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19 Burst results for "Bravura"

Ballerina: Fashion's Modern Muse, an interview with Patricia Mears

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:30 min | 3 months ago

Ballerina: Fashion's Modern Muse, an interview with Patricia Mears

"On your new exhibition. It is truly magical. It's supremely beautiful. Have to say and I learned a ton from its accompanying catalogue which is called Ballerina. Fashions Modern Muse for any of our listeners. Who WanNa pop on over to Amazon and pick up a copy so for any of our listeners. Who like me may not be ballet aficionados? I'm hoping I we can do a little bit of Bali history just a little bit. When do I see the emergence of ballet? And what distinguished? It from other types of dance which preceded it bally's quite an old art form the genesis of what you see today. The basic steps in the positions were already in place as early as the sixteen sixties. The first formal school was started in sixteen sixty one under the auspices of Louis. The fourteenth who himself was a very accomplished valeted Ella. It was clearly an aristocratic endeavor. And you see that carried over today. This would erect posture. This sort of very formal movement of the body so in some ways it is part of that French also regime aspect and we still see it today but ballet's also a very athletic endeavor so it's marrying these two extremes if you will sort of restraint kind of technical Bravura and again. That's why I think they call ballet dancers artists athletes. Yeah because they merged the two and then fast forward. The ballet went from being aristocratic very classical in its themes and male dominated to about the eighteen. Twenty eighteen thirties when women take over ballet's international. It's much more standardized and very importantly the romantic style. The sort of supernatural narrative takes over and it seems that women artists were better suited to express this new ballet form. What can you tell us about the life of a professional ballerina in the early years of the art forum in the Nineteenth Century? What was her place in society very different from today. The Ballerina really sat at the bottom of the socio economic scale. If you will. There were a few exceptions in. Even though there was a flourishing in the eighteen thirties and forties where there were certainly respectable stars By and large these women were very marginalized. They were paid very little and as a result they were often exploited. Many of them had to turn to prostitution To survive and we see these beautiful pictures by got today showing what seems like an idealized environment but in fact often in the back. You'll see men lurking. They were known as the abomination repower men of the Jockey Club and they regularly exploited these young women so many of them had very sad stories even though they were quite accomplished artists and speaking of data. I think there's even a little back story to his very famous sculpture of the fourteen year. Old Dancer Right. That's right that famous. Bronze sculpture is of a young girl She was part of a family where I think her sister was. Also a dancer but sadly she was likely a victim of the circumstances at the time where she hardly made any money to survive. Many of the dancers were hungry. They were physically exerting themselves and this young lady did fall into prostitution as well and probably died a very sad life so yeah it's horrible to think of and so different from the way we view dancers today right and it really is a fact that the majority of ballerinas then and now will never make it to star status. That's right or or you know prima which was a term. That's kind of more favorite in the past right. Today's top dancers are really generally called principal dancers. If I'm correct right why this shift and terminology from Ballerina to Principal Dancer. I think it has a lot to do with the fact that ballet culture came up in Great Britain and especially the United States and we view ourselves as a bit more democratic so the idea of the Ballerina which was a term given to very very few female dancers. You really had to be at the apex at one point in the late nineteenth century in Russia and said there were only six ballerinas in all of Russia was extraordinary So you can see how limited the term was bandied about then but today we view of the hierarchy of the principal soloist in the quarter ballet member but I think it erases the difference between male versus female and one that really I think asserts a sense of achieving it not so much through social connections or through whims but really through technical as well as artistic merit so. This is one of the reasons we see that change in France. They still use the word. A twelve or star to designate the very top rank. Oh Nice Yeah. I'd like to turn our attention to one of the all time greats who we were just talking about Before we started recording Marie Tahiliani And she really rose to international claim in the early nineteenth century. I'm hoping you could tell us a little bit about her. And also her innovations which helped to shape the future trajectory of ballet as an art form. That's right I think Marie Tagliani was important to very significant ways. One was the art form itself. He was not considered a beautiful woman and had certain physical flaws. Someone told me that. She was slightly hunchback and her father who was a brilliant choreographer was able to create dance. Movements that did not distract from that in fact Really enhanced her physical illness She was very hard working and she was a pioneer of the idea of going up on point sort of Now we think of it is absolutely essential in classical ballet for a female dancer but it was very rare when she started and I think the other thing that she did was to raise the respectability of the Ballerina. She was very careful in the way she cost him herself. She was discreet. Show is where pearls she had. A Floral Diadem And the other thing is that she acted very lady like off stage and she made sure her physical depictions whether in costume more in high fashion. We're always done in a very respectable way so she was able to do something. Many other ballerinas could not do which was Garner female audience. Even the young Princess Victoria was a huge fan of hers and so if members of the royal family could embrace. It was considered acceptable. So she was a breakaway star but unusual in that way and and correct me. If I'm wrong queen perhaps named one of her horses Tahiliani. He did tell Yoni was one of her race horses and also there was a stagecoach that ran between cities that was called the Tagliani fabrics after her famous role muscle feed many different types. Candies were named after her and the Russians were especially enamored. There were some bellum who made a soup out of her shoes needed hotel. Yoni mania swept through Europe and the eighteen thirties forties talk about being a mythic. Yes exactly Speaking of iconic elements of ballet. I would be very very surprised if there's a single one of our listeners out there who is not familiar with the garment which is of course. Queen essentially synonymous with ballet and I am of course talking about the two one thing that I was taken a bit backed by. When I was reading the exhibition catalogue was the somewhat body origins of this term. So how did this term to come about an aunt at its most basic? What is a two two while the two two is just the Ballerina skirt? It's costume and when it was invented in the eighteen thirties It was a word that came from. Rather if you will of course background it's a slang or play on the word. Kuku which itself is slang for the petite call. Which is your behind. Basically ballet audiences were different in the way they were positioned back in those days. The people who were members of the aristocracy or had money were always in what they called the box seats or the rings that were on the upper tiers of the Opera House and it was down in the orchestra seats where the more working class people sat and they could sometimes get a glimpse of the Valarie Yes that they were diaphanous garments and so sometimes depending on how she twirled or whatnot it you could get a look up them and they were also bit dangerous they were often starched ahead sizing in them which made them flammable and with the open gas lights. Some of the Ballerina skirts caught on fire and sadly a number of stars did die that

Prostitution Principal Russia Jockey Club Amazon Marie Tagliani Bally Bravura Ella Marie Tahiliani France Europe Louis Opera House United States Tahiliani Great Britain Yoni Princess Victoria Garner
David Mackenzie Narrates a Scene From ‘Hell or High Water’

Filmspotting

02:14 min | 5 months ago

David Mackenzie Narrates a Scene From ‘Hell or High Water’

"Prompts Marcus to find a local guy who can drive him up to an area where he tried to get a shot? He's really out for blood. Now because he's so angry at foster's tanner and he's told it's going to be an impossible shot. It's GONNA be five hundred yards away. He says I don't care let's go do it and as they get up there the character says Joe you're winded and it's not even your gun let me take the shot and he says not on your life he's mine with that jaw jutted out and that grizzled grumble of his that we get from bridges in this fell and right before he takes the shot. We get that deep breath the intense focus. But there's even a sense of pain in that pause where it's almost like. He wishes. None of this was happening. He so angry though and he's so eager to shoot but you get the sense that he could break down. Any second is if the whole weight of all of this senselessness is there on bridges face and when it cuts to foster. This is where that mythic sense comes in again. He's looking looking at everyone down below him. He thinks he's safe up here in the hills and he says Lord of the planes. That's me and that's exactly the moment where he gets shot and I'll let our listeners. Takeover a couple listeners on our facebook page talked about this moment the beats that happened after he fires the kill. Shot Zac Santo. Chief says his reaction action to the end of the shootout at the climax of hell or high water is playing like three emotions at once relief. Joy and sorrow through a haze of mental and physical exhaustion. And it's a fantastic moment. Tom Curran shape. Powell goes even further with those combinations of emotions. He says when he kills Ben Foster's character after his partner is killed. His reaction is incredible. Incredible mix of victory sadness. Justice relief exhaustion frustration. Regret all at once. It's incredible. It really is incredible. It's all those things and there's even a little a bit of humor the guy who's next to him who said he probably couldn't do it. He turns to him and gives him a look. Like you doubted me. And then he slaps him a couple of times playfully letting out a chuckle. And it's that chuckle then just immediately kinda shifts into this really plaintive cry and just within a few beats as I said he hits every one of those notes that our listeners describe it's really a Bravura Jeff bridges

Tanner Jeff Bridges Powell Marcus Facebook Tom Curran Zac Santo Chief Ben Foster JOE Partner
"bravura" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"bravura" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"I wonder where that. That came in one of quite a few AMI's now six and do you have them all out? No, I don't I I. To tell you the truth that they're in storage. I I mean, it sounds ridiculous. But I've got a lot of these things. And like they're too many of them to put on display. Sure. All the different wars. It's the mid westerner. And may where do you let you have here. Yeah. I live here and to have an apartment in New York. So oh, that's nice. I'm sort of bi-coastal character. So a moving through the movies, though. Like like, I remember like you one of those guys it was sort of, you know, lot of things. Always I feel like a grew up. Always seeing you somewhere. Yeah. Bad penny. No on showing up, but like the twilight zone movie that was Greece. Yes. Roll fabulous. And for working for George Miller. Yeah. You know of Mad Max fury road. He directed your episode. He directed. My episode is the first I'd done a few movies before then including bar. Sure. But until then nobody knows. No, film director had asked ever asked me to do more. They'd all asked me to do less. But George nothing was ever enough more. I wanna see your face crack is just and it was incredibly liberating. That was the first time. I brought all my sort of bravura theater chops to to the movie. Really? Yeah. So like everything you are. Yeah. Bam. Ma'am. I wanted it. You got it because you are sweating and throw. Yeah. Total freakout off nonstop. It was like a twenty minute heart attack. Oh, man. It's really fun. Did you work with him again, ever, not George? No. No, no. And I loved him in terms of endearment. Like, you were the sweet guy. Yeah. Yeah. That was at the Bank that. Yeah. It was about a two or three year stretch. Which was I came out to when I met my wife, I came to LA we got married. So you left New York you'll have to theater the ongoing theater the seventies. Yeah. And came out to L LA on what movie did you decide? Like, I gotta go to LA when I decided because Mary when we got married I moved in with her. She was a tenured professor and out here. Yeah. At UCLA. And I couldn't does for you've been married twice. Yeah. Yeah. She's my second life and. And I just I was just sort of a time for change in my life. I guess. Yeah. Moved out and moved in with her and bam. Bam. Bam. Bam. I did garp twilight zone. Yeah. Terms of in baron footloose. Yup. Buck ru banzai all in the space of of about two and a half years, and they were all wildly different character parts of popular movies in different ways. Yeah. I'm a number big hit movies, right? Terms terms banzai. They'll have kind of a cult following. It's still does. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. What is it? Wherever you go. There. You are. Yeah. And laugh while give giveaway. Yeah. It was fine. I wish your listeners could see your lap. Hey, no, high last mile. I'd forgotten that one. Yeah. Mung pretty capable. That was like a me Mun before the internet like that was of the people were saying. Of that guy. Monkey bowl is the most lunatic character ever, I loved it nineteen Eighty-four..

George Miller New York LA Mung Greece UCLA director Bank twenty minute three year
"bravura" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"bravura" Discussed on Filmspotting

"And you know, what I forgot about the earthquake when I was trying to catalog some of these catastrophes in the forest fire. Yeah. I mean these earthquake events. Yes that happen. And for me what they did is along with these amazing long. Tracking shots down the Mexico City nighttime streets, they they take this particular family and also place them in a very particular social setting. Yes. And then when the world becomes unhinged in that way. What it did for me is to realize that. Okay. Maybe the domestic strife that we come to learn happening within this family is somewhat common. A lot of families deal with these things. Right. But to this family, it's everything the tremor of an earthquake. It's the roar of a wildfire. And that's how it was experienced by these kids, and you know, remember, I don't know if these exact same things happened or to Koran, but perhaps the equivalent that's how it felt to that family. So these not not quite cosmic. But almost these global kind of catastrophes are just echoing what are these small domestic catastrophes happening? And I think it's not only opportunities for bravura filming especially that wildfire sequence. But completely of a piece with what's going on the medical. Yeah. I knew very little about this where it was going to go. I knew that it was auto biographical. And with that in mind as I was watching it. I was thinking well is the little boy in this then because there are multiple kid. In their multiple voids. I was wondering if it is Pepe the little one the one who we probably see showed the most outward affection for her is that then probably Koran I assumed it was and now I know it is because I did get that book. Did you get that coffee table crazy that came I guess as part of a ward season, I was thumbing through that after seeing the film and at the very end of it. He shows the actual pictures of the actual people, and he really has here pulled off quite an experiment because he managed to cast people who look identical to everyone from his life. So he is to an extent here at least based on those images. He is certainly trying to go back into his life. Very literally and trying to recast it in reimagined and see what this new perspective brings to these events. And again trying to bring this kind of understanding to the character here being cleared, but I love the generosity of that two of Koran like think about what this film could have been held still. Might have been a great film had been very clearly from the perspective of the young. Boy. Right. Had it been about the filmmaker saying I'm going to go back into my past. And I'm gonna make this about my memories. And I am going to try to honor her, and I'm going to try to honor these larger stories what this movie has to say about class and about race and all the turmoil in the early seventies in Mexico City at this time, but I'm going to do it from my very personal prism, and he doesn't do that. Or he does it only as a director doesn't make it about the pet character. He keeps the focus completely on Cleo. And I think you were getting it this with your acknowledgement of the earthquake and the forest fire. The thing that's really staggering about this film for me is the scale how intimate it is. It is this everyday story of a family drill down even further..

Pepe Mexico City director
"bravura" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"bravura" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Thanks for being here. Great to beer a lot of drama amid the rebellion by some Democrats who want Nancy Pelosi to step aside takas through some of the negotiations right now, Molly. Well, I think it's fair to say it's a little bit anticlimactic, and there is somewhat less drama than might have been intimidated ahead of the leadership vote. This is a closed door vote of the democratic caucus conducted in. Private by secret ballot and that is to decide who the caucus chooses as its speaker candidate as its leaders as its leaders, and then the actual vote on the floor, which officially in which members of congress officially vote for the speaker of the house that is in January. So the fact that the vote is being held now is already somewhat of a concession. You'll recall that the caucuses both caucuses in the Senate and the Republican caucus in the house have already chosen their leaders, but Nancy Pelosi agreed to put off this vote for several weeks after the election to give new members a time to make decisions and as a sort of concession to the her many critics within the caucus, but what we've seen her do since then is really put on a sort of bravura display of her abilities as a politician, she has relentlessly lobbied all of the members of her caucus. She has summoned every possible activist group on the left. Side of the spectrum from the far left to the center all of them coming out to express support for her or almost all and while two years ago in her bid for democratic leader. She did have an opponent Representative Tim Ryan. And he got about a third of the caucus to vote for him in that leadership vote. This time no one has declared that they are running against her..

Nancy Pelosi Representative Tim Ryan Molly congress Senate two years
"bravura" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"bravura" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We've had a little time with the word worries. O H U A R is e. Tony is looking very confident. No, I'm looking more reverential as I am always in the presence of a catch your word. Yes. The only language which sees the future as being behind you. Because you can't see it in the past is being ahead of you. Because you can. Brought to you by. It's future is going to have a lot of gene, splicing and stuff. The worry show will not be as long as it is right now, it's a love child of two animals the animal being the Lama who has to be a male and the Packer who obviously has the. Okeydoke? Pack and Lama an orange Lhamo and outback. Yes. The shall not to be mistaken for the jury. So nobody knows what goes Theresa. We won't even try to deconstruct that way. But okay, that's the offspring of a male llama and a female alpaca could be it or Francine. What do you have? Areso is actually a bravura straight who. Yeah. I thought you would know that. It is a short beaked bird. Lipson South America. And it has a bright green breast, the worry. So. Short beaked, South American bird it short beaked or short beaked. Right. Really, no plastic. Has a short beak a short little nose short beaked, South American bird. Or maybe it's what Barry has why. Why are we so is meant to be a term of insult for someone who is a peasant liking education or lacking sophistication you actually have heard it uttered in that famous film gone with the winch starring Carmen Miranda and Clark Gable? When she's standing out there in the peach patch and says the Clark Gable? How can you think such a thing you want to see so down? Do you? Burma shave. Is burning in the background? Yeah. Sure, I.

Clark Gable Lama Carmen Miranda Lipson South America Areso Burma Tony Francine Theresa Packer Barry
"bravura" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Of John gazelle and you're listening to the soundtrack. Of the deer hunter Beautiful By the way that that point that somebody made before the knew how to find the, pain the character that was what did and in. Doing so I think Fallon pain and all of. Us His als five films received forty Oscar nominations in addition fourteen of the performances by accuracy supported when needed for Oscars this is. Not a coincidence he enriched every film in which he acted inspired every, actor with whom he worked. For more impressive. Than John's association with Oscar nominated films was the acting he did in them but what he did was something beyond acting what, can be called transcendent acting or non acting cer-. Ben Kingsley observed the camera is allergic to acting John's characters tend to just stick in our minds, because as opposed to just. Singing them we. Feel as if we're meeting them For. Those who weren't alive when the godfather premiered it is hard. To quantify its impact on the culture there is no contemporary equivalent the only comparison is, the arrival of the Beatles in America The opening of the godfather like the arrival of the Beatles was similar, to a. Cultural earthquake nothing was quite the same afterwards and like. The Beatles the godfather has remained contemporary shortly after the film. Premiered a joke started to. Circulate someone would say in our family. He's frito, everyone would laugh because they knew exactly what that meant the subject of the joke was weak inept a bit stupid perhaps most certainly. A loser no one ever. Said in her family he's salon Zoar Clemenza or tests you What would that mean but Frago everyone. Knew it was vivid clear perfect is the actor who portrayed frito someone named John Zell made him vivid clear and perfect from the moment he comes into view in the, godfather he. Commands the screen not through bombast bravura but with sublime. Subtlety in the midst of the noisy activity of the wedding. Celebration he's slowly and quietly. Approaches the table where brother Michael and. Kay or, sitting played by Dan. Keaton When he appears he is quite drunk but John. Is to find an actor to play drunk instead, he, plays a, drunken man trying to appear sober He. Steps carefully and slowly puts his hand on cage chair, to steady himself and kneels down in his tux to. Get, I level with Michael and.

John Beatles Oscar John gazelle frito someone Zoar Clemenza John Zell Ben Kingsley Fallon Michael Keaton America Kay Dan
"bravura" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Paltrow is Becky with the good hair I really, feel like she's the one who was like blanking Jay z. This is. Kind of interesting and I there might be some legs to. This one only because they were best east I'm kind of. With you Best. Season I, have not seen around beyond say and Jay. Z and quite adding they were besties yes well you're. Really on the right track Julia Ambrose theory she reference, with and beyond say's public friendship not how the two aren't seen together very, often anymore, she said the timing makes sense as well. As sorry came out shortly after the, group CEO filed for divorce from her former husband Chris Martin this is a. Conspiracy I can get behind Right I really thank you amber rose forgiven On. Spencer Patton podcasts Things that was. To keep reinventing themselves they. Maybe this hormone work all right Mick Jagger of the many things Vic Jagger has said in public this is one that. Is really coming, back to haunt him was one thousand nine. Hundred seventy five and he said I'd. Rather be dead satisfaction with I'm forty five was thirty one at the time needless to say he has. Sang it pundits of type. Since then So, much for that bravura well remember in the. Last dirt alert we talked about Roger. Daltry talking about, my generation yeah all these guys have been come All right one more for Jane Fonda optimistic words about the nine to five sequel she says my role is. Executive, producer working with the writers with, lily talking to the right is right now Dali. Are, all intending to be in it Timing certainly makes it seem as though the reboot would tackle the metoo movement but Jane Fonda implied the continuation will be slightly different She implied that technology corporate voyeurism could be the. Foil in the. World of the new nine to five and it's going to be set in, the same fictional office, of consolidated companies interesting for it Yes They need to get it, on get making it. Soon, yes they. Get let's do this while we're all. Here,.

Mick Jagger Jane Fonda Jay z Becky amber rose Paltrow Julia Ambrose Spencer Patton Chris Martin group CEO Daltry Roger lily Executive producer
"bravura" Discussed on Pop Culture Palate

Pop Culture Palate

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on Pop Culture Palate

"Actual design that vehicles themselves was done by gentleman by the name of bob gurr he's also the guy who designed the the like the utah auto p cars and the mister toad cars basically if you wrote in it he designed it and one of the interesting things is that it goes to the disneyland hotel who at the time disney did not own that hotel it was owned by the rather corporation and it was because disney couldn't afford to build their own hotel and they didn't have any experience in running any kind of resort or anything like that if you remember correctly disney was just a filmmaker back then so whenever they decided in the nineteen eighties that they were going that they really wanted that property back they basically said oh with our next negotiations we're going to bump the price of the monorails what what i'm sorry what we're going to make it more expensive for us to bring the monorails into your resort prohibitively so so you're probably gonna want to sell the property does that's that's how they got it you know too much about this stuff you know that some sneaky lawyers involved with all that michael eisner took no prisoners wow while kuhlman june was a busy month in the history the adl lanell sales aimal history i take and the line here is the anal of history there you go but let me go ahead and read this here before we go into the news segment for you the listeners pop culture pallet audible is offering a free audiobook download with a free thirty day trial to give you the opportunity to check out their service and we talked about lucifer earlier will did you know that lucifer was written by neil diamond and he has a book out right now called nor smith allah g neil diamond has long been inspired by ancient mythology and creating the fantastic realms of his fiction now he turns his attention back to the source presenting a bravura rendon didn't of the great northern tales he fashions primeval stories into a novelist art that it begins with the genesis of the legendary nine world's dell's into the exploits of the deities dwarves giants and culminates in ragnarok the twilight of the gods and the rebirth of a new time and people so if you wanna go get that book right now.

bob gurr disneyland hotel disney michael eisner lucifer neil diamond rendon dell adl thirty day
"bravura" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"You might hear something that's louder than everything else has been in the foam that's kind of shocking right whereas that same loud sound in a different context and any other movie where you've got ball to wall music score and a lot of sound wouldn't read as big or jarring just just elaborate on idea of of contrast you know eric mentioned that when you know when we did sort of break the the the sonic roles that we had established and played something loud that was very shocking conversely there's a there's three moments in the film where we take all of the sound out and i think those are actually probably the most shocking and also in many ways the most intimate moments in the movie and these are all these the three moments that we do that are all moments where we go into the sonic perspective of the of the deaf daughter regan when she has her cochlear implant turned off and so these are moments when we're in her point of view and it's complete silence and this is something that you know we've never done in our careers where we've gone to complete digital zero and some of the feedback we've been hearing on the movie is that these are these moments are what people remember yeah like even here in the studio we have the fluorescent lights have you know all these different little noises one of the things i kinda wanna i don't wanna spoil this movie for people who haven't seen it though everybody in the world has seen it at this point but the movie starts with a sort of five minutes sequence that lays out the rules of the world almost entirely entirely through like camera work and sound and you know the visual and oral elements film without dialogue and it's really a bravura sequence in lot of ways and i'm wondering you talked about stripping all the sound out but that's he says a lot of ambient noise.

regan eric five minutes
"bravura" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"This is our american stories we continue with the life of john gazelle and you're listening to the soundtrack of the deer hunter beautiful by the way that that point that somebody made before the knew how to find the pain the character that was what gazelle did and in doing so i think found pain all of us is als five films received forty oscar nominations in addition fourteen of the performances by accuracy supported when needed for oscars this is not a coincidence he enriched every film in which he acted inspired every actor with whom he worked former impressive than john's association with oscar nominated films was the acting he did in them but what he did was something beyond acting what can be called transcendent acting or non acting cer ben kingsley observed the camera is allergic to acting john's characters tend to just stick in our minds because as opposed to just seeing them we feel as if we're meeting them for those who aren't alive when the godfather premiered it is hard to quantify its impact on the culture there is no contemporary equivalent the only comparison is the arrival of the beatles in america the opening of the godfather like the arrival of the beatles was similar to a cultural earthquake nothing was quite the same afterwards and like the beatles the godfather has remained contemporary shortly after the film premiered a joke started to circulate some would say in our family he's frago everyone would laugh because they knew exactly what that meant the subject of the joke was weak inept a bit stupid perhaps most certainly a loser no one ever said in her family he's salons oh or clemenza or tissue what would that mean but frago everyone knew it was vivid clear perfect is the actor who portrayed frago someone named john gazelle made him vivid clear and perfect from the moment he comes into view in the godfather he commands the screen not through bombastic bravura but with sublime subtlety in the midst of the noisy activity of the wedding celebration he slowly and quietly approaches the table where brother michael and kay are sitting k was played by dan keaton when he appears.

oscar ben kingsley america john gazelle michael dan keaton kay
"bravura" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The listeners of kqed it's 920 this is we can tradition from npr news i'm scott simon japan's moment came at the winter olympics in south korea the country claimed the gold and silver medals in men's figure skating no podium for the us but all three american skaters did finish in the top ten because of some last minute come from behind drama that's what sports role about trump young and peers melissa block reports this was japan's time to shine in shine the two dead japan's means star the reigning world champion zuhdu high new skated his long programme with lyric grace his with a thin form lofting into quadruple jumps it wasn't perfect but it was plenty usga when you also won gold four years ago and now he's become the first male figure skater to repeat as olympic champion since 1950 to that was american skater dick button oh the extra drama came in the athletic form of 18yearold us skater nathan shan known as the quad king for his jumping prowess chen had been favored to win a gold medal but he tanked in his earlier short program he was in a miserable seventeen thplace heading into the free skate along long program and he was looking for redemption he got it chin shook off the misery and turned in a bravura performance he landed five quad jumps and olympic first and then what the heck he threw in a sixth for good measure sort of an eight here late us is why literally nothing lose loves go for it in the end of those six squat jumps vaulted shan from seventeen th place to fifth not enough for a podium but a solid measure of redemption as for his teammates vincent joe finished sixth adam rippon tenth.

olympics south korea us japan chen gold medal vincent joe npr scott simon japan melissa block nathan shan adam rippon four years five quad
"bravura" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The winter olympics in south korea the country claimed the gold and silver medals in men's figure skating no podium for the us but all three americans skaters did finish in the top ten because of some last minute comefrombehind drama that's what sports role about trump yongjiang and peers melissa block reports this was japan's time to shine and shine the tomb did japan's means star the reigning world champion zuhdu hanyu stated his long programme with lyric grace his with a thin form lofting into quadruple jumps it wasn't perfect but it was plenty usga when you also won gold four years ago and now he's become the first male figure skater to repeat as olympic champion since 1950 to that was american skater dick button the extra drama came in the athletic form of 18yearold us skater nathan chan known as the quad king for his jumping prowess chen had been favored to win a gold medal but he tanked in his earlier short program he was in a miserable seventeen thplace heading into the free skate our long program and he was looking for redemption he got it chin shook off the misery and turned in a bravura performance he landed five quad jumps and olympic first and then what the heck he threw in a sixth for good measure it was sort of anger let us grohmann finally live literally nothing louis loves go for in the end of those six quad jumps vaulted shan from th place to fifth not enough for a podium but a solid measure of redemption as for his teammates vincent joe finished sixth adam rippon tenth.

olympics south korea us japan zuhdu hanyu chen gold medal vincent joe melissa block nathan chan louis adam rippon four years five quad six quad
"bravura" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The winter olympics in south korea the country claimed the gold and silver medals in men's figure skating no podium for the us but all three americans skaters did finish in the top ten because of some last minute comefrombehind drama that's what sports role about trump yongjiang and peers melissa block reports this was japan's time to shine in shine a tomb did japan's means star the reigning world champion zuhdu new skated his long programme with lyric grace his with a thin form lofting into quadruple jumps it wasn't perfect but it was plenty usga when you also won gold four years ago and now he's become the first males figure skater to repeat as olympic champion since 1950 to that was american skater dick button the extra drama came in the athletic form of 18yearold us skater lincoln chan known as the quad king for his jumping prowess chen had been favored to win a gold medal but he tanked in his earlier short program was in a miserable 17th place heading into the free skate along program and he was looking for redemption he got it chin shook off the misery and turned in a bravura performance he landed five quad jumps and olympic first and then what the heck he threw in a sixth for good measure whose sort of an anger let us finally why have literally nothing louis loves go for it in the end of those six quad jumps vaulted shan from seventeen th place to fifth not enough for a podium but a solid measure of redemption as for his teammates vincent joe finished sixth adam rippon tenth.

olympics south korea us japan chen gold medal vincent joe melissa block louis adam rippon four years five quad six quad
"bravura" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Over on pms nbc they went to tom brokaw after this they the usa tom what are your thoughts he said no what i think it's time to end the state of the union where we don't need these speeches anymore you imagine tom brokaw or any of these other clowns suggesting we need a and the the state of the union after a bravura performance by barack hussein all it would never happen yeah we need the end these it's a waste of time they don't accomplish anything besides trump was too good it really doesn't help us trump does not looked anything like we have been characterizing him for people there were five in addition our montage over five things are democrats refused to applaud of that there were just there more than this but here of aid the 5 of note the national anthem tax cuts record law black unemployment veterans in god we trust trump mentioned that in god we trust is right there over the podium announce chamber and the democrats would not applaud that either to the phones we return here's todd in in charlotte north carolina your thoughts are you doing harm mr limbaugh megat bid owed thank you sir oh i have been static with this president and i grows happier every time i hear him or even hear about his tweet i loved everything he shot is becoming more and more my favorite presidents ever goal i love is courage and just see a bitter gummy nancy pelosi a hundred depends on our watch twisting every time something you mention this kind of a problem ocean depends were kinda creeping up the uh uh the kravice there i thought it was i thought it was may be the the uh the end he seemed for the for the for the for the i'm having a minimum of what the dentures young you you think do you think the the the jargon handinhand was kind of water go far yeah i do she's probably so loaded with some stuff skewed by idea the second perac so what the democrats and the general this just all we need or they don't even show any any one hundred ten to get to the other side kind.

tom brokaw barack hussein trump todd president nancy pelosi charlotte mr limbaugh
"bravura" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Film festival in hawaii where take in the western and they did a tribute in the he did it all around the speech at last satisfied endorse you know i gotta say a not imagine my whole over a inside your hair aiming miami speech that's all you heard and you saw images from all the other movies the dinaledi realize 'oh god i guess it all comes down to a speech turner well it's it's a memorable speed it's true my husband said the only question that he had for you the only thing he cared about will flows it like fighting aliens and all that matters smiley day is a great privilege to fight it right really an honor to know that you've got a big challenge zero bad real difficult difficult fall in may i remember too two know it's the movie was near now that's another one sky like while you're sleeping that really wasn't meant to be a classic gear in its way it's kinda climbed into being you know one of the pillars of the genre all your yeah of your and then uh but not at all that way in um um i love dustin hoffman very much and great respect for a i remember it the ah deauville film festival he added filmon we were there with independence day am i caught a little of his press conference in which he was bemoaning the condition of current film guide us in good he added i g said there any honestly called it a popcorn movie in not also that's not a terrible insult eln now doesn't seem so you know he think while in the kind in new itself you know all about oh yeah nat nato bravura he was all about you know really giving a little scary and really feeling like the circumstances or real but then having this defiant humor in face of it and so i you know as at the time i thought oh jeez oh god may be he's right tell us may be said little shameless niddle.

hawaii miami dustin hoffman deauville
"bravura" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on 1A

"At as general kelly's remarks were yesterday i thought that his attack on the congresswoman which did fail to understand her personal connection to the soldier what really was unfortunate because he could have put a period after this and instead that just that part of it really seemed to inflame the situation and incentivize it to keep going it's also worth noting that during his remarks general kelly called out congresswoman wilson four speaking at a dedication for an fbi building in miami and apparently aggrandizing herself for raising the money received at freezing the money for the building but congressman wilson told cnn today she was not in congress in two thousand nine when the money for that building was secured i believe she was still a state lawmaker so this this seems like it just won't die you don't want to pick a fight with a gold star family i was in a different context but that's a lesson that the trump administration should have learned from the convention and its fight with the con family let's talk about attorney general jeff sessions he sat before the senate judiciary committee this week for a five hour hearing the senators asked mr sessions about jailing journalists about sanctuary cities and of course about the investigation into whether or not the trump campaign colluded with russia during the 2016 election that matter still under some investigation do we learn anything this week about that gregg nothing i think that basically moves in needle a lot i mean it was in some sense of bravura performance in so far as he managed to not recant anything it said before and not to break any new news i thought perhaps most striking thing is what hasn't happened he disclose he has not yet been interviewed by the special prosecutor robert muller on the issue of what was said during the campaign or possibilities of collusion it was also interesting that he very strongly defended what he had said during his confirmation hearing but having no contact with the russians regarding the campaign he admits that yes he didn't meet with bassett dea russian ambassador at the time but he sticks by his story that nothing about the campaign was discussed.

kelly miami cnn congress senate judiciary committee russia robert muller fbi congressman wilson attorney gregg prosecutor bassett five hour
"bravura" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome too hard talk on the bbc world service with means steven saka my guest today is a longstanding member of russia's foreign policy elite constantine casa chaffetz served as a diplomat during the dying days of the soviet union and then became a foreign policy adviser to a succession of rushing prime minister's he's now serving in the russian senate as a member of vladimir putin's united russia party and head of the foreign affairs committee he's just bag from new york where he was part of the russian delegation to the un general assembly a meeting which will be remembered for an aggressive bravura performance from donald trump which included a threat to totally destroy north korea in the age of trump us foreign policy is hard to read not least in moscow and for all sorts of reasons the washington moscow a relationship looks more unpredictable mistrustful and potentially dangerous but at any point since the end of the cold war through the russians sense opportunity amid this confusion well constantine katachev joins me now on the line from moscow welcome to hardtalk thank you you have been a diplomat and an experienced observer of international affairs since the 1980's can you ever remember a time when the russia us relationship was more dysfunctional more unpredictable well i've studied history of relations between our two countries during the cold war theater definitely the it had much worse examples or for frozen relations between our two countries so what is happening right now is definitely a other unusual and on welcomed here it in our bilateral relations by this is not the worst one you have have just come back for new york you're part of the russian delegation at the un general assembly did you get any sense solvay coherent american stands toward russia well everything is changing everything is moving one of this change reach i could notice was the reaction of the people sitting in the whole of the general assembly in new york listening to mr trump and that edit you'd was uh ova slid different from the one i quote experience the previous year swearing at people were listening to to mr obama these guy what do you mean by that big be clear with me well mr obama was was interpreted by most people in the.

washington mr trump coherent moscow un united russia bbc mr obama constantine katachev cold war russia north korea donald trump new york vladimir putin senate prime minister soviet union casa chaffetz foreign policy
"bravura" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"American stories we continue the life from john because they'll and you're listening to the soundtrack of the deer hunnam beautiful by the way that the point that somebody made before the knew how to find the pain the character that was workers l did and in doing so i think found pain and all of us is els five films received forty oscar nominations in addition fourteen of the performances by actors who supported were nominated for oscars this is not a coincidence he enriched every for when which he acted inspired every actor with whom he worked former impressive than john's association with oscarnominated films who's the acting he did in them but what he did was something beyond acting what can be called transcendent acting or non acting sir ben kingsley observed the camera is allergic to acting johns characters tend to just stick in our minds because as opposed to just seeing them we feel as if we're meeting them for those who warn alive when the godfather premiered it is hard to quantify its impact on the culture there is no contemporary equivalent the only comparison is the arrival of the beatles in america the opening of the godfather like the arrival of the beatles was similar to a cultural earthquake nothing was quite the same afterwards and like the beatles the godfather has remained contemporary shortly after the film premiered a joke started to circulate some would say in our family he's radio everyone would laugh because they knew exactly what that meant the subject of the joke was weak inept a bit stupid perhaps most certainly a loser no one ever said in har family he's alonzo or clemenza or test you what would that mean but frago everyone knew it was vivid clear perfect is the actor who portrayed frago someone named john zile made him vivid clear and perfect from the moment he comes into view in the godfather he commands the screen gene not through bombast or bravura but with sublime subtlety in the midst of the noisy activity of the wedding celebration he's slowly and quietly approaches the table we're brother michael and k r sitting here we've played by diane keaton when he appears he's quite drunk but john is.

john oscars ben kingsley johns america john zile michael diane keaton oscarnominated alonzo