3 Burst results for "Brandon Schwartz"

"brandon schwartz" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

06:04 min | 3 years ago

"brandon schwartz" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"To the rehearsal dinner, or any sort of party. You might have before him. In the meantime, what is going on in the headlines this week? Well, first up, we have a story with the local tie. This is from the drinks business. Queer is Jonathan van Ness, is fronting a beer released for Seattle pride. It's through lesion brewing. The ale uses Mandarin, a hops to produce a fruit forward character with four point four percent, alcohol by volume. It'll be available in June two thousand nineteen and it's an ale and it's called glitter is pride. Jonathan van Ness, is on the popular new net flicks. Remake of the old queer eye for the straight guy. He's the show's hairdresser and he's listed as beauty mentor extraordinaire in the article, and it's really cool. He's going to be officiating wedding allegiance, Capitol Hill. Location on June fourth to enter couples over twenty-five have to post video to Instagram, describing their love story and why they wanna be married by him. Oh, that's awesome. Local local Tien. I know it's really popular on Netflix. I haven't been able to watch it yet. Unfortunately, most of our lives revolve around sports on the other side of the of the equation here. So I watch a lot of sports, but there are a couple of people in our office, who absolutely love it. And this is just a cool, local Tien. I always have a great time at pride festival. Yeah. I watched the old version. I haven't got to check out the new one but Taylor Jacobs. See you work with on your Saturday show. Here he is obsessed and brings a tear to your eye every now and I'm so I'll probably have to bench that at some point soon. Absolutely. What else is going on? I read this is a good news. I like hearing this from maxim, magazine wine kills germs that, cause sore throats and dental plaque says awesome study. Oh, wow. So it's helping with great oral hygiene. Okay. All right. In the study published in the journal of agricultural, and food chemistry. Researchers discovered that the acidity and alcohol concentration in wine isn't what's responsible for the antibacterial properties, as previously believed. Instead, it's due to a number of organic compounds found in both red and white wines. Okay. Yeah. I would think that makes sense. And granted, it's always important to, to read, these in their full context, and take every survey with a grain of salt, because we do often hear about health benefits or medicinal benefits for a lot of spirits, and or wine or beer, so probably people should read in judge for themselves. Yeah, I have a feeling you're Dennis might argue this. I think there are other aspects of it that they don't think are good for your I've definitely heard that red wine isn't the greatest your team. You know, I like looking at the positive. Full kind of crafts last full of wine. Exactly. Last year. We have a pretty cool invention. This is from Forbes Brandon Schwartz and Lawrence Cisneros believe they've solved a problem. That's vexed the spirits industry for years, trying to create a cocktail with fresh ingredients in ready to drink form. We've kind of talked about this before, with maybe using some dehydrated fruits or different things to try to overcome the problem of maybe trying to make a fancier cocktail on the go and you, you don't have refrigeration as an option. So this is pretty cool. It's a patent pending bottle that keeps cold, pressurized solids in a compartment separate from the pre mixed liquid whose unique seals involves could withstand the pressure of cold Pressor pressurization can't talk. So it's, it's pretty actually complicated to explain. But it sounds like there's going to be a bottom compartment in this bottle. I think you ask the spirits, and then you can release, what's in the bottom of the compartments. So it sounds like you could do something, even as complicated as like an old fashioned that would have maybe usually some. Some orange or muddled fruit in the bottom of it. Or maybe you Moheda or something like that. And that's pretty interesting. Yeah, we'll pretend to understand all the scientific genius of this. But we have talked so many times on this show over the last year and a half about how ready to drink RTD I think, as you know, the ready to go convenience aspect, people are looking more and more into up is going up. I feel like every time I go to the store, I'm inundated with even more options for on the go cocktails wine and things like that. So, yeah, I would think this would be the next step in that evolution. Yeah. It says it can keep fruit, stabilized for up to three months. So how, yeah we've loved the canned wines, and things like that. But this is taking it a step further in making it actually legit cocktails with multiple ingredients that you would normally only be able to mix at a bar and again, it all comes down to. I think you can have cool branding, and you can have cool packaging, but it does come down to the taste. So I'll be very interested to see how the quality of this turns out, and we might have to do some, you know, some field research work official research, and try one of these definitely. And also, I'd be interested to the price point because it sounds like it might be true complicated technology. I would think it would be a little bit more expensive. I wonder if it's a type where it's like, growlers, where you'd return this bottle too, because it sounds almost like a complex, or you could at least who knows is really. Maybe we can try to get an interview. Yes, good idea. Speaking of, we should mention we spoke to David Carson from Seattle world, whisky day a couple of weeks ago. And that is actually going on today. Yes. So if you are looking for something to fill your Saturday with is pretty cool event. And we're all whiskey lovers here at the show. So but if you are not, they also have plenty of other beverages. They've gotta have food music sounds like a really cool event. And if you have nothing to do today, or you want to check that out it is at in downtown Redmond, so make sure you check that out coming up on cast club radio. Since we are down one member of this show today, we wanted to take some time to revisit one of our favorite interviews over the past year. Something we think deserves a little more attention because he was just so great to talk to him Elliott Clark of apartment bartender how he turned a passion project into a full time job.

Jonathan van Ness Seattle dental plaque Instagram Taylor Jacobs Netflix Redmond journal of agricultural Elliott Clark David Carson Dennis Brandon Schwartz official Pressor Lawrence Cisneros four percent three months
"brandon schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:17 min | 3 years ago

"brandon schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Past eight it's morning edition on weedy. I'm Brian watt. It's been a big year for snow in the Sierra Nevada range records have fallen along with the snow. We've seen reports of fifty feet of snow or more on mammoth mountain in the central Sierra. And in the resort town of mammoth lakes. Some people have literally had to tunnel out of their homes. This is the time of year when the snowpack is typically at its peak and tomorrow when surveyors do their monthly manual survey. They're likely to find a snow pack at about one hundred sixty percent of the average we've called up Ben hatchet in atmospheric scientist at the western regional climate center in Reno and Ben in a word or two. How would you describe the snowfall this year, absolutely fantastic and not just for skiers? But also for anyone who uses water in California. All right. So the water supply loves it. But what is it about the storms that have come in this year that has created so much snow and so much water in the snow? Well, we've had very consistent snowfall and the storms that have been bringing the snowfall have been somewhat colder than average. And so we've seen snow levels bringing snow down to one or two thousand feet. Quite frequently. We've even seen snow in the city itself, San Francisco, and the foothills there close to sea level, which is pretty novel and rare, and so we cumulated a lot of snow at the higher elevations at the middle and even down in the foothills. So we have a lot of water stored in our snowpack right now. All right. So do we ever reach a point where we have too much snow is definitely possible because we have a very nice state of our reservoir water levels right now or at about eighty percent full and running about one hundred and eleven percent of the historic average for the date, and we have a lot of snow stored in our natural snowpack reservoir. So if we have a warmer than average spring or has some very warm spring storms that accelerate the melting we might see some that water coming down a little bit early, and that could create some challenges for the water management community because our reservoirs are so full right now and those in some of these communities that have been receiving heavy snowfall like Manasota springs and Myers. People have been tirelessly shoveling out of their homes or businesses. We've seen overuse injuries from too much shoveling. I think the chiropractors are going to be very busy this spring and summer. Oh my goodness. Right. Well, I'm sorry to hear that. Everyone shovel safely shovel safely. Yes. Stretch then hatchet of the western regional climate center in Reno. Thank you very much. Thank you very much for having me on a much more serious note. All the snow we've received this year has also meant a heavy year across the west for avalanches. Especially in the rocky mountains avalanches there have triggered evacuation orders in almost twenty five people have died. That's a lot of people. But it's pretty typical for a heavy snow year. Unfortunately, science editor Danielle Benton has been looking into the state of avalanche science. It's an old problem. But the full solution still eludes us she started with a call to the Sierra avalanche center. Good morning. Sierra with the avalanche forecasts for when if you're heading into the Lake Tahoe back country during winter and early spring. The Sierra avalanche center is a good place to start bottom line. Considerable avalanche tangible exist all of Asians to win. Slab storm slot and loose wet islands problems. Human triggered avalanches likely with natural triggered avalanches possible recording. Forecasts offer about five minutes of info on conditions and where it's riskiest. Everything's available online too. It's the product of lead forecaster Brandon Schwartz and his colleagues who start studying the snow wants the first ball of the season hits the ground. And we tracked that snowfall. We look at how those snow crystals change on the ground, and as they change throughout winter each snowfall creates new layers in the snow pack a relatively weak layer of snow under a stronger one on a slope of thirty degrees are more. That's the recipe for an avalanche. Though, we're looking to see what it's gonna take to make those weak layers fail and trying to figure out what is that gonna be perhaps surprisingly Schwartz and his colleagues do not use computer models. They're forecasting. No one has yet developed a computer model that can accurately predict the complexities of an avalanche one area of science that he says has advanced recently is the physics of how snow fractures and releases or start sliding, which is important for modelling, Kara Burke Lind is one of the researchers studying this fracturing he directs the national avalanche center in bozeman Montana. He says even snow that looks the same can vary widely across a slope. There's areas that are going to be center areas that are going to be sicker. The weekly is going to be a little bit weaker in one spot and a little bit stronger another spot that means in some places, you might trigger an avalanche just by skiing across it. But other.

Sierra avalanche center Ben hatchet Brandon Schwartz mammoth mountain Brian watt mammoth lakes Nevada Reno Kara Burke Lind California Lake Tahoe Manasota springs bozeman San Francisco Montana atmospheric scientist Danielle Benton forecaster Myers
"brandon schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:27 min | 3 years ago

"brandon schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Twenty two. It's morning edition on weedy. I'm Brian watt. It's been a big year for snow in the Sierra Nevada range records have fallen along with the snow. We've seen reports of fifty feet of snow or more on mammoth mountain in the central Sierra and in the resort town of mammoth lakes. Some people have literally had to tunnel out of their homes. This is the time of year when the snowpack is typically at its peak and tomorrow when surveyors do their monthly manual survey. They're likely to find the snow pack at about one hundred sixty percent of the average we've called up Ben had an atmospheric scientist at the western regional climate center in Reno and Ben in a word or two. How would you describe the snowfall this year, absolutely fantastic and not just for skiers? But also for anyone who uses water in California. All right. So the water supply loves it. But what is it about the storms that have come in this year that has created so much snow and so much water in the snow? Well, we've had very consistent Southall and the storms that have been bringing the snowfall have been somewhat colder than average. And so we've seen snow levels bringing snow down to one or two thousand feet quite frequently. We've even seen snow in the city itself, San Francisco, and the foothills there close to sea level, which is pretty novel and rare, and so we accumulated a lot of snow at the higher elevations at the middle of Asians and even down in the foothills, and we have a lot of water stored in our snowpack right now. All right. So do we ever reach a point where we have too much snow is definitely possible because we have a very nice state of our reservoir water levels right now or at about eighty percent full and running about one hundred and eleven percent of the historic average for the date, and we have a lot of snow stored in our natural snowpack reservoir. So if we have a warmer than average spring or has some very warm spring storms that accelerate the melting we might see some of that water coming down out of the nouns a little bit early, and that could create some challenges for the water management community because our reservoirs are so full right now and those in some of these communities that have been receiving heavy snowfall like Manasota springs and Myers people who've been tirelessly shoveling out of their homes or businesses we've seen overuse injuries from too much traveling. I think the chiropractors are going to be very busy this spring and summer. Oh my goodness. All right. Well, I'm sorry to hear that. Everyone shovel safely shovel safely. Yes. Stretch then hatchet of the western regional climate center in Reno. Thank you very much. Thank you very much for having me on a much more serious note. All the snow we've received this year has also meant a heavy year across the west for avalanches. Especially in the rocky mountains avalanches there have triggered evacuation orders in almost twenty five people have died. That's a lot of people. But it's pretty typical for a heavy snow year. Unfortunately, science editor Daniel Benton has been looking into the state of avalanche science. It's an old problem. But the full solution still eludes us she started with a call to the Sierra avalanche center. Good morning national fan with Alan's forecast for when if you're heading into the Lake Tahoe back country during winter and early spring. This year avalanche center is a good place to start the day. Bottom line, considered changeable exist all of Asians to win. Slab storm slab and loose. Wet avalanche problems. Human triggered avalanches likely with natural triggered avalanches possible. Recording forecast offer about five minutes of info on conditions and where it's riskiest. Everything's available online too. It's the product of lead forecaster Brandon Schwartz and his colleagues who start studying the snow wants the first ball of the season hits the ground, and we tracked snowfall we look at how those snow crystals change on the ground. And as they changed throughout winter each snowfall creates new layers in the snow pack a relatively weak layer of snow under a stronger one on a slope of thirty degrees or more dots. The recipe for an avalanche. Though, we're looking to see what it's gonna take.

Sierra avalanche center mammoth mountain Brian watt mammoth lakes Nevada Reno Southall Manasota springs atmospheric scientist California Ben forecaster Brandon Schwartz San Francisco Lake Tahoe Daniel Benton Myers editor Alan