quickly. Yeah I mean for me is crab saying but also I knew that when I got one I was checking my breasts. I didn't know I had to I. I have quite a small set throw. It wouldn't affect me as a lot of an boom turns out. No any breast tissue means breast cancer and I wasn't doing yeah on my peers weren't doing it which is really upset because I think in this day and age will fuqua empowered but US voices but maybe we're not supporting our own bodies as much as that's what we were were. You surprised it was just one in five yeah completely surprised but at the same time surprise but also I wasn't so you know I'm not surprised maybe not actually and Dr Zoe Williams you speak to women every single day in clinic and the results also came back and said that there was a real lack of knowledge people didn't know they they were looking for and that's why they weren't checking so you must see that on the ground. How are you sharing that message with people and how are you communicating with them that they really need to check this this real lack of confidence about checking breasts. I think often we're all over thinking in one specific way. You have to do it one routine. Can you know there's a set way and the reason is just about really getting to know your breasts..

breast cancer Evelyn Lauder Laura Alexandra Penney Dr Zoe Williams US fuqua editor twenty five years
"breast cancer" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"What we hope to achieve is empower anyone listening joining to talk more openly about breast health and feel more comfortable and confident checking their own breasts knowing what normal is an encouraging their friends to do the same? I Shan't say much more at this point. You know my story earlier. This year. I had a breast cancer scare and created a couple of episodes around that including one on breast health and this really brings all of that together. My panel really do say it. Will they really do so much brilliant insight and information but I just want to mention that in in the episode Elizabeth Incidentally flew into London in the very small hours of the morning after a whirlwind trip to New York to the Empire State Building Pink as part the Breast Cancer Awareness Month mentions the speech that she's given before this recording started and for the benefit of those listeners he would like to hear it. I have included at the the very end of the episode. After we wrap up the live recording. It's honestly an honor to have hosted this podcast welcomed these women onto the show and to be apart something so worthwhile and I really hope you find this episode useful comforting and hopeful because that was what our intention was in making making it so please do enjoy this live episode of the gun show Hello another episode of the Meghan Show. I am your host. I am I gonNA wardner and I'm so thrilled to be joined by this excellent excellent panel a welcome return to Elizabeth Hurley. GP MTV Doctors Zoe Williams and broadcaster and found.

breast cancer Elizabeth Hurley Breast Cancer Awareness Month Zoe Williams Empire State Building Meghan Show London New York
"breast cancer" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

Point of Inquiry

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

"What this means and many women don't realize this what this means is that millions of women will be living healthy lives post, breast cancer post breast cancer, long enough to develop heart disease, osteoporosis, dementia and other problems of old age. In fact, some of the treatments for breast cancer increase the risk of heart events, and so there's no new specialty called cardio oncology. Which is how do we treat women who have had breast cancer most effectively so other question can we safely give estrogen to women who have had breast cancer to reduce their risk of dying of heart disease, osteoporotic, fractures, and developing dementia is more crucial than ever and off. Already getting letters from women saying the treatment for breast cancer threw me into menopause into all these terrible symptoms. My doctors won't give the estrogen. What can I do? So this question is powerfully relevant to women now. But it's important to add that this is not a mail order pitch. And we are not looking to advise every woman to take it. The issue of hormones after breast cancer is still a question. And while it's worth looking at and we review the data in chapter six of our book. It is still a question, but women can go into their physicians empowered by data. So they're not simply put off by a shrug on the part of the doctor and the letters were getting now from around the world are women who say I'm wearing sunglasses because I am crying tears of gratitude when I go out that you wrote this book and Atlanta. Somebody is beginning to listen to what I've been saying you're trying to of pry people off these new jer- reaction of denial of estrogen and even at the high levels here. So what's the are are those is it risk aversion that people just don't want to they feel like they're taking a chance unnecessary for. Sure. But it's you pointed out in the vaccine study, not doing something can be riskier than doing something. And we think certainly in women with no history of primary breast cancer. That's really where we are now and one area that Carol touched on is cognitive decline or in its most severe form Alzheimer's disease for every woman in this country diagnosed with breast cancer, at least two will be diagnosed without timers disease and unlike. Breast cancer, which has a ninety percent curate when his diagnosed early there is no treatment..

breast cancer heart disease Alzheimer's disease jer Atlanta Carol ninety percent
"breast cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"This is such an important thing for physicians and for women to understand, and it seems so counter intuitive women who've had breast cancer who are to on HR t have a better prognosis. This is a stoning at what's interesting about it is you can dismiss the nurses health study on that because of the healthy user bias that goes into it. It is. Easy to say. And I think it's a legitimate criticism that the women in the nurses health study who had better outcomes. Of course, they had better outcomes, they were more health conscious. They were nurses, they were selected through that process to be that way. So that the proponent of the women's health initiative will say it's better study because it was randomized notwithstanding the limitations of that. But it's interesting that in this subset analysis, which is always fraught with its own statistical issues, the finding of the nurses health study with respect to this point. You make still held up that is to say, a repeat it because it is so important a woman who is on HR t- at the time of breast cancer diagnosis has a lower rate of mortality, not just all 'cause but breast cancer if I'm correct, yes. And if we amplified that just little hormones have been used estrogen specifically has been used to treat breast cancer. And there have been significant favorable responses. I can't imagine treating lung cancer by increasing the number of cigarettes you smoke every day and yet as early as nineteen forty four. There were researchers publishing a twenty five percent response rate among patients with measurable.

breast cancer twenty five percent
"breast cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

Mayo Clinic Talks

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Talks

"So it's a great question. And I would like to bring up Angelina Jolie's who's a famous actress that we all know. Of who shared her story publicly with the with the world that she was a carrier of the breast cancer, gene. And the reason is that she really highlighted the importance of family history and her mother had ovarian cancer on her mother's sister had breast cancer, and these were young onset cancers, and that led to the mother testing which subsequently led to this actress testing, and so what I have really taken the time when I'm in in the room with my patient asking questions about the family histories to ask the age of onset of the cancer and the individual first degree second degree and third degree relative. And then asking more than just was there. Breast cancer, ovarian cancer colon cancer, melanoma, brain tumors because of these other mutations and if you're getting a history with multiple. Generations of variety of cancers young onset that should be the red flag to consider referral to genetic counselor. And then the genetic counselor can really help get much more in depth history about these cancers and then guide the individual on. What would be the appropriate generic testing? We can offer. Now, I just gave you a list of six different hereditary mutations, including the well known Brakha one and bracket too, which make up about fifty percent of the revelatory, breast cancer mutations. But there's now an additional goup of panel testing. They call these genetic panel tests that are being added. And there's another twenty that I didn't even mention and the genetic counselors are able to decide based on that history. What the patient is best served to recommend that type of genetic test. So I really do think having a genetic counselor is part of your team. Especially in those practices where you have strong family histories to be able to utilize them on who's who should test the type of testing and to discuss the pros and cons of testing. So based on what you said if a patient had genetic testing shortly after these came available and was negative, but these significant family history may be wise for them to be tested. Again. There's some new information out that wasn't available in the past absolutely. And being tested. I would say within the five years if they hadn't had it repeated that would be an indication to repeat the testing with specially with the new panel testing. There's another group that I don't wanna forget an mentioned testing based on family history. But if an individual's already had a cancer, especially breast cancer and has never been tested, or if they're breast cancer was a triple negative, breast cancer. That's a estrogen progesterone negative tumor. Her two negative. Those are ones that have been highly associated with being more of a mutation associated cancer that they should be considered for testing. So let's say a patient tests positive for genetic testing for breast cancer. What are the implications for that patient, and what are their options? So this would be someone who does not have cancer and pursuit the testing either. Because the family member already had one on this individual was now tested positive, and this now becomes a scenario where we describe it as high risk, and we have to discuss what are the ways in which we're going to detect cancer early in this high-risk individual or prevent cancer. And so early detection would mean, of course, breast awareness the clinical exam with the provider and mammography and now we add Marai and the the this individual the mammogram Marai are most often alternating every six months they getting some type of imaging every six month. And many women will choose to do this with the mutation for maybe five or ten years, and especially if they're still interested in childbearing, or they are not ready to pursue the more aggressive prophylactic procedure that being a prophylactic mastectomy or prophylactic euphoric Demy removing the breast issue of the ovaries are.

breast cancer Angelina Jolie progesterone fifty percent five years six months six month ten years
"breast cancer" Discussed on Babes and Babies

Babes and Babies

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Babes and Babies

"You watch your blood pressure. You can do everything in the book. You can stay out of the sun, whatever. And you're sometimes people still get it just I don't know, it's it's sad, so you can try everything to and sometimes sometimes you still get candy. I think that there's a lot of things to prevent, but it doesn't mean that it's necessarily gonna work. I'm sure that there's things that we can do to keep our bodies as healthy as possible possible prevent things, but that doesn't. It's not one hundred percent guaranteed because we just live in a world where disease exists and it sucks so, but that's why hearing stories like Laura's, I'm sure is going to be super inspir-. Because there are ways that people can survive and there's things that people can go through and do to get through it and come out on the other side. So I'm sure she will inspire us. Oh, for sure. Let's get her own. Thank you so much for coming on to share your story with us today. Of course. Thank you for having me. It's very sweet or a special of course. Yeah. So I guess none of us know that much about breast cancer, but we would just love for you to kind of share how you discovered it in your journey, getting over it and all of that. Okay. So a little weird. I noticed when I was seventeen years old and ended up being what they call Babar deny, which is just a benign lawn. And because of that, I had no history and the time of breast cancer. So because of that though, they still wanted to watch me and make sure that it wasn't going to turn into anything else where I be more Lum's. But throughout those years from seventeen to thirty one, I kept getting more and more of these benign loves, but every time I got one, it really wasn't that scary. 'cause I just thought Mr. another two now. So I would go every six months. It'd be shocked. I went at Debbie. Airy and they were checking the one they've been like had been watching. And during that time after she felt that around on that one, she does like the door. She just around everywhere else to make sure there's nothing else that she feels weird and she felt the one that they found and she didn't alter sound in the office and could. I could see it to the right in. And I'm like, that does not look like when shelters down other ones of little like scarier and she had me bro biopsy the next day and days later I was told that I had restaurants where it was just the most surreal, crazy thing that you don't get breast cancer, thirty one, but that what happened? So that just happened this last February this last February. Wow. So then what did you do after they told you that? So after that in my head always thought sin, as you get out, you have cancer, you're going to get the thought of me like, let's schedule next week. This oughta knee, and that's not how it works at all. You had so many has. They did a blood test than that day to check for genetic thing. Call this BRCA one Brockett sues mutation where he just can produce scam surveys ably and did come back negative for that. But so they had to do that says they had to do. I did a breast MRI. They did. What all I do. Mammograms, ultrasounds. I had all these tests. I'm not with probably. Account doctors and between time of actually finding it in and actually having the surgery on. So yeah, it was crazy also decide between Demere misogyny and that was for some reason the easiest decision for me because I think I was just so over getting these lumps in general. And then I was scared that if I had another one, then you know, I didn't wanna have to worry about it. So just like dishonored this Dr bass, they referred me this plastic surgeon Nashville of doctor. He's absolutely amazing if you're ever need anything done like he's amazing. But he tell me about the nipple sparing the Masek Demy so they actually were able to save everything. They kind of scooped out all the tissue and the cancer and all that, and that these tissue expanders in and just did reconstruction, and it's it's amazing..

breast cancer Lum Dr bass Babar Masek Demy Nashville Laura one hundred percent seventeen years six months
"breast cancer" Discussed on Babes and Babies

Babes and Babies

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Babes and Babies

"I mean, but like if you feel that's something you want to do to save your life pop, you know, possibly. Then I understand why people do it, but I just blows. I mean, good for you. But while. I actually love to get Leslie on. I've reached out to her before, so hopefully she'll come on some time, but I'd love to hear her story lender percent into. Yeah. When I put out having, you know, asking for people who have breast cancer to come on a lot of people requested to Leslie, well, she's a, they call it pre survivors. So she's a pre survivor. So she actually has had cancer, but she was doing the precaution where she was removing her breast tissue before the cancer ever had a chance to grow, which makes it makes sense because sometimes cancer spreads. And so you know, she's taking care of herself and taking care of her health. And you know. Preventing probably like her, you know, help helping her loved ones by keeping herself around. You know. She's, but she's a pre survivor is what they call it. Now. My neighbor. She passed away last year from breast cancer and her twins, twelve, and it was so bad because we all did like a meal train, and we all brought food over while she was in hospice and it was sad, so sad. Yeah. I mean. It's a good breast cancer awareness month as a good thing just because I mean, there's gotta be a cure out there somewhere. There's gotta be something that we can do to to save people's loved ones. But like you said, Liz, checking your body boobs and just keep it on top of it. So you can catch it fast. They like, you have to get a mammogram. You get a mammogram, not into your thirty five. I mean, maybe they should start bumping. Well, I get a Pap sphere, though the doctor Phil's my boobs. Yeah, but the mammogram is where like goes on that machine and I heard it. Yeah. Squeezes. Oh, yeah, but you gotta do it. Yeah, you gotta do it. I like everything. The doctor's office. So as I've said before, I am trying to get in shape for my wedding and I actually just started the eighty day obsession on beach body on demand, and it is super motivating. I love it so far. I'm only on day four, but I actually already feel sore and some changes in my body, but I'm super excited to see my results in seventy five days. Oh my gosh. That's so cool. I, I'm so proud of you. What's crazy is beach body on demand has so many different workout programs. Like it's the one, it's a company behind p ninety x sanity twenty one day fix Brazil, but lift in like so many.

cancer Leslie Brazil Liz Phil seventy five days twenty one day eighty day
"breast cancer" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Ologies

"Women's were scared. They didn't say anything about breast cancer. We didn't talk about it. That's so great. It is right because we're not that our generation don't like that and that fear lead to death, plain simple, straightforward lead to death because you didn't tell anybody anyone see your doctor, I think because it's in your face which Tober that's actually when we see more patients for mammograms, because people start thinking a little because it's right in front of you and people start thinking about a little bit more. So I think the advocacy in the awareness that happens Tober is necessary with that said, I often tell patients breast cancer just doesn't happen in October. We talk outside of October, and you need to be evaluated outside of October. Some of my patients are sick of October because they're tired of the pink, the tide of the emphasis. But I have to remind them that there are a lot of women out there who have not been your in your shoes or yet to be in your shoes. And that's Tober four. It's not just to celebrate the survivors. I think it's more to celebrate the ones who will become survey. Drivers. God, that's I think that there are a lot. It is with two hundred and fifty thousand people diagnosis here. There's so many people out there that don't know that this into become their costs. I know exactly exactly. Have you seen anything change, you know, shifting in terms of awareness for patients who are men or who are trans or who are non binary, like having it be less of a of a woman's issue necessarily and having it be more of a could happen to anyone. So we're trying to infect when we do our talks. We try to mention that a lot more increase our readiness and for the trans population in particular, it's actually relatively new issue. It's funny because we were talking about this this morning in our conference because these individuals are taking estrogen and what we know about breast cancer is estrogen as a malt. So it gets concerning when someone's actively taking estrogen for good reasons. We don't want them to now increase the risk of something that could be bad. So it's. A relatively new area, but I think it applies to anyone across the board male or female. If you feel something on your body that was not there before, evaluate it, I don't care what you are. Anybody can get a cancer. Anybody can get cancer anywhere on their body. If it's something that's not normal for you, it doesn't hurt to to see somebody for them to say that's nothing. Rather do that then say, how long has this been here? Right. And plus if you get a mammogram, you can go out to dinner afterwards and get a toy. Don't you have to get the toy? You can't just do the didn't lollipop or the toy. Remember the lineup and the toy, don't forget the toy. The toys important toy is very important. So figure out where you're gonna go towards the toy shopping documents. He is a treasure. Okay. Getting back to hormones and how how do hormones affect breast cancer? Because I know a lot of people now since the seventies sixties more people are on birth control. You know, more people might be taking hormonal therapies for other reasons. I'm on a hormone patch because I have ovaries that are like we're out before forty. So how, how does hormone therapy effect that like, what do we need to know about that? So that's a controversial topic, but the lemon short of it is we know when we're not know the exact mechanism of how estrogen directly causes a breast cancer. We know that women get it more than men and women have more estrogen than men. We know from some hormonal studies on Homer replacement therapy that some women may be at an increased risk. I have women who take home placement therapy for most of their lives and never get a breast cancer. I have women who never take it and do get breast cancer. I think you have to do good nutrition, good health, which means exercising, walking at least thirty minutes a day, low stress if it possible..

breast cancer cancer Tober thirty minutes
"breast cancer" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Ologies

"With breast cancer young age, you're a potential candidate for having this Jane. Let's check you now. I think what we would more say is personally, I think almost every woman should probably be tested if possible. That's kind of hard to do, but I think somebody in the family's gotta be that index person, right? Somebody's gonna be that first person. We haven't caught up from an insurance coverage perspective to allow that to happen. Unfortunately, there are those things out there like twenty three and me, and those type of genetic type stuff, which is which I think is important. But I think it's more important for for listeners to recognize that if you find something on that test in these to be evaluated because nothing's perfect. And I think if it came back positive, you need to see geneticist and check it. But the story I'll tell you, which will probably leave an imprint is a young woman. That's one of my favorite stories is a young woman who she's probably about twenty nine and her aunt got breast cancer on. It's probably like in her mid fifties, sixties with somebody really young, but being empowered and who she was, she encouraged her father, the ons brother to be tested. Because, hey, your sisters got breast cancer, and it's the only person in the family by the way you need to be tested and they're falls like, yeah, yeah, yeah. And ultimately, he gets tested and low and behold, he happens to carry the gene. So she decides. Leads me and my sister have to be tested. And she also ultimately has the gene. Now she is, I said, an twenty's. She's been getting imaging like the Mirai and such to keep an eye on things. In about two years later, we find something on her MRI this little something. Thank God was a stage zero, very, very early cancer. Rupe boy, if she had not done that any of the things I just told you, this young woman would have presented in her thirties with an invasive cancer does, but it's also great, right? Because because she was in power with the information, she, we started screening her, she's twenty something years old. We were not going to screen her for anything. She had one aunt with breast cancer. She was not going to be screened for anything, and I love seeing because I say you saved your own life just gonna drop another one of these bad boys. Right? And so it's so I think when it comes to the genetic question, I think more information is good. I think people get scared by information because they don't wanna know, but the problem I always tell them is that eventually you will know. I not know when you can do something that's so true. Right. That's true for everything from car repairs. Every car repair in particular? No. Please keep starting. Please keep starting. Yeah, exactly. And now what about can you tell me a little bit about really quick about imaging? What imaging methods do you recommend? I know mammograms are supposed to start with your forty. I'm like, going out nowadays, is it better to do is is a better to mammograms, like, what are you? What do you suggest? So we have three modalities for.

breast cancer Jane two years
"breast cancer" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Ologies

"With breast cancer while in the US in the US. Unfortunately about forty thousand still die of the disease. It's tricky because what people don't recognize that breast cancer is made up of very different types of breast cancer. It's not just one type of breast cancer. There's a spectrum. So remember those different things that make up a boob. So different types of tumors can occur depending on the location in the breast. So a ductile carcinoma may start in docked and a lobby lobster carcinoma in a lobe, some have not spread to the surrounding breast tissue, but others called invasive have, which is why early detection is clutch. So how does this cancer even start though? Well, Dr monas- he is incredibly gifted at explaining things in understandable terms, and she's also it's deadly, hilarious. And so the incidents of breast cancer has increased more so because technology's better at picking up the smallest little detail. And in our bodies, they're probably cancer cells circulating all the time because remember a cancer cell is a normal cell that just went a little quirky immune system, you know, quirky funky. So just just a little wacky. So the police otherwise known as your immune system go around and take care of them when they don't take care of them or worse when those cells recruit the police to their side. So now you have dirty cops. Then the then the they take over and the cancer cells grow the not foreign invaders. They're actually your own cells. And so these cells as they circulate if they get destroyed great, if they don't, they grow. And so if we're picking up some of these cells that are actually really, really early like haven't figured out how to invade. But on a mammogram, they show up and on my biopsy, it shows up. Now I'm treating you as a cancer patient. Whereas before mammogram is believe it or not. Some of these we didn't pick up and may not have done anything so because of better awareness and early detection. We're seeing more cancer patients, but better prognosis for them if treated early. But the problem is, once we know about it, we don't know exactly which ones really will do something or which ones won't we're not there yet. I think we will get there, but. For now, we have to go with what we have, and we can't just assume somebody has something that's probably going to be an issue and God forbid something later. Right? Can you break down? Let's have lump one. Oh one. Okay. Boob lumps Yagi down because I know that you can have a fiber. You can have a sis- have a tumor like, and I know that there's probably a lot of confusion if people feel something like, what are we dealing with and how do you tell the difference in what should someone now? So the base basic rule number one is a few which I told my high school girls to do if you examine yourself regularly be familiar with your breasts, anything different than what you're used to feeling is a problem, a problem that needs to be investigated. There is no, this is exactly how cancer presents. There are many different ways it can present. Sometimes it presents with a lump or mass sometimes at lump or mass feels like what we think should be benign, but it's not big just because of the features of the cancer. Sometimes it presents with the breast being read and there's no mass sometime. It presents with the nipple being and anyone is usually an outy. Sometimes it doesn't present what anything at all. So I always tell women, the best thing to do is to be familiar with what you used to feeling like. And if the breasts just feels different and do it around the time of the middle of your cycle. So not because your breasts get lumpy during the cycle, but do the time when is the middle, you're more likely to feel if there's any kind of a change PS if you're ever like, why do by boobs hurt? Sometimes why we boobs, why? Okay..

breast cancer cancer US Dr monas
"breast cancer" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Ologies

"Ogies merch dot com. There's hats and pins and shirts. There's backpacks and thank you for telling friends about it either in person, maybe over a game of pinochle or online every time you tag all Gs in tweet or Graham. I'm so happy to see the word spreads. So thank you for that. And thank you for rating and subscribing that keeps allergies up in the charts, which delights me not only because I'm a petty baby who's. Happy that this type dream didn't fail, but also because that's just how more people discover it, which means they discover these all adjusts and these cool science stories. And you know I'm a creep, I read your reviews every single one of them every week. And I present a just plucked one from the review patch of itunes. So this week I wanna shout out a couple of people. So thank you too. Dear g seventy two who says that they imagined that I'm really ferry flying around the country in order to sprinkle knowledge dust. I like that I'm into the visual. I like the vibe, Sarah stabler k. also thank you for your review, which started look mom here on a podcast kind of. So I did want to show you offer that. Okay, so thank you to everyone who left reviews. I read each and every one of them this week. Thank you. Okay. Surgical oncology, two words, what do they mean? It means being a tumor hunter and it's bad ass. So surgery comes from the ancient Greek for handwork who. New and college also, Greek is derived from tumor or mass. So this surgical oncologist is the chief of breast cancer surgery at my monitors, medical centers, breast center in the borough park neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. I don't know my way around Brooklyn, but I thought if you're on the east coast, that would mean something to you, but she graduated from Harvard Medical School. She's been working in this field for twenty two years. She is in word a boss. So I happen to be New York, and I got myself there with my little recording kit. And I let the nurses in the waiting room know that I was there to see this doctor. And as I took a seat next to this tidy stack of magazines and started leafing through them a patient and her husband were leaving the office and he was carrying this folder of paperwork, and we made eye contact and she gave me kind of a sympathetic smile. And it was the first of many times. I tried not to cry during this. I had litter. Really not even gotten past the waiting room door to interview this doctor. So I have never had breast cancer. I've never had a scare and I know women, my age and younger who have been diagnosed tube treated who are marching on and we all see the October breast cancer awareness marketing. And I wanted to talk to someone who does this all twelve months out of the year to learn about her life and her work. She's passionate, she's inspiring. She so so funny. She's not only approachable as this like sparkling, amazing human, but she makes it very scary topic approachable to we talked about boobs and boobs touched on boobs. Also heads up the term women is used a lot to discuss breast cancer patients. But of course, breast cancer happens to men to non binary patients, trans patients as well, and we talk about that too. So you'll hear about different kinds of breast tissue who should get screened. Then genetics deodorants making your body less hospitable to the asshole tumors. And most importantly learn about why being your own advocate might save your life and others..

breast cancer Brooklyn Graham Sarah stabler Harvard Medical School New York twenty two years twelve months
"breast cancer" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"To make the argument that women who had more babies or women who spent more time nursing or women who spent more time either in pregnancy had a lower chance of breast cancer. And therefore they were making argument. I don't know if it's right wrong. Which is why masking you that when women were having more children spending more time pregnant that there were lower rates of breast cancer. Now that we have a different society with less time spent pregnant with a debt breast cancer rate types, lowered I have no idea if that is a complete myth that been put forward by people who think that women are not spending enough time pregnant or or having babies or if it is actually true tweet. Do we have any idea that is that is that been why there's been a change or has there been no chance, it's a great question. I do think there's been a definitive fluctuation in likelihood of death from breast cancer. I think one of the. Good things is now that we are better at treating things like heart disease patients actually live longer and more likely to die of other things like cancer, the other I would say is that I think are tracking of cancer deaths was not all that good until more recently. So I think in some ways hard to go back and understand that I do think we know one of the major inflection points in likelihood of risk relates to use of hormone replacement therapy, and our subsequent understanding of that. And so there's definitely been downward trend more recently, why does breast cancer kill it. This is know something about it before it's seems like the cells divide, we have chemo, we have radiation. We have surged we've wasted. But but it's still in the breasts. So so why does cancer eventually kill you? You know, that's a it's a really important question. And I think it becomes one of the most fundamental topics of discussion that I have with my patients when we talk about chemotherapy, certainly makes sense to cut the cancer out. And I think most patients they of course, I want to get this. Tumor out. But then when we talk about doing chemotherapy, many of them asked me, why do we do anything else? And the answer is we know that many tumors for whatever reason early on in its inception. Also seed its way into the bloodstream, and so once a cancer cell has left the site where it started and makes its way to the bloodstream. It has the opportunity to see it up into different Oregon's at when this happens, it becomes very very difficult to Aratu Kate. Yeah, absolutely metastases. The number one killer of all cancers, and here is a huge amount of research right now trying to figure out the biology metastasis is interestingly, very inefficient process as Brian mentioned early on in the exception to tumor actually in the order millions of cells will enter the bloodstream, but only very few will actually see metastasis in a distant organ that process of being able to get into the bloodstream get out of the bloodstream reside in a resident tissue that has nothing to do with its normal biology where it came from. And then be able to form a tumor requires significant amounts of Lucien of that cancer to be able to do that. Unfortunately, you know, once it begins to grow in those tumors, starring those resin areas like the brain or the kidney, obviously that those that growth in peace normal function in no one ever thought about that. And so I think let me let me make sure I get this. So 'cause I envision metastatic cancer like it's a fully operational robot ready to go it get knows how to go somewhere else. Grab on develop a blood supplies. So, but it doesn't I would imagine just to sell, and it's it's it's a modified breasts Ellen. If it went someone else wouldn't know how to latch onto wouldn't add command and it was so how does it a literally evolves? And you know, it's interesting some research that is hopefully soon to be published a u actually discovered that these cells metastasis distant organs, actually, begin to gain certain characteristics of the organ that metastasized to that the gene expression, it's it's repertoires genomic repertoire changes to be able to be hospitable to that new environments, very..

breast cancer Oregon chemo Ellen Aratu Kate Brian
"breast cancer" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"So when I think of breast cancer, I think of a cancer that is one we've known about for a really long time. So it's actually kind of fascinating is you look through art and literature. We see references to breast cancer way way back, and that's because breast cancer. Unlike a lot of other cancers is one you can actually see and feel without a big scans or a really neat technology. So why does breast cancer seemed to dominate our dialogue so much wise. It seemed to be the cancer that people think about all the time, you know, breast cancer is one that has an amazing history, both politically, and I think socially, and I think in part because it arises in the breast so it has implications of privacy, sexuality cosmos's a variety of other things. In addition to being the most common cancer to claim lives for women. And so obviously through earlier periods in social history. It became one of do. I wanna talk about this. Do I want to tell people about this to one that has really become an empowered topic one that I think women and patients family and friends feel very empowered to do the. Right things to make things better. Why is it the cancer? That claims the lives of most women. I mean, it just it just evolutionary it just seems why does breast cancer seemed to occur so often. Is you really great question. What we know is that is disease of aging in as the population continues to live longer. We're seeing more incidents of cancer in general. And as we do with breast cancer. Interestingly a breast cancer starts in the normal. Ducktail sells the milk ducts that were the cells go awry and become cancerous. And what we know is that over time that these cells within the milk ducts can accumulate mutations in once they do transform and become cancerous. Why exactly these particular cells are more susceptible to cancer compared to some others? Actually, we don't know completely. We believe it probably has to do with the fact that it's undergone what we call more of Aleutian more cell divisions. But to this point, we really don't know is it something that's always been there. I mean have have women throughout history have had. Sort of a very high death rate of cancer from breast cancer. Or is this something that has changed socially in the last hundred years, I'm asking this question because I read an article I got us how many years ago where people are trying to make the argument or scientists I should say we're trying.

breast cancer milk hundred years Ducktail
"breast cancer" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"I'm very excited. We're gonna be talking about breast cancer, specifically triple negative, breast cancer. We've got to experts with us Milan. Radovich and Brian Schneider. Both of whom again work at I use school of medicine with me, we're going to be partnering as we've talked about before with ice school medicine over the next year to talk about topics that are both of clinical interest to the general public while also talking about research and things that are going on on the cutting edge to try to improve the way we care for those Ellis's. So I'm going to let both Milan and Brian. Use themselves. And then we're going to get started polo. Thank you for having us this morning. My name's meal and rod vich assistant, professor at Simon cancer center. Also, co director of the precision genomics program, and I'm Brian Schneider. I'm an associate professor of medicine and rector you health precision Nomex program. And so part of what we're trying to do as well as talk about sort of the different professions encrypt has the people get to these jobs. And so could you tell us little bit about your training, which degrees are how you got to this place. Yeah. Absolutely. So interestingly, I'm actually genomic scientists. So my job is really focused on understand the underpinnings of breast cancer. What causes this cancer? What are the mutations that have caused a normal brussel to become cancerous? And so my training actually was in classical genomics, medical genetics. I got my undergrad in biochemistry my PHD in medical molecular genetics that I you and then actually with Brian and head then the honor to join the faculty at school medicine. Great. And I am a classically trained MD and the decided to. Do my specialty in medical oncology? So I do fun things like chemotherapy pills for cancer was trained by great breast oncologist, George sledge and also had a translational laboratory and subsequently partnered with Dr savage in opening the precision Nomex program. Great..

Brian Schneider Milan Simon cancer center associate professor of medicin Radovich MD George sledge professor Dr savage Ellis director
"breast cancer" Discussed on Well This Sucks

Well This Sucks

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"breast cancer" Discussed on Well This Sucks

"Female with male breast cancer and i think it's just that men can have this so you're testing positive for actually a gene mutation heather on men can have this same you take it will just put them at risk for different types of cancer good breast cancer there on their they got their own breast cancer yeah and heather sat there and thought to herself what the heck is this be r c a what's it and i'm gonna do some research going to do some though exactly how you now gonna lay some knowledge down on the w t s listeners and tanna and danielle yeah this is called an olive education station knowledge porridge no knowledge college college college oh wow yeah that rhymes better than poor so slop take us to the knowledge college education station about education stages oh boy okay i think we're gonna always have to say maybe even for legal reasons that we're not doctors were nonscientists we're just us and we're just trying to make sense of everything and like know what the fuck any of this means all right so here i spent a lot of time i'm gonna pedia i'm just going to try and relate to the best of my ability i can't believe it put it took this long to figure out that biard c a stands for breast cancer but i we we let that subtle guys because i've had breast cancer for a year and a half now and i was tested for this b r c a would it people call brakha gene mutation and i did not know that it's i kid he's peasy you don't have to be like.

male breast cancer breast cancer heather danielle