20 Burst results for "Bravura"

"bravura" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:03 min | 2 weeks ago

"bravura" Discussed on The Big Picture

"It's basically made by a drone. I mean, half the shots in this. But here's the thing. And I don't mean to get us off topic, but we freaked out over a movie that was essentially made by a drone earlier this year, ambulance. Yes. Where it's like somebody who is like, okay, I have this technology. What's something that people haven't seen before with this? What could I do that I couldn't do ten years ago that I can now do? I can throw this off a building. I can throw it under a car. Nobody gets hurt. The russos are just like, eh, let's just do every establishing shots of drone shot. Let's just do if a train's coming, the there will be a drone shot that goes past this train. It doesn't have any cinematic tension to its usage. Yeah, I mean, there are multiple set pieces in this movie. They're all bravura in a way, but in the most bland way. Opens was like, what should be like a pretty astonishing scene. This sort of nighttime assassination attempt, yes. Which is just straight up like, you guys definitely watched only God forgives. Yes, and there's some really interesting set design and costumes in those sequences is particularly what on a Dharma is wearing this sort of flower suit that she has on is really amazing. Brian Gosling is wearing this magenta suit. It's a very stylish and stylized and it feels like everyone who participated is the right person. Except maybe the russos, like they might be lacking a kind of vision that you need to pull something like this off. I'll point out a couple of pretty critical sequences. There's one, there's this sort of a plane exploding in midair and all of the people who are on the plane have packs and parachutes and except for Ryan Gosling. He sort of floating through the air. Now we've seen similar sequences to this recently, we saw similar sequence in a dark knight movie, we saw some most sequence in the mummy, the Tom Cruise movie recently. We've seen a lot of sequences like every other scene emission impossible. Tons of Tom Cruise movies over the years. And so there's really nothing that can be accomplished in that scene other than making it like slightly more vertiginous and exhausting. And they accomplish that, but it's kind of like to what end this just feels like something I saw in another. It doesn't look like a real plane or the sky completely out of it. And so the other thing that I wanted to ask you beyond when a movie is made for you do you start to judge it more harshly is that if this was the 41st most important movie of the year, do you think you would have had more fun with it?

Brian Gosling Tom Cruise Ryan Gosling
"bravura" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

07:22 min | 9 months ago

"bravura" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"About Dwayne and band camp tomorrow. Dwayne is running the band. Palooza that it's happening in Southern California. The traffic guy. So sunny bunch our movie critic is coming in not to his usual music Sonny bunch, but we're celebrating band dads everywhere directing thousands of buses and vehicles to a giant band palooza in Southern California and Dwayne is the guy with the you know those people on the airplanes, what they were on the runways when they have the lightsabers and they direct traffic. Sure. Well, that's what Dwayne's doing tomorrow for 14 hours. So he's really looking forward. He's looking forward to tomorrow. I'm sorry. You have to explain van to lose. I don't understand what that means exactly. Is it just with their vans? Yeah, no, I banned the high school band. They actually have a tournament marching band tournament featuring 35 schools all having a band tournament off. And so you see, it's sort of like medieval times only with trumpets and bassoons. Gotcha. You don't have bas in a marching band. I think they do. You might be ill informed there. Sunny bunch welcome, all thanks Sonny available at sunny bunch on Twitter. He also is the host of across the movie aisle, great podcast on movies. The bulwark goes to the movies and many other fine things. So sunny, you are not sending us to a band at palooza. I hope tomorrow. I hope you have something for us to see in the theaters. Well, we could talk about drumline. I feel like that is a band the band of palooza sort of movie, right? Well, South American park. Of drumming groups. So what's coming out? All right, so we are in that weird stretch where we have a marvel movie out that weekend before, which means that nobody wants to release a movie this weekend. Because nobody wants to compete in either of the first two weekends with the marvel movie. So in theaters, your options are a little bit light right now. But Netflix has not scared of marvel. Netflix is not scared of marvel. They are releasing one of their big blockbuster movies of the year this weekend. It's called red notice. They probably noticed any ads for it because they don't show ab but it is a big $200 million heist by way of Indiana Jones style movie. Starring Dwayne, The Rock Johnson, Ryan Reynolds and Gal Gadot as a trio of well, technically, Dwayne Johnson is like an FBI agent who's trying to clear his name. Ryan Reynolds is an art thief and Gal Gadot is another art thief she competing our thief. They are trying to steal or recover three eggs, the eggs of Cleopatra, which are these ancient artifacts, not real, not a real artifact that ancient artifacts from Egypt that were given to Cleopatra on her wedding day and their price list are very they're very valuable and they are trying to they're trying to recover these. Dwayne Johnson, so we can clear his name to our thieves right rental, so they can sell them to a Egyptian businessman who wants to give them to his own daughter as a wedding gift. Okay. That's the plot. The plot doesn't matter for this movie. What matters about this movie is that it feels as though it was created by an algorithm somewhere in Netflix's basement. I mean, you have the three biggest arguably the three biggest movie stars in the world in Dwayne Johnson. Ryan Reynolds and Gal Gadot. Maybe you could switch in Scarlett Johansson for Gal Gadot. I don't know. You have a plot that I would describe as again it's like the sting, by way of indium Jones. There's even some Nazis in this, maybe there's Nazi treasure to be found. Oh my gosh, isn't that close to copyright infringement? It's not far off. It's not far off. And you take all these things and you throw them together in a blender, you have it directed by this guy, his name is Ross and Marshall thurber. He is probably best known as Dwayne Johnson's in-house writer director. He also did skyscraper the Dwayne Johnson movie and he had central intelligence, which is the movie with The Rock in what's his name the comedian Kevin Hart. Who is a perfectly competent Michael Bay knockoff action filmmaker he's not no great shakes, but he's fine. And you make this thing and it's the sort of thing that when you put it on the front page of Netflix and 200 million people see it in the see that on their screen in a weekend. They're like, yeah, I'll give that a shot. Why not? I'm in for the weekend. It doesn't matter. It's the sort of thing that gets watched by they will 100%. There's a 100% chance that Netflix puts out a press release sometime in the next three days that says something along the lines of 95 million people watched at least two minutes of red notice. And that's why I have a big success for us. That's why it justifies the $200 million price tag. It's going to be the most watched least remembered movie of all time. I saw this movie on Monday. I went to it, it's playing in a few theaters right now. Just because I think Netflix wants to keep Dwayne Johnson. Are they trying to get an Oscar nomination for the score or something? No, no. I thought on Monday, I can't remember a single line. I can't remember single line from the movie. There's nothing there's nothing approaching an interesting visual shot in this. There's no, there's no big bravura action sequence that people are going to be talking about on the way home. It's not even like fun ridiculous like the fast and serious movies, right? There's nothing there's nothing over the top and awesome. There's no real great spectacle. There's no really amazing action sequence. It's just it is just perfectly competently done. Okay, I want to contrast this money. I want to go into the off script sunny bunch. If I said to you, give to me a quiet little movie that is stunt that is hung with you for decades that you like and you want to find again in the title about what you can't really even remember correctly, but you know it was a fine film. To contrast with Rudd one DOM whatever you just told us about the name of which I can't remember. Red notice. Red noted. It even has a boring flat name. Nobody nobody ever read dawn, and there's big red one, but the idea of red notice. It's like a communist. It should be a communist movie. Yeah, you wouldn't like red corner, right? The Richard Peter movie. The red violin. There are a lot of good red movies. Yeah. You know, I can't remember if we talked about last night Soho at all. But that's out in theaters right now. It's still and it's still in theaters for a bit. That might be worth checking out it's the Edgar Wright movie, it's a horror movie, you. You might not.

Gal Gadot Dwayne Dwayne Johnson Netflix Ryan Reynolds Sonny bunch Southern California South American park Starring Dwayne Rock Johnson Cleopatra indium Jones Marshall thurber Sonny Indiana Jones Scarlett Johansson FBI Kevin Hart
"bravura" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

06:11 min | 9 months ago

"bravura" Discussed on Filmspotting

"By guru is just kind of transporting and it added to sort of the experience of this as I think you said early on. It's a very sensory film. And the soundtrack the score is part of that. Yeah, and there's more in the filmmaking. I want to highlight my favorite cut in the movie. There's one subtle and I know this seems like an oxymoron, but one subtle bravura match action cut where they go to a dance together in Harlem. And there's one shot where a couple is dancing. It's another couple. They're on the floor and they're really kind of whooping it up. And just as the man dips down to the ground, the camera cuts to nega, lifting up her flask to take a drink. And it's a very deliberate match cut on kind of this opposite action, right? Of going down and then back up again. We talked about point of view shots. How about the moment where we are a little bit jarred by the fact that we are now being aligned with the point of view of Claire after seeing everything through Irene's eyes and it's walking into that dance, the camera is tracking along the line to get in. And we think that's all it is. It's the camera, it's the director choosing to track across and show these characters who are almost all looking straight ahead, except for one man. Near the end of the line, who's not looking straight ahead, he's looking straight at the camera. And then we cut and we realized that it's nega, it's her point of view as she's walking past them. And he's looking straight at her. So another moment where we feel like we're being we're being seen like we're almost being called out there as viewers. And there is, I think you may be noted this impressionistic aspect to the black and white, that becomes really prominent, the more unsteady Irene gets. Unsteady in every facet of her life. The perspective becomes more and more warped and it is something you don't see often with black and white in film. But the apartments that are across the street outside these windows look distorted. They look like they are something out of an impressionistic painting, lacking the color. We often see the rest of the world around the women, very blurred. And another line I wanted to call out a really good screenwriting moment, I think, as obvious as it may seem, it does really make you think for a second. At that same dance and it's that conversation talking to the Bill camp character again, a writer who is a friend of Irene and her husband. A white writer, notably a white writer. That's right. She says something about how it surely has to be more difficult for a white person to try to pass as a black person than the reverse than what Claire is doing and he says something like, oh, I had never thought of that. And she calls him on and says, well, why would you hew and right there in that line? And that rhetorical question she throws back at him, you realize sort of the immensity of the dynamic at play there between the two races. And the fact that the empowered, the one who is lived an entire life of privilege, basically, of course, never would think about it in those terms. Should never consider for a second. What it might be like for a white person to pretend to be black because why would they ever do such a thing? Which is very different is this movie tells us for people who are of the other race. Yeah, I like those conversations with the camp character because they show that these are all things Irene has thought about deeply and is kind of trying to repress. It's not that she's naive, or doesn't understand any of this. It's that she wants to sweep it aside and live what she's been told is supposed to be a comfortable life. But she's very thoughtful about a lot of this. Back to your note about the point of view shot involving Claire. I think that moment and maybe some others are helpful in getting us to realize that there is some fragility here. If I seem to describe nega's performance at Claire as sort of this super confident unbothered character, that's what she presents. But the movie and the performance show us there is more there. Especially as we get closer to the end and this really climactic party where we will not spoil at all, though I don't know if it's possible to spoil because I was so relieved to see that hall left the ambiguity of the novellas ending at play here and I would love to hear how that worked for you. Did you kind of hope for something that was a little more a little more concrete in where this movie leaves us or did you feel it was fitting to kind of leave us walking out wondering what we just witnessed? Yeah, no, definitely appreciated that ambiguity. I think there are multiple layers to the ending that are fun to think about and seem appropriate for the characters and the story. I feel though and I'm not familiar with the novella, I believe it's maybe only about a hundred pages long. There is a little bit of a short story aspect to this film where there's a moment, for example where Irene is questioning Brian on his feelings for Claire and don't get me wrong. Hall stages more than enough scenes where we start to, again, seeing it from Irene's perspective, it seems like there might be something nefarious going on. That there might be something more to this relationship and yet the moment where she specifically almost accusing him of maybe not even cheating on her with Claire, but really almost defining his life by Claire if that makes any sense. It felt a little false to me. It felt it felt as if the plot in that moment needed a little injection of that drama to kind of get us to the end. And I was very aware.

Irene Claire Bill camp Harlem nega Brian
"bravura" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

05:15 min | 11 months ago

"bravura" Discussed on The Big Picture

"You want a place for people together. I'm very partial to that that santa barbara home in in. Something's gotta give no wait. It's complicated it's complicated is the meryl streep alec baldwin to steve martin. One number two is. Something's gotta give star messing up. My nancy meyers movie. Stay on very specific titles. Which is the hamptons kitchen. That's like the archetypal. Nancy meyers kitchen. But i like something with a little more character number three. It's outdated at this point. Because it's ninety s. The father of the bride kitchen is very lived in very nice very functional which he wants number four. This is just a writing credit. Technically but i think a lot of nancy meyers is in baby. Boom and he can't sleep on the vermont baby boom kitchen which is very beautiful. Inspired like cabin. Whatever on instagram. For sure check it out if you haven't seen it. What movies am i missing the holiday. Obviously that's real estate focused. But they don't really spend a lot of time in the kitchens. And the will cottages very cute but not a super functional kitchen. What about nancy meyers is actual kitchen. Which we got a chance to see that too islands. Yeah i mean it's beautiful. I think it's not. I guess i would put it above the baby boom kitchen and maybe like tied with father of the bride kitchen. I'm gonna say my lowest. Is the intern kitchen. A little too. Hdtv makeover for me personally. And i know that's what they were going for. That's honestly the most recent through. I think it's i think it's probably accurate with what is in a brooklyn renovated townhouse in two thousand fifteen or whatever that movie was released by i. She's comfortable in california and the hamptons. You know that's when they really shine. That was a bravura performance. As a lot of just watched michael jordan shooter. A lot of detail about kitchens. I can't say identified off. Tom's that was those now. There were no no spring here very strongly that the it's complicated kitchen does not need to be renovated even though meryl streep character is like that's what she's always wanted to do is expand the kitchen because she's a professional chef but she has the professional kitchen to make the croissants when she needs to impress. Steve martin you're literally more interested in the sanctity of the existing kitchen than having a plot device to move the story forward to make the movie happened..

nancy meyers hamptons Steve martin alec baldwin santa barbara vermont brooklyn michael jordan california meryl streep Tom
"bravura" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"bravura" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Build slowly and again. I'm not gonna detail it negatively. But i will say happens. Thematically basically this sequence is the ultimate summation of the film's view of cleo as this secular saint. This is how koran remembers the woman. Who cared for him as a child. It's how he wants to honor her at the same time and it was kinda criticized right that it was ideal. Some people said it. Idealized this woman but this moment is crucial. It's a crucial retort to that. Because it involves this touch of confession enclosed part that she makes at the very end of the scene that totally humanizes her i. It brings her down if she was an angel before. She's brought down to earth in a way that makes us as viewers. Just love her all the more and then the hug that we get to hold all of this together on the beach. The water rolling up towards them. It's an all-time movie hug adam. If we ever get to that list. I'll probably revisit here and bring this up again. I would love to break things down even more. But like i said. I hope it'll just act as a tease for anyone. Who hasn't watched roma yet. And it's right there on netflix. It's still sitting there on netflix. for you i think. Sometimes we think of netflix. Just like this dross of i don't know like reality. Tv staff and series But there are great films like roma still there. Sorry i'm just reacting to the fact that you just use dross in a sentence is that is that the right word was the right word that i think so. I think the character in the scene. We massacred this week. Used his where. I got it. Okay i think you stole it from well done. You said it packs a wallop. it back of. I can't believe you actually had the nerve to revisited. As much as i would like to watch roma someday. I'm not sure. I'm ready to watch some of those scenes that one included. Yeah it's a lot. It is a lot well. My number one's a lot as well. It's a scene of total chaos. Set off a beach in world war two. But no it's not saving private ryan and it's scene where we see three hundred thousand or so british soldiers and things on fire and smoke billowing but it's not christopher nolan's dunkirk. It's joe wright's version of dunkirk in my beloved atonement from two thousand seven. Yes from little women to a tournament. I just have this warm feeling about this top five list this week josh. Two of my all time favorites. It is that five minute tracking shot. And what really makes it special beyond. Obviously the technical accomplishment is the scale of it and the utter absurdity of the imagery. It's actually even crazier than i remembered it. And i haven't seen atonement since two thousand seven. I was admitting to my daughter. Sophie who of course. I told her she has to watch. This movie was admitting to her. Though that i don't wanna watch it. I just wanna have the experience. I had with it at the toronto film festival in two thousand seven where i was just utterly transpired it but to get back to the absurdity pages of books flying in the air as they're they're being burned it seems horses being shot at point-blank range a guy at one point on a pommel horse. There's a ferris wheel in the background. There are two men wrestling. There is a chorus singing a hymn. The most of the people we see are just kind of waiting for the inevitable which is death. This is all imagery by the way that we really do not see in nolan's version of dunkirk and then at the core of it is james mcevoy's character searching staying in motion as if maybe somehow if he does stay in motion he'll find some solution some way out some way to get off that beach. It's it's actually this primal visceral thing. I think we can all relate to even as you're looking around at the chaos at the terror recognizing how insane it all is knowing that it's where you're probably going to die if you've got that urge to stay alive and to get back home to get back to the person you love then staying still isn't really an option you're always gonna fight. And he is. He is fighting. He's looking for something. It's heartbreaking and exhilarating and what makes a standout so much is it's like no other war scene or beach scene that i can think of maybe other than apocalypse now in terms of giving us a portrait of war in which it feels like. You've moved through some kind of surreal portal. Where you're you're just glimpsing the complete breakdown of order and reason and civility. And i mentioned the director joe wright cinematographer here shame mcgarvy the steady cam operator obviously so crucial to the scene success peter robertson and according to what i read today they actually did it in part at least least according to the filmmakers they did it in part out of necessity not because they were trying to really make this bravura spectacle but because they they needed to capture the scene in a way where it wouldn't have required so many different setups and shots and takes now. I guess i'll believe them. Even though you think about all the time and energy it obviously took to get all those people in their proper places and to choreograph. The camera work the way that they did. Of course the cinematography here is a big reason why it was nominated for an oscar for best cinematography and it also won for best musical score another crucial part of this scene and for whatever it's worth one expert i read online one war. Two historian said that it probably captured. It actually fairly realistically in that. It was chaos and everyone was so thirsty because they had no water. They had no access to water. So they basically just started Pillaging from all the sellers around town and they were all just drinking wine and everybody was hammered. While they're writing on the the merry go round or doing all of these rambunctious thing so it seems watching it that it couldn't possibly be authentic and perhaps it actually was doesn't really matter one way or another as far as my experience with the scene. It's more obviously about what it suggests and kind of those metaphorical almost existential implications of the scene. I just think it's a wonder yeah. It's distinct from Christopher nolan's dunkirk in its absurdity those details that you discuss. We don't really get that in dunkirk And i've thought like what is more. What is more impressive. That joe wright can include like this dunkirk sequence in the midst of a whole other film or that nolan can build a whole film around this sequence right They're they're both really amazing and obviously dunkirk. Nolan's is one that i considered. I think i set aside. Just because i couldn't pick the whole thing takes place on the beach. I couldn't pick one one beat scene. But i did consider it well. Those are top five movie beach scenes. we'd love to hear your picks feedback and film spotting dot net and speaking of ones. We considered josh any other honorable mentions. Oh yeah i mean. Truffaut's for milk blows another ending scene. Right yelm talked about saving private ryan. I wanted to mention a matter of life and death. One that i just to my shame caught up with within the last year but andy harris on my larsen on film facebook page said this david niven thinking. He's crash-landed woken up on an endless speech at the shores of heaven. In a matter of life and death completely idyllic. He surprised to see his own shadow. Delighted that there are dogs in heaven..

netflix joe wright james mcevoy christopher nolan roma mcgarvy peter robertson nolan adam josh ryan Sophie wrestling toronto oscar Christopher nolan yelm Nolan Truffaut andy harris
"bravura" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

Piecing It Together Podcast

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"bravura" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

"Who i was not familiar with but who apparently is on letterkenny which is a favourite of my awesome movie. Your co host. Jason harris sure kelly mccormick and my guess is this is a very different role from whatever. She does on letterkenny. Because this is not a comedic film really She plays this struggling musician. Who gets into the business of being a sugar baby via one of these websites that you can sign up for and she does it for extra money and it turns into something that kind of consumes her life and also fuels her art. So there's a lot of character stuff going on in this movie about her sense of her own identity and her own worth and the way she relates to these guys and if she gets too close to some of them or some of them get closer than she wants to her but it also has these sort of impressionistic almost music video style interludes where she interprets her experiences via her original songs which i believe kelly mccormick also sings and possibly co composed. This is amazing like bravura performance from her and like shiva. Baby i think an open minded and thoughtful examination of sex work as legitimate but also not discounting sort of the emotional toll that it can take on people sure. Yeah it sounds interesting. I had not heard of it. But i will have to check that out yeah. I don't think many people have heard of it. It was something that i came across from my vod column that. I write where. I'm looking for things that haven't heard of most of which turned out to be very bad. Yeah but there are some gems. I wrote about psycho gorman there which went on to become a much bigger sensation. This one did not but i think it should. It was on hoopla for a while. At least you can watch it for free. It still is. But i'm sure it's available somewhere And a good companion piece to shiva baby daddy right on My number three is a movie that at first. I didn't think i would be calling a movie or including on my list but it's bo burnham's inside which i see you laughing over there you know everybody's considering whether or not this is a movie. I think it is getting a Theatrical run for a night next month which will you know do something to get. Its legitimacy out there. maybe you have fights theaters. That's true but Yeah i wasn't. The biggest bo burnham fan i like his stuff and of course i loved eighth grade so i wasn't even really on my radar like ober burnham's doing a new special..

kelly mccormick Jason harris psycho gorman bo burnham ober burnham
'In the Heights' and the New Golden Age of Musicals

Filmspotting

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

'In the Heights' and the New Golden Age of Musicals

"Early word about in the heights has been effusively positive in general and praising of star anthony ramos as a screen presence in particular if you get the film spotty newsletter. You already know that. This week producers. Sam wrote about seeing hints of ramos's potential in the filmed version of hamilton. So i thought we might want to start there atom to ask if this potential was realized for you in this screen adaptation of lin-manuel miranda's pre hamilton stage. Musical ramos plays whose navy de la vega twenty something new yorker. Who's taken over corner. Bodega from his late parents. But dreams of moving back to his native dominican republic. There two other main characters whom will get to but it's it's navy who introduces us to. His washington heights neighborhood in the movies. Bravura pre title sequence. Which is a chance for ramose to showcase his skills as a singer. Slash rapper as a dancer and just general screen presence

Anthony Ramos Ramos Manuel Miranda Hamilton SAM Navy LIN Bodega Dominican Republic Washington Heights Ramose
"bravura" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"bravura" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"And with Gainsborough, you don't get a whole lot of psychology. But you get a little bit here with somewhat pouty face of Mrs Graham, the flesh tones of fantastic the brushwork. Word in art history of bravura. He's not trying to hide the brushstroke to give you what we would think of us. Kind of like a photographic image. We can see the hand of the artist. We can see the lines. The brush In in the in the flesh. We can see it in the hair and then in the rough background, it is a beautiful study, and that's at the National Gallery of Art to get there really should be shown together. I don't know what they've ever been exhibited together. But the full length and Edinburgh and the study for it bust length I at the National Gallery in Washington. It would be wonderful to be able to see them together. But the honorable Mrs Graham, by the way, there's a A kind of a sad, um Corolla re to to to her life. She died relatively young in 17 92, and she was actually on a trip with her husband. France on ship and she died on board ship off the coast of France. Her husband lands in France and he has her in a coffin basically is going to be bringing her back home, but they have to go north again, and they're going to get another ship to be able to go back to England that year. 17 92 is the year that the French Revolution Year three of the French revolution that the monarchy was finally overthrown. In September of that year, and that happens to be the month that they're going through, Um, the countryside and they're set upon by a group of revolutionaries who are checking. He's a foreigner, and he's got his small entourage traveling north. You got a cat a fault with the coffin on it. And these, um officers or revolutionaries where they actually opened up the coffin. Now I I've actually read where they defiled the body trying to search for contraband for arms or whatever. I've even heard that the body was removed. Husband, Thomas Graham, who was quite a person in the biography was written about him. He's really quite a person. He was infuriated with this. He joined the Army after that, here is already approaching middle age. He's just lost his wife. He joins the army. He commands of a A, uh, a regiment of infantry, and he actually fights on board ship. He's landed and for any fights, the French On defeats them helps to defeat them in a couple of battles. The second big engagement for him is that he's present at Waterloo, and so he was able to get back. He swore that he would get back at the furniture prior to that had been very sympathetic to the French revolution. But after what they had done to him into filing his wife's body as he was going through France, he swore vengeance against France. And he was there in Napoleon's fall of Waterloo in 18 15. So a lot With that cider was portrait in member of the Honorable Mrs Graham. Another painting. I love very much, and I'd seen the work of John constantly before I'd seen the beautiful um Painting, uh, of a in a state of the National Gallery in Washington. Uh, but I was not really prepared for the major canvas called Dead in Vail or the Veil of Death and from 18. 28, by Thomas by John Constable John Constable is one of the two Great of the English Romantic school Joseph Network. William Turner is the other who gives us the fabulous sublime scenes of nature. Sometimes history scenes, beautiful landscapes. We have some lovely examples. A zey Water colors at the University of Michigan Museum of Art of Switzerland, Looking down and into a valley and you see the river down below your CD with the people on the banks. Very, very steep banks looking down into that into that valley. The sex with sky Land and water are absolutely fantastic as water colors by, um you know that might give me some oil to it might be an oil sketch, but it's framed. It's one of the drawers of U of M Museum of Art. When they open again, You'll be able to go in that first gallery on the right and alumni Memorial Hall opened up and it will be there. And it is a feast for the eyes to see with Turner. You could have a large canvas. You could have a small you can have his drawings or he could have his water.

Thomas Graham France Army Waterloo Um National Gallery William Turner Washington John Constable John Constable Gainsborough M Museum of Art University of Michigan Museum Napoleon alumni Memorial Hall Edinburgh Vail England Joseph Network
"bravura" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"bravura" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"By the play caller, but still it's not quite the same when that when that voice of calm is not there for the final paragraph before you go out pregame and halftime I That's the Penske actually probably my choice for Coach of the year. So my two teams six point teaser bills stealers. Like it was go ahead. Group just gets asked what he thought of Baltimore, Tennessee because that that was such a tough one. Because you know, Tennessee can really run it with Henry. But me and Baltimore is rolling into these playoffs, firing on all cylinders. They destroyed their last five opponents. They coming off a game where they just ran for 400 yards. Lamar's getting a dialed up. He looks like he's in rhythm. Hard game to handicap. I could see either team winning that game. I'm kind of leaning towards the Ravens. But what's your? What's your field? I won't back the Ravens until the Mark Jackson wants a playoff game. That's just my observation. The Titans have beaten him twice in the last two times I play him. Including last year in a playoff game. The one problem that I think Lamar Jackson has going forward is when he's behind. It's very difficult because it's not the kind of a passing attack that that a team can rally around. Listen, you've done a great job, and I You don't see me saying I'm going with the Titans either, But if I had to pick a side in that game, if I had to pick it in a contest or something I would take this long to stay is 3.5. I would take the Titans with the points. I think, Henry. I think Henry could control the clock. They're going to move the ball. You're right. The Titans defense is a mess, but they're a mess primarily against the past when you strike downfield. And that hasn't been a strength of the Ravens. But in that one, you know, I watch and we'll see what Lamar Jackson does. He's all into a starting quarterback in the playoffs, and he's got to step out and prove that he could win and believe me. Leave me We're talking about it. And no one knows that more than Lemar Jackson. He's feeling the pressure right now getting ready for Sunday's game, tempted to show us what he could do in a playoff game. For three in the playoffs. That is the unmistakable voice of Mr Brent Mussburger joining us here on the Tolbert Kruger and Brooke Show. Is there an underdog you like in any of these games? Believe it or not, I like Washington. Washington has a tremendous defensive front. Tom Brady is a stationary quarterback, and that can present problems. Kocharian's and the Buccaneers to cover. The last number I saw in Vegas today was eight. Cover that eight. They're gonna have to move the ball on the ground. They cannot just snap the ball that Brady and say, find one of his receivers. I don't know that Evans is going to be close to 100%. If Alex Smith was 100%, and he's not, he's not at all. Not even close to it. I might take a money line. Bet. Take a flyer on them at one point They were, plus 3 50 on the Moneyline. Last time I checked, they were, plus 3 20. So some people have taken the Washington football team and come on Moneyline on. That is a very, very good defensive front. I know there are some 500 team, but look it up. Looking about what coach Rivera did with the Panthers. Once who got into the playoffs, set us up 5 30. They won the game. Okay, so that would be one team that I would look at. I don't consider the Bears. I wouldn't under any circumstance think the Bears. And beat the Saints that that's up to 10 at the time that I was betting the teaser. I didn't want the saints because it was at 9.5 when I still had to give up this friend, a half which I don't want to do. I don't think I don't think the Bears can upset them with the number being what it is. Obviously the Titans beating the Ravenswood would be an upset, but I think the big number to watch Is what Washington comes up with against camera bag. Yeah, I think there's a stat Brent that the three tight think the three teams that Have hosted a playoff game with a losing record. Or all three. No dream? No against the spread three. No straight up, So they've all they've all won the game, Which is amazing. I like the football team as well. I just I hope they don't get down. If they get down there. They just can't find them. They have nothing. They have nothing. It's not like what we could do this to get back in. And then you can just so I don't You know what I'm thinking too with Hi, Nikki plan. I know he runs a little bit. They might have a new wrinkle to the offense. And because Washington's a team that just tries to pick up four yards like Give me four. Give me like Army of the NFL or Navy. Like just trying to get get the first down by a half a yard. What do we need? Three. Let's get 3.5 will be good. They thought of the brand backs all the time. Right? And Logan Thomas Is quietly becoming one of the better, tight ends and league. I mean, he was a quarterback of attack. Now is a tight and I bet you in two years, this guy's private, and if he had somebody to throw it to him, he might end up being in that. You know that group of three or four will you look at him and go got it has a really good tight end. Yeah. You know what a great point that is. I covered him and several games of Virginia Tech as a quarterback on he was always athletic. What? It wasn't a really good downfield passer, but they had a very good football team back in that day with a good defense. And so it's fun to watch him, you know. Patrick Mahomes. He gets the week off trying to win back to back Super Bowls. I was I was looking. Tell me I was looking at the quarterbacks who have won back to back Super Bowls. There are seven We've won back to back Super Bowls. Obviously you guys do in San Francisco. Joe Montana is one of them. You want to throw out a couple of names for me who you think won back to back. Super bravura seven. Every bride shot did it twice. Tom Brady obviously is in that list. Good way. John Elway did all you guys are right on the money. I'm loving this. Okay. Very, very nice. What about what about greasy? Yes, Bob greasy did at Bingo. Okay. What about? I've got to learn Bart Starr. That's it. It was the first one it one Super Bowl. One of bad, you guys. I am impressed with my fake. It can't be our way. Got one to go on and you hear him all the time. Notorious woman. There you go. There you go. All right. You got him all congratulations to my guys over there. Yeah, You know what this wild card teams. All right should say the playoff teams 14. Okay. Speaking of the over under in Las Vegas on Lee, one of them went under on its season total. There's a tougher question that one push that was the Chicago Bears. Okay, but one team that made the playoffs. Went under the total. Okay, boys, The clock is ticking..

Titans Lamar Jackson Ravens Washington Tom Brady Henry Mr Brent Mussburger Baltimore Bears football Tennessee Chicago Bears Lemar Jackson Saints Vegas Alex Smith Mark Jackson John Elway
"bravura" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"bravura" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Mike production. I must say you never realized key chains of key changes in a song until you have to edit it. Then you really Oh, they didn't keep. Couldn't you picture Biden and his boot dancing. They're kicking one way and the other is getting ready to give Trump the boot. That's for sure. At music doll. The politicians, you know on their plan to find, you know, Hey, had a great message there. I'm sure the music would have given me a $10 find it would have, but it made me think of it of a segment that I got a proposed to mark and that's stories from Joe Biden. Because he always has a story he does. He's a good storyteller reminds me of suggest that what my dad used to say to me, which was pretty much nothing. Shut up. Move. No corn pops. All right, no more means. Let's move it on. If you didn't watch Hannity last night, first of all, Congratulations. It's how he said he needs to pardon his whole trumps. Trump needs support himself and his whole family's. He walked out the door. That's what he said. Well, he was interviewing this fringe lawyer, Sidney Powell, who actually got bounced off Trump's legal team and then listen to this last night during the Hannity report. He let out a little bit of truth. We in this hour? I am not told what to say. I don't get the information on this program that I give out. We have always been independent, follow our own path on this show. Because said, he said he doesn't vet the information he gives that will somebody on his staff must have got that pointed out. He may have misspoke. He came back to clarify how much events said that old vet this program. I vet the program. We vet the fax. We got Obama, right. We got Russia, right? We got Ukraine, right? We vetted Biden when nobody else with wood in the fight and family. Think we've got what we do. We're not told what to do. They get everything wrong every single time. Wow. What? I know you are. But what am I? I'm gonna go with the We don't bet part. Yeah. Right. Dr. Scott Atlas. Remember him controversial pandemic adviser to Trump, who was lambasted for supporting the idea of herd immunity to deal with code covert 19 pandemic. Last night, a former medical adviser to the Bush White House doctor, Jonathan Reiner, offered up a scathing point by Point takedown of Dr Atlases brief tenure. As the trump White House covert advisor. You know, he understood something. That really resonated with the president. He understood that it's easy to convince somebody that you're right when you tell them exactly what they want to hear. And that's what he did with the president. He told the president exactly what he wanted you here. He told them that you know most of the folks in the United States for a low risk. He advocated for herd immunity and promoted really magical, bogus notion that you could achieve maybe only 25% of the population getting infected. Hey, told the president that we never should have had a goal to prevent. College students from becoming infected because they had no risk. He really completely ignored the fact that we live in multigenerational households, so he ignored the fact that the young who are relatively low risk We kill their grand parents. He completely downplayed testing and basically say that if we tested asymptomatic people, we would destroy the workforce. As you said he questioned the efficacy of masks. He told the people of Michigan to rise up against restrictions and mask wearing and just as a cherry on top. He gave an interview to Russian television. Other than that, it was a bravura performance in his three months in the White House. Is it all that stuff work? You just take free rein when Mason's not here, don't you? She just said was Don lemon show from CNN last night. Just a little bit. Yeah, I think that'd be another 10 bucks. Right? All right. Let's go to the Georgia Republican Lieutenant Governor Jeff Duncan on CNN's out front. Last night he was talking about the current barrage of false claims from the President Trump. And his campaign supporters about widespread fraud in the Georgia reelection and how it's distorted reality. I'm very concerned about the amount of misinformation that continues to fly around. I mean folks in my inner circle. They're very educated, very successful individuals sending you a screenshot of Facebook post or a Twitter post that takes 30 seconds to debunk. That's concerning to me. You know, And certainly you know, it troubles me that some folks are willing just for the sole intent of flipping an election of spreading misinformation. And I think we're better than this. My hope is that we move. We move past this here in Georgia and as a country Certainly there are better days ahead of us that within what we're in right now. We might add to that. The Justice Department, according to Attorney General William Barr, has found no fraud whatsoever in the election. So you know what that means. Is these air never bars fired. He's out of there. Let's go to the funny guys tonight show Jimmy Fallon talking about Joe Biden hurting his foot while playing with the dog. Over the weekend, Joe Biden ran into a little trouble while playing with his dog. Listen to this. President elect. He spent Sunday night at the doctor's office after twisting his ankle playing with his dog by his doctor says after a CT scan, he ended up with hairline fractures in his right foot will probably have to be in a boot for a little while. Finals. I ask no big deal. I've been dealing with a fractured hairline for years when the news broke. Kamila Harris.

Joe Biden president Trump White House Hannity Georgia fraud Mike production Obama Jimmy Fallon CNN Don lemon asymptomatic United States Bush White House Kamila Harris Sidney Powell Michigan
Ballerina: Fashion's Modern Muse, an interview with Patricia Mears

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:30 min | 2 years ago

Ballerina: Fashion's Modern Muse, an interview with Patricia Mears

"On your new exhibition. It is truly magical. It's supremely beautiful. Have to say and I learned a ton from its accompanying catalogue which is called Ballerina. Fashions Modern Muse for any of our listeners. Who WanNa pop on over to Amazon and pick up a copy so for any of our listeners. Who like me may not be ballet aficionados? I'm hoping I we can do a little bit of Bali history just a little bit. When do I see the emergence of ballet? And what distinguished? It from other types of dance which preceded it bally's quite an old art form the genesis of what you see today. The basic steps in the positions were already in place as early as the sixteen sixties. The first formal school was started in sixteen sixty one under the auspices of Louis. The fourteenth who himself was a very accomplished valeted Ella. It was clearly an aristocratic endeavor. And you see that carried over today. This would erect posture. This sort of very formal movement of the body so in some ways it is part of that French also regime aspect and we still see it today but ballet's also a very athletic endeavor so it's marrying these two extremes if you will sort of restraint kind of technical Bravura and again. That's why I think they call ballet dancers artists athletes. Yeah because they merged the two and then fast forward. The ballet went from being aristocratic very classical in its themes and male dominated to about the eighteen. Twenty eighteen thirties when women take over ballet's international. It's much more standardized and very importantly the romantic style. The sort of supernatural narrative takes over and it seems that women artists were better suited to express this new ballet form. What can you tell us about the life of a professional ballerina in the early years of the art forum in the Nineteenth Century? What was her place in society very different from today. The Ballerina really sat at the bottom of the socio economic scale. If you will. There were a few exceptions in. Even though there was a flourishing in the eighteen thirties and forties where there were certainly respectable stars By and large these women were very marginalized. They were paid very little and as a result they were often exploited. Many of them had to turn to prostitution To survive and we see these beautiful pictures by got today showing what seems like an idealized environment but in fact often in the back. You'll see men lurking. They were known as the abomination repower men of the Jockey Club and they regularly exploited these young women so many of them had very sad stories even though they were quite accomplished artists and speaking of data. I think there's even a little back story to his very famous sculpture of the fourteen year. Old Dancer Right. That's right that famous. Bronze sculpture is of a young girl She was part of a family where I think her sister was. Also a dancer but sadly she was likely a victim of the circumstances at the time where she hardly made any money to survive. Many of the dancers were hungry. They were physically exerting themselves and this young lady did fall into prostitution as well and probably died a very sad life so yeah it's horrible to think of and so different from the way we view dancers today right and it really is a fact that the majority of ballerinas then and now will never make it to star status. That's right or or you know prima which was a term. That's kind of more favorite in the past right. Today's top dancers are really generally called principal dancers. If I'm correct right why this shift and terminology from Ballerina to Principal Dancer. I think it has a lot to do with the fact that ballet culture came up in Great Britain and especially the United States and we view ourselves as a bit more democratic so the idea of the Ballerina which was a term given to very very few female dancers. You really had to be at the apex at one point in the late nineteenth century in Russia and said there were only six ballerinas in all of Russia was extraordinary So you can see how limited the term was bandied about then but today we view of the hierarchy of the principal soloist in the quarter ballet member but I think it erases the difference between male versus female and one that really I think asserts a sense of achieving it not so much through social connections or through whims but really through technical as well as artistic merit so. This is one of the reasons we see that change in France. They still use the word. A twelve or star to designate the very top rank. Oh Nice Yeah. I'd like to turn our attention to one of the all time greats who we were just talking about Before we started recording Marie Tahiliani And she really rose to international claim in the early nineteenth century. I'm hoping you could tell us a little bit about her. And also her innovations which helped to shape the future trajectory of ballet as an art form. That's right I think Marie Tagliani was important to very significant ways. One was the art form itself. He was not considered a beautiful woman and had certain physical flaws. Someone told me that. She was slightly hunchback and her father who was a brilliant choreographer was able to create dance. Movements that did not distract from that in fact Really enhanced her physical illness She was very hard working and she was a pioneer of the idea of going up on point sort of Now we think of it is absolutely essential in classical ballet for a female dancer but it was very rare when she started and I think the other thing that she did was to raise the respectability of the Ballerina. She was very careful in the way she cost him herself. She was discreet. Show is where pearls she had. A Floral Diadem And the other thing is that she acted very lady like off stage and she made sure her physical depictions whether in costume more in high fashion. We're always done in a very respectable way so she was able to do something. Many other ballerinas could not do which was Garner female audience. Even the young Princess Victoria was a huge fan of hers and so if members of the royal family could embrace. It was considered acceptable. So she was a breakaway star but unusual in that way and and correct me. If I'm wrong queen perhaps named one of her horses Tahiliani. He did tell Yoni was one of her race horses and also there was a stagecoach that ran between cities that was called the Tagliani fabrics after her famous role muscle feed many different types. Candies were named after her and the Russians were especially enamored. There were some bellum who made a soup out of her shoes needed hotel. Yoni mania swept through Europe and the eighteen thirties forties talk about being a mythic. Yes exactly Speaking of iconic elements of ballet. I would be very very surprised if there's a single one of our listeners out there who is not familiar with the garment which is of course. Queen essentially synonymous with ballet and I am of course talking about the two one thing that I was taken a bit backed by. When I was reading the exhibition catalogue was the somewhat body origins of this term. So how did this term to come about an aunt at its most basic? What is a two two while the two two is just the Ballerina skirt? It's costume and when it was invented in the eighteen thirties It was a word that came from. Rather if you will of course background it's a slang or play on the word. Kuku which itself is slang for the petite call. Which is your behind. Basically ballet audiences were different in the way they were positioned back in those days. The people who were members of the aristocracy or had money were always in what they called the box seats or the rings that were on the upper tiers of the Opera House and it was down in the orchestra seats where the more working class people sat and they could sometimes get a glimpse of the Valarie Yes that they were diaphanous garments and so sometimes depending on how she twirled or whatnot it you could get a look up them and they were also bit dangerous they were often starched ahead sizing in them which made them flammable and with the open gas lights. Some of the Ballerina skirts caught on fire and sadly a number of stars did die that

Prostitution Principal Russia Jockey Club Amazon Marie Tagliani Bally Bravura Ella Marie Tahiliani France Europe Louis Opera House United States Tahiliani Great Britain Yoni Princess Victoria Garner
David Mackenzie Narrates a Scene From ‘Hell or High Water’

Filmspotting

02:14 min | 2 years ago

David Mackenzie Narrates a Scene From ‘Hell or High Water’

"Prompts Marcus to find a local guy who can drive him up to an area where he tried to get a shot? He's really out for blood. Now because he's so angry at foster's tanner and he's told it's going to be an impossible shot. It's GONNA be five hundred yards away. He says I don't care let's go do it and as they get up there the character says Joe you're winded and it's not even your gun let me take the shot and he says not on your life he's mine with that jaw jutted out and that grizzled grumble of his that we get from bridges in this fell and right before he takes the shot. We get that deep breath the intense focus. But there's even a sense of pain in that pause where it's almost like. He wishes. None of this was happening. He so angry though and he's so eager to shoot but you get the sense that he could break down. Any second is if the whole weight of all of this senselessness is there on bridges face and when it cuts to foster. This is where that mythic sense comes in again. He's looking looking at everyone down below him. He thinks he's safe up here in the hills and he says Lord of the planes. That's me and that's exactly the moment where he gets shot and I'll let our listeners. Takeover a couple listeners on our facebook page talked about this moment the beats that happened after he fires the kill. Shot Zac Santo. Chief says his reaction action to the end of the shootout at the climax of hell or high water is playing like three emotions at once relief. Joy and sorrow through a haze of mental and physical exhaustion. And it's a fantastic moment. Tom Curran shape. Powell goes even further with those combinations of emotions. He says when he kills Ben Foster's character after his partner is killed. His reaction is incredible. Incredible mix of victory sadness. Justice relief exhaustion frustration. Regret all at once. It's incredible. It really is incredible. It's all those things and there's even a little a bit of humor the guy who's next to him who said he probably couldn't do it. He turns to him and gives him a look. Like you doubted me. And then he slaps him a couple of times playfully letting out a chuckle. And it's that chuckle then just immediately kinda shifts into this really plaintive cry and just within a few beats as I said he hits every one of those notes that our listeners describe it's really a Bravura Jeff bridges

Tanner Jeff Bridges Powell Marcus Facebook Tom Curran Zac Santo Chief Ben Foster JOE Partner
"bravura" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

07:23 min | 3 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"My gosh. I've been we've been played any of the audio, but I've seen Livia wild and a Cup of her. The gals that are in this movie book smart in Libya, while the actress who's with Jason today. This is her directing debut. It's called book smart. Here's what Katie Walsh rates about it. She didn't have to go this hard, but she did for her direct to'real debut book smart. The actress turned director comes out swinging with not only one of the best movies of the year. Here's where it's the clincher for me, but one of the best high school movies of all time, which I flip in love. You. Of course board stars. Yeah. Girl, girl times at ridgemont high on the list goes on and on. Yeah. Fierce bueller. I mean I really do sixteen candles birthday Cobb all the know John Hughes, ninety seven percent on rock and. Giving it four out of four stars. The film has been heavily Hypo with a stack supporting cast as script crackling with densely packed jokes in revert bravura awards verty comedic performance from star. Beanie Feldstein lives up to the hype. Olympia wild screen size joyful, colorful and rhythmic. It's a crack team of female writers, the team that gave us TV's, good girls did the script. And then the gal who wrote the spy who dumped me, and Katie Silverman, isn't it romantic? So it was for female scriptwriters doing that. And it's to less than popular teenage girls who decide they want enjoy one night of high school hedonism before they graduate already. Sold sold our. Yes. This movie has been getting lots of positive buzz being Feldstein, by the way is Joni hill. Sit little sister. Oh, it is heard him talk about her, and how good she is a skateboarder movie was and she hurt. Yeah. I think she was in his movie. And then the other girl is, is from what we do in the shadows, which I've been meaning to why that show is so great is that it's on FX kind of zombie or vampire vampires a dark comedy. Okay. So it's about vampires who live in Staten Island. Got her day. I guess I've had too many other things to watch TV to watch. Yeah. There is so anyway, the this reviewers said book, smart is deeply indebted to clueless. In other high school classic from a female tour. Amy Hecker lean Molly one of the characters has shades of hair Horwitz and book smart. Absolutely nails. Clueless. Did so well, with the deep bench of quirky richly written side characters that round out the high school, ecosystem. Oh, well that's going to be great excited for this movie. And I forgot that it was coming out this weekend. It's coming out this weekend. Billy Lord, whose Carrie Fisher's daughter, and she's been in all things Ryan Murphy, with the American horse, or she's in this movie. She's one of the, she's a wacky rich girl, and we're going to hear from her later, she was in the clubhouse last night. And it's I guess the the to lead so that just totally make this movie. And it's, it's, it's a movie. That's a love letter to, to friendship too young. Woman being each other's allies, not enemies. So this is the movie to see this weekend. It really is looks like maybe we shouldn't bother going to see Aladdin. The. Big move big movie out, this one just got a rave review from a listener. Well, this Star Tribune, the Jeff Strickler who reviewed it. Talk about a name from the past. He gave it three out of four stars. But he said the movie really kicks into high gear when Will Smith shows up as a lag, which is forty minutes, forty minutes in kind of, makes the movie so you just have to wait. But I'm book smart has my name all over it for. Yeah. I don't have any little kids that I need to go see Aladdin with. Although would it be little bit older kid, maybe too, because it's not all it's not a pure cartoon it's a cartoon at all. This is a live action. I would say young kids over kids, if you got them, you need something to do when it's raining on Monday. Yeah. I can't. I can't wait to see books part. So there that's, that's our our movie pick for the weekend. If you are looking for a great movie. Yes, yeah. And then there's a bunch of stuff opening on Netflix this weekend. Show. What if that's sort of north thing Neal? Justin said it goes onto long didn't need to be a ten episode thing that was his only thing about it. It's kind of a twilight zone ish show every, every hour, or every episode is different. Yes. That would be. Yeah. The. So that's what he liked. But you know he's still gave it a. You know. That's all right. Yeah, I'm excited for. She's gotta have it season two on net flicks based off of the Spike Lee movie. It's been a year and a half since the first season without on. Netflix was a TV. Yeah. So it was a movie in the eighties loved. It made it into a TV show about a year and a half ago. Fantastic. Now finally season two is is back out. But I don't remember a lot of the first season except that I really liked it. So it's one of those things where it's like been a year and a half since the first season was out. But sometimes they'll do a good recap Rican watch that last season. Boy, I saw Patrick racy in the hallway he did not like the game of thrones. You know, he sought me out. People are mad about that. And I'll always just enjoyed it for the spectrum never really knew all the things that were going on. But it George r r Martin didn't write that last. The series those last eight or seven episodes, went past the book. Right. Right. So it was the two creators, benef-, whatever whatever's name is were you satisfied with it because I didn't check in with you Lori about how you felt about the series. The only thing that didn't there were couple. I mean, the one thing I couldn't believe that this one death of be careful how I say it happen. And it happened like in the first ten minutes. I mean I could there could have been so much more tension, so much more storytelling. You keep your main characters around. I, I don't know. That was the one thing that was like ours, like I thought it was too long. I thought it was too long. I usually don't complain about length, though, thought went on and on. No, you know because of how it ended. And because, you know, now, now all the naysayers have finally got through to me. It's breaking bad. Oh, gosh. Oh, how could you compare it to? Expecting it to be that way because we did have the two great the white walkers that episode with aria you know, that was a killer episode. And then even the one with the dragon fire that was just for the special effects. But yeah, what the heck anyway, listen? We come back our story. We can't get enough of second chance friendship retired..

Beanie Feldstein Netflix Aladdin ridgemont high Katie Walsh Livia wild Libya director Star Tribune Katie Silverman Jason Spike Lee Staten Island Will Smith Joni hill Cobb John Hughes Patrick racy Amy Hecker Jeff Strickler
"bravura" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"It was a new grammar from me a required, a new set of skills, and I was terrified. And it was like I spent more time on set trying to figure out how to do something than I ever had before. It was really it was hard it. And so the funny thing is talk about the look down with the actors the actors were fine was perfect. It was just you know, I felt it deserved of a real bravura. Kind of visual style. And it was just I hadn't really made anything quite like that before. And it took me about. It took me about a week before the math of it finally became apparent to me. And I realize like, oh, okay. The geometry of how all these shots should be designed and built and put together is this, you know. So it was it was. It was just the biggest thing that ever been a part of, you know, back eighty nine million dollars, which to me was like it's a lot of money. Reality was sex is. But it's. The oceans films for me are kind of movie I really enjoyed doing even though they're tricky because I get to play in a way that I don't really get to play on their concert films. Yeah, they can handle a lot of trickery, and sort of, you know, those are close to comic book movies as I can get like, that's it. And I've you'd them sort of as comic films away. Hey, I wanna take a break to talk about our Super Bowl coverage here at the ringer. I mean, we have some awesome football writers. A lot of them are in Atlanta. A lot of them are hanging out. Although I don't know who hangs out. Does anyone hang Kevin Clark? Nut Kevin car. I mean, he's got an entourage. Now. He's just he's gone off the rails. But they're all they're they're doing the reading pieces. They're doing podcast. You can listen to the wonderful ringer NFL show..

Kevin Clark NFL Atlanta football eighty nine million dollars
"bravura" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

10:00 min | 3 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Start sliding around the day. I'm joined by Eliana Johnson from the great north herself from a weather challenged area known as minutes so called, but she now lives in blizzard bound DC. How are you coming with the snow Eliana Johnson? You know, I appreciated the snow because the streets were empty. So that was that was nice. I'm actually temporarily in New York where there's no snow there. Oh, that's good Eliana Johnson at Twitter. She of courses politicos lead correspondent reader everyday, you ought to as well, Eliana. I began last hour talking to the wonderful, Liz Cheney I am owner of one of the rare Cheney grand slam having interviewed her father her mother and her Sister, Mary as well as lives many times, and she joins me this morning. And here's the opening of that interview to which I would like your reaction. Do you believe President Trump is a Russian mole? If you're not believe that President Trump a Russian asset. No, listen, I think that you know, one of the big things that we the mainstream media has failed to cover. No big surprise is the depths of the abuse that went on the fraud that went on when the Obama FBI under Jim Komi used the dossier, which was a campaign document, the Clinton campaign and put together, and they use that to secure a warrant to wiretap to listen in on an American citizen, and that that story sorta got some play and then disappeared, but I think the abuse that went on there certainly deserves a deeper and ongoing Eliana Johnson what's important about that is whenever one gives voice. And I've done it with Tom cotton. I've done it with Dan balls. I've done it with Susan Glasser to the idea that Russia has a mall in the White House or an asset. It's so patently ludicrous. That everyone laughs, but that is insinuated in a lot of left-wing media. What do you think of my approach of just saying it out loud and getting the sort of involuntary laughter from people? Well, I think. I think the laughter. Is there because I have to say, I don't think that the congresswoman answered your question, the DSP, I could have done things that were inappropriate. And and president could still have a troubling relationship with Russia. Wait chase said no both times. No. He is not a mole. No. He's not an asset. Well, I was gonna say and the president can have a troubling or inappropriate relationship with Russia, for example. I think we now know he's not disclose. He he he lied about. What is business interests were in Russia? They went on far longer than, you know, his efforts to build a Trump Tower in Moscow went on far longer than he said, they did during the campaign while he was running and that and that raises questions about why he was saying nice things about bladder MIR Putin and wanting to lift sanctions that during the two thousand sixteen camping and he could not be a Russian mole just distinguish between all of those things. Yeah. I should have done. What did doesn't mean? Trump's the mall and still Trump could have done things that I think warrant scrutiny, and we're that we don't wanna see in our presidential candidates in marriage scrutiny by by the media what you just did was to diss aggregate conflation, which is what journalists ought to do. They ought not to conflict stories. They ought to diss aggregate them into the silos in which they belong and Russian foreign policy which under this president has in its final act been almost exclusively anti-putin, although Mike Gallagher admitted that withdrawal from Syria could play into Russian interests. But I mean, destroying the Russian mercenaries arming Ukraine with lethal weapons getting NATO to increase the defense budget radically increase our defense spending. The sanctions the objective Russian policy has been very anti Putin. But the president's comments have been very pro-putin, which would suggest an. There is a a benign view of that. There's a sinister view the Senator view is. He doesn't understand it the more. Sinister view is he's under Putin's thumb. That's the one. I think is stupid the less. Sinister is he doesn't understand it. But the benign, indeed, perhaps encouraging view is trying to flip the script on China. The way that Nixon flip the script on Russia, and that he's got Pompeo and Bolton who are hawks doing that. But I think the media has gone over the edge Eliana in that they do not this aggregate, the completing of the various charges. I think that I think sometimes that's that's fair. But I do have to defend some of my colleagues and praised some of their reporting like it, you know, when when you read that the president has a conversation with Putin. And then tells his interpreter up the notes, you know, that that was a fantastic story in it raises questions. I think about what is going on. I actually don't believe that I believe that it's important for pre because I worked for Nixon in Nixon conducted diplomacy with China under secrecy that makes this pale by comparison. Nobody knows Kissinger went to Beijing in nineteen seventy-one. Nobody knew that. Nobody knows what Nixon talked with showing lie about in about its to this day. Nobody knows because that's how you do. You studied under the great professor at Yale, professor hill. Right. Yeah. And I actually I I did he's and I've I've talked to him about these sorts of things. And and you know, he has said that. There is a reason you have translators that you have no takers, and there he he's actually a notetaker. There's a reason you have no takers in the room for these sources. I would pay I would pay cash money for you to interview him about this question. I really what I would love because I believe Stanley Hoffmann who taught me international relations would believe there are times when you want notes and there are times when you want notes. Okay. So if there are times that you do not want notes, that's fine. Don't have a note taker in the room, but why is the president asking for no script up? Because after the fact you realize I don't want a record of that. And here's my analogy. Do you not to this day whether or not there are secret appendices to the JCP away which have never been revealed to America? I don't know that that has been alleged. No one will answer it. And if they exist you'll hear Ben Rhodes and other people say I can't answer that because it's classified. But if it exists it's because it does not advance the cause of the JCP way which is dead anyway secrecy in diplomacy. I mean, we have a different standard for Trump. And I don't defend Trump. I was a critic of the withdrawal from Syria. I critic of many things but secrecy in diplomacy is the sinonov successful diplomacy. I think I think I think now you're waiting good point different things for tough. But fair Eliana tough cut me if you cut me do I not bleed on the radio. Yeah. I I wouldn't say that Trump telling a notetaker to ripped up notes is the same as secrecy and diplomacy. I think every you know reporter with their cell. We could see we have to have secrecy and diplomacy. Oh, you've got a cop professor hill because he would say it's the same thing. He might not think it's a good idea on the show, you should invite him on the show. And and I don't think that I I would not say that the president should be telling, you know, take her to rip up the now great idea. We'll find out because I will do that. Now, let me turn to Bill bar bravura performance yesterday. He's gonna win confirmation. I hope he persuades judge Mike Ludik to be his new deputy. 'cause then we'll have Batman and superman or superman Batman at the department of Justice, the best legal brains in America who aren't on the supreme court of the federal bench running the DOJ. What did you make of that? And by the way, didn't the Democrats look stupid again. You know, I think bar acquitted himself. Well, and I think the Democrats and even those who who pressed him in the hearing the Bill bars the best in, you know, the pool of attorney general candidates that you're going to get and it for the reason that bar stated he's a season hand who had no further political aspirations and this job. And for that reason, he he he will be able to stand up to this president. Here's the new Mattis. All right. He's the canary in the mind point bell bar credits. If he quits now if Madison quit early on we'd have been. Have the canary in the mind now, we've got on Palin Bolton riding the fence is on national security, but Bill Barth he quits. That's like Elliot Richardson quitting. I think that's a great point. And another point that I think a great point that barmaid was that he wants to be able to finish this investigation. He'll try to release it. And he said that's in the president's best interests, which I think is true. Now now in terms of going forward do Democrats in the house today risk overplaying their hands. I asked lives Cheney about her father during Iran contras ranking minority member if the Republican staff the committee's with smart people, they can win these the way that Cheney water Ron contra from his minority view. But if they let Louie Gohmert run this it's going to be a nightmare. I think what the president starting off democratic control with the shutdown. I I do think plays into Democrats hand because they're able to portray him as somebody who. Unreasonable. I and I think it's risky for.

president President Trump Eliana Johnson MIR Putin Russia Liz Cheney Nixon Bill Barth Trump Tower New York Syria Trump Twitter JCP America Tom cotton Louie Gohmert Elliot Richardson Stanley Hoffmann
"bravura" Discussed on Extra Hot Great

Extra Hot Great

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on Extra Hot Great

"American level you. And will not tolerate aluminum. No, it is time for winner. And a loser. The week Tara has winter very timely in the coal area. No household villainous is getting adapted as an American TV series. Dave. And I literally just watched this last week. I think that they were doing metrics. And we were view that may ask you. And they had nine hundred ninety nine thousand nine hundred and ninety nine shirtless. Get the villainous shot boom TV show, you the movie is really good. It's it's Korean came out in twenty seventeen. It's. It's hard to describe without going into it. But it's like those long planned Korean revenge films. But this one's a little more sort of violent and direct. Yeah. It's like it's like one of the park ten work. Vengeance seeks trilogy movies times the raid. If you saw that like super duper violent it opens with a like a completely. I mean, just jaw dropping bravura like multi minute action sequence where a character just like lays fucking waste to dozens and dozens of guys. It's amazing. It's like if the daredevil hall scene was triple link first person, and he had knives. Yeah. You're following people as they fall out windows and stuff like it's it's it's really good. And it's yeah. Peepshow style. First person camera. Anyway, the reason that this is the winner of the week is because getting adapted. American TV series, Robert Kirkman production companies making it there isn't a network attached yet and at first I was like oh as a series, but like there is probably enough befallen, easy, even for a two hour movie that they can blow this out. And I am interested to see what they do with the character is still going to be like Korean but grew up in the US. So it's not going to be one of those things where it all gets whitewashed. So that's good totally enough there because there's a whole organization that is like creating these sleeper cells soldiers and stuff and a whole Harry Potter Esq violence school full are wizards. Yes, there's like assassin Hogwarts. Yeah. So yeah. Almost could make like an anthology show where like each episode is about a different student, and like what got them there and stuff. Anyway, the movie is great. It's on items you can rent it. And I absolutely recommend that you do and Yay for it being a TV show, which I will watch loser. Music journalist, Tori, last seen on surviving R Kelly where I thought he was an excellent if Akayev commentator who made many elastic faces in response to our Kelly's are killing has himself been accused of sexual harassment in response to which Terry crews immediately cancelled a scheduled appearance on Tories show. So Ye Terry boot Toray Tara you had. You had Ansari material. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Crazy timing because I also listen to speaking of great podcasts that have nothing to do with the citations needed podcast, which is about publishing PR in the history of bullshit like a media criticism podcast. And so they had him on to kind of re. But a previous episode. They did kind of pointing out all the many blind spots of MSNBC's aditorial decision making and first of all he was bad and second dropped they drop that up like last Wednesday. Which is I think the day before this story hit so. Yikes. Speaker both things go. Yikes. You know time it is. What time is it? It's not regulation..

Kelly Robert Kirkman US MSNBC Dave Harry Potter Ansari Tori harassment Terry Akayev two hour
"bravura" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

10:09 min | 3 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"This January. The sixteenth twenty eight nineteen and a very very drench southern California where hillsides are going to start sliding around today. I'm joined by Eliana Johnson who is from the great north herself from weather challenged area known as minneso- called. But she now lives in blizzard bound DC. How are you coping with the snow Eliana Johnson? You know, I appreciated the snow because the streets were empty. So that was that was nice. I'm actually temporarily in New York where there's no snow there. That's good Eliana Johnson at Twitter, she of course, politicos lead correspondent reader everyday, you ought to as well, Eliana. I began last hour talking to the wonderful, Liz Cheney I am owner of one of the rare Cheney grand slams having interviewed her father her mother and her Sister, Mary as well as Liz many times and she joining me this morning, and here's the opening of that interview to which I would like your reaction. Do you believe President Trump is a Russian mole? No, you're not believe that he is President Trump a Russian asset. No, listen, I I think that, you know, one of the big things that we the the mainstream media has failed to cover. No big surprise is. You know, the depths of the abuse that went on the fraud that went on when the Obama FBI under Jim Komi used the dossier, which was a campaign document, the Clinton campaign and put together, and they use that to secure a warrant to wiretap to listen on American citizen, and that that story sorta got some play and then disappeared, but I think the abuse that went on there certainly deserves a deeper and ongoing Eliana Johnson what's important about that is whenever one gives voice. And I've done it with Tom cotton. I've done it with Dan balls done it with Susan Glasser to the idea that Russia has a mall in the White House or an asset. It's so patently ludicrous. That everyone laughs, but that is insinuated in a lot of left-wing media. What do you think of my approach just saying it out loud and getting the sort of involuntary laughter from people? Well, I think. I think the laughter. Is there because? Look, I have to say, I don't think that the congresswoman answered your question DSP. I could have done things that were inappropriate. And and president could still have a troubling relationship with Russia. Wait, wait. Chase said no both times. No. He is not a mole. No is not an asset. Well, well, I was gonna say and the president can have a a troubling or inappropriate relationship with Russia, for example. I think we now know he's not disclosed. He he he lied about. What is business interests were in Russia, and they went on far longer than, you know, his efforts to build a Trump Tower in Moscow went on far longer than he said, they did during the campaign while he was running and that and that raises questions about why he was saying nice things about Vladimir Putin and wanting to lift sanctions that during the twenty sixteen camping and he could not be a Russian mole. Would just Singlish between all of those things. Yeah. I should have done. What it did doesn't mean? Trump's a mall and still at Trump could have done things that I think warrant scrutiny and were that we don't want to see in our presidential candidates and marriage scrutiny by by the media what you just did was to diss aggregate conflation, which is what journalists ought to do. They not to conflict stories, they ought to aggregate them into the silos in which they belong and Russian foreign policy which under this president has in its final act been almost exclusively anti-putin, although Mike Gallagher admitted the withdrawal from Syria could play into Russian interests. But I mean, destroying the Russian mercenaries arming Ukraine with lethal weapons getting NATO increase the defense budget radically increase our defense spending. The sanctions the objective Russian policy has been very anti Putin. But the president's comments have been very pro-putin which would suggest and there is. A a benign view of that. And there's a sinister view the sinister view is. He doesn't understand it the more. Sinister view is he's under Putin's stop. And that's the one. I think is stupid the less. Sinister is he doesn't understand it. But the benign, indeed, perhaps encouraging view is trying to flip the script on China. The way the Nixon flip the script on Russia, and that he's got Pompeo and Bolton who are hawks doing that. But I think the media has gone over the edge Eliana in that they do not this aggregate, the conflicting of the various charges. I think that I think sometimes that's that's fair. But I do have to defend some of my colleagues and praised some of their reporting like it, you know, when when you read that the president has a conversation with Putin. And then tells his interpreter to tear up the notes, you know, that that was a fantastic story. And it raises questions I think about what is going on. I actually don't believe that I believe that it's important for pre because I worked for Nixon in Nixon conducted diplomacy with China under secrecy that makes this pale by comparison. Nobody knows that Kissinger went to Beijing nineteen seventy-one. Nobody knew that. Nobody knows what Nixon talked with show in lie about in about its to this day. Nobody knows because that's how you do. You studied under the great professor at Yale, professor hill. Right. Yeah. And I actually I I did he's and I've talked to him about these sorts of things. And and you know, he has said that. There is a reason you have translators you have no takers and there he's actually a storied notetaker. There's a reason you have no takers in the rooms source of thing. I would pay I would pay cash money for you to interview him about this question. I really what I would love because I believe Stanley Hoffmann who taught me international relations would believe there are times when you want notes and there are times when you do not want notes. Okay. So if there are times that you do not want notes, that's fine. Don't have not occur in the room. But why the president asking for no ripped up? Because after the fact you realize I don't want a record of that. And here's my analogy. Do you not to this day whether or not there are secret appendices to the JCP away which have never been revealed to America? I don't know that that has been alleged. No one will answer it. And if they exist you'll hear Ben Rhodes and other people say I can't answer that because it's classified. But if it exists because it does not advance the cause of the JCP which is dead anyway secrecy in diplomacy. I mean, we have a different standard for Trump. And I don't defend Trump. I was a critic of the withdrawal from Syria. I a critic of many things he does. But secrecy in diplomacy is the sinonov quad successful diplomacy. I think I think I think you're conflating good point different things for tough. But fair Eliana top cut me if you cut me do I not bleed on the radio. Yeah. I I wouldn't say that Trump telling a notetaker to ripped up notes is the same as secrecy and diplomacy. I think every every you know, reporter with their cell. What could we have to have secrecy diplomacy? Oh, you've got a cop professor hill because he would say it's the same thing. He might not think it's a good idea on show. You should invite him on the show. And I don't think that I I would not say that the president should be telling, you know, take her to rip up the now great idea. We'll find out because I will do that. Now, let me turn to Bill bar bravura performance yesterday. He's going to win confirmation. I hope he persuades judge Mike Michael to be new deputy because then we are Batman and superman or superman and Batman at the department of Justice, the best legal brains in America who aren't on the supreme court of the federal bench running the DOJ. What did you make of that? And by the way, didn't the Democrats look stupid again. You know, I think bar acquitted himself. Well, I, and I think the Democrats Joe and even those who pressed him in the hearing the Bill bars is the best in, you know, the pool of attorney general candidate that you're going to get and for the reason the bar stated, he's a season hand who had no further political aspirations and this job. And for that reason, he he he will be able to stand up to this president. He is the new Mattis. All right. He's the new canary in the mind point to bar if he quits now if Madison quit early on we'd have been would have the canary in the mine now, we've got on Palin Bolton riding the fence is on national security, but Bill Barth he quits. That's like Elliot Richardson quitting. I think that's a great point. And another point that I think a great point that barmaid was that he wants Muller to be able to finish this investigation. He'll try to release it. And he said that's in the president's best interest, which I think is true. Now now in terms of going forward do Democrats in the house today risk overplaying their hands. I asked Liz Cheney about her father during a Ron contras ranking minority member if the Republican staff the committee's with smart people, they can win these the way that Cheney what Iran contra from his minority view. But if they let Louie Gohmert run this it's going to be a nightmare. Democrats. I think what the president starting off democratic control with the shutdown. I I do think plays into Democrats hand because they're able to portray him somebody who. Unreasonable. I and I think it's risky for Trump in that either..

president Eliana Johnson President Trump Trump Vladimir Putin Russia Liz Cheney Nixon Bill Barth California New York Syria Trump Tower Twitter JCP America Tom cotton Louie Gohmert Elliot Richardson
"bravura" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:47 min | 3 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Dot com. I mean, the the faucet school, but it's more of like a proof of view. Here you go here. Try this thing out you can try it for free, basically. Yeah. Anything with daily if you felt like it. I mean, if it happened to shoot up dramatically than maybe you could buy something with it eventually, but I don't know what the amount is. They're they're giving it can't be much pennies. I would get these faucets are used to you know, typically historically have given out no more than a few cents worth. But check it out over a bitcoin dot com. All right. So we're talking about this story Mark that you say is a revelation, basically, you're very excited by this news from some happy to be clear. Okay. Well, you seem to be excited by the news because decided is true. This red ties not red tide has been an issue that has plagued the Gulf Coast, not just Florida, but apparently all around the Gulf of Mexico, according to Wikipedia and other news articles about it. But you, and I Mark grew up on the Florida, and we grew up with red tied to some extent. Now, I didn't live near the ocean. So I didn't have an experience constantly about red tide. I mean, certainly I've experienced enough to know what it is. It's something that was fairly consistent over time. Like, it was guaranteed. Red tides going to happen once or twice or whatever, you know, every single year for a period of a week or two or something like that that's kind of my general recollection. But again, I haven't lived down there in a dozen years and grew up there. So. There's been the study done. I don't know where we're at in in your story that you're reporting from mostly was the source on that covered. It was. The second here. Sorry. I wasn't prepared for you to ask me that particular question. W M F E dot org. NFC? Okay. I'm not familiar with that, which which broadcast affiliate the Air's syndicate Pettus. And so the statement, and if there's more please share it, but the statements so far is these scientists from some college went there. They did some testing in lake Okeechobee they did river in river, and in the Gulf of Mexico sat you ever comes out on and Fort Myers tested the Gulf itself. And the idea is where where does this algae bloom that causes that is red tide algae bloom where does that come from? What starts that? And they believe that it has to do with fertilizers fertilizer, just technically synthetic fertilizers nitrates. Yep. Coming out of the synthetic fertilizers. And that somehow creates the algae generically. Okay. What are outlets algae? I have no idea. It's plants. Okay. Yeah. I'm not a science. I'm not. I'll on straight up. I'll admit to you. I don't know what I'm talking about. Okay. Good algae plants fertilizer for make plants grow. Right. Okay. So you dump fertilizer place with algae what's going to happen to the algae. It's going to grow. Excellent. And if you get enough algae grow, then it sucks up all the oxygen in the water, right? And the fish die. Okay. And that's why is that where the smell comes from his from the dead fish or does the algae itself. Nassar generators sent I don't know. I think that must be the algae. Because it, you know, the waves coming in on the Gulf area lies it or something. Well, according to live science what causes a red tide. Red ties aren't just the scourge of beachgoers their deadly to marine life like fish birds and even manatees and can have a serious impact on human health as well red tide occurs. When the population of certain kinds of algae known as Dino FLA jealous explodes, creating what's called an algebra bloom. Scientists sometimes referred to red tides as harmful algal blooms or ABC's when millions of these microscopic algae reproduce in cluster in one area of the ocean. They can actually change the color of the water. So this we weren't sure about earlier when you to ask are you? Neither you or I Mark had really ever noticed an actual red coloring to the water. But according to this. It can happen. According to the CDC, a rusty shade of red is often seen though the color may range from pink or orange to Brown or yellow. There are three types of algae associated with red tides in the Gulf of Mexico Carina bravura is especially prevalent along the west coast of Florida and the Texas. Sure farther north Alexandria fund. Jens is found on the Atlantic coast line from New England into Canada. Now, the other story or the Wikipedia article said this was mostly a Florida thing. But it's saying here that that it could happen along the Atlantic. And then Alexandria, captain nila is common throughout the Pacific from Mexico to Alaska and along the coast of Australia and Japan. So turns out it's not necessarily just a Florida thing. Well is everywhere and so are synthetic fertilizers. These are the these are the ones associated with red tide specifically a number of factors can cause an algebra blue bloom to grow. Oh, low salinity a high nutrient content in the water that would be the nitrates, right? And warmer than usual surface. Water temperatures are usually cited as contributing to a red tides formation the algae linked to red tides contain a toxin, it affects the nervous and digestive systems of animals red tides are usually accompanied by a massive die off of fish as well as the birds and other animals that feed on those fish when you see a big fish washed up on the beach. I mean little fish you. See it all the time with red tie, the big fish. It's a pretty sad because you're like somebody could've caught this fish and fed their family. This fish could bread and created more fish, and it's you know, here it is lying on the beach dead because well, we just polluting the water all the time. And look libertarians have a very difficult time with this whole environmental issue because they never want to hold the people responsible. Well, how do you hold people responsible in the case here because we're still not sure? About anything. Right. Like, this is just a scientific study that has been done. Maybe it wasn't even scientific. I don't know. It was science people from university went and they measured some stuff. And you know, the professor in charge says. I think ideally, we would take him to a civilian court present the case and have a jury determined. Whether I do it. Because the well I would trust the judgment of twelve people more than I trust the judgment of one person. They have at this point. That's all we've got for honestly. But we're talking about a future where it's a libertarian. We're talking about the red tide right now, we're talking. No. But she's talking about in the future where it's an actual libertarian future. Wouldn't you want a professional jury or some group of people that actually knows about.

Gulf Mexico Florida Mark Wikipedia Gulf Coast lake Okeechobee Atlantic ABC CDC NFC professor north Alexandria fund New England Canada Jens Fort Myers Alaska Alexandria
"bravura" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:00 min | 3 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Delays in. Last time. Lord of the rings was at the road fury. Of course. Please. Okay. Almost as good. Roma wall wall. Whoa. Oh my God. Okay. I'm going to see it in seventy millimeter. There's no there's no question that there's no way I'm going to miss it. Because it's got to be seen that way. I've seen it on TV. Because it's available on Netflix. Which is just I don't. The way to see this movie. I mean the best way to describe it. It's it's a autobiographical semi-autobiographical thing. Recounting Alfonso Karan's childhood in Mexico in the seventies. As told through the eyes of of a of a servant who who works with this family, and it's basically her story, and and what happens to her. It is found so Coronas is is the guy's a master. There's there's just no there's no question about it. He's a master. And this is clearly as most personal movie shot in beautiful black and white by him. He shot it he edited. He I mean, he did all him everything and the central performance. By. Oh my God. Aparicio? Yeah. Who is just amazing in this movie? And you put through the paces in this movie because it is it is it's an emotional roller coaster from the beginning. It is gorgeous. It's funny. It's terrifying at times. And a really quirky the handling of the father character is I think one of my favorite, my favorite thing is one of my favorite things in the movie. There are mesmerizing shots just cement. The opening credits. I'm like wa. Yeah. But anyway, it's you guys Cowan go ahead. What do you? Yeah. I mean, this is you talk about him being a master. I go back and look at all my top ten lists. And there's been directors who have been number one more than once, Spike Lee, Peter, we're among them. But this is the fourth time, we'll found krona's been number one on my top ten lists think that might be the same case with me. Well, for me, it was little Princess children of men gravity and now Roma children and gravity. Both your number one. Gravity. And then the Princess is a great film to. Yeah. That's that's the needs. A Blu Ray. Release big time. Yeah. The, but this movie is just I mean. Yeah, you're watching the master at work. And this is what we think about when we think of when we talk about movies as being cinema. Yeah. And this is a genuine work of great cinema. That is the kind of thing, you you study in film school, but not in a pretentious way. But in a in a way that it's like it's a gift, and yeah, just everything about this movie. And and like everything in it is something from is a piece of Karan's passed as a filmmaker as well, there's references to gravity if you know where to look there's children of men references. There's a Harry Potter reference in kind of a Harry Potter reference, but let's not direct. But it's it's there it's part of his his journey as a filmmaker and his journey as a human being growing up in this family. And what I love is that he could have easily told this film from the point of view of one of the kids as being him. But he tells it from the point of view of the housekeeper. Yeah. Which is a beautiful way to tell a story that is very personal to you not making it about you necessarily. Yeah. But still is about him. And it's just one of the great personal state. At any filmmakers ever made. I agree. All right, Eric. Yeah. I mean like a concert. I mean when I got Salvatore the last movie I saw Toronto on. I was totally go see Roma. See I ended opportunity. I saw it on the big screen, and it felt like being taken back to school in a good way. The kind of school that I enjoyed film school and watching it again on the small screen, and what a very personal story this is. And you know, we we kinda taps the Marlins. Amac mecca stuff you'll to whether or not that was his intention necessarily is up to debate. But here very clear is very interesting watching his relationship autobiographically with children because you consider what has happened in movies that he's made children a man the backstory and gravity. Yeah. Stuff like a little Princess, and Harry Potter and whatnot. And then we'll ultimately happens. Yeah. In this movie. There's a real. Empathy towards all of that. And on top of that is just bravura film-making. I mean their economy times in the movies that he just puts a camera somewhere. And then just goes back and forth, and you know, up to a crucial point lead in the film. But you'll be still has to direct all the people, and it's easy to follow in that frame and everything and the cinematography is just is masterful storytelling is great. I want to punch that boyfriend in. Reveals a bedroom with that sword that he's got really all my God. I wanted to punch someone in so bad. Yeah. And I couldn't get couldn't get get it out of me. You know, it it it. It's a masterful piece of it is there's just nothing. I mean, nothing even came close this year. It's by far the best movie of the year. And I can't see it not winning the Oscar both foreign film and best picture. I wouldn't be surprised if if it won both one could hope it's a remarkable piece of work. This is cinema. This is the reason why I watch movies. This is absolutely the reason why all three of us chose Roma as the best movie of two thousand eighteen cool because we're all smart. That's right. All right, guys. Hang on because we got to do the opposite now and do the worst. And then we got our subcategories to right now. Let's take a break..

Harry Potter Alfonso Karan Netflix Marlins Spike Lee wa krona Oscar Blu Ray Cowan Mexico Salvatore Eric Toronto Peter
"bravura" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:42 min | 3 years ago

"bravura" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rain heavy at times tomorrow, mainly starting after ten AM temperatures will be in the fifties. This is all things considered from NPR news. Michelle Martin we've been checking in every so often with boy and slot. He's the CEO of the ocean cleanup. That's an environmental organization he founded to develop technology to clean up plastic in the ocean. Now, we spoke with Mr. slot back in September just after his team launched a floating device designed to clean up that great Pacific garbage patch. You'll remember that's a small island of trash between California and Hawaii. This is what he told us then now, the real test starts, and we're now know the next day's few weeks will really decide whether we can prove the technology because that's really what's required to to scale up and radio shows of plastic points slot is with us now via Skype. Welcome back. Thanks so much for talking to us. Once again, could you just remind us of what the goal is here. So halfway between Hawaiian California this area twice. The size of Texas contains one point eight trillion pieces of plastic and we help to clean it up removing about half of this edge every five years, we just launched this for system really to prove the technology. And if that works, well, we hope to skim kitchen just describe the device itself for people who haven't had the opportunity to see it yet. It's like what is it? It's like a boom like a big rope. Or what is it for the device is a two thousand feet long floating barrier. That's in a u shape and underneath there is a ten feet. Deep screen. That's designed to capture the plastic. That's not exactly at the surface. The plastic is drawn towards the center like funnel. And that way. We I concentrate the plastic before we take it out. So we've been hearing there have been some troubles. What's been going on the past couple of weeks? Preliminary results have been that on one hand. We we have been able to see that the system is indeed propelled by the wind that it can catch and concentrate, plastic, but so far we've seen two main issues that we hope to resolve in the coming months, the plastic occasionally drink out of the system just last week. We noticed that a sixty feet long section of the cleanup system has separated from the rest of the system. So therefore, we decided to to bring Mechta system it's on its way to Hawaii now for repairs and upgrades. Do you have any sense of what is working as you hoped? And do you have any sense of what the problem is? But I think we are relatively close to get it into working. We have been able to catch and concentrate plastic with the system, it's just that. It's it's sometimes the plastic is also escaping again. So like, the what we have to do is we have to speed up the system. So that had come from. Moves faster than the plastic. And with regards to this material failure likely we have to locally reinforce the system a bit. But I'm confident that the team will be able to designed appropriate solutions for this and the system back in the batch in in a few months from now. All right. We'll check back in with you. Then that's boy in slot, founder and CEO of the ocean cleanup. Thank you so much for talking to us once again, our pleasure. Thank you. Now to Brooklyn New York where vivid details of the infamous Sinoloa, drug cartels, day-to-day operations have been coming to light in the courtroom. You might remember that Joaquin El Chapo Guzman has been on trial since November fourteenth. He's facing seventeen charges including drug trafficking, money laundering, conspiracy to murder rivals and firearms violations to name just a few witnesses have been providing a look into one of the world's largest, drug trafficking organizations. The trial took a break for the Christmas and New Year's holidays. Started up again this week and jumped right back in with insider testimony from a so-called cartel prince Allen foyer has been covering the trial for the New York Times where he reports on courts and criminal Justice, and he's with us now, Ellen flare. Thanks so much for talking to us. My pleasure. So just to backtrack a little bit for people who have not been following this story how much of the operations of this kind of infamous drug cartel are coming to light in this trial. Everything is coming out Michel this is really the first time that we've seen what the. American government knows about the full operations of Sinoloa drug cartel. And this is all coming out, not just through a vast amounts of documents and photographs and recorded phone calls and drug ledgers. But by an incredible cast of witnesses from within the cartel people who worked for many years with troppled Guzman and this week the trial resumed with what had to have been just a very explosive witness. It was Vincent as somebody in the Ebola. You called him a cartel prince in your reports because he's the son it'll chapels former partner in the cartel. What are some of the things that we learned from his testimony? I mean, we learned everything from the fact that his father miles umbanda Trump was partner regularly had a monthly bribery budget of one million dollars. I'll say it again, that's monthly to pay off corrupt officials in Mexico. We learned how the cartel us submarines to. Smuggle drugs up from Colombia to Mexico. We learned that they then cross those drugs into the United States in everything from trains with secret compartments to tractor trailers where the drugs were stuffed in between pallets of frozen meat. He took the jury to virtually every aspect not only of the cartels operations, but even down to the level of its kind of petty politics and personal vendettas. You know, one of the things I was struck by your report was how you describe somebody as smirking at Cushman and having an era of quote bravura on the witness stand. And the reason I was struck by that I think many people will remember that Guzman has previously escaped prison a number of times, the fact that this cartel is known for being I don't know how else to put it murderous. What do you make of his eagerness to testify has confidence and testifying? I was just wondering what you make of it. It was a remarkable moment he got onto the witness stand and within seconds of sitting down. He looked over. Chop any kind of raised his head. Put a big smile on his face and nodded kind of in this like cocky, gesture that said partly Hello old friend to you know, like Gotcha now hard to know. But to your point. Yes, I mean, chapel did escape twice from prison in Mexico famously once in a laundry cart wants to a tunnel that his associate Doug literally into the shower of his cell in prison. And so there's been a lot of concern on the part of the authorities here in New York to prevent that from happening again you've been covering courts and criminal Justice for twenty years. Just as briefly as you can how how would you compare this to other trials that you've covered? Well, I mean, this one is more than most really truly immersive experience part of that is just the logistics involved because of the intense security, and because of the number of reporters who are covering the trial. We all have to get there by. Six thirty in the morning to be assured of a seat inside of the courtroom. It's a very challenging atmosphere in which to work. I mean, there's a team of drug sniffing dogs. There are police snipers deployed around the courthouse. And there's even I've never seen this one before there's a federal marshal with some sort of radiation sensor who goes through the floor, not just the courtroom itself, but the entire floor making sure there's no radiological devices. That's remarkable. So before we let you go. What are you expecting their next days? And we how much longer do you expect this to go on? Well, it's definitely gonna go for I would guess at least another month, and what we can expect is more sort of ghosts from out shoppers passed to appear in the courtroom to testify against him. That's Ellen foyer. He covers courts and criminal Justice for the New York Times, he's been covering the trial of Joaquin El Chapo Guzman. Allen, thanks so much for talking to us pleasure to be here. Finally today, a dister. Curbing story about an r&b superstar for years. Robert Kelly, better known as R Kelly was at the top of the Rb charts. Many of his songs were raunchy and his performances were infused with sexual overtones. But some of his other hits were so popular so mainstream. They became a staple of graduations and church services..

Joaquin El Chapo Guzman Mexico New York Times California us Hawaii founder and CEO Michelle Martin NPR Robert Kelly CEO partner Texas Ellen foyer prince Allen foyer Mechta American government Allen