15 Episode results for "Brandenburg Concerto"

Johann Sebastian Bach 4: The Story of the Brandenburg Concertos

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 4 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 4: The Story of the Brandenburg Concertos

"Hello I'm Naomi. Lewin welcomed the classics for kids. That's the opening to the fifth of six Brandenburg Concertos by Johann Sebastian Bach. Why start with number five well first of all the concerto numbers don't really have anything to do with the order in which. Bach wrote them. The Fifth Brandenburg Concerto features a Harpsichord and the story of the Brandenburg concertos begins with a trip. That Johann Sebastian Bach took to pick out a new HARPSICHORD for the prince whose court orchestra he conducted. There are actually three solo instruments in the Brandenburg Concerto number five Harpsichord violin and flute. The harpsichord is an ancestor of the piano. But as you can hear it doesn't sound the same. That's because Harpsichord strings are plucked by teeny tiny. Quills in a piano. The sound is made by hitting the strings with small felt covered hammers. Here's a spot where the harpsichord plays alone. So you can hear it while he was on his trip looking at Harpsichord he met Chris. Jon Ludvig the Margrave of the province. That's like a state of Brandenburg. Margrave is a fancy title. They used to give to military governors of German provinces. The margrave of Brandenburg had his own orchestra and when he found out. Bach was a composer. He said he wouldn't mind hearing some of his work. Only own okay. There's the Brandenburg Concerto number one. It has a really huge group of Solo instruments. Seven in all Bach was thrilled that the Margrave was interested in his music. He thought there might be a good job prospect for him in Brandenburg so he pulled together a set of concertos mostly stuff he'd already written for the orchestra he conducted and sent them off with a very flowery letter to the Margrave the Brandenburg Concerto Number. Three IS FOR THREE SETS OF STRING. Instruments Violins violas and cellos. It's a good thing. Bach didn't hold his breath waiting for an answer from the margrave because he never got one in fact the margrave probably never even looked at these beautiful concertos. What A DOOFUS. Part of the problem may have been that his orchestra wasn't as big as the one baulk road them for so the Margaret didn't have the musicians to play them but he could have at least sent a thank you note. That's the six Brandenburg Concerto. It's also just for strings given the Margrave of Brandenburg's rudeness. You can bet that. Bach didn't name his concertos Brandenburg years. After he died one of Bach's biographers attached the name to them and obviously it stuck Bach called his pieces concertos for a variety of instruments which is a pretty good description since each one is written a different instrumental combination. The Brandenburg Concerto Number. Four has a small group of soloists two flutes or recorders and a violin. It's the violin that really gets to show off especially towards the end of the peace. The Selo Group in Bach's Brandenburg Concerto number two consists of four very different instruments trumpet Flute Oboe and Violin. See if you can pick them out. I'm ruin I write classics for Kids and produce it at W. G. UC Cincinnati with. Tim Lender and Bruce Ellis. Please join me again for more classics for kids.

Johann Sebastian Bach Brandenburg Concerto Number Brandenburg Brandenburg Concerto Margrave Fifth Brandenburg Concerto Jon Ludvig Lewin Selo Group Bruce Ellis Cincinnati Chris W. G. UC Tim Lender Margaret
Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 4 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

"I'm Naomi Lewin. Welcome to classics for kids. Concerto comes from two Italian words with sort of meanings first concerto means in agreement or together like the word concert. You go to a concert to hear people playing together but the Italian word contract. Tari has to do with struggling. And a concerto also has to do with one or more solo instruments doing friendly battle in concert with a larger group. Italian COMPOSER GIUSEPPE. Torelli gets most of the credit for developing the instrumental concerto. In the late sixteen hundreds an Italian who lived a bit later on Tonio Vivaldi wrote Zillions of Concerto will actually only five hundred or so. But it seems like Zillions Vivaldi's most famous set of concertos named for the four seasons the earliest concertos were written for violins. But you can have a concerto for any instrument. Here's one that you'll have nipple Makoma road for trumpet. One for cello by front-seat high one for Tuba by Refund Williams who in the late twentieth century Scottish composer James Macmillan wrote a concerto called vinnie Emmanuel for percussionist. Evelyn Glenn you can also have a concerto with more than one Solo Instrument Wolfgang Gone Medina's Mozart wrote this one for flute and Harp Dmitri Shostakovich wrote a wonderful concerto for piano and trumpet the end of the peace sense just like music for a silent movie. Let's because when he was young Shostakovich had a job playing piano for silent movies in box day composers also wrote something called the Concerto Grosso which does not mean. A concerto with slimy stuff. Losing out of it grow is Italian for great. Instead of just one or two soloists. A Concerto Grosso has a whole group of soloists. A smaller group pitted against a larger group. George Frederic Handel. Who lived at the same time as Bach wrote quite a few Concerto Grossi? That's the official plural of Concerto Grosso. a lot of Bach's Brandenburg concertos fall into the Concerto Grosso category in the Brandenburg Concerto. Number two the small group consists of Trumpet Flute Oboe Violin and the big group is made up of string instruments. You've heard music from Johann Sebastian faulks Brandenburg Concerto number. Two so by now you might be wondering how many Brandenburg concertos there are and how they got a name like Brandenburg. I'll tell you that next week. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for Kids and produce it with Pimm Lander at wgn Cincinnati. Please join me next. Time for the story of the Brandon. Birds on classics for kids.

Concerto Grosso Brandenburg Concerto Concerto Grosso Naomi Lewin Johann Sebastian faulks Brande Dmitri Shostakovich Zillions Vivaldi Brandenburg Brandenburg Pimm Lander Tonio Vivaldi George Frederic Handel Bach Tari Torelli Evelyn Glenn James Macmillan vinnie Emmanuel Cincinnati Refund Williams
Johann Sebastian Bach 2: The Sons of Johann Sebastian Bach

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 5 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 2: The Sons of Johann Sebastian Bach

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin Johann. Sebastian Bach was the greatest member of a musical dynasty beginning in sixteenth century Germany. Three Hundred Years. Worth of box held jobs as town. Musicians organist and choir directors Johann Sebastian's. Father was a musician. His grandfather was a musician and his great grandfather was a musician. All the male members of the family were trained by their fathers uncles and older brothers to carry on the tradition. That's by no handsome. Asean box Uncle Johann Michio or John. Michael Bah his daughter. Maria Barbara Married Johann Sebastian. Who was her second cousin? I guess that made her Maria. Barbara Bach. Pa IN GERMAN WORD MEANS STREAM BUT JOHANN. Sebastian produced a whole ocean of box. He and Maria Barbara had seven kids when Maria Barbara Died Balk married. A singer named Anna Magdalena and had thirteen more children twenty in all J S. That's short for Johann. Sebastian Bach expected his sons to follow in his footsteps and several of them became well known composers. Box oldest son bill him. Freedom on or W. F. Baugh worked mostly as an organist. He never quite lived up to everybody's great expectations even though he wrote some Nice music the fifth child the third son of J S Baugh was Carl Philipp Emanuel Norse EP. Aw He was very successful. Cpi box spent years working for the flute. Playing King of Prussia. Frederick Great Frederick. The great never went anywhere without his flute. Not even into battle so. Cpa Bach wrote a lot of music both CPI and W. F. were sons of J s Bach's first wife Maria Barbara Anna Magdalena Baw. Second wife was the mother of his youngest son. Johann Christian J C Bach was the most radical member of the clan for starters. He left Germany and went to study and work in Italy in order to get a job at the cathedral in Milan Italy. This Bach did something. Nobody had done before he changed. Religion converting from Lutheran Catholic and J C Bach. Did something else. His father had never done. He wrote operas after Italy. He moved to one of the hottest cities in Europe for Italian opera and became known as the London Bach. That's right people in London. England were crazy about Italian opera even or especially if it was written by Germans. There's a man named Peter Shakily who claims to know about yet another box son P Q. According to Peter Shakily until he discovered P Q. No one wanted to admit that he existed. Peterson says that's because PD Q. Box Stole Music from other composers and came up with things so outrageous that they make people laugh because it makes people laugh. Peter Shakily keeps right on composing. I mean discovering music Cuba that's from PD Q. Bach piece called Kanaya in Brooklyn. That's written for Double Reeds. When a COMPOSER SAYS MUSIC IS FOR DOUBLE REEDS? He means oboe. Zampa Soons instruments that have double reeds sticking out of the top of them. Blowing into the reads is what makes the instruments sound but PD. Cuba wrote for double reeds without Hobos and bassoon. Attached the words pretty funny to watch it to us to be home you know moves run grounding knows PD. Cuba may be big. Newton of someone's imagination but Johann Sebastian. Bach certainly wasn't at the beginning of this show. You heard a bit of his Brandenburg Concerto number. Two next time on classics for kids find out what a concerto is. I May Omi Lewin. I write classics for Kids. And produce with Tim. Lander at WG UC Cincinnati. Please join me again for more classics for kids.

Johann Christian J C Bach Johann Sebastian Naomi Lewin Johann Double Reeds Maria Barbara Uncle Johann Michio Cuba Germany Maria Barbara Died Balk Maria Barbara Anna Magdalena B J S Baugh Italy Anna Magdalena Peter Shakily Frederick Great Frederick Omi Lewin Asean W. F. Baugh Prussia
Johann Sebastian Bach 1: About Johann Sebastian Bach

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 5 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 1: About Johann Sebastian Bach

"Hello I'm Mayo Lewin. Welcome to classics for. Kids is one of your parents doctor or lawyer and maybe as far back as they can remember everyone in their family has gone into the same profession while that's how it was with the Bach family all of them were musicians Johann. That's German for John. Sebastian Bach was born in sixteen eighty. Five in the German town of is enough. His father was the official town musician. There by the time was ten. Both his parents had died so he went to live with his older brother. Who was also a musician? Of course Johann Sebastian. Bach turned out to have very fleet fingers. He played a mean violin and by the time he was eighteen. He had a job as an organist. Bach held three main jobs over the course of his life. You can tell where he was working by. What kind of music? He wrote the first box. Big Jobs was official. Court organist for the Duke of Weimar so a lot of box great organ. Music comes from early on in his career. That Weimar job also had box serving as concert master. The head Honcho violinist of the Duke's orchestra when the Duke of Weimar decided not to make him conductor of the Orchestra. Bach was pretty unhappy. Then a visiting prince offered a job directing his orchestra but when Bach tried to quit his job in Weimar. The dukes said no way he even threw in jail for a month to try and make its point but it didn't work when Bach got out of jail. He headed straight to the town of curtain to work for the prince the prince had a wonderful orchestra so Bach wrote lots of instrumental music. While he was in curtain eventually balk moved onto his last job at the Saint. Thomas Lutheran Church. In the city of Leipzig. His title was cantor. That's what they called the choir and music director and it was a huge job box trained singers organized music for several churches in town and for the University of Leipzig and he composed new music every week for services at the Saint Thomas Church most of Bach's great choral music was written in Leipzig the choir at the Saint Thomas. Church still performs box music every week. One of the coolest things I ever got to do was sit in the church where Bach worked and listen to the choir sing. His music while Bach was alive. No one outside the towns in Germany where he worked had heard of him and people thought of him as just another working musician after he died people pretty much forgot about him until a century later when another composer Felix Mendelssohn dug out some of Bach's music and performed it after that the whole world recognized what a genius had been and Faulk may even be recognized beyond this world in nineteen seventy seven scientists sent the unmanned voyager spacecraft off to explore the galaxy. They put examples of the best that planet Earth had to offer on board and one of those examples was a recording of Johann Sebastian box. Brandenburg Concerto number. Two Johann Sebastian Bach came from a long line of Musicians and he had twenty kids himself so he added even more musicians to the line next week on classics for kids. Some of Johann Sebastian Bach Sons Naomi. Lewin I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim. Lantern at WG UC Cincinnati. Please join me again next. Time for classics for kids.

Sebastian Bach Johann Sebastian Bach Sons Nao Johann Sebastian Bach Bach Weimar Johann Sebastian Mayo Lewin Saint Thomas Church University of Leipzig Leipzig official Thomas Lutheran Church Cincinnati head Honcho Felix Mendelssohn Saint Thomas Germany cantor Tim director
TechStuff Classic: TechStuff Goes on a Voyage

TechStuff

1:01:15 hr | 4 months ago

TechStuff Classic: TechStuff Goes on a Voyage

"Here's the thing. Saving money with Geico is almost better than playing pickup basketball. Because there's always that guy who joins your game. He never passes the rock. He constantly bricks threes, and who completely hack you, and then put his hands up and say no foul, no foul with GEICO. It's easy to switch and save on car insurance, no need to fake an ankle sprain because you're absolutely exhausted so switching, save with Gyco. It's almost better than sports. One night in nineteen, sixty, one on the side of a dark highway. Betty and Barney Hill. Kat Lights in the sky two years later, the underwent hypnosis to try and recall what happened. Some took it as fact. Others thought it was a fantasy, but what really happened that September night in rural New Hampshire join me toby ball for the inaugural season of stranger rivals a CO production of iheartradio in grim, mild from Aaron Monkey. Listen to strange arrivals on the iheartradio. APP ON APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to textile production from iheartradio. Hey there in welcome to tech stuff I'm your host Jonathan? Strickland executive producer with iheartradio and a love, all things, tech and today we're going to listen to a classic episode titled Tech Stuff Goes on a voyage it's about the voyager program and this episode originally published on April Twenty Fourth, two, thousand thirteen. The Voyager program is one of those really fascinating space programs that I absolutely loved learning about so I hope you guys enjoy this classic episode. The first thing we wanted to talk about was. I've kind of what was the purpose. Of the voyager missions, which by the way are still going? On right now, but we wanted to talk about the time line of the missions, and then we'll get into more details about the spacecraft itself, and then follow that up with a discussion about the science that has been discovered by these amazing spacecraft so going back to May nineteen seventy-two. That's when NASA begins to fund emission, though involve designing building and launching spacecraft. Spacecraft, that are meant to explore the outer planets of our solar system, and even before this back in nineteen, sixty five and engineer named Gary Flanders noticed that sometime in the nineteen seventies, the outer planets would be aligned planetary alignment in such a way as to make this very possible, and this was you know the space program was going and booming and it was. Kind of an incredible. Alignment of the stars that allowed us to right when we had money to do this stuff. Right so so I mean that planetary alignment is really what makes the voyager missions possible because you know if the if the plants were in such an alignment so that let's say the. Missile. They're still aligned properly. They're just not. Viable for us to explore share. Let's say let's say like Jupiter's on one side of the sun, and Saturn's on the other side of the sun than it would be really tricky to design a spacecraft. Could explore both. And this particular alignment isn't going to occur again for another one hundred seventy six years, so you had to jump on the opportunity, and so in one thousand, nine, hundred eighty two, even though it was still years away from when this alignment would occur, NASA gets on the ball and starts to design this and in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, seven, they are finished with design and the spacecraft they had been designing was. was under the working name the Mariner Jupiter Slash Saturn nineteen seventy seven, but they decided to rename it little bit mouthful. Yeah, they called it later and on August twentieth, Nineteen, seventy seven Titan Centaur. Rocket carried one of the two voyager spacecraft from Cape Canaveral Florida into the atmosphere, and ultimately into space, which one was it that will announce I. It was voyager to that launched I which one launched second voyager one. Okay so. So this this was basically for PR purposes because the the way that they were designed voyager, one was going to do to stricter. It was going to reach Jupiter I. So start sending back images of Jupiter. You know fingers crossed if all goes well I and NASA about that the public would be incredibly confused if if. Voyager one launched first, but got to the planet's second, whereas some for some reason lodge second Gig to the planet, I is less confusing. No one was paying attention to the launch. Goodness knows no one pays attention to to salon. Yeah, but one thing. You're actually able to watch while you're still on earth. It still makes me tear up every single time. Anything gets launching. Only just. Humidity's so beautiful. That's pretty awesome when you think about what it takes to get something into space, it is phenomenal, the amount of engineering and ingenuity that went into that but yesterday so the Voyager two launches I. The voyager wine launches about sixteen days later, in fact, not about six days later it launched on September fifth, Yep, nineteen, seventy seven and it's using the same sort of rocket Titan Centaur rocket, which by the way love it. Anyway. The initial purpose was for these to explore the giant planets in the outer solar system. Those giant planets are Jupiter. And Neptune. Pluto of course Nada giant planet it does not get the treatment. For these missions forget you Pluto, and there were two separate trajectories that were being used voyager. One of course was designed so that the trajectory was chosen so that it would reach Jupiter I. Then move onto Saturn. And then get flew off to head toward interstellar space. Joop Voyager two. Would do a visit to all four of the giant planet right, so that's why the you have the different timelines, because even though voyager launched I for it to be able to hit this trajectory where it was going to pass by each of the four giants. It had to do that at a different angle. So, that's the and if you were to look at a model of the solar system and just spend the plants around at the different rates you would see. Oh, yeah, now. I understand. You would have to be really particular about when you would launch and how you would launch for it to be able to hit all of these points properly amazing engineering that's required and just math. This required to make sure that you've got the right the right timing. Yeah, and it was. It was kind of shady, you know. Know basically until it happens, no one was sure that it was going to happen right, and and it's interesting. Because the voyager spacecraft used the plants themselves to help. Make sure they got to where they needed to go, but we'll get into that. It's pretty awesome, though so moving down the time line, they've launched in one thousand, nine, hundred seventy seven almost two years later on March Fifth Nineteen, seventy nine voyager one has its closest approach to Jupiter and it captures a lot of images of Jupiter and Jupiter's moons. And then July ninth, nineteen, seventy nine, so same year. That's when voyager two passes closest to Jupiter Then we go to the next year on November, twelve, thousand, nine hundred eighty voyager one has close to Saturn, and then it begins its trip out of the solar system, saying so long suckers and starts heading off into the. Sunset accept it can't be at opposite of the ten set right. The sunrise either normally be the opposite of a sunset. Son diminishing into a Tinier Ball I guess. Not Nearly as poetic, but August twenty, fifth, nine, hundred, eighty, one, that's when voyager to gets its close approach, the standard, but of course to is not flung off into interstellar space right away instead it is then headache toward urine s, which it passes closest to on January twenty, fourth nineteen eighty-six, so it took five years for voyager to go from Saturn to urine tests. And it would take. It would take a few more years before like five well three more years I'm sorry three more years before. I would get close to Neptune but before we get to that point. Nine hundred eighty seven voyager to observes these. Supernova nineteen eighty-seven eight. One thousand nine hundred eight voyager, returns the first color images of Neptune so that voyager to that is, so it's getting closer to Neptune in one, thousand, nine, hundred eighty. It's still not the closest it will be, but that's when we first start getting color images of Neptune back from voyager. And, on August, twenty, fifth nineteen, eighty nine voyager two has its closest approach to Neptune and that concludes the primary mission of the of both voyager spacecraft that primary mission, being the exploration of those outer planets so the cost of the missions. From nineteen seventy-two to the time when they finish their mission, their primary mission was eight hundred sixty five million dollars. Now NASA points out that if you break this down by the population of the United States and year over year, that's about eight cents per person per year so. Too Shabby essentially saying look really in the grand scheme and it sounds like a lot of money, but in the grand scheme of things. This is just a tiny investment, so look at these pictures to center. Keep. Calm and keep exploring is what they said hate that name. Anyway so the that that entered sixty five million dollars included everything include the expense of the launch vehicle's the radioactive power source which will get to talk about a little bit and and just the maintaining of the missions. By nineteen, eighty nine voyager one was heading toward interstellar space. And on Valentine's Day in nineteen ninety, we get the final images from voyager, which is portrait of the solar system. Happy Valentine's Day. I gave you the filler system sweet, not shabby. Three days later, February. Three days in eight years later. On I should read the year before we. You said there were seventeenth nineteen ninety eight. I have all my notes in front of me. It's just you know. My typing and viewing skills are apparently. There's something to be desired. Diminished today, nineteen, ninety eighth every seventeenth, the voyager one passes the pioneer ten, which had obviously been launched previously, and so that makes voyager one the most distant human made object in space. It is still to this day. The most distant human made object in space. It's actually most distant stir. was because it keeps going those good grammar. Well I figured I might as well measure up to my reading and comprehension skills. December fifteenth, two thousand four voyager one crosses the termination shock manasian shock. This is this is a pretty cool guys today. He'll you chief? Yes, here's some things that you need to know about our wacky little solar system here you might ask what's the solar system. Is it. Pluto Oh. No, it's not Pluto. Again it all depends on how you're defining the edge of the solar system, but the way NASA defines it no not blue well especially since it's still on the planet rain. It's a dwarf planet. There's that never mind, yeah. It's Pluto is right there with happy sleepy, Doby Doc, bashful so termination shock. That's that's the point where the solar wind particles start to slow down. They were traveling essentially at. kind of the speed of sound would be, but anyway traveling really fast. They start slowing down because you can think of the solar wind as this this force that pushes out from the Sun all right now, think of the interstellar space kind of having its own pressure. It's sort of like air pressure is pushing in on the solar. Magnetic fields air pressure. They're exactly they're not air particles. It's all we're talking. There are particles on space, but that's that's a different thing. Anyway, so the solar wind is pressing against these these other pressures. To the point where the solar wind is slowing down, that's the termination shock, right? Boundary with with shockwave and also still not the edge of the solar system now. You've also have the Helius fear now. This is where we still have. We still have evidence of the solar wind within the heels year. Then you have the he'll pause. which is the very boundary of where the solar windows, and that still is not the edge of the solar, system. Now according to NASA. Really we need to think of the edge of the solar system as being a an area where the sun's gravitational pull has no greater effect on you than any other particular celestial body out there so in other words you aren't being pulled toward the solar system at that point any more than you're being pulled toward other point right? Yeah, so that that areas ill defined by the very nature of gravity. That would take a very long time to get there and we'll talk about that. When we get into the science section so anyway. Termination shock has all these fluctuating magnetic fields due to the change in the speed of the solar wind, and that's kind of why it's called what it's called and voyager one like I said crossed on December fifteenth, two thousand four, and begins to encounter the interstellar medium that doesn't mean that it's an interstellar space yet, but starting to encounter the particles that would be an interstellar space. September fifth two thousand seven three years later, that's when voyager two catches up and crosses the termination shock at a totally different point by the way, these two spacecraft are in two totally different sections of. Nowhere near each other, and you're not at all and in July and two thousand twelve wager one enters a new region of space, which is still inside the solar system. The Hilo Helius fear here. She called a magnetic highway Yup and the directions of particles that it's encountering are beginning to change which suggests that the spacecraft is at the very edge of the Helius. Fear then. Engineers didn't expect the data that they got back. They thought that it would have passed beyond this point earlier. Which just tells us that? Our solar system is actually larger. We thought. Is more powerful than we previously expected. Never underestimate the power of the sun. It can turn me read in a matter of minutes. Very susceptible to that sort of thing, so yeah, that's we've already talked about how they have they. They left at different times in their pathways meant that they are traveling in different directions different at different speeds. And they visited different. Voice your to visit to more planets than voyager one dead. We talked about how the planets helped. Move the spacecraft and direct the spacecraft. So if you guys have seen science fiction films like a star Trek for the voyage home where they slingshot around the sun, they're actually using the sun's gravity to kind of accelerate a ship to the point where it can travel back in time. I don't understand that by the way. If you've got warp speed you technically anyway, that's another. We did that episode. Went. They use it to slingshot around the sun, which magically lets them travel back in time? There's some truth to that in the sense that we have used that same kind of principle with designing the voyager spacecraft a right. What we what we realized is bet. If. You okay, you're moving towards the planet. You're PROB- okay. Okay? And as you move towards the planet, you're going to start accelerating as the planet's gravitational pulse. That's pulling you in. If you only kind of by then hypothetically you'll decelerate on the way out, because you're losing energy to that gravitational pull right, and by the way because of the conservation of energy, technically the planets orbit actually slows sure I'd infinitesimally. Yeah, it's Let's see I've got I haven't written down. I know I've got it written down. It's something like a one foot in a trillion years. Well, but hey, that is an impact you are. You are making a difference, but Jupiter is going to be a little late to its to its appointment and trillion years right, however, because planets are moving in their orbits. If you are going on the same trajectory as a planets orbit, you can pick up that orbital speed right as he slingshot around the planet, and so that that has allowed voyager spacecraft to. Get propulsion from one plant to the next without having to have massive thrusters onboard in fact when we get to the actual description of the spacecraft. You'll find out that they're. Thrusters are not incredibly powerful at all at all. But they were able to use the power of gravity direct and propel themselves. As large as Jupiter it's moving through space at something like thirty thousand miles per hour, forty eight thousand kilometers and Yeah! And, that's yeah, it's completely free energy boost about that much speed now, according to NASA because of the use of planetary gravity voyager to ended up having a fuel economy. Of about thirteen thousand kilometers per liter or thirty thousand miles per gallon. That's efficient. It's my car. That's highway. Miles city miles. They did not give me so I. DON'T I. Don't know how it would do in the city They're the voyager. Two's flightpath got a look like we said at all four of the giant planets and and it's a couple of billion miles further inside the solar system than the voyager one, so the voyager one got a kind of head start into interstellar space. and is more than eleven, billion or seventeen point, seven eleven, billion miles or seventeen point seven billion kilometers away from the Sun at this point Alabama more than eighteen. As of as of today there's there's a tracker on NASA nice can check this out. And and. At that distance it takes hours for a for data Toco from the spacecraft to be picked up here on earth about seventeen hours. Well. Yeah, so that's a long time so. The the way that let me let me find my note on it. It's not really interesting the way that they receive radio signals because they're. They're pretty far away. They're getting increasingly difficult to the technology that they have a whole series of two hundred and thirty foot radio dishes specifically to poll voyager data, the these are the deep space antenna that they have to pick up this information. And and they actually. Those over the course of the life of the Voyager Program when they first started, they were significantly smaller, and they didn't have to be as big because the voyager spacecraft were relatively closer to the earth. And now now we got to a point where we keep upgrading the antennas so that we can continue to pick up these increasingly weak signals so pretty amazing according to NASA the missions from Earth to Neptune, required the equivalent of eleven thousand working hours of human work while eleven thousand work years. which they said, there's only a third of what it took to build the Great Pyramid. So Hey. We're slacking. Really, they're just saying look. How much more efficient we are. They were piling up rocks. We were sending a spacecraft into space. And and again we've learned that the solar system is actually larger than what we previously anticipated, and so by the time the voyager two flew by Neptune the two spacecraft together had transmitted about five trillion bits of scientific data back at Earth, and it was someone's job to look at all that. But yeah, the deep space tracking antennas are the ones we were talking about earlier that have been upgraded several times, and that that kind of that's the brief view of the mission, and next we're going to take a look at the space craft itself and also some kind of cool. Records that are above the the two spacecraft, but before we do that, let's take a quick pause to thank our sponsor. With the capital, one quicksilver card, you earn unlimited one point five percent cashback on every purchase everywhere. That's unlimited one point five percent cashback on everything you buy and unlimited really means unlimited with quicksilver. There's no limit to how much cash back you can earn capital one. What's in your Wallet Credit Approval? REQUIRED CAPITAL ONE BANK USA IN A. Technology is becoming more open data, more accessible and the world more innovative IBM is combining their industry expertise with the open source leadership of red hat to bring you more freedom, more security more flexibility. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work. Learn more at IBM dot. com slash red hat. Okay, let's talk about the actual spacecraft and and we know what they were supposed to do, and what they have done so Oh, in one thing I did not mention I guess. Is that the whole enter interstellar travel stuff that's totally planned as well in fact has been added on as a secondary mission, primary mission was the outer planets secondary is what's up with this interstellar stuff? We don't know anything about well. They realized that are power sources would. Would work until about twenty twenty and so figured well. Hey, let's just kind of roll with it. Yeah Yeah, so. That's twenty, twenty, two, twenty, twenty five. That's about when we expect the power resources to be to the point where they can no longer power the transmitter to send us back data, and we'll talk about that. That's one of the things that That's interesting about this space craft. There are a lot of interesting. Thank so both of them Denko. Yes, they are identical so each one of the ways just under a ton. And now when they were on top of the the launch vehicle, they weighed a lot more than that, but the space craft themselves are just under a ton each on earth, obviously because weight is all relative to where you are. And they are each made up of about sixty five thousand individual parts, but these parts are often made up of Tinier. So. They have a term they use which is equivalent parts and equivalent parts means like. If you were to look at for example, if I were to stay, my computer is part of is one part of the equipment that I use. Someone else could point out well. That computer has multiple chips in it, and those chips have transistors, and so really that one part is a representation of lots and lots lots of parts, so NASA was like well. If you want to know how many. Parts there are about five million of them. compare that to your old standard definition color television. There'd be about two thousand five hundred equivalent parts. So lots more than a color. TV which is kind of what you want in your. Space, you need a little bit more than your average standard definition color television I agree. I would hope so yeah also. Larger than, your standard. Yes. Unless you're? A crazy rich person, the the main body is a is a ten sided box. That's about six feet or one point eight meters across, and that's where the fuel tank the and some of the electronic instruments. And we'll talk about those instruments. There are a lot of them. Lunch. They're. They're they both have areas that are hardened against radiation and shielded, and the reason for that is obviously that when you go into space, you're going to encounter things that you would not encounter here on the surface of the planet, and the reason for that is that the earth atmosphere and magnetosphere? Magnetosphere sphere still makes me think that we're watching X. men I I would say I would say magnetosphere I know you would, but but I. Fear. Is the fear in which magneto travels, and it's also a magnetic field that surrounds the earth penetrates and binds us together. like the force now what it does actually repels certain types of waves and particles, which allows us to relive. Yeah, we to being bombarded by cosmic radiation or gamma, rays, or things like that because. Much worse sunburns than than others, we're talking so the the combination of the atmosphere and the magnetosphere or magnetosphere. Protects US and so the thing is that when you're on space, you don't have the benefit of that protection, so that's why both of them have these these shielding areas in casings that are hardened against radiation to protect them if they were to encounter any of these waves or particles. Clearly very important, interesting, little side fact, so earth has a magnetosphere. Mars doesn't. So if we were to make a colony on Mars we would not have that protection that we would need to compensate for it in some way right, so you wouldn't want to go on any long strolls on the Martian soil radio, some serious protections. That's all of those all of those fashionable space bikinis that were that were really popular back in the nineteen fifties would not probably be good. The interesting thing I heard was I was listening although I. It was a skeptics guide to the universe. Great podcast has no affiliation with us, but they are fantastic very. Interesting Educational podcast. They had a recent episode where. They had an astronomer on talking about things like Mars and they were even talking about all right. Let's look into a science fiction future where we can tear a form Mars, so we're able to transform Mars so that the actual services habitable livable, and even then because of the lack of the magnetosphere you would still be prone to things like cosmic radiation gamma radiation you would, you would still be vulnerable that so you would not be able to tear form it for any extended length of time eventually that stuff would kill the life on that planet right because things like gamma, radiation for example aren't as cool as for example, teenage mutant Ninja Turtles make it sound or Mostly you just die. Yeah, it's not. It's not attractive. NASA said that because of the distance from the the the voyager spacecraft passed close enough to Jupiter that. It received more than a thousand times the radiation that would be a lethal level of radiation very. For Human Person. Yes. So moving onto more things that are on board this these spacecraft. It has a it has a twelve foot or a three point. Seven meter high gain antenna looks like a satellite dish. Yeah, this is what allows it to transmit and receive data to and from Earth, and no matter where it goes. The Internet is programmed to always point towards earth. Yes, that's it's actually got a gyroscopic. System so that no matter how it's oriented, it can, it can readjust its attitude so that the the antennas twenty toward us, so we can have the best possible hike up those radio transmissions It has a lot of different instruments aboard including. Besides the high gain antenna it's got a low energy charged Particle Instrument and ultra-violet Spectrometer, which currently only the voyager one is using to collect data. has both narrow and wide angle imaging instruments also known as cameras. Got A. Fancy eight hundred eight hundred cameras, because this was launched in the nineteen seventies. Yes, seemed pretty cool at the time. Yeah, as a cosmic ray instruments that can detect and measure cosmic rays a photo polar remedy. which I have no idea what it does I I was I? I ran into and thought that's really cool and I. Never actually look more into it. Because I was lucky that I could say it. There's an infrared interferometer spectrometer. And Optical calibration targeting system, a planetary radio astronomy and plasma wave antenna, each spacecraft's two of those and also as the planetary radio astronomy instrument or Has the a plasma instrument. Voyager one's plasma instrument is nonfunctional, but all other instruments are in working order and boys. You're too is still collecting data through its plasma instruments It's got. It also gets power from three Isotope Thermo Electric Generators, and currently it gets about three hundred and fifteen watts of power now the spacecraft designed so that all of their systems can operate at four hundred watts of power. Okay, so it's able to It's still getting power, but it's not enough power to operate everything, and in fact they designed the voyager spacecraft with this in mind, the idea being that as the power as the power supply begins to decrease, it begins to shutdown unnecessary, says instruments. So originally. There were eleven different. Projects that were involved in gathering data from the Voyager's systems and processing that data here on earth. There were eleven of them currently, only five of them are still in operation because the other systems have been progressively shut down to make sure that the voyager spacecraft can still send us information, and like you said by twenty, twenty or twenty five or so. That's when we expect. Expect the power to have run down enough where we're not going to be able to get any more information from them, because it's just not going to have the power necessary to broadcast right right well, because the way that this engine of sorts works, is that appellative plutonium dioxide released heat through their own natural decay processes, and so once they have finished a king. That's it. Yeah. That's true and then I'll I forgot. Magnetometer boom which designed tests to measure magnetic fields, so that was one of those things we didn't really know a lot about the magnetic field to the outer planets before we sent these these spacecraft up. That's one of the really huge as sources of information that it is. Yeah and so then it has a flight data subsystem, which handles all the information, and it has an eight track digital tape recorder. So you've got an eight track up there. It's a it to the FTSE configures controls collects data from the various instruments and the tape recorder handles the data from the plasma wave subsystem, because that's the one that gets the highest density of data and the shortest amount of time, so the data tape recorder was the cutting edge technology to handle that that information and according to NASA. The tape in the digital recorder won't wear out until the tape has moved back and forth through a distance that is equivalent to the width of the United. States that is not. Not Terribly, precise because the United States is not a perfect rectangle, but in general I would say that's probably about three thousand miles, which is around four thousand eight hundred kilometers I assume they mean is that it's doing fine. Yeah, so what they're saying is that that tape is capable of traveling that collective amount of distance about breaking right, so you got to remember the tape. itself is not that long. It's just saying that they would you'll by the time you would go through all this tape and his worn out. You could have gone all the way across. The United States using that same distance of taping played through. Just kind of that's impressive that has a command computer subsystem which provides sequencing and control functions, which includes fault detection, corrective routines, antenna, pointing data and spacecrafts sequencing data. The detection involves seven top level fault, protection routines, and each one is able to detect and correct for several possible failures. Oh, basically it just means that there's the computer has multiple modules, and they compare data back and forth between each other, and it will decide if one module is different from the others that that one's faulty and to cut it out system. And it also means that the space craft capable of shutting down systems if it needs to automatically autonomously, because which is important, because we can't broadcast to these things they broadcast to us. They don't have receivers though their antenna could receive information, thank yeah, but it means that it would take seventeen hours for the information to get to us in seventeen hours for the freshly of back, and by then whatever the problem was is probably not the biggest issue at that point right, so yeah. It's important to have something to connect autonomously. If if you if the communication is a barrier, same sort of thing with the the curiosity rover when it was landing on the surface of Mars, you know a lot of that landing. In fact, all of the landing was autonomous because there was no time for us to send any adjustments to the system. It's like you're on your own. Yeah, by the time we. We would be able to send adjustment. It would have already either crashed or landed safely, so you had to design a spacecraft that could do this or else. It wouldn't work pretty impressive in the nineteen seventies for for the amount of computing power that what's going Oh. Yeah, definitely, and it also had an attitude, art or still hassle I. Don't know why I'm using the past tense still up dead to you. The attitude and articulation control subsystem, which is also known acs it's in charge of maintaining the spacecraft orientation in positions the scan platform. This is what we're talking about. The system that's that's in charge of making sure that data antennas pointed back at Earth, and also that the scan platform, which is really you know the instrumentation panel? Is pointed in the right direction to get the data the needs. And the. It's yeah. It's a three axis stabilization system and use the celestial, or Giro referenced attitude control to make the high gain antenna point back to Earth now we talked about the fact that there is an interesting gold plated copper disc on board each of the two voyager spacecraft. The golden records there for. So this This was a really cool idea you know. Who of course was the chairman for this Carl? Sagan yes, he he had billions and billions of suggestions, but not all of them can make it onto the desk, obvious right, and and these are these are these these goldplated copies engraved like vinyl records? Yeah, yeah, and kids. Ask Your parents. Oh dear, no, no kids are hipsters. These days. We know things final. It's cool kids, 'til your older siblings because they they've missed out on the HIPSTER generation right? I'm not all right, so so yeah, you're talking about a desk. Vast physical grooves that are in it that can be read using a stylus and country, which which were included the they included the cartridge and stylus did not include a turntable. So aliens aliens work it out. They have to build it, but they did leave instructions written in a symbolic language to say here's how you would construct something that would be able to play these things right now. They were there twelve inches in diameter, and they are designed to be played back at sixteen and two-thirds revolutions per minute. So actually fairly slowly i. mean you re thinking about the? The, Forty five or thirty three revolutions per minute for for your average albums, and this is a six hundred two thirds so. on these golden records are lots and lots of stuff actually. It's including things like greetings from five different languages, including some that aren't being used anymore did not been used in a very long time. which is a Sumerian language which was last used around four thousand. Selection of nature sounds Yup, so if you ever wanted to hear what frogs burping sounded like, and you are from some distant planet. Here's an opportunity to. Share. Your for Ford Prefect and you're on your way to Earth. This is a good way to do some homework before you get there. A lot of traditional music, some native American chance and Scottish Bagpipes talk about some of the music was on here. For African ritual music there's a bunch of classical music and so. I wrote down some of my favorites. This is this is obviously. There are lots and lots of musical tracks on the records. These are just the ones that I personally wrote down because I I they resonate with me, It's not to say that the other ones are not anti sense. Familiar with some of them but there's the Brandenburg Concerto number two F. actually it's just the first movement that's by a guy named Bob Batch. Johan batch wrote that. If I'd he's just some dude really. Yeah obviously Bach's Brandenburg Concerto number two enough Then there's a melancholy blues which was performed by Louis Armstrong Stravinsky's. The rite of spring was included Bach actually was pretty well represented on this record. He also had the well tempered clavier on there there was the first Moon Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. You know the There was another tribes chant, and then of course, the most important I think musical work that was included out of all the pieces were on there as we as we all know from the documentary back to the future I. Save Marnie MC fly. It'll save the human race. We're talking about chuck. Berry's Johnny B good. There's actually a book all about the process that they used to select which sounds went on the golden record. It finally came out with a CD companion at some point. I'm sure it's on digital. Yes, the book itself is out of print, but you can sometimes find copies is called murmurs from Earth so if you want to learn more about how they came about choosing, which sounds, go in there That's that's a really well done piece it's. It's something that I've heard nothing but good things about it. I personally have not had a chance to read it. by the time I learned about it. It was wearing print. But. There's also a bunch of images on the desks including a star map, clearly showing the location of earth. NEW SAYING Here's what humans tastes like maps of earth images. I'm just I'm just ignoring that entirely. There are people who have said what a huge mistake! It was to essentially include directions directly. I, I think it's pretty ridiculous because the odds one. Anyone finding voyager sweating. Big as it turns out really big no-no. Head, not you might think it's a long walk to the chemist on the corner, but that's just nuts compared to space. It's going to be tens of thousands of years before. Either Voyager craft encounter anything near another star. Yeah, exactly so really by the time I'm betting. We will have either kill ourselves off or hit. And plus on top of that. You know it would all depend on from what direction the other creatures were approaching. Earth because. There are a lot of different vectors. You could take, and only a couple of them would. Intersect with the pathway of either voyagers waste. Than most science fiction movies are willing to acknowledge, there's just ship space battle than just the single plane. so there was also an hour long recording the brainwaves of a woman named Ann Druyan, who would become crossings wife Yep. She's an author. She concentrates mainly on cosmology and science and she. She signed up for this. She volunteered to have her brainwaves recorded in Carl. Sagan talked about it, and she thought it was a really interesting idea, and so she went in for. The process where her brain. Heartbeat were were red, and then transferred to data analog that we have to say because it's an analog desk. And She says that what she did, was she? She thought about big historical moments that were very important in the development of human history, and then she spent some time. About the the current situation on earth how what that's like thing and not sugar coating at things like violence between people and the the. Yeah yeah, so she really spent some time thinking about things that she felt needed to be addressed. And then she said that she took the liberty toward the end of the session to take a little bit of time and think about what it's like to fall in love, which I think is amazing, wonderful sweet! Yeah, so now we those aliens can't tell us. They don't know how to love because she thought about it for for a while. Darn, it so yeah. Those radio signals do take a long time to get to US so but. And and the record that's on there. If you want to hear some of the stuff there are, there are a lot of different sites out there that that keep all the things that. Tells you? What's there and most of that's pretty easy to get access to and listened to. Find one in Lincoln up on social. Yeah, we'll see if we can find something in the know. Maybe I'll see if I can make it a spotify playlist or something. I'll get a Ukulele and play Johnny be good on the Ukulele. Johnny please stop. That would be the name of that song all right so. Anyway that's that's kind of the the the wrap up of the spacecraft in the stuff that was aborted, but we still haven't talked about the actual science return, so we're going to do that in just a moment, but before we do, let's take a quick moment to thank our other sponsor. Here's the thing. Saving money with Geico is almost than playing pickup. Because there's always that guy who joins your game. He never passes the rock. He constantly brings threes, and who completely hack you and then put his hands up and say no foul, no FAO. With Geico it's easy to switch and save on car insurance, no need to fake an ankle sprain because you're absolutely exhausted so switch and save. Gyco it's almost better than sports. All My name. Santa host of to Miami Morning Show and all the move. I want to personally invite you to my new podcast. Allah my name is a new show we're all talk to. Community leaders and people like you. Together we'll learn more about the triumphs and failures that empower my weekly guest. My show kicks off with the Awesome J. Balloting from Columbia that's revolutionized Latin music and continues to break records worldwide K. bothering opens up and talks about his humble beginnings, the secret to the success, and how he managed to remain authentic to style. You'll be able to go a few layers deeper into the lives of my special guest. You can find my new show all off. My name is on the free iheartradio APP or wherever you prefer to listen to your podcast. A new episode every Tuesday if combined. Yes, I hope you'll join me all are my name is the podcast. If talked about what the mission was, we talked about the spacecraft. Let's talk about what the spacecraft found. So of the eleven investigation teams that were originally involved in the voyager mission like I said earlier. Only five of them are still supported, and those five are magnetic field investigation. Low Energy Charged Particle investigation, COSMIC RAY investigation plasma investigation, which is only active on the boy or to the. Doesn't work anywhere and PLASMA WAVE INVESTIGATION SAY PLASMA, investigation plasma wave, two different things, and these are clearly the more important ones because there's not all that much to for example, take pictures of. Once you're done Dante the photo of the the the solar system from way the heck out there. There's really no purpose to. Going to that, so yeah, that's been shut down and the five instruments that support these five missions. The medic field instrument or MAG. Low Energy charged particle instrument the ACP. COSMIC ARRANGEMENT SIERRA THE PLASMA instrument that's, p., L. S. and the plasma wave instrument. That's PWS. Really at this point now that we've finished taking photos and measurements of all the planets, which was the main science, before was really getting good images, and getting some good scientific data about the actual plants, and their movements was the origin of the program. Yeah, before they kind of realize. Oh, Hey, we can do more stuff out there. Yes, go now now we're. We've switched over to interstellar, but some of the stuff they've found because of these, and then later on have have expounded upon by sending other orbiters like Cassini for example but some of the stuff they discovered were like they. They took a closer look at Europa which is one of Jupiter's moons. And saw that it had a a water ice surface and originally thought maybe Europa could have an ocean underneath that ice, but some scientists now say they think that it's probably more like a slush or maybe even solid solid ice but that was a possibility they The voyager spacecraft also observed Palay. which is the largest volcanoes on ECHO? Which is the another moon of? And they observed that pay was erupting, sulfur and sulfur dioxide and. These eruptions were going up to heights that are equivalent to about. Thirty Times, the elevations of Mount Everest. Hollis mountain on Earth multiply that by well mountain on the surface like a not underwater. Look at underwater and there's an argument these area. But, over above water. It's tall mountain unnerved. By thirty times, that's how high up these eruptions going not necessarily a good vacation spot now scientists point out that gravity is about six times weaker than that of earth, so it's closer to what our moon has but the fallout zone for the the the sulfur dioxide that was being. Thrust into the atmosphere of i. o was about the size of France. Well yeah, so. That was. When I read the while a huge huge volcano Now the. We also had some information about Saturn's largest moon which is called tighten. discovered the oceans of pain and methane aboard aboard on Titan, not aboard time it is technically a space. Scuttling. Satellite. Natural satellite, not a man-made one. And it has a also discovered that has the Titan, the largest moon of Saturn has a dense atmosphere lots of hydrocarbons, and maybe it could possibly at some point in the past have supported life. The methane is a possible indication that living things once lived there. Now. It does not necessarily hydrocarbons as well, but that does not necessarily mean that life. On Titan, but it's a possibility of voyager also took images of urinalysis rings, which are very difficult to see. Right. And but they did that. They also observed Saturn's rings and saw that they were made of about ten thousand strands of ice, particles and car sized icebergs and that if you at the proportionally, their thickness is much much much much much smaller than the width of the rain, so if you think of it as like A. One of those things called. They're not the FRISBEES, but you know the rings the Dickie. Hollow in the middle there, so it's just a it's a desk. That doesn't have a center to it. the width of the band is much wider than the thickness of the band is what they discovered those kind of interesting. Now. We're talking more about the interstellar work. They're still inside the Helius. Fear right and I did want to mention at some point here on March twentieth, and we mentioned this in another podcast that we were recording right around March twenty eight. There were there were false reports that it had left. The healers fear entered interstellar space, and those were those were false reports NASA came out and said No. We've not seen the changes in the magnetic radiation that we are expecting because they did say that they had seen some changes in particle movement, which at I would have indicated that the spacecraft had moved out of the Helius here. From the magnetic movement, that's not the case right, so it's one of those things where again we keep finding out. The solar system is larger as we learn more about how behaving so now the next step in this you can think of the interstellar exploration and being in three phases, the first was crossing the termination shock, which both of the spacecraft already done. The next is exploration of the hero Sheath. Opening right now, and then the third is interstellar exploration, which is when the spacecraft have passed beyond the helium pause boundary. Now he'll. Boundary you can think this is kind of like a bubble around the sun that co completely encompasses the the the entire solar system. It's not a perfectly round bubble, so. But it's it's Whibley wobbly area. And beyond this boundary there's no solar wind or magnetic field from the Sun. However, they're still the gravitational influence of the sun at that point, but particles in waves in this area of space are unaffected by our son, and we don't really know a whole lot about them because we haven't been able to observe them directly through any kind of spacecraft. and. This is a hypothetical Heliopolis. We have not encountered it yet, so, but it's still not technically the edge of the solar system. If you if you ask NASA, the edge of the solar system would be that area where there's no longer that gravitational factor from the Sun which would require us to travel about two light years away from the sun, so they'll take us about forty thousand years for those spacecraft to get there which is. You know set your alarms because it's GonNa take a while so in other words. If someone tells you that the voyager has passed outside the solar system, your response should be wow. Which Alien Warp did away from there? Because there's no way that it's done that at least not by the definition that NASA makes now. They're talking about the Halio pause. That's a different story and it's different. That's a different story and they are anticipating that within our lifetimes. They said they expected it to happen. Within ten to twenty years of passing the termination shock. So now it's just a real be probably hopefully. Fingers crossed before before that plutonium dioxide runs out right before twenty, twenty or twenty twenty around that area so. Learn, you have an interesting idea. An experimental idea that we thought we would try. which is that you sent out a tweet saying? Hey, guys! If you have any anything interesting that you want to ask or goofy that you want to ask about our podcast about the voyager spacecraft and the time to do it and people did a of people did anyway so hopefully we'll be able to do this in the future and get me even more discussion, but this was a fun. First Attempt, so here's some of the questions we receive in on twitter asked a whole bunch of questions that I'm going to tackle one at a time. I was how fast are the voyager spacecraft traveling? Good question so voyager wants traveling at about three point six astronomical units per year and wedge to his poking along at three point three astronomical units per year now. That might not tell you very much unless you know how long an astronomical unit is, it's measurement of distance based upon the mean distance between Earth and the sun, and that's equivalent to about one, hundred, forty, nine, million, five, hundred, Ninety, seven, thousand, eight, hundred, seventy, one kilometers, or ninety, two million. Million Nine, hundred, fifty, five thousand seven miles, and because Jonathan loves you. He did the Math Yep, so let's talk about how the sucker breaks down, so remember voyager. One's going at three point six astronomical units year that means traveling about five hundred, thirty nine million kilometers per year or three, hundred, thirty five million miles per year, and that breaks down to sixty, one, thousand, four, hundred, thirty eight kilometers per hour or thirty, eight, thousand, one, hundred seventy six miles per hour either way. It's going wicked fast. Voyager two three point three astronomical yet for year that breaks down to four, hundred, ninety, four million kilometers per year or fifty, six, thousand, three hundred eighteen kilometers per hour and miles. It's three hundred seventy million miles per year or thirty five thousand miles per hour. Slightly less wicked fast, but still we could fix so, but still faster than than me. For example his next question next question was. Are they accelerating no. Next question was how long will remain in contact well like we said, we're not really sure it's all going to depend upon the power supply, and also whether or not our antenna here on earth can continue. But we expect around twenty, twenty, twenty, twenty five will be the last we hear of them. And then Ian and also a listener named Jonathan also a date. They both that we somehow reference a film star. Trek the motion picture okay. What does have to do with Star Trek the motion picture well in a way, voyager is the bad guy in star trek the motion picture. In another way, the whole film is the bad guy because it's slow as heck. I watched it I watched it not for an anticipation of this podcast I watched it just. And I had not seen it since I was a kid. Not Don't think I ever sat through it all the way through when I was a kid. I don't think I got through it. All the way throws an adult again. I can't say that I've seen since I was about A. Laundry. Search to amazing movie star Trek. The motion picture not so much, but in that story, and this is gonNA sound really familiar to anyone who watched star trek four, because it's very similar story. A probe that has this weird energy field around it enters our solar system actually I. It's just moving through space, but everything encounters. It's starting to deactivate and everyone's kind of upset because that's terrible. We stop this. And, of course, the only person who can stop it is Kirk who come and deers star starship enterprise. He is no longer the captain of the Enterprise. At that point, he's teaching it Starfleet, but the enterprise is docked in a space station around Earth, and so he after a very long tour of the ship the outside of the ship that Scotty takes on eventually onboard. This movie moves slowly is what I'm saying and they they go and investigate this this probe that's called V., Jer vitre and. And Vija is this artificially intelligent. Vehicle and actually the vehicle contains a smaller probe leg vehicle inside of it ultimately. They discovered that what Vija. Really is is voyager six, which doesn't exist yet. No, there's only. Two, but in this in the movie it was voyager six that was supposedly lodge toward the end of the twentieth century, which I don't know if you noticed, we're not in that anymore. So you know same thing like I think the eugenics wars and star trek to that. are that ever mentioned that Khan was part of that was supposed to take place in one, thousand, nine, hundred six, so we have a lot of catching up to do not that I want those to happen anytime soon, but the the Vija was called villager because it could no longer see the letters that were missing. So. The missing letters were gone so all that was left. Was the VGA since feature? And and in the story, what you find is that aliens had encountered the voyager six probe, and had enhanced it so that it could learn everything that is learnable, and then return the information to so it was trying to do a originally, it was supposed to be a benevolent thing, but because feature had gained since it no longer completely understood the parameters of its mission, and so it started to go a little bunkers and then of course, the some crew members aboard the enterprise end up essentially reasoning with the artificially intelligent probe so like I said it's kind of the bad guy in Star Trek the motion picture. If you feel like spoiled that movie, I didn't. Really I mean. You bear skipping our star Trek. Takes. Say, this is someone who loves star Trek. Okay I don't don't get me wrong I. Just I feel like that movie, was it? A lot of the movies played for Grandeur and problem is that we've all gotten used to seeing these amazing of visuals. They're even more amazing than what was available back then so to kind of have this big reveal moment and you look at the picture and you're like you. Happens on TV every week. So that's the problem all right so Then we also had a listener who has the handle retina made it his name who asked what about future missions with better equipment. Well we had the Cassini orbiter, but we also NASA had proposed a couple of joint missions with the European Union. But they haven't really worked out. One of them was the Jupiter Europa orbiter, but that was essentially scrapped because of budget problems, and the other was the titan. Saturn system mission, which was shelved in order for NASA to concentrate on the Jupiter Europa or So but originally those were supposed to launch in twenty twenty now because of the budget cutbacks and everything, and you know the fact that they're just hasn't been time to develop. That launch window is kind of closed at this point so. As far as I, know right now, there are no definitive. Space or Outer Planet Missions Plant I think right now. People are really concentrating on on Mars Mars and the moon. Earth orbit those are those are the things that are. I hesitate to say easier. Remaining more achievable. I have heard that that future moon landing have been scrapped in favor of future Mars. Yes. And this changes from one administration to another, because because a lot of these considerations are not just technological or scientific. They're also political. The whole space race was political the fact that the if there had not been that rivalry between the United States. Show of muscle. We can send. We can send this rocket not only to your face, but all the way to the moon. So that was that was you know without that kind of pressure? Then it makes it harder for scientists to get the money. They need to be able to do the science they do. That's a sad fact of the world. Is that money away? Does make the world go round. And that wraps up another classic episode of Tech Stuff Hope. You. Guys enjoyed it. This was a lot of fun for us to do. I really had a great time with it. I want to do more episodes that are space-related about specific projects. I've done everything from like the Jimmy Program or German I. Program to You know like the Apollo missions the space shuttle missions, but I want to look at more of the satellite type stuff, too. I I think that those are really fascinating and only done a few of them, so if there any specific topics whether they are space related or otherwise. Let me know you know ones that you want to hear anyway. Let me know about it. reach out on twitter or on facebook. The handover both texts stuff H. S. W. and I'll talk to you again really soon. Is, an iheartradio production for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio, APP, apple, podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. My name is empty. xanthos host of a morning show and on the move. I want to personally invite you to my new podcast. All My name is Ado show where all talk to artist community leaders and people like you. Together, we'll learn more about the triumphs and failures that empower my weekly guest. You can find my new show on the free iheartradio APP or wherever you listen to your podcast. I'm Oscar Ramirez, and I host the daily Corona Virus Update a daily podcast bringing you the latest on what to know about the global pandemic. We're facing. There's a lot of information going around about the viruses spreading hot spots around the world and the United States, possible treatments and Best Practices to keep you and your family healthy. It's more important than ever to follow this fast moving story and avoid misinformation, so you can keep up to date and make informed decisions. Listen to the daily Corona virus update on the iheartradio. APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your podcast.

NASA Jupiter United States Geico Joop Voyager voyager iheartradio Helius basketball New Hampshire Low Energy Sagan Kat Lights Jonathan Cape Canaveral Florida Johnny B Strickland
#65 | Voyager Golden Record

Twenty Thousand Hertz

34:17 min | 1 year ago

#65 | Voyager Golden Record

"This episode is brought to you by the listeners who support this show with a recurring monthly donation. And if the is meaningful to you, please consider joining that exclusive club with a two dollar a month recurring donation at twenty K dot org slash donate. If you do that, you'll also get a link to an ad free feed that you can subscribe to write in your podcast player. Again, that's two zero k dot org slash donate. Now, here's the show. The second that agenda lofty United Nations who represent almost all of the human inhabitants off the planet earth. I sent greetings on behalf of the people of our planet. You're listening to twenty thousand Hertz. I'm Dallas Taylor. We step out of all solar system into the universe seeking only peace and friendship to teach. If we are called upon to be taught if we are fortunate we know full by Dr planet and all its inhabitants about a small part of this seamen's universe. That surrounds us at it is humility and hope that we take this step. That was Kurt Waldheim the fourth secretary general of the UN, and what you just heard is the first track from the most epic album of all time. It was made by team of scientists artists and historians hoping that one day other intelligent lifeforms might find it. It's the Voyager golden record. It's also a time capsule. And there's actually two of them. They're currently over eleven billion miles away hurtling through space at over thirty thousand miles an hour. These literal golden records are attached to the Voyager one and Voyager two space probes. These probes were launched in the late seventies. And today they're further away from earth than any other human made object, the Voyager probes could continue to explore worlds unknown for more than a billion years. So there is a theoretical chance that alien life. Could find one of these probes in the seven? Sees a committee chaired by Carl Sagan curated a record to ride on each craft. Here's Carl talking about the record on the original Cosmo's television series. A phonograph golden delegates. With instructions for use on this record or a sampling of pictures, soons, greetings, and an hour and a half of exquisite music. The earth's greatest hits a gift across the cosmic ocean. From one island the civilization to another. Recently Osma records has repressed the Voyager golden record using the original master tapes before then no one on earth could hear the golden record in context. But now we're going to explore it together track by track Kurt Waldheim who you heard at the beginning of the episode is track one of the record. He greeted whoever might find this record on behalf of all humanity. Here's track to which are hellos and greetings in fifty five languages Salima famine witness Podesta Hidetada shallow, all ice allude us at all those because I think it was an amazing project. That's Linda, Salzman Sagan. She was in charge of organizing all of these greetings. She was married to Carl Sagan at the time the records were made their son Nick Sagan was recorded for the English greeting when he was just six years old gape degrading in English, and we never told him this. He said Hello from the children. Of planet earth. And that was his greeting choked up. I think about it. I kind of appreciate his wisdom that he made a special greeting. So he he's a very remarkable young man Hello from the children of planet earth. The greetings continue into track. Three this time. It's from more members of the United Nations. Jimmy will NC in his dot com. And then fed in the UN. Greetings on this track are mixed with another sound humpback whale songs. Zoya janine. Janine don't depend. Then we'll keep John brought in you. By the tracks end the whale songs or the only sounds left. The choice of whale songs was deliberate. Carl Sagan believed that they carried a lot of information just like humans beach. If I imagined that the songs of the humpback whale are sung in a tonal linked. The number of bits of information. In one song is about the same. As the information content of the leeann. Alien or the odyssey. If this record is found by intergalactic life. It's possible. They could understand a whale song. Just as well as they could understand human speech that brings us to track for the sounds of earth. This is a twelve minute sound essay that depicts the history of our planet. The first part is known as the music of this fears. It's a sonic representation of the planets in our solar system rotating around the sun. The music was composed mathematically each planet given its own frequency the highest pitch. You here is mercury. The lowest is Jupiter. Timothy Ferriss and Andrew and led the production of the sound essay they wanted to present an evolution of our planet. So next comes the sound of thunder volcanoes bubbling lava this is prehistoric earth. Each minute of the track takes us through thousands of years of planetary development from the birth of life on earth to the modern day, and beyond Linda also helped collect many of these sounds when we were going to actually record sound I think and suggested that we try to do in an evolutionary way. So I've went to a professor at Columbia who specialized in anthropology, and I got the sound of him striking a Flint. Dukes a sense of wonder to it and a sense of the ridiculous and sublime. About halfway through the track. We hear the first signs of human life a heartbeat. Footsteps. The first tools, then modern tools transportation. The launch of a space craft. The last human sound on the track is a recording of Andrew and brain activity. The hope was that extraterrestrials might be able to decode that data and read her thoughts. It's an odd idea to think about whether you know, alien civilization could make sense of the G. But one doesn't know that's Timothy Ferriss who produced the golden record. You know, when you play a piece of music for someone you don't know what they're gonna make of it. Exactly if you're playing it for them, you hope they'll find something rewarding in it. But I suppose that's the idea behind the Voyager record is that if someday far away in space and time you come across this thing. We hope it's meaningful to you in some way, the track ends with the sound of a pulsar the pattern of the sound. Plus, the image of pulsars on the cover of the record can be used to calculate time and distance in space. It comes together as a map of earth's location in the galaxy. Timothy fears also led music selection for the record which brings us to track five. This is the Brandenburg concerto by j s Bach. I was concerned to represent some music that has strong mathematical foundations because we might well be communicating with creatures who don't have hearing or don't have hearing in the range or timescale is different. So that are rhythms might not make sense. None of us imagined that aliens would be like us, and that they would lounge back and listen to the music and experience it the way we do. So I was interested in finding relationships in the music that would make sense, even if you were just mathematically analyzing it, and there are some pieces by Bach and Beethoven. They're there for that purpose. In addition to mathematical principles Timothy also wanted to find songs that could properly introduce us much of the time though, we were just including pieces because they were heartbreakingly beautiful. And we thought they they represented are human values. Next up is track. Six it's an Indonesian folk song called Catta Wong whose porna-. The pieces an introduction for a prince the lyrics name different flowers, each symbolize, a spiritual or philosophical state. Apparently, this was a favorite of Carl Sagan. Carl Sagan our friends, we'd both had a particular interest in extraterrestrial intelligence. How really would you communicate with an alien intelligence in the distant future was of great interest to us and music was subtle on quite early to make a record with music. And then we realized you could put other things in the grooves to and so we had natural sound greetings on the photos and all to buy deepest interest. In live had always been science and astronomy, the universe has a hole in the one hand and music on the other. So here was a chance to bring the two together determining which songs represent humanity. Best is an enormous task Tim Carlin others listened together to album after Alba at one of these gatherings. They found track seven sin gooney, it's a percussion sewn from Benin a nation in Africa. The listening sessions themselves were great a lot more done in my apartment in New York. At that time, I was among other things music critic. At Faouzi, thousands of LP's lining, the walls, and you know, a good stereo. It's what people used to do in those days, civilised music, twenty stereo. It would have been incredible to attend these listening parties. Imagine listening to music with the greatest scientific minds trying to figure out what music should be on an intergalactic greatest hits record. Trek? Eight is a Lima song. This piece is performed by the indigenous people in the rainforests of the Congo. This is followed by Austria Boniver and mois own track. Nine sounds like this. It's followed by track. Ten L Casco bell mariuchi song. You have to consider the dynamic you're in. If you're going to make a brief collection ninety minutes from all the music on earth. Then you are going to exclude almost all of the great music because there's so much of it. We could have done a voyage record every year over the past forty years, and they'd all be terrific. It's not as if you're going to run out. Great is. We try to get music from all around the world. Not just from the culture that had created the space craft. Oh. You end up really with one piece representing each kind of thing the one rock track on the record is Johnny be good. My Chuck Berry. Here's track eleven. Timothy also, use some creative engineering to get as much music as possible onto the record. The disc is the size of record that used to be accorded at thirty three and a third revolutions per minute. I cut the voyage record to have speed. So that we can have twice the content took our high end response down around eighteen thousand Hertz to around twelve five somewhere in there. I figured a little bit of high in-laws was a good trade off for doubling the information content. This doublespace allowed for even more diversity in culture on the record like track twelve mar you a traditional folk song from NEW GUINEA. Remember? Trek thirteen is. So Kaku Rabo this Japanese folks is played on a bamboo flute. It's title means depicting the cranes in their nest. Next up is track. Fourteen it's from the baroque period of western European music. This is Partido for violence solo number three in e major by j s Bach. Music means a lot to us. And I would be surprised if something like music didn't mean a lot to at least some other intelligence species. The fact that it is done specific. And yet communicate something to everyone. Trek? Fifteen moves us forward in history to the classical period. This is from the Mozart opera. The magic flute. Something fundamental about rhythms. Difficult to imagine any intelligence PC's not having some familiarity with. I thought music was a good way of maybe communicating isn't perhaps the right word, but memorialize in the base. Trek sixteen is an ancient drinking song from the country of Georgia. It dramatizes preparing for battle. Now, halfway through the Voyager golden record at the end of one side of a record their wide grooves, the catch the needle. These are known as the takeout grooves or run out grooves popular bands, sometimes used to leave secret messages hand etched in between these grooves. So I'd compose them, dedication and cleared it with the other members which was. To the makers of music all worlds all times when the record was completed in was sent to NASA. There's something called the compliance officer whose job it is to make sure that every part going onto a spacecraft meets exact specifications when the compliance officer checked the Voyager record here was this handwriting. And there was nothing about that in the blueprint. So he rejected the part. So with the project near completion a simple handwritten message almost derailed. The entire thing will flip the record decide be and finish the story after the break. Here's the answer to last episodes mystery sound. Okay. So maybe that was too easy. Because so many people got it. Right. It was just me popping my lips. That sounds used a lot and things like animated videos when you see something like text bubble pop up congrats to Brooke Mallow for getting it right and winning a super soft twenty thousand Hertz t shirt now, here's this week's mystery zoned. If you know that sound tell me at mystery dot twenty K dot org. If you get it, right? You'll be entered to win your very own super soft twenty thousand Hertz t-shirt. And if you have no idea again give you a clue I tweeted about it on my personal Twitter feed on April fourteenth. Eleven billion miles from here, the twin Voyager spacecraft carry golden records. These discs are time capsules memorials of our global culture, but a tiny visual detail of the record almost stalled the entire project. Here's Timothy Ferriss. Again, we went through an anxious week or two when NASA was preparing a blanket dissed to replace the ones we'd worked so hard on for fear that the nonstandard part might threaten the launch Carl had to go to the head of NASA to get away. His argument was that this would be the sole example of human handwriting on the spacecraft that argument carried the day. So it was with a certain amount of relief that Carl nine our collaborators watched the launch of the first of the two voyagers doubt the Cape because there were times when we weren't sure. It was going to work at all, thankfully, it did work out. So it's time to. Flip the record. Roncador syndromes is trek seventeen. It's from the Hong Kong region of through. The Voyager probes were launched in nineteen seventy seven compared to the spacecraft of today. They used really simple technology. So NASA engineers had to use special techniques to reach deep space. The voyagers are accidentally interstellar the used a sophisticated technique to fly past the giant planets Jupiter Saturn on out to your Neptune in such a way that the they were able to excel right to ever higher velocities? So they're lost the exceed the escape velocity of the solar system. That means they'll leave the son of our planet's behind forever and drift in the Milky Way. Galaxy because they're going to last so long in space billion years is the lower bound on there like the lifetime. It seemed appropriate to put some kind of time capsule aboard the craft. Each probe travels in a completely different direction. They're billion year journey is likely to be lonely. It's fun to imagine a lonely space craft drifting through space to track. Eighteen melancholy blues. Performed by Louis Armstrong in the hut. Seven. Next is track nineteen Mugame by as Johnny musician. Camille jalala. Both voyagers are now interstellar that means they've completely left our solar system. There the first and only human made objects to do. So the voyagers will fly on for a billion years, but unfortunately, they won't function for that soon. Scientists may have to start shutting down instruments to try and save power. They still send data back to earth each day. But eventually the probes will go dark and become hunks of metal hurtling through the void. Here's Carl Sagan again. We do not know whether there are other spacefaring civilizations in the Milky Way, if they do exist. We don't know how abundant they are much less where they. But there is at least a chance that sometime in the remote future. One of the voyage is will be intercepted and examined by the correct? The voyagers themselves will die but their mission won't so back to the music track. Twentieth. From ballet eagles Vinci's the rite of spring. By the way, when this premiered in Paris in nineteen thirteen people rioted, this was not what they expect that from a ballet. The next piece track Twenty-one is prelude and few number one from box well-tempered clear. And coming up next is track. Twenty two. An epic symphony for an epic journey this Beethoven symphony number five. This music. Sounds familiar to us. But we really have no idea what aliens might make of it. If they can hear like, we do at all they might only be able to hear the higher frequencies. Maybe the lower frequencies. Or maybe they'll interpret the groups of the record a totally different way. And they won't hear music at all. It seems like miscommunication is a big possibility. Could we anger aliens with the golden record track? Twenty-three is a day you Hayden. This Bulgarian folk song is about an unkillable rebel hero. Aliens. Threat. I never took that part of it very seriously. The idea that. We'd somehow be threatening someone there is just nothing in the history of human species or any other relatively intelligence basis to suggest anything of the sort. I saw no reason to get into such considerations and making the voyage record. The Voyager record is truly a message of peace much of the music is friendly. Enjoy full next up is track. Twenty four. It's a Navajo ninetieth called the dance. Trek twenty-five is the ferry round by British composer. Anthony hoeger. Trek twenty-six from the Solomon Islands its name near near at Tanah Kuku, which translates to the cry of the Megapode bird. If you had to do it all over again Timothy says, he would still use a record over newer digital technology. People say well with digital technology. We could include so much more information, but more isn't necessarily better twelve hour feature films, not necessarily better that I to our feature, Phil. So just shoveling large amounts of data into time capsule does not necessarily create a work of art voyage record. We were interested in creating work of art. There's also the question of durability. Remember these records are supposed to last one billion years. They're not vinyl records like you'd find at home on your shelf. The Voyager golden records are made of copper and plated in gold. If I were doing the Voyager record today. I would use exactly the same technology because I can warrant that the information on that disc will last for a very long time. There is no digital medium that would give me the same assurance. So the technology of making the record. I would have done the same. That would probably be a little harder to do today than it was in the seventies. When that was the universal industry standard track. Twenty-seven wedding song is a Peruvian folk song the woman singing the song laments about marrying too young. It's a haunting melody. Good. Buffa? We the title means flowing streams in Mandarin. It captures the feeling of ever moving water. Voyager craft will flow through space almost endlessly impossibly long after we're gone. I have no way to estimate the odds that the record would ever be encountered by alien civilization. There's so many variables we don't yet know at what rate intelligence emerges on planets that have life. I imagined that life itself is fairly widespread. Vers another big variable is we don't know how long intelligence typically last. The powerful species technologically powerful species like ours. Might still be here in one hundred thousand years, or at might not you then get to the question of how many of those deligence species get involved in space exploration or wire up a whole part of the galaxy. So that they would even be able to detect like Voyager. We don't know that either the Voyager probe would be pretty easy to pick up. It doesn't look like a space rock discovering. That's out there in the first place, though is pretty much random chance. The next track track Twenty-nine Jehad kahad ho from India. The voyagers will travel huge scales of time and distance truly entering the noon. Carl Sagan talks about this in his book, pale, blue dot. Perhaps no one in five billion years will ever come upon them in that time the evolution of the sun will have burned the earth to a crisp or reduced it to a world of atoms far from home untouched by these remote events, the voyagers bearing the memories of a world. That is no more. We'll fly on. Nearing the end of the record. This is the second to the last track trick thirty. My very first gestion was the track dark was the night. Cold was the ground field. Recording decades ago American South. About enduring a cold night with nowhere to sleep. Everything on the Voyager project was both personal and universal China represent the whole human species. I meeting we ever had the poetry record. I propose to goals the first that we try to be as inclusive as possible and second that we make a good record. The final track track. Thirty one is Beethoven's string. Quartet number thirteen. Kevin tina. This record is about humans. It could be our first introduction to alien life or it could become the only remaining evidence of our existence war. It might just be for us. You know, I started said imagination is mourning for in the knowledge there's a certain wonderful that this project was wrapped up in the voyage of record says about humanity. That however, limited or smaller primitive. We may be or have been when we made the record. We had the imagination of the intellect to think about scales of time and space far beyond their own. The Voyager golden record will circle our galaxy essentially forever. That means there's plenty of time for it to be found if there's anyone out there to find it. It's message may not be understood. But it's intent may be the Voyager spacecraft itself is a message to the Cosmo's. It simply says we are here, and we are listening. Twenty thousand Hertz is produced out of the studios of defacto sound a sound design team dedicated to making television film and game. Sound incredible? Find out more at defacto sound dot com. This episode was written and produced by Lee MacDonald than me Dallas Taylor with help from Sam Snead Blay was designed and mixed by next Brad. Thanks to science writer. Timothy ferriss. Timothy was the lead producer on the Voyager golden record. You can find him online at Timothy fairus dot com. Thanks also to artist and writer, Linda, Salzman Sagan. We absolutely couldn't have made this episode without Osma records. They recently repressed the golden record from the original master tapes for forty years before that no one on earth could listen to it. It also comes with an incredible book that I keep right here in my own studio at outlines the history of the project in much greater detail than we had time for it. Also includes all of the photos that were on the record so go buy it at Osma records dot com. That's a record Stockholm. The non golden record music in this episode was from our friends at music bed. Find out more at music, bed dot com. Lastly, what would you include on a contemporary golden record? Let us know what music and sounds you. Choose on Facebook Twitter, whereby riding high at twenty K dot org. Thanks for listening. This ad free. Episode was brought to you by the listeners who support this show. And if this podcast is meaningful to you, please consider joining in with a recurring monthly donation of two dollars or more. You can set that up at twenty K dot org slash donate.

Salzman Sagan Timothy Timothy Ferriss Galaxy Linda United Nations Voyager NASA Carl Kurt Waldheim Bach Cosmo United Nations Johnny Dallas Taylor Dr planet Nick Sagan
Deconstructing the Voyager Golden Record

Just the Beginning

34:43 min | 9 months ago

Deconstructing the Voyager Golden Record

"From kickstarter is just the beginning on this episode deconstructing the Voyager Golden Record. I'm nick UELMEN. And here's a question in for you. If you had to make a playlist that represented life on earth. What would you include? That's the challenge. A team led by the astrophysicist. Carl Sagan set that for themselves in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven. They compiled a record of greetings. Sounds and music representing life on this planet as sent it into space on NASA's voyager probes. It's intended audience was extraterrestrials. who might discover these spacecraft and wonder who sent them? That's right it was a mix tape for aliens. Hello often the children of planet earth does does the call there Chretien de Golden Record. It was a twelve inch gold plated phonograph record bolted to voyager your one and two and housed in his sleeve etched with diagrams explaining to anyone or anything who might find it where it came from and how to play a carcinage forty years later the golden record finally got a proper release here on earth thanks to asthma records and more than ten thousand backers on kickstarter I was one of those backers akers and it was such a treat to receive my copy of the Golden Record even if it was delivered by a mail truck instead of a space probe. It's a gorgeous meticulously researched box and asthma even won a grammy for the design and listening to the Golden Record. It's clearly a product of its time. Certainly if we were selecting a soundtrack to represent earth today it would be different. Oh but beyond the amazing selection of sounds on the record. There's power in holding onto the optimism of the project itself. It's a reminder of a time just four decades ago when curiosity scientific discovery and celebrating human creativity in its many forms where at the center of our public conversation remember this was funded by the government and championed by world leaders. Then President Jimmy Carter and at moments when that sense of optimism might feel a little more distant. It's good to remember that these are roots. And maybe we can return to them. So let's listen to the record. Our Guide will be Dallas Taylor who hosts a wonderful podcast twenty thousand Hertz. They tell stories behind behind some of the world's most interesting sounds and they did a whole episode. deconstructing the golden record track by track it features interviews with Tim Ferriss and Linda Salzman Sagan in two of the folks who produced the record and they start us off with track one of the Voyager Golden Record as the second that agenda Lofty United Nations who represent almost all of the human inhabitants of the planet earth. I I sent greetings on behalf of the people of our planet. You're listening to twenty thousand Hertz. I'm Dallas Taylor. We step out of fall. Solar System into the universe seeking only peace and friendship to teach if we are called upon to be taught if we are fortunate we know full to our planet and all its inhabitants about a small part of this immense universe that surrounds us us at it and hope that we take this step that was Kurt. Waldheim time the fourth secretary general of the UN. And what you just heard is the first track from the most epic album of all time it was made by a team of scientists sts artists and historians hoping that one day other intelligent lifeforms might find it. It's the voyager golden record. It's also time capsule. Oh and there's actually two of them. They're currently over eleven billion miles away hurtling through space at over thirty thousand miles an hour. These he's literal. Golden records are attached to the voyager one and voyager two space probes. These probes were launched in the late seventies and today they're further away from Earth than any other human made object the voyager probes could continue to explore worlds unknown for more than a billion years so there is a theoretical chance. Chance that alien life could find one of these probes in the seventies. A committee chaired by Carl Sagan. curated a record to ride on each craft. Here's Carl talking about the record on the original Cosmos Television series a phonograph golden delegates with instructions for use on this record or a sampling of pictures owns greetings and an hour and a half of exquisite music. The Earth's greatest hits a gift across the cosmic ocean from one island the civilization to another recently recently Osma Records has repressed the voyager golden record using the original master tapes before then no one on earth could hear the golden record in context. But now we're going to explore it together track by track. Kurt Waldheim who you heard at. The beginning of the episode is track one of the record. He greeted whoever might find. This record occurred on behalf of all humanity. Here's track to which are Hellos and greetings in fifty five languages. Salem came in Alton. His Podesta hired shallow. All La Salle lose does because I think it was an amazing project. That's Linda Salzman Sagan. She was in charge of organizing all all of these greetings. She was married to Carl Sagan at the time the records were made their son. Nick Sagan was recorded for the English greeting when he was just six years old. Nick excape degrading in English and we never told him this he just said hello from the children of planet Earth and that was his greeting choked up. I think about it. I kind of appreciate his wisdom that he made a special reading so he. He's a very remarkable young man. Yeah Yeah Hello. From the Children of Planet Earth the greetings continuing to track three this time from more members of the United Nations Masha. Masha stardom and then fed the UN greetings on this track or mixed with another sound humpback whale songs. They play at any district just two days. It don't Mulkey brought by the tracks end. The whale songs are the only sounds left the choice of whale songs deliberate. Carl Sagan believed that they carried a lot of information. Just like human speech. If I imagine that the songs of the Humpback Whale are Sung in a tonal language then the number of bits of information in one song is about the same as the the information content of the Iliad or the Odyssey if this record is found by intergalactic lactic life. It's possible they could understand a whale song. Just as well as they could understand human speech that brings us to track for the sounds of earth. This is a twelve minute. Sound Essay that depicts the history of our planet the first part is known as the music of the spheres. It's a sonic representation of the planets. In our solar system rotating around the sun the music was composed mathematically each planet given its own frequency the highest pitch you here is mercury. The lowest is Jupiter Timothy Ferriss and Andrew and led the production of the sound. Say they wanted to present an NFL Lucien of our planet so next comes the sound of thunder volcanoes bubbling lava. This is prehistoric earth. Each minute of the track takes us through. Thousands of years of planetary development from the birth of life on earth to the modern day and beyond. Linda also also helped collect many of these sounds when we were going to actually record. Sounds I think and suggested that we try to an evolutionary way so I went to a professor at Columbia who specialized in anthropology and I got the sound of him striking a flint dogs a sense of wonder to it and a sense of the ridiculous and sublime about halfway through the track we hear the first signs of human life a heartbeat footsteps the first tools then modern tools transportation the launch of a space craft in the last human sound on the track is a recording of Andrew Brain activity. The hope was that extraterrestrials might be able to decode that data and read her thoughts. It's an odd idea to think about whether you know alien civilization could make sense of EEG. That one doesn't know that's Timothy Ferriss. Who produced the Golden Record? You know when you play a piece of music for someone you don't know what they're gonNA make of it right exactly if you're playing it for them you hope they'll find something rewarding in it but I suppose that's the idea behind the voyager record. Is that if someday far away away in space and time you come across this thing we hope it's meaningful to you. In some way the track ends with the sound of a pulsar the pattern of the sound plus the image of pulsars on the cover of the record can be used to calculate time and distance in space. It comes together. As a map of Earth's location in the Galaxy Timothy Ferriss also led music selection for the record which brings us to track five. This is the Brandenburg Concerto by J. Bach I was concerned to represent some music that has strong mathematical foundations. Because we might well be communicating with of creatures. Who Don't have hearing don't have hearing in the range or his timescales different rhythms might not make sense? None of US imagined that aliens would be like us that they would lounge back and listen to the music and experiencing the way we do so I was interested in finding relationships in the music. That would make sense even if you just mathematically analyzing it and there are some pieces by Bach and Beethoven there for that purpose in addition to mathematical principles. Timothy also wanted to find songs that could properly introduce us much of the time though we were just including pieces because they were heartbreakingly beautiful and we thought they they represented are human values. Next up is track six. It's an Indonesian folk song called Catta Wong whose warner the pieces. An introduction for Prince the lyrics name different flowers each symbolize spiritual or philosophical state. Apparently this was a favourite of Carl Sagan. Carl Sagan and I were friends. We'd both had a particular interest in extraterrestrial intelligence. How really would you communicate with an alien intelligence? In the distant future was of great interest to us and Music was sudden in quite early. Make record with music and then we realized you could put other things in the grooves too and so we had natural sound. Greetings in the photos ought to buy deepest interest in life had always been science and astronomy. The Universe has a hole on the one hand and music on the other. So here was a chance chance to bring the two together determining which songs represent humanity. Best is an enormous task. Tim Carlin others listened together to album after the album. At one of these gatherings they found track seven Sin Gumi. It's a percussion song from Benin a nation Africa. The listening sessions themselves. Were Gray. Lot of them were done in my apartment in New York. At that time I was among other things a music critic and thousands thousands of LP's lining the walls and you know a good stereotypes. What people used to do in those days than the civilised music twenty stereo it would have been credible to attend these listening parties? Imagine imagine listening to music with the greatest scientific minds trying to figure out what music should be on. An intergalactic greatest hits record. Track is Alina Song. This piece was performed by the indigenous people in the rainforests of the CONDO. This song is followed by Australia. Number and Moist Song Trek Nine. Sounds like this this it. It's followed by track. Ten Il Casco Bell Amir Jacci Song. Yeah you have to consider the dynamic you're in if you're going to make a brief collection ninety ninety minutes from all the music earth then you are automatically going to exclude almost all of the great music because because there's so much of it we could have done a voyage record every year over the past forty years and they'd all be terrific. It's not as if you're going to run out. Great is and we try to get music from all around the world not just from the culture that had created the space craft. It you end up really with one piece representing each kind of thing. The one rock rock track on the record. Is Johnny. Be Good by Chuck Berry. Here's track eleven timothy also use creative engineering to get as much music as possible onto the record. The disc is the size of record that used to be accorded rated at thirty three and a third revolutions per minute. I cut the voyager record to half speed so that we can have twice the content. This took our high end response. Aunts down from around eighteen thousand Hertz. To around twelve five somewhere in there I figured a little bit of high in laws was a good trade off for doubling the information content of this doubled space allowed for even even more diversity in culture on the record might track twelve. Mar You Angie a traditional folk song from New Guinea. You only thirteen is so Kaku Rabo. This Japanese folks on is played on a bamboo flute. It's title means depicting the cranes in there next up is trek. Fourteen is from the Baroque period of Western European music. This is Partido for violin. Solo number three in e major by J S Bach. Music means a lot to us and I would be surprised if something like music didn't mean a lot to at least some other intelligence the fact that it is nonspecific and yet communicate something to everyone. Trek fifteen moves us forward in history to the classical period. This is from the Mozart Opera. The magic flute something fundamental about rhythms the difficult to imagine any intelligent species. Not having some familiarity with I thought music was a good way. The of May be communicating. Isn't perhaps the right word. But memorializing the image species. Trek Sixteen is an ancient drinking song from the country of Georgia. It dramatizes preparing hiring for battle. Ah Ah we're now halfway through the voyager wager golden record at the end of one side of a record there are wide grooves. The catch the needle. These are known as the TAKEOUT GROOVES or run out grooves popular bands. Dan sometimes used to leave secret messages. Hand etched in between these groups so I'd composed a dedication cleared it with the other members. which was he to the makers of music all worlds all times when the record was completed and was sent to NASA? There's something called a compliance appliance officer whose job it is to make sure that every part going onto a spacecraft meets exact specifications when the compliance officer checked the Voyager edger record. Here was this handwriting and there was nothing about that in the blueprint so he rejected the part. We went through an anxious this week or two when NASA was preparing a blank disc to replace the ones. We've worked so hard on for fear that the nonstandard part might threaten the launch Carl had to go to the Head of NASA to get a waiver. His argument was that this would be the sole example of human handwriting on the spacecraft. This craft that argument carried the day so it was with a certain amount of relief. That Carlin I in our collaborators watched the launch of the first of the two voyagers down the Cape it because there were times when we weren't sure it was going to work out at all thankfully it did work out so it's time to flip the record This song roncador and drums is track seventeen. It's on cash. I region of Peru the voyager probes were launched in nineteen seventy seven compared to the spacecraft of today. They used really simple technology. So NASA engineers had to use special techniques to reach deep space. The voyagers are accidentally interstellar interstellar the yuesday sophisticated technique to fly past the giant Planets Jupiter Saturn on to your an Neptune. In such a way that the they were able to accelerate to ever higher velocity so their velocities exceed the escape velocity of the solar system that means they'll they'll leave the sun and our planet's behind forever and drift in the Milky Way galaxy because they're going to last so long in space a billion years is the lower bound on their likely lifetime it seemed appropriate to put some kind of time capsule aboard the craft each probe travels in a completely different direction. They're billion year journey is likely to be lonely. It's fun to imagine a lonely spacecraft drifting through space nice to track eighteen melancholy blues performed by Louis Armstrong in the hot seven next is tracked Nineteen Munem by Azerbaijanis Asia. Musician Camille Jalala Both voyagers are now interstellar. That means they've completely left our solar system there the first and only human made objects checks to do so the voyagers will fly on for a billion years but unfortunately they won't function for that long soon. Scientists may have to start shutting down instruments to try and save power. They still send data back to Earth Day but eventually the probes will go dark and become hunks of metal hurtling through the void. Here's Carl Sagan again. We do not know whether there are other spacefaring civilizations in if they do exist. Ask We don't know how abundant they are much less where they are but there is at least a chance that sometime in the remote future ranger one of the voyages who intercepted and examined by me in the correct. The voyagers themselves will die but their mission won't so back to the music track twenty s from a ballet eager Stravinsky's the rite of Spring by the way when this premiered in Paris in nineteen thirteen people rioted needed. This was not what they expected from ballet the next piece track. twenty-one is prelude the number one from box well tempered clavier and coming up next. Is Track twenty two in an epic symphony for an epic journey. Beethoven's symphony number five In this music sounds familiar to us but we really have no idea what aliens might make of it. If they can hear like we do at all they might only be able to hear the higher frequencies or maybe the lower frequencies or maybe they'll interpret the groups of the record a totally different way and they won't hear music at all. It seems like miscommunication is a big possibility ability. Could we anger aliens with the Golden Record. Track twenty-three is Zale a day. Oh Hey tuten this. Bulgarian folk song is about an unkillable. Rebel hero could could aliens interpret this as a threat. I never took that part of it. Very seriously The idea that would somehow be threatening things someone. There is just nothing in the history of human species or any other relatively intelligence to suggest anything of the sort so I saw no reason is beginning to such considerations and making the voyage record the voyager record is truly a message of peace much of the music is friendly. Joyful next up is tracked twenty any four. It's called the dance. Trek twenty-five is the ferry round by British composer. Anthony Hoeger the track. Twenty six from the Solomon in Ireland's its name near Tanah Kuku which translates to the cry of the Megapode Bird. If you had to do it all over again. Timothy says he would still use a record over newer digital technology people say well with digital technology We could include so much more information but more isn't necessarily necessarily better. A twelve hour feature film is not necessarily better that I to our feature Phil so just shoveling. Large amounts of data into time capsule absol- does not necessarily create a work of art with the Voyager. Record we were interested in creating a work of art. There's also the question of durability remember these records are supposed to last one billion years. They're not vinyl records. Like you'd find at home on your shelf. The voyager golden records are made of copper and played it in gold so if I were doing the voyager record today I would use exactly the same technology because I can warrant that the information on that disc ask will last for a very long time. There is no digital medium. That would give me the same insurance. So the technology of making the record I would have done and the same. That would probably be a little harder to do today than it was in the seventies when there was the universal industry standard. Track twenty-seven wedding song is a Peruvian folk song. The woman singing the song laments about marrying too young a haunting melody Good Oh twenty. Eight is bluish. We the title means flowing extremes in Mandarin it captures the feeling of ever moving water. The the voyager craft will flow through space almost endlessly impossibly long. After we're gone I have no way to estimate. The odds is that the record would ever be encountered by an alien civilization. There's so many variables we don't yet know. At what rate intelligence emerges on planets that have life. I imagined that life itself is fairly widespread leaders. Another big variable is we don't know how long intelligence typically last powerful species technologically powerful species like ours might still be here in one hundred thousand years or it might. Why not you then get to the question of how many of those deligence species get involved in space exploration or wire up a whole part of the galaxy so that they we'd even be able to detect something like voyager we don't know that either the voyager probe would be pretty easy to pick up? It doesn't look like a space rock scarring. That's out there in the first place though is pretty much random chance the next track track twenty nine Jihad Kahan Ho from India The voyagers will travel huge scales of time and distance truly entering the unknown. Carl Sagan talks about at this in a book. Pale blue dot quote. Perhaps no one in five billion years will ever come upon them in that time. The evolution of the Sun will burn the earth to a crisp or reduced it to a world of atoms for from home untouched by these remote events. The voyagers Being the memories of a world that is more we'll fly on. They were nearing the end of the record. This is the second to the last track track thirty. I think my very first suggestion. It was the track. Dark was the night cold. was the ground field recordings decades ago. American south The song is about enduring cold night night with nowhere to sleep. Everything on the voyager project was both personal and universal trying to represent the whole human species the first meeting ever had the point directly I propose to goals the first that we try to be as inclusive as possible and second that we we make a good record the final track track thirty one is Beethoven's string quartet number thirteen Cantina. This record is about humans it could be our first introduction to alien life or it could become become the only remaining evidence of our existence or it might just be for US Weinstein said imagination is moines going for it and the knowledge. There's a certain wonderful s that this project was this wrapped up in the voyager record says about humanity that however limited or smaller primitive. We may be or have been when we made the record. We had the imagination and the intellect to think about scales of time and space far beyond their own. The Voyager Golden Record will circle our galaxy essentially forever. That means there's plenty of time for it to be found if there's anyone out there to find it it's message may not be understood but its intent. Maybe the voyager spacecraft itself is a message to the COSMO's it simply says we are here and we are listening This story was originally featured on the podcast twenty thousand Hertz. It was produced by Lee Mc. Donald's Dallas Taylor with help from SAM shneebly and with sound design and mixed by Knicks Bradley. Subscribe to twenty thousand Hertz to hear more fascinating stories about sound find them at two zero K dot. Org If you like your own copy of the Golden Record Osmond records put out the

Carl Sagan Linda Salzman Sagan Tim Ferriss NASA Dallas Taylor Beethoven UN Carl Nick Sagan Timothy Tim Carlin President Jimmy Carter grammy nick UELMEN asthma Kurt Waldheim Chretien akers
Remembering Actor Jerry Stiller / Cellist Lynn Harrell

Fresh Air

47:22 min | 2 months ago

Remembering Actor Jerry Stiller / Cellist Lynn Harrell

"From whyy in Philadelphia. This is fresh air. I'm David Being Cooley. In for Terry Gross. Today we remember comedian and actor Jerry Stiller. He died Monday at the age of ninety two with his wife and mirror. He was part of the comic duo stiller and mirror he went onto play. George CASTANZA's father on Seinfeld and another TV. Father on King of Queens will listen back door in nineteen ninety three interview with him. Well also hear from his son. Ben Stiller we remember American cellist. Lynn Harrell who was known as the gentle giant for his six foot four stature and for his sensitivity with the cello. He died last month at the age of seventy six. And I'll review the great the new Hulu series about Catherine degrade. Today we remember. Comedian and actor. Jerry Stiller who died on Monday from natural causes. He was ninety. Two Jerry Stiller had success as an actor on stage and screen. Then saw a career resurgence in comedy playing George Castanza's father on Seinfeld. He also played devine's husband in the John Waters. Film hairspray. Back in the ED Sullivan era. He was known as half of the Comedy Team. Stiller in MIRA with his wife and mirror their act played off what an improbable couple they made. He was short schlumpy Jewish. She was tall attractive Irish. Let's hear a sample from alive routine. That came out on a record in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven. I Love Your Mary. Elizabeth Doyle I love you Hershey. She marry me. Yeah I will. I will never work. What do you mean impossible? Of course it'll work my father's a Jewish bego bike your father's an Irish cop. What tiffany me? What difference it's like hot PASTRAMI ON ON WHITE BREAD? It doesn't matter it doesn't matter love each other. It's a world of. Hey look hey she. It'll work out. The families will go crazy for each other crazy. That's what they'll do on your mother. I'll I'll hugger kiss kisser. Say Mrs Horowitz Terrific. I hear you make the Best Michigan a bowl super bowl full again and I'll say gee you know where we're going you're going to go to Israel on our honeymoon. We're GONNA live on a couple of not father. Mr Look at this why. You're not losing a son. You're gaining schick. No aware agreeing time. I'll say top of the Irish insurance a great day for the Jewish genres. The Irish. We're not gonNA follow like me for son-in-law Pilots H. O. Ara wishes honeymoon. Blind East along installed sweep Jerry Stiller and MIRA from their days as a comedy team Terry Gross Talk to Jerry Stiller in nineteen ninety-three about his work with his wife and MIRA becoming an actor and about his surprising success on Seinfeld. They started with a clip from Seinfeld in this episode. George landed a job as a model a hand model. And he's home with his parents pampering his hands. Jason Alexander Plays George Costanza and still Harrison Jerry Stiller portray his parents. I know I always knew you have beautiful hand. I used to tell people. Frank did nice to talk about his hand. Held Jevon mentioned his hands to the plenty of people never mentioned it to me memory board. I always talk about your hands. How they're so soft and Milky White. You never said Milky White join some Jello. Why did you put the bananas in there? Is this constant bickering. Stress is very damaging to the epidermis. When you play George's father do you think of yourself as playing your own father? Yeah in a way I. It's all of the things that my father wanted me to do When I was When I was just starting out as a as a teenager when I told him I wanted to be an active front since there was a kind of a a power that went over his face in shock because there was no understanding of what I was talking about and that immediately Put me in another position in terms of the way they looked at me and they wanted me to go to work for instance. That was something. I was really onerous to me. Why should I go to work? I wanted to be an actor. And George is very much the idealist. Whatever his loves and his thinking is It's contra active to his parents and my father said why don't you be a stagehand? That's like being on the stage. At least you'll be working every night and maybe it was easier for your father. Understand the work of a stagehand than the work of an actor and my father was in New York City bus driver. He was Five foot three. He was probably the shortest bus driver. And all of New York City He was Jewish which was not what most drivers work and HE had to put a. Ah Queens telephone book under his seat so he could see the road to do that when I started to drive so anyway a driving a bus and so so the working aspect of life was very close to him in other words. If you put in your ten twelve hours a day that meant you you were worthy of something I of course looked at you. Know my God. How could anybody WANNA do a thing like that for the rest of my life now In the movie the pickle which was directed by Paul Mazursky about a a theater direct a film director played by Danny Yellow. You play Denia yellows agent and it was fun to see you as an agent wondering if you could share with us any great agent stories from Your Life. Well there were times when we were starting out in the business You used to make the rounds you see and Rows meant not only seeing agents but also seeing producers and there was one thing that I always dealt with. Somebody sent me. How do you deal with rejection? I said the way I dealt with rejection very simply was. I kept knocking on every door that I could no matter what happens and I always thought that if I got to see Lee Shubert I would I would be able to get through and Make my marcus business so believe it or not. I got to the office. I knocked on the door and the other receptionist Mitzi high-cost still remember her. I said I'd like to see Mr. She said WHO? Shall I say is calling? I said Jerry Stiller. And I knew that Lee Shubert had come from Syracuse because I'd gone to Syracuse University and the Shubert brothers were from Syracuse. She said just a minute. She hit the intercom. She said Mr still to see Mr Lee. Send them right in. I walked in. I said Mr. Show but he said yes. I said I'm Jerry Stiller. He said yes. I said I'm from Syracuse. He said yes. I understand you and your brothers came from Syracuse. He said yes he said. What are you doing right now? I said nothing he says. When you're doing something will you let me know? I said yes and I walked out of the officer. I couldn't get over the fact that I made it these business so I was never afraid to knock on doors to people ought to another. That is what what will the other thing about the business and getting into see people there were there were agents who were very nice There was an agent named building. Do you want to go on like this? Let me just ask you about The the Schubert's story so when you got out of the office and this is like your big brush with with Mr Schubert did you yourself. We'll wait maybe I should have lied. Maybe I should of like puff mess off up a little bit more taking advantage of the fact that I was in the office with him. The man was so direct. You couldn't lie to him. He's looking right at your eye. And first of all he was very small and his head just came up over the edge of the desk and you felt like it was a canon being shot at you. He would he tell a liar and five seconds. I couldn't go any further than that. So it back to my regular job which was Serving hot dogs at Knicks ours. Juice and this is the quintessential New York job right if people don't need X. which I guess many people just national chain now. Isn't it It used to be a big chain. Anita was Located in the Yankee Stadium It was located in Grand Central. I worked a lot of Knicks and the reason I work needed was at nine o'clock at night. I could get on the on the job work till six in the morning. Get a couple of hours sleep than knock on the doors and Make the rounds. They call it. It seems to me entered a new phase of your career When John Waters cast you as Devine's husband in the movie hairspray well. I had no idea that I would be playing upset divine As as as her husband will be turnblad and with Ricky Lake But somebody called and said You want to be in the John Waters Movies and I had never seen a John Waters movie. But I heard about John Waters and They said well. This is going to be a movie in which you know you could just be who you are. I says well all right I took a wild shot and I went down and so there I was getting it to make up during the first day shooting. They're sitting next to me was was a divine and the first thing he said to me while he was putting on his makeup he had His dress on he was had no wig. He looked at me said house. An said she's fine and few minutes later we were on a set shooting and I was We'll turn for for any listen don't know divine. Divine was an approximately three hundred pound man who always played women or usually played women in John Waters Movies and I'm wondering playing in John. Waters Film changed the way people thought of you. I don't think you've done too much acting before that. And it was such a fun spirited movie and everybody in your family in that film Ricky Lake and divine and yourself. We're really a very very very offbeat people you just fell in love with all the characters and it is nice. People are always shocked when people say I didn't know you did. He did movies or anything like that because I had been doing it. But it's true what happens is when you get into something that suddenly catches the public's fancy and if if you're lucky enough to be in a hit And you don't know it's going to be something changes you recognized on the street like when I went to see hairspray at the lowes eighty third street in New York. I walked into the lobby and The manager said you don't have to pay well. Isn't that the thing that we all wanted? When we were kids. Who Work in the movies for nothing? Then I went to go into the film house itself girl with the hotdogs gave me a free hotdog and I had not seen the picture at all. I had not seen the movies. I didn't know whether I was. I was good at our media minute or whatever I was. So the shocker is to walk out of that place and then suddenly feel. You didn't know what you were going to get yourself into but look how everybody treats you. You See. I loved it and then I went to see it again at the waverly down on the village. And that's where the people were not in the lobby. I was besieged. I was there within people. Came up to me. Is it your will turnblad. Yo Ricki Lake's father and I had no idea it going to turn out that way really. Was it hard for you to break out of the stiller and mirror image years after you had stopped performing with your wife well really stopped We still do it and But at the same time We had come from you know theater backgrounds but the the need to go on my own and and to do her thing alone it really kind of came out of the fact that our kids were born amy and Ben and suddenly hit with a husband and wife work together and suddenly you were being asked to play Las Vegas and then what do you do you pick up the two children and the nanny and you go to Vegas and you get ready to do the nightclub back. I mean it was easier for me because I'm the father and the man. He's supposed to be the breadwinner for the MOM. How could you be a mother and a nightclub performer? Working on new material. And your kids take the kids to school. So we made a kind of a concerted decision which is very rare for both and myself to try to figure out a way to do everything and one of the things that happened with see. She got a job on medical center with Chad Everett in which she was offered a major role in I was in New York She said can I do this? Jerry would you be upset if I went out and did this role I said you do it? Now be with the kids and long behold she got nominated for an emmy for that role and suddenly we say. Hey we got a new career. Ab Ran and the next Couple of weeks I was offered a role in the Ritz on Broadway. With the Rita Marino Jack Weston and F Murray Abraham my dear POW and the show opens and that becomes a hit. And I'll be damned if something to say. Hey there's more to our lives than just doing the act so at we had the best of everything now. We could set the kids off to school. New York will always be with with them or the two of us were with them and it worked out That we were able to the act later to you told us before that your father did not want you to become an actor so when you found out that your son Ben Stiller wanted to go into show business himself. What was your reaction? I had a kind of a knot in my stomach because Ben was Could name all the parts of the body and Latin when he was going to Let literally in Junior High School. And Amy was also kind of like caught up in this kind of I I guess academia but what happened was both of them decided that one point that they were going to do it then dropped out after nine months. He said it's school doesn't give me what I thought I wanted. I wanted to be a film director. And he said I'm going to go and become an actor and be theater person on my own. I suspend if you do if you quit school. I'm GonNa Really GonNa Kick Your Butt. I don't use those words but he said Dad. Trust me I will do it on my own. And would you believe for two years? He went to classes in New York. He studied he cleared up his skin which was full of acne he He went to the gym. He lost weight. He became an actor and he eventually tried out for the house of Blue Leaves for John where he was got the part and he when he was appeared on Broadway is to come down sneak in see him in the second act went crazy watching him. I loved it. I went nuts every time. He got applause. I G GREAT. My kids doing great meantime. Amy's working down at the Thirteenth Street playhouse off Broadway in little isn't some kind of a little red riding thing and go down taking movies of her so I was thrilled watching both of them. Go into it. But every time they came home and said you know I didn't get this. I didn't get that I went and nuts Jerry Stiller. Thank you so much for talking with us. Thank you very kind. That was the late Jerry. Stiller speaking with Terry Gross in nineteen ninety three still are in Miras kids. Amy And ben have gone onto their own successful careers in comedy and acting. Ben Stiller also became a filmmaker in two thousand ten terry talk to him about Zander. A comedy which Ben had written and directed he played the title role but also wrote a role for his father. Ben Stiller Played Zoo lander a dim witted male model in Jerry. Stiller was his agent. I WANNA play a short scene. And this is a scene with your father Jerry Stiller and et cetera. In in your Father Plays. Maury Boston head of balls models and this is a model agent model agency that he helped build build with nail modeling agency. Yeah so at this point in the movie your character Derek. Zoolander wants to take a break from from the fashion world. And so here's your here's you with your Father Jerry Stiller in a scene from zoolander. I WanNa do something meaningful with my life. Maury deeper thoughts on my mind today. I was thinking about volunteering to help teach underprivileged children. Learn how to read and just thinking about. It was the most rewarding experience I've ever had out there kind of thing. I mean maybe it could even have my own institute we could call it the Derek zoolander center for kids who can't read good. What about us? We've built this place together. Look squeezed when I met you. You're a joint potato. Couldn't book a Goddamn Sears Catalog? And who couldn't find left to save his ass. Now Look at you. I can't turn left. Yeah right Berek please. Some bailed marlins go left at the end of the runway. You got a lot of gifts but hiking. Lowy just isn't one of them. It must be given such pleasure to to say okay now going to write a role from my father and direct him in it. Oh Yeah I mean that's how I was laughing listening to that. Just because he's just so first of all character of Maurya so far afield from my my dad's actual personality In terms of like you know ever squeezing squeezing to she of lady. I don't picture him doing that But that was fun was getting him into those situations and he you know he really goes goes with it and goes for it and It was it's great i. I'm really happy like I'm kind of looking forward to someday. My kids being able to see their grandfather in that movie 'cause he's he's awesome What was it like for you when your father was Costarring on Seinfeld and everybody was watching the show. Well you know it really changed his life. I mean he you know for years and years. My parents You know were successful as a comedy team. And you know. Did the Ed Sullivan. Show over thirty times and nightclubs and TV shows and all that and they and the You know did really really well but then I think Seinfeld happened from. My Dad had just changed people's perception of him and reach so many people and I was really very very happy to see that for him because he's really deserving of it as I think my mom is too so you know and and I think it's for him you know he thrives on work. I think he loves to work. A- keeps them going And then out of that came King of Queens for him and people love him. He's a naturally funny human being and he's incredibly loved from that show and so it's it was great. It was great to see that. That was Ben Stiller. Speaking with Terry Gross in twenty ten his mom and Meera died in. Twenty fifteen at age. Eighty five Jerry. Stiller died this week at the age of ninety two after we take a short break. We'll hear Terry's interview with renowned cellist. Lynn Harrell who died last month. And I'll review a new. Hulu comedy miniseries about the rise of Catherine the Great. I'm David Being Cooley. And this is fresh. Air Face Masks have become the new normal as we continue to grapple with the ongoing pandemic. But when did we start wearing masks for our health and safety this week on through line the origins of the n? Ninety five mask and how it became the life saving tool it is today through line from NPR. The podcast where we go back in time to understand the present. We're going to listen to an interview with renowned cellist. Lynn Harrell who died last month aged seventy six in herald obituary in the New York. Times music critic. Anthony Tomasini wrote quote at six feet four inches tall and built like a linebacker with long arms. An enormous hands to unveil up the cello when he played it producing burnished and penetrating sound easily yet. He was also a sensitive interpreter and subtle colorist Unquote Herald. Grew up in a home. Where music was the first language. His father was metropolitan opera. Baritone Mack Harrell. His mother Marjorie Fulton was a successful violinist. Lynn Harrell joined the cello section of the orchestra when he was eighteen and became principal cellist. Only two years later heroin on to perform as a soloist with major orchestras around the world. He also was known as a beloved chamber musician and teacher. He won two grammys for recordings with violinist. It's hot perelman and pianist Vladimir Ashkenazy when Terry Gross Interviewed Lynn. Harrell in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven. They started with the first movement of Shostakovich's first Cello Concerto Is that as exhilarating? Oh indeed I think this kind of cold clammy excitement and quivering intensity is Main thing that I'm feeling when I start to play that it's almost. It's almost impossible to control the explosive quality of the of the rhythm and the the vitality required a enough to actually keep it in wraps enough for it to be a public performance. I find this piece so powerful that it It's just it's dwarfing to come in contact with it and at the beginning of the music. Sounds perhaps a little bit gay a little bit just bouncy and but those sudden crescendo? The tiffany claps the the The offbeat that that that that just a slowly scratches at you until it's just the breaking point. It's very exciting. Are You thinking technique? Are you just thinking what you're feeling when you're playing that? I'm thinking technique occasionally when it gets very difficult but mostly I'm just reacting to the emotional picture of music you are. I think one of the few soloists actually started with an orchestral career. You started your career with the Cleveland Orchestra. Did you choose to start your career at in an orchestra? So that you'd learn ensemble playing better learn to to be part of a larger group. Yes my teacher at that time. Leonard rose a great American cellist. played in years in orchestra. And he thought it was a wonderful musical training. Also I had recently been orphaned and I needed To have some financial security and it was just came along at the right time in my musical development as well your father died. I believe in your sixteen in. Your mother died in an auto accident three years after that was the orchestra family for you. Oh Yes yes. I was so much younger than my other colleagues in the orchestra and in a way I was very lonely because I couldn't really late to them one on one because they were all Zola's my parents and their children were too young for me and the schedule of the orchestra was very demanding so although there was university in Cleveland I didn't really have time to to get involved with People my own age at the time so it was a difficult time but one that I wouldn't trade at all because that's the foundation of my musical and Intellectual beginning your parents were both musicians and as you had mentioned they both died when you were a teenager musicians. Especially when they're young. I think really immerse themselves so totally unusual and shut out a lot of other parts of of life and I was running if you went through that even more so because of the tragedies in your own family Because you you were probably forced to be more of a loner than you might have even chosen to be yes. That's definitely true. I I did Do that and it's sometimes causes problems of adjustment for me today because that world of myself the hotel room the cello and maybe room service is Can Be very complete one when I'm on tour and and away from my family and away from my friends. And it's only over protracted long period of time. Do I realize that That I'm I'm not really happy living that way anymore. But certainly for a number of years it was kind of cocoon that was protection against the harshness of the outside world and in that way music was like a savior to me. It really was a balm on hurt minds. Your father was a metropolitan opera. Baritone your mother was a violinist when you decided to start playing music was there pressure anew to be great and to really shine no there wasn't in fact. My parents were so afraid that they would innuendo that kind of pressure that they They didn't take any kind of active interest or concern with my music at all in school. Orchestras and music organizations. They'd always say well. Of course Leeann has the great advantage of his parents. But I didn't have one musical discussion with either one of them Never went to my father's or mother's concerts. He was as though the only thing that did Rub off was that music as a way of life as a is it. Just normal thing to do was an was part of my family upbringing. Putting on a tie practicing your instrument warming up putting a full dress on our address in going out on stage and performing in front of people was the way people lived as far as I was and it was very dramatic when I went to Florida on vacation and I saw Chris Evert practicing tennis with their father and I realized that her upbringing in tennis was the same sort of thing that I had in music. Just a way of life. Not just something you choose as a profession because her father recorded you've been able to go back and hear him sing as a mature adult. You've been able to use your developed ears now to listen to him. Does he sound different than you. Remember him. Sounding when you were young no not at all. The it's overpowering emotionally particularly when I am using a recording of my fathers as a demonstration of a something in a masterclass in in my teaching That's all I can do to control. Not just breaking up and weeping out of my misery of missing him in his in his art on the other hand I realized now more as because I am a father and he wasn't such a good daddy in certain so it's sort of balances out very interesting. We're listening to an interview from our archives with acclaimed cellist. Lynn Harrell. Speaking with Terry Gross Herald died last month at the age of seventy six. We'll hear more of their conversation. After a break this is fresh air a rabbi an Arab and a comedian all with Cova nineteen walk into a luxury hotel it was Zimba class. Old Young religious secular Arab Jewish was like where am I? It's the hotel corona on. Npr's rough translation. Let's get back to the nineteen eighty seven interview terry gross recorded with cellist. Lynn Harrell who died last month at age seventy six. I want to play are an excerpt of your recent recording of Bach cello suites and wondering if learning to play. This is a right of passage for chalice. I WANNA think one would have to say so in Casale The Great Old Spanish master. Who died to just in the mid seventies he really was the Pakistani of the cello He was the first one in the turn of the nineteenth century. Start to played instruments. So much better. He's discovered the cello suites as something more than just technical practices and They are profound pieces of music. They aren't the Saint Matthew Passion. They're not as good. I don't think even as the Brandenburg Concerto but they're astounding still when you working with a genius like bar or a Michelangelo etching is pretty astounding. It's not the Sistine Chapel okay. But it's quite amazing. So that's what these suites ally for the cellist. It is a real passage to go through to to develop one style and to come up face to face with such masterpieces and they require so much. Technically musically aesthetically and in every way that it's It's a marvelous challenge. Let's give a listen to your performance of the Jig from Fox Cello Suite number one in g major career and Ooh My Guest Lynn Harrell performing the League from box JELLO SUITE NUMBER ONE IN G. Major. I really have to say as beautiful performance and I think of of the cello is have having just a very emotionally direct sound. Maybe more south most instruments and I don't know if that sounds silly or not. No perceptive of you. I think because the cello is the only string instrument that plays really in the speaking and vocal singing registers of all four voices. Bass Baritone Mezzo Soprano and soprano even the highest notes of the Coloratura. We play on the cello. We often are required to buy The great romantic composers but So there's that immediacy identification to being human that it has that some of the other instruments. The clarinet doesn't vibrate. The natural human voice does sometimes quivers if it's very emotionally distraught the Oboe has has read. And you can hear that it's it's The plays with vocal characteristics. But that it's a little bit arbitrary in. I hate to say that about the instrument that I love so much. Piano of course is Is slightly a percussion instrument when I start talking about all these other instruments sounds like talking? Any of them are good. All really loved loved the cello for this direct qualities of communication. That you mentioned. What do you feel physically when you play? Does your body vibrate along with the cello. A little bit. Yes particularly the lower notes. The I hold the top of the instrument against the my neck in as sort of contact points balanced with my other edge. The other side of the cello with holding it with the knees. So a Lotta. The vibrations of the instrument Flow into into my neck and spine and chest and particularly when you're playing very forcefully. The lower tones of the instrument Your vision sometimes. It's slightly blurred because you're quivering right along with the vibrations of the instrument. There's of course as a fairly strange effect on development of character asked what you were talking about earlier. Now I understand. What do you do when you're not getting the sound you want? Every I think instrument has its own set of neuroses associated with what are you doing? This isn't working. I need to. I have to make a change. Yes Yes I recently got strove Ari one of the very great instruments of all time Maine. Sixteen seventy three and they're now times when I think this is terrible because I've gotten used to it and I've gotten closer to make it sound a certain way Fidget FUSS It's just it's all in the mind and try to sometimes recognize that I remember recording and saying to the recording producer. Let's listen to this tape a little bit long because I've just started a practice. Something in this part of the session. I want to see what it sounds like and listened and in here. I was playing a passage over and over again and each time as far as I could hear from the microphones and from the tape was perfect and yet I was struggling back and forth over Oregon aggravating Lee knocking my head against the wall UAE. Where was I it Oh it's very Symbiotic kind of weird relationship. Goes on there There's a small group of really really int- Cello cellist. Performing now you are among them and I wonder if if you see yourself as friends or competitor's you're sometimes recording the same parts of the Repertoire. The repertoire isn't that vast so Is there this competitive edge to your relationship? I think so. I think that's just in the nature of it. We probably Think that each of us is better than the other but on the other hand we recognize that. We're just different and it's wonderful that in music in art. You can't say that Rembrandt greater painter than Vermeer. Or or Gloria. They're just different follow squares. It's just different and We try to remember that but it's sometimes difficult sometimes easy to just think that So and so is Is a wonderful cellist. But I I can do this. That he can't do and not to really be truthful with oneself that that artist is able to do some things that I'm not able to do and those truths are sometimes difficult to deliver up to recognize and to try to do something about them that Slight competitiveness is a very healthy one. I think it's caused cello playing in the last generation to advance In incredible amount in relation to the violin as a solo instrument the cello has had only since. Let's say a nineteen fifty. The most outstanding technical accomplished Virtuosos on the instrument while the violent has had them since the late nineteenth century. So that's because we've all heard each other on record and broadcasts in what whatnot and we said. Oh my gosh. That's pretty good. I'd better go back and practice. Stealthy I love your playing and I thank you very much for being with us today. A great delight thank you. That was Lynn Herald. Speaking with Terry Gross in one thousand nine hundred seven. The acclaimed cellist died last month at age. Seventy six after a break. I review the new mini series about Catherine the Great. It's called the great in stars. Elle fanning this is fresh air support for. Npr comes from whyy presenting the pulse. Podcast that takes you on adventures into unexpected corners of health and science plastic in the guts of deep sea creatures crying after anesthesia building. Your own Internet. Each episode is full of fascinating stories and Big Ideas. The pulse available. Where you get your podcasts or at whyy dot org. Hi Teri gross inviting you to check out our new online archive collecting forty years of fresh air interviews and reviews. You can hear my interviews with people like David Bowie aretha Franklin Johnny Cash. John Updike Tony Morrison Search for names. You're interested in make a playlist for yourself or friends at fresh air archive dot org. That's fresh air. Archive Dot Org. This is fresh air. I'm TV critic. David Being Cooley in the twentieth eighteen movie the favourite Olivia Colman won an Oscar for her portrayal of the Eighteenth Century British Monarch Queen Anne that comic story about an increasingly devious power struggle within the palace walls was co written by Tony McNamara. Ten years before the favourite was filmed McNamara. Wrote a play about another powerful eighteenth century female ruler it was called the great and centered on the young German woman who was chosen to marry Peter the third the descendant of Russia's Peter the great eventually in seventeen sixty to the empress known as Catherine would rise to power in a palace coup against her own husband and become known as Catherine the great even more eventually as in now Tony McNamara would expand his original play by creating and Co writing a new ten part. Hulu miniseries also called the great. All ten episodes of Hulu is the Great Premier today starring Elle fanning as the Russian empress. And this new miniseries is indeed great fun it is also however more funny than it is factual more hysterical than historical the title sequence of each episode acknowledges this honestly and openly with the same flippant sassine is that flavors the entire series after displaying. Its title the great attached an Asterisk with the playful disclaimer. An occasionally true story. That story begins as a young woman is transported from her quaint German village to the Russian Palace re Christened Catherine enthrone all at once into her new surroundings and circumstances her husband to be. Peter is played by Nicholas from the favorite but his beater is not the physically repulsive ruler from history but instead is a handsome imperious pompous brat. Indulging his whims and appetites like a Rockstar on tour and following each of his own jokes or outbursts of cruelty with a self-satisfied Huzzah. He's not particularly pleasant to Catherine at first not even on their wedding night and neither are the other ladies at court. Her only friend initially seems to be her maid. Marielle who is inquisitive outspoken and honest even when asking Katherine about her first intimate encounter with her husband the night before. Elle fanning at this point plays Catherine as endearingly naive but the young empress will learn and grow very quickly. Meanwhile her Marielle played by. Phoebe Fox is already wise and very brazen and opinionated will right. I'm Chris quite fabulous. Us night was right. As you'd imagine to be honest it was brief refer softener relief and not as much as I had imagined. I'm sorry I had thought of warning you. It is possible. Had An overly romantic view unfolding. I do that. It would not be the first. The truth is we do not know each other. A love is an MBA amiss. Bach and I must on it with the full force of my lung so that it busts into passionate flames right. There are many key actors and characters in the great players inside and outside the palace whose fortunes rise and fall according to the whims of royalty and the winds of history not all characters survived through these ten episodes but they all make a strong impression particularly good or Sash Dewan or low one of Catherine's closest confidants and Sebastian Desouza as Leo. Who is presented to her by her. Philandering husband as sexual diversion of her own. He quickly earns his keep. There's a lot to take in and enjoy while watching the great visually. The architecture and landscapes and interior sets are sumptuous rich and ripe as the often scandalous dialogue sexual chemistry intention. Run through the entire miniseries in the ballroom dances as well as the intimate conversations and confrontations. The great is very much in the style of the nineteen thirty four movie. The scarlet empress in which Marlene Dietrich. Start as Catherine. It's got a similar sense of humor and irreverence and a captivating leading lady. Dietrich's empress rose to power using sex as a weapon while fannings empress uses her mind above all in the great both fanning and Holt. Serve up shrewdly entertaining performances. I'd call it a perfect diversion for these times. Except certain coincidental parallels do surface from time to time Catherine embraces. Art The free press and science while her husband is initially resistant to all of them and before the great is over the palace itself is invaded by a smallpox epidemic which has the characters debating about quarantines treatments and acceptable death tolls aside from those eerie parallels though the great is immensely enjoyable and clearly lends itself to a second season for now. Though I give the great a hearty Huzzah come a glove GEICO. That's show crashing. Slow me count on Monday. Show our guest will be singer and actor Janelle monae. She's now starring in the second season of the Amazon series homecoming. She's also had supporting roles in the films moonlight and hidden figures earlier. This year per electrifying seeing performance opened the two thousand Twenty Academy Awards. Her twenty eighteen album dirty computer was named one of the top albums of the year. Hope you can join us. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our Technical Director and engineer is Audrey Bentham with additional engineering. Support from Joe Lieberman and Jillian Hirschfeld our interviews and reviews or producing edited by. Amy Salad. Phyllis Myers Sam Brigger Lauren Crandall Heidi Soman Theresa Madden Moods. Eighty say challenor and says Kelly our associate producer of digital media. Is Molly Seavy Nesper? Roberta shorrock directs the show for Terry Gross. I'm David being cool.

Jerry Stiller Terry Gross Lynn Harrell Ben Stiller Catherine New York City Seinfeld Fresh Air David Being Cooley MIRA Amy Salad NPR Syracuse Comedy Team Elle fanning John Waters Queens devine Terry Chris Evert
The Smooth Sound of Morning News

Switched On Pop

43:02 min | 1 year ago

The Smooth Sound of Morning News

"Earn? Support for this episode comes from Dell taking binge-watching to the next level with their new totally remastered. X P S thirteen laptop with smoother streaming. You'll never have to wait to find out who breaks up makes up or takes the throne, stay tuned. Because later on in the show, I'll tell you what gone. Learn more about the X P S thirteen with Intel core processors and get ready to give your next binge session a refresh. Call eight hundred buy Dell. Welcome to switch on pop music, Nate Sloan songwriter, Charlie Harding, Charlie today. We are here to talk about one of the most popular songs in the western world. Ooh. It's not Taylor swift. No. And it's not little MAs X. No. And it's not the Jonas brothers. Okay. Let's just spin it. All right. What are we listening to hear Charlie? This is the morning edition theme song by NPR. Ding, ding. And while this song is not at the top of the charts. This is absolutely part of the world of popular music. I mean as, as popular as music gets this is heard by millions and millions of people every single day morning edition being the most popular program on the entire radio. Dial I had no idea. Oh, wow. So this is like this is big. Every if you're like like you've heard this is so familiar to you. Yes, Whitney says, when she hears this, she smells toast. It's like this, since the kind of interaction you hear the morning edition. Joe's mean this is like built into our DNA for a lot of us who've been listening to the song was first composed in nineteen seventy nine to company. The daily NPR morning edition news broadcasts. But for the first time since then there's a new morning edition theme song that's been release. I've heard it. I like it. Okay, so but we're going to get there. But I, I wanna talk about, like, why are you BIC witness incredibly familiar piece of music it works on a so affectively? So what I want to do is I want to break down this theme song in the first half, and then the second half we're going to dissect the news theme song. And then I want to hear your take compare contrast. Yeah, but let's just start like why again, this is for a lot of us. This is just like you know as familiar as twinkle twinkle little star or something. So what is it about this song? That's so effective in that screams, like NPR public radio news, smooth jazz. Guitar. Okay. We're going to get there. But first before this move jazz, guitar. I wanna talk about the, the harmonic motion in the sun. First of all, like, what do you? When you think NPR, like what, what do you think of what comes to mind? Drive time news. Okay. Wonky, yeah. Balanced. Yeah. Balanced. Okay. Very, very generous newsworthy. Yeah. Good. Okay. Let's go with that so far. We've got news. You said one key. Let's let's stick with those two. All right. So it's like what current and sort of area diet or something. Yeah. Okay. So I think there's a way that the music to this song composed by BJ Liederman way. Back in nineteen seventy nine gives us that feeling of like area dish in intelligence seriousness even and that has to do something called the circle of fifths. Yes, I remember the circle of fifths from college harmony classes in order to talk about this. We're just going to zoom in on part of the theme. We're just going to zoom in on that, like distinctive guitar part don't dump down to let's play that. Jazzy Bill stop. You're, you're, you're dropping the jazz bomb too soon. We're here. We're hearing classical harm. Yeah. We're talking about the circle of fit. So get so race from your mind the associations of that sound of that smooth sexy. You know, vaguely familiar of hold music electric guitar. I want to focus on the underlying harmony in order to abstract it a little bit. I'll just playing on the piano. First second. Now, I'm going to argue that the reason that we get the sense of like okay this is serious. This isn't hedge is going to tell me important things about my world is because it's using this ancient musical property called the circle of fifths. Yes, let's take that line. And obstructed, even further just into a series of harmonies. Feel that right? And I'm not gonna get too deep into the theory here. We're just going to say that, when you hear this, I think you hear musical logic. Well, yeah, this is like when I studied classical music with you in school. One of the very first things you learn about is the fundamental sort of structure of harmony, and the way in which cords want to move into each other. Exactly. And this is the sort of, like underlying. All of classical harmony is this meta superstructure. Yeah. So fifths are distance between two notes. So we move from our I note g and the cord based around that note to our second note, and our second chord, c. Away from a fifth below g exactly. So that is like a really important relationship in classical music, moving from a note that a fifth below and what we do after that is we take that new note. See go to remove a fifth below that to happens after that Charlie fifth below that to be flat v below that. And that's where in the morning edition deemed the progression stops, but we could keep going right? Yeah. We could go on where it's to a flat. And now I feel like I'm actually quizzing. Back in your music, fifty five final shouts out to professor Arleen coal. We love you sorry, a flat goes down to deflate and fifth below. Deflate is g flat and then a fifth below that is c flat, but will rename it as be major because that's a little nicer. And if it below that is easier that a D, And now where we truly after d major right back to where you were right back to Jean. It's a very complicated way of spelling music, you, like basically go through seven different letters, and you just do so obnoxious, permutations until you eventually get back to where you started. Yeah. I don't know why you have to say, call it obnoxious that seems comedic using when you first learned it, and then you learn to spell in funny ways. But the point being that there's this sort of wild underlying mathematics, where if you start one place you keep going down five. Eventually you end up back where you started totally. This is one of the fundamental properties of western tonal harmony is that this this circle of unlike undergirds so much. And whether we're aware of that or not, whether we have taken music, fifty five that is like present somewhere in our collective consciousness. Certainly. If we've heard classical music after morning edition, listen to Bach or Mozart, specially earlier classical music. And baroque music you're going to hear these things. It's embedded in this stuff. And so you just associated to classical music. Right. There's like callous examples, but I'm just going to pull out one of my favorites. Here's a nice circle of v progression. From Bach's Brandenburg concerto, number five, I movement in d major, what's have listened jam? So every time it switches between the flute and the violin. You can hear. It's moving from one fifth chord to another fifth cart. An ember learning the going through the cycles of fifth was away of drawing composition. So he'll longer and longer and longer. It's absolutely. It's a way of like moving from one harm onic place to another. Yeah. You can also serve as a bridge or a harmonic highway if you. So, yeah, has this feeling of movement, and which kind of makes sense if we're I think about how that applies in the morning edition theme song. I am sort of waking up and slowly rising. And so this thing is kind of, like moving me along. Yeah. Okay. I love that. So it's giving you this energy and momentum and it's also reaching back. I mean, literally when you hear circle Fiszman, especially in this context, a generation later Beethoven, Mozart would look back to that sound, and they would call it this delay onto go like the old old school. That's an old like literally even in, you know, the, the eighteenth century that was being called old school. Yeah. So now it's like firmly got that association like this is old. This is venerated. This is serious. So it's like you know, I think it's a good thing for news program to say, like, hey, we're going to be we're going to be like. Reliable. We've been around since the fifteen hundred essentially, and you can trust us, we know what we're doing okay. Now at the same time, let's move to the complete opposite end of the equation. Because there's things that at least nineteen Seventy-nine would sound very modern, and that gets us back to smooth Jess. Okay. So we're going from era dish in into contemporary newsworthy. Yes. But newsworthy nineteen seventy I didn't. Okay. But I do have an ulterior motive here because I want to understand the influence of smooth jazz here, and maybe in doing so give some credit to smooth jazz, exonerate expiate bring smooth jazz back into the light even putting off this discussion for a long time because I keep hearing like inclinations of smooth jazz coming back, especially into some like LA. Hip hop stuff, one hundred percent and you've been, like, whole lot. Yes, it's time, you know, and the derision in your voice, when you first said two words, smooth and jazz. It was palpable, right? NPR public radio news, smooth jazz guitar. Smooth jazz guitar spruce, droves guitar I think it's it is a cultural trope, smooth jazz bad. Yeah. So we're going to you're going to start going to be our Guinea pig for hopefully, a culture wide movement of re reclaiming Jess. Barbecue me? Okay. So when you think, you know this theme, let's play it one more time. I think one musical antecedent, we can here for this is a song that had come out the year before, or actually, it was released in nineteen seventy seven but in nineteen seventy eight it hit the charts and became super popular and that was feels so good by Chuck Mangione. Maybe the only top forty hit ever to feature the Flugel heart. Okay. There's like letting thing going on. There's some really spunky base half inning. And a really. Lagarto soft tone to the horn. It's smooth. It's, it's butter. It's great. Yeah. No, I think these are definitely occupying very similar sound worlds. They make sense. This was a big kit, but it's an instrumental hit instrumental hip. Wow. Yeah. So it's, but it's interesting because it's not just I wanna talk not just about this sort of sonic similarities and the sonic world of smooth jazz. But also kind of what it meant and what it signified in where it came from and where it came from. So we're at the end of the seventies, let's go back to the beginning of the decade because smooth jazz arises from another jest. I'll called fusion which starting with miles Davis, late sixties was really about bringing the sounds of rock and funk, and Arn be into the world of jazz. And I think like you know, there's many beautiful damsels of this, but a crystalline one would be Herbie Hancock's headhunters. Let's take the first track. Off of that. Chameleon. A a a. The. A I. Functions base. A. Drumming that Harvey Mason senior. Oh, and it is like words fail. It's just pure funk, can't sequence that. A I. The tar line. Okay. So I don't know about you, but me there's not much smooth about this. No. Because this is what's the opposite. This is rough, scratchy funk. Yeah, yeah, yeah. This is rough. And and you know this was like this was a hit unto itself as well. This is actually played on the popular television program. Soul train like this. This is a legit hit in its own right? But it's different. It's like this is like a dance get down, like sweat flying off your face kind of kind of jazz fusion. So how does this transform overtime? I have no idea. Okay. Over the course of the seventies, a new market starts to merge for a longtime jazz had been the dominant music for African American audiences. That starts to change in the seventies fusion starts to take some of that audience that audience starts to move to, to other genres that are popping up, and especially the adult audience that the adult African American audience that listened to jazz is looking for something that they can grab onto maybe something that isn't quite so intense and funky and youthful sure maybe, but that has some of those elements, some of the jazz elements, some of the rock, it's funk. Elements of and the answer to that lies in what would become known as smooth jazz. And we can hear very like early interational of that in a George Benson song from nineteen seventy six we're in the middle of the decade left or Cranston called breezing. Still funky, but I feel like lounge at home. Yeah. Days where it's got that rhythm. It's got that drive, but it's also like a little chiller. It's a little. It's like this grownups music, this is like, you know. Yeah. Put a little George Benson. I'm for yourself. Glasses chardonnay. Let a fire, you know, this is like, this is music for, I love, George Benson. And I love smooth jazz. But we haven't really gone into the, the beating heart of smooth jazz. Yeah. We haven't gone to the eighties when this genre really takes off and transforms from this more sort of Nishi adult African American audience to something that's very mainstream. And that's where it becomes a little more controversial. We start to get this negativity surrounding it. And I think if there's one figure that encapsulates all of that, who would it be Charlie? Kenny G. How there's an essential difference, there's many differences here, but one of the things that I'm hearing when you get the eighties is the introduction of all of these digital sounds. Digital keyboards right shaney as well as digital river, which sort of impossible spaces that you can hear on the drum hits that big. And part of my associated with smooth jazz is the actual production space that the thing is made in what it sounds like more so than even necessarily the notes in all of those digital textures sound bright. They are actually having a resurgence right now in popular music the artifice she -ality of the actual way, the music is made, I think imposed upon my year an idea of what's real, and not real where when we're listening to the Benson. You have some of those big wide spacious sounds made by an orchestra and an actual reverberate space rather than with a digital effect. Yeah. No. And I think you're, you're hitting the nail on the head of what people react so intensely to in the music of Kenny G is this sense of artificiality, not only in the sound of the recording as you're describing, but also in his personality. He's not a real jazz musician. He's like he's a sellout. He's a he's a phony. And I think this view is encapsulated by jazz musician like patent Athenee who described Kenny G as lame ass. Jive Suto bluesy out of tune noodling wimped out fucked up playing. Yeah. Inspires, a lot of animosity the whole back, and you can read into this language. Okay. So now it's time to get myself bucks and say, like, hey Leif, Kenny G loan paraphrase, Chris Tucker, like, and it's interesting to hear Mathie here. It's like a lot of this language to is very masculine very macho like he's serious. He's, he's like this is Wimpy this is this is not like, you know, supercharged macho jazz. I don't mean to go ahead of you. Okay. But I always feel like when I have some sort of subjective relationship to why something aesthetically bad. It's actually something else, not the. Object self? Right. It's like some other kind of cultural identity marker that is unsaid. And so in this case, pointing to masculinity authenticity serenely as well. I mean, all these things are brewed together and come out like Kenny, g you know, jazz monster. Right. So we have to get back to the morning, but I do I would I would feel remiss if we didn't take this digression to say, hey, everyone. Let's get check yourself. Kenny G unmistakable remarkable saxophone tone here that in an instant, you know who it is. And it's not something that just comes naturally. That's that's hard work. That's dedication to your craft, would you call him, the Jimi Hendrix of soprano saxophone. I don't. Okay. Morning edition. So let's bring it back now. Okay. So what we have here. We have I the stealing onto co the circle of fist, this ancient harmonic progression. That says, hey, we are smart untrustworthy and be we have something that in nineteen seventy nine was not only contemporary and cool, but literally, like the paragon of adult African Americans Fistican, which says a lot about a, the kind of audience, they were reaching to, which is maybe a more diverse audience than we might expect and be like, how are understanding of those sounds have changed in the intervening erasing because underlying, this is like the age old criticism that NPR doesn't reach its intended public community that it's too white. It's too old of certain demographic, it serves on urban population, and I'm totally blown away because when you first played the classical thing I was like, yeah. Everyone knows NPR's Eric. I didn't know the history of the jazz sound I was. I went right to Kenny G. So keeping that in mind. Let's take a quick break. And come back and listen to this new theme song and think about what kind of audiences that might be engaging with call. Okay, it's time to talk binge-watch brought to you by the del X, P S thirteen laptop. And today, we're talking about our top three vengeful shows of all time. Okay. Number one Benjamin show of all time. Tremaine. Yeah. I mean you know, I have to be completely honest, I've never seen it. But it's like pretty much at the top of my list. I can't believe we've hung out going to jazz shows Norrland's, and you have never watched tra- may is the best. It is beautiful into Rovan narrative of post, Katrina New Orleans on HBO with all of the best characters music stories. It's beautiful. It's a black Mark. I'm resume. I can't. I can't tonight this is a little unorthodox. It's not it's not a TV show, but I think I'd argue you could been getting of jazz, the fantastic documentary, Shirley, Jackson Conan's, America. I mean, this is like, if you wanna learn about jazz, the world we live in this beautiful film to start with I can't recommend it enough. Okay. Our third top binge Ables show. I would say is explained on Netflix. This is vox explainer show. They're like, super concise, little mini documentary, like fifteen minutes beautifully done animated story. Telling it's awesome, there episode on music and on K pop or phenomenal essential watching totally the cave of one. So as you can see, these are all music related binging, but you can you can get ready for your own binge session. Experienced del cinema technology on the remastered. X P S thirteen laptop with the latest Intel core processors for incredible streaming color, and sound. Call eight hundred buy Dell that's eight hundred be you why del. I'm Todd Vander the host of prime time a new show from box dot com this season we're tackling the American presidency on TV stories that capture the way television effects, and reflects politics and culture. We'll take a look at fictional presidents who've changed the way we think about the real Oval Office, that isn't gentlemen. The president of the United States. The morning everyone. Please take your seats and how real presidents US TV to further their own goals. What'd you come here to plug? Have you heard of the verbal correct from the first TV president people have gotta know whether or not their president's? Well, I'm not a crook to arguably the last, we have fighting the fake news. It's fake phony fake primetime. From the vox media podcast network, and vox dot com. Listen and subscribe, wherever you get your podcasts. Okay. So as we mentioned morning edition has a brand new theme song. And if you thought something as anodyne as a public radio show, slightly altering its the music could not be controversial. You would be completely wrong because this has generated so much attention. And to quote, the NPR buds Mun. She describes the in very characteristic, NPR fashioned. She says the vast majority of the reaction has been negative. So let's spend this new controversial morning edition, the inside. K look funky. Are you hearing the original theme in here at all? And I think it becomes a little more explicit here. Lot of different. Sounds in here. Lots. Claps. Prizing melody. Jail. Immediate reactions here. I really liked the opening. It's really long. There's a few sounds that I almost didn't want in there. It definitely is the old theme song, kind of just reimagined. Yes. Yeah. That's what comes to mind except. It doesn't have that circle of fist progression from the original, which kind of bums me out a little bit. Yeah. But, you know, like, as I said, like, if we're trying to escape the overly one-sided Yar, maybe dropping the classical reference works. Okay. This think what I'm hearing and I agree that they're clearly trying to capture the diversity of like American public radio listeners, I think. Right. And in doing so, like, have all these different sounds, it's kind of like as you go through. You hear one thing and then another and then another it's kind of like the Epcot center of musical styles. And I did read a few things about this. When it when it came out which was like the thing was actually made by a committee. Yes. Has to there's no way like just one artists gets to compose this, and it was made by a music agency that composes things for HBO and other places like that. So why do you think it's generated so many negative reactions? We'll link to a great piece by head reduce the in the end where he goes through basically everything that this fees, but we don't need to do that. Other people. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. Big fans of Adam's work. But like, why like why is this generating so much negative feedback thing aid definitely change? Just ever. It's the thing like if they hadn't even announced it, and it had just like boop played it in people probably be on their drive forgetting to now eventually get used to it. Yeah. But like we've been we've been primed to have an opinion. So that's I think that's the first thing that's going to happen. Interesting. And we also have a decades old relationship. It's not just change. This is something which is the smell of toast. Right. So what are we going? What are you going to smell out so we have these deep deep deep personal cessations thing? Okay. So Charlie this point. Let's spin the new theme one more time. And see if we can't pick out what they might be trying to reference through some of these musical decisions. I'm hearing a mixture of acoustic instruments, and then sample based instruments. So the most predominant change. Here's a Ford of the floor kicked her. Them. And then there's some sweeping sh- kinda sound here, which are sort of like EDM ish. At the end of weird clap sample, which I think, is actually far too high in the mix. It's actually only thing I really don't like about this song is just the mix of that clap is. Okay. This is cool. So maybe it's not that they're actually saying, like, oh, we're gonna reference these specific genre. 's these specific, you know world musical styles. But more, we're going to incorporate these general sounds from the twenty first century into this theme. Yeah. Risers for in the floor bass drum. I mean that could be in the back of a house track for sure. And then these claps which you would find I don't know anything from like a big Sean track to, you know, the new Jonas brothers song. Yeah. Okay. So it's, it's more about the arrangement choice in there was no point where where they're like. Oh here, here's a here's a trap song, right? There's not one point where I was like, I knew the song they were deriving from the particular styles just the instruments. Yes. Yeah. So you think that serves the purpose does that meet the requirements of sounding more contemporary to you? Yeah. I think it's perfectly effective part of me just wants to not even judge the sung until another three decades. Have latte. Holy it sort of like sat with us end becomes like part of our new new cultural touchdown and that, you know, might be a cool way to pivot to another discussion. I wanna have regardless of how you feel about this new theme. You know, there's another NPR theme that has everything you want, and that's all things considered. My favorite theme. Is that a different rhythm the one before we'll talk, let's dig into the details of it in a second. But what I wanna I start with yet. I mean, we're on the same page, Chuck, like I love the sign, and I'm just gonna lay all my cards on the table. I even prefer this to the morning edition in the first place served, if a purpose, though, yes, I actually acoustically what it's doing is actually try one is waking you up at one is sort of, like taking you home, how interesting. Oh, yeah. Because all things considered comes on in the afternoon. Yeah. Drive time show. Yeah. Through traffic. It's evening music of fast. Okay. So what's what's wild about this? When those unlike morning edition, this theme song what we're listening to is already the end result of a number of changes to, to the theme. So let's go back to the first all things considered them by done vogue. Alley in nineteen seventy six. This is switched on Bach. Yeah. Drops. Collars, try the best part is coming up in the next variation here. Rising peggie. It'd. Wow. Okay. So almost entirely synthesized in sequence, but also very classical reference switched on Bach who inspired games. Hopefully, the popular at the time using this the size or on old music. Okay. That's for two nineteen Eighty-three. We'll hear the development of this all things considered theme. Which position here we started to get the rhythm, which makes it sound, it's like more code is that we going for. Yeah. Like telegram. Yeah. Like telegram service, everything whenever you see, like a movie has something news like. Use that kind of telegram sound is used in all kinds of veto. Exactly. Totally. Yeah. And. You hear that the other one get there? Get there. Slow your roll. We're gonna get there. But yeah, this is definitely more classical more developed, you know, interestingly still hearing the circle of fifths motion that actually is something that connects us from all things considered to morning edition. You wake up and you go to bed both with the circle of fifths. Now, fast forward to nineteen ninety five and we get the current interruption of the all things considered theme, sung recompose by the great jazz, trombone, est Wycliffe, Gordon. This is the section. It's really knew. Yeah. And it's not smooth jazz. This is Bob. Yeah. That's I love. Yeah. Okay, let's just hang out here in this kind of vamp tail fade out section of the nineteen ninety-five Wycliffe, Gordon, all things, considered beam. Okay. I think what's happening here. Why this is so compelling. And like you I'm the same way. I'm like, well, I listen to this day, I think what's happening here is we've got to rhythms going on at once poly rhythm. Yes, we have one rhythm. That's in three two one two three one two three one two, three one two three. And we've got another rhythm kind of drawn from the original bomb. Boom, boom. That's in four one two three food to two three four. Yeah. And now what Wycliffe Gordon is doing is like he's putting them on top of each other at same time. So once we hearing one two, three one, two, three one two, three four, if you put those together, it's like. One two three two, three one two three four. The one two three four I was that party trick over for you. I've worked on that a long time. And I'm glad to finally share it on the show, and that's like super exciting to listen to because your mind is Louie being torn in two directions. Oh my gosh. Division division, three four. Make it my mind can't stop listening. Yeah. So this is I mean, let's just like I of want to step back now and say, like, regardless of whether you love or hate the new morning edition themes, on, like trust that all things considered. We'll always be there for you. The other thing I love about this theme is that it's been recompose and so many beautiful ways. This is my favorite thing about it, too. Yeah. Every single time you here on the show. They play in different context, depending upon this sort of emotion of the story will it's also gone this one, especially as gone beyond the world of NPR into the world of popular music, at large, like check this out. This is incredible. Arrangement of this. Tune by easily my all time favorite Capella group, take six. Yeah. She. Yes. Oh my God, I heart is racing. So that it's just like a masterclass in vocal harmony, and I mean, I would just listen, I would listen to that on repeat. It's, it's so good. The timbre are so beautiful person's voice the way that they take on the instruments. It's amazing. Okay. Try and now I want to end our conversation with another pop version, another sort of recomposition of the all things considered the and this one's by one of your all time favorite bands. Very cylinder. Nope. Great guests, though, that's to be MC. Go reach deep reach deep. I know you've been talking about nine inch nails on the podcast and your youthful love of that ban. But go even deeper, it's fish. It's fish. You've you've exposed. Cowbell our. I mean, this is the fishies fish that was ever fished. So I love what they've done here. But I I'm being a little tongue in cheek like also, let's get to the end of the song because something really interesting happens brings this whole episode full circle, they turn the song into a few like we were talking about morning edition, and how it's using these old baroque Bach properties of music now fish takes all things, considered, and just makes that man can't just drop an f-bomb and not explain what you're talking about. I feel justified in wild fish growing up. They're the best. That's amazing. You dropped the f bomb, and I don't know if everybody's going to be familiar, I'm not gonna define few in the last two minutes of an episode. We'll cover that in a future. It's just it's a baroque technique. Yeah. We get a reference to what we were hearing in back in morning edition like this circle of fist stealing onto go this old school baroque approach. I mean you hear this, and it sounds like BOK BOK does. Okay. This point we've spent more time than anyone probably should dissecting various in VR themes. But my takeaway is that, like, regardless of whether we do or don't like this new theme, these themes, will continue to, like ramified through our world in ways that we can never expect and we'll roles in our life, that we can't expect so like I'm curious to sit with this for a while. And listen to it day in day out and see how my appreciation of changes over time. I'm getting the cultural historical associations to these sounds are constantly changing based off of the references that we come with. And I didn't know anything about, as we talk about in the first half, about smooth jazz, and how it had multiple racial vectors that I actually became associated to NPR, and I didn't even realize the importance of music made for adults and it's something I actually would like to explore further. The show at another time because there's a whole world of music that is geared towards young people, and another world that is geared towards adults and different audiences in different. Genres have tried to sort of seize an adult listening audience, another thing often much maligned and I didn't have probably something worth unpacking. More there. There's some sort of ageism going on. What's there? I think there's a lot of ripe discussion to be had could look forward to it. Switch on pop is produced by Nate Sloan, NB, Charlie Harding, or engineering, mixing mastering done by Brandon, McFarland or community manager is Sarah, Terry. The shot Kirwa and Allison rocky are executive producers are production, vox media. You can find more episodes of our show anywhere podcasts exists, and you can always reach out to us contact. It's which on pop dot com. Twitter switched on pop anywhere else, which pop out there. We'll be back again another week and we promise you more pop hits until then thanks for listening. Hi, I'm Ashleigh Carmen of the verge, and I'm Linda me of the goods by vox. And we are the hosts of wide, you push that button, a show where we can fronts, the decisions that technology forces us to make and good news. We're back and we've got new episodes out now. This season will be tackling topics like why people slide into DM's why people run anonymous accounts. Plus, we will also have special miniseries about death online. Eventually, we'll be more dead people on Facebook than living, people listen to push that, and every Wednesday on apple podcasts Spotify or your favorite podcast app. Ends of scribe for free to get our new episodes, automatically little seal later.

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Audio Judo: Glen Phillips of Toad The Wet Sprocket And One Full Year Of Podcasting

Pantheon

59:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Audio Judo: Glen Phillips of Toad The Wet Sprocket And One Full Year Of Podcasting

"Hello everybody welcome to another episode of audio. Judo I'm Kyle and I matthew. We'll. Oh? You. Know I was because they today. We're interviewing Glen Phillips. That's true you know You know quite a bit about him, don't you? I do. I. Do just start off your. about a year ago, I came to car with an idea. We just finished working on a different podcast for about six months or seven with varying success it was breaking apart for work reasons, couple of our regular members going to take jobs, but quite honestly My heart wasn't in it anymore as it had become and something I didn't really recognize that it was when it started, so I told Kyle what I really WanNa to do podcast about music. That was really my first love and I feel like. I could do some service and be at least a little entertaining talked about it for a while trying to shape it and see what form it would take. Originally. It was going to be more of an argument show or to convince each other wine album was good or bad. I don't know how long we could've kept that up I'm not not long because it seems like we keep agreeing on albums, so it would have been a problem. That would've been weird, so I thought why don't we just get together in my garage? After work I'll pick a record. We can do a little research independently and talk about it. See what happens so that's what we did. And after a year now, this podcast with a fairly humble beginnings. is now thirty four or so episodes all fat thousand downloads, and it's growing daily. Joined a music podcast network at their invitation. Yeah, which was great, interviewed some up and coming bands and artists, and some legendary artists as well. Yeah, couple of guests, hosts, couple, and that's been It's been a ton of fun so the first record we ever talked about was fear by told the Westbrook. And to bring this amazing first year of the Audio Judo podcast full circle, we are going to be joined in a few minutes by the lead singer of Said Band Toad, the wet sprocket Glen Phillips. we could really think of no better way to close out the year and begin the new one this. Yeah, so glen has been with toad since its very beginnings in the mid eighties when he was just a teenager. Recorded six records with them as well as releasing several solo records lately. He has been performing regular facebook live shows from his home during lockdown free of charge as well as some stage shows for a small fee. However, during these shows, he is constantly raising money for a myriad of charitable organizations I've been a fan for thirty years of their music, but stuff like that. That makes me a fan of Glen as a person. So, let's welcome in Glen Phillips. To See, you know before we get started You're kind of our anniversary episode. I record ever talked about on our podcast. Last July was fear. So first of all, thank you for that. Yeah, and Thanks for being with us here today. Sure thing so, how are you Are? You holding up during this lockdown? I imagine it's coming to some sort of merciful and or beginnings of an end. Yeah, I! Don't think there's an into anything coming up I. Mean it's it's i. mean especially as a musician. Since I think we're known as super spreaders singers are. Basically. Our job is to spit all over people so barring of the vaccine. You know high hopes for For Operation Warp speed not actually. Not a lot of eighth. But Hey. I? Six at Sei. We'll be as happy as anyone but we'll be surprised, but yeah, yeah, I'm happy to be surprised. it's GONNA be. An interesting couple years to to see how things come back online. People have been really generous. With the online chosen stuff though and It's felt good to given myself stuff to do in this time, but Yeah. It's also been been pretty weird, so. Mostly I've been showing up on time for interviews and making all that work. Fan! I got. Out Up in. Is for everybody so so well. We appreciate it a yeah. You're speaking to Matthew obviously and my co host. Kyle is with with us today. Through still hanging in there, things are going well, so you've been doing these concerts, but you haven't been doing the singing circles. Obviously, no, am doing the singing circles they're. They're different. Though I've been doing them a online on zoom out. As soon as I am done here any dissent out my notice for tomorrow, so we're doing them on Tuesday nights, and what I started doing was bringing out a looping pedal. a lot of the. Strong's the the singing circle. Songs are kind of by design. written to be Sung not an written for people. You know who were just. With the written to be easy quick teaches for like non musicians and so something you can jump in on, and and you know you learn a eight songs in an evening. And so they tend to be kind of short and repetitive. They turned into kind of Montrose. You know more like a cure tom thing. Something fairly positive over and over. And so they're perfect for live looping. Do. Is We go on zoom and I? Sing and I'll teach the parts, and then I will start looping myself, and so they can all hear me and choose the part. I WANNA sing, and we're all doing it at the same time roughly, but everyone else's muted, so we don't have this cacophony of delayed signals. and. You started doing that locally in the community around where you live right by. You've been doing that for several years. It's almost three years now and Yeah I've really loved it for years I was wanting to find ways of making music that we're kind of non-performing tive and you know as inclusive as possible I love performing and I love. You know I love expertise and being. You know really good at what I'm doing but I also. I just feel like music is something. Everybody has a right to make and the joy of it. Is Something Pretty Universal in most cultures? It's not so professionalized like. Everybody sings you go to a bar? You know in any country in I mean here. We slide sweet. Carolina's closes get. That's true. Dada fat button like everybody knows. You don't and maybe I don't know you know. Don't stop believing but site from that. We don't have like our songs where. You know you just everyone knows it. You Sing it and Kinda defines the region. You're from and Accom a common -ality and so these songs are kind of a a patch on that important cultural thing that we lost i. mean it's just there's few better ways to feel like you belong than singing. The same song is a bunch of other people at the same time. It just feels great, so the closest I've ever seen to that is. Like a art like an Irish bar or something in the midwest where everybody in their nose, every single song that's being sung in, it's it is like a group. It's a group effort. Everybody's into it. Yeah, it's one of the coolest things about going to Ireland and you know their songs that everybody sings together, and if somebody's singing along sad ballad, like everybody else, just you're respectful you've you go quiet and you wait for the guy you. You let him sing his twelve verses. Trials, individuals, and then, and then you get back to talking can it's a? It's a really great thing. Anyway yeah, so this is kind of a another. Another way to try to patch that back I mean. People do it together in church. That's one of the only times and I. Think there's things like Sunday assembly that we're trying to be kind of a non-denominational. you know equivalent the belonging parts of church without necessarily having to have any. Belief. System behind it. Just you know the effect as opposed to the background. Dogma. Radi call it. So are the the stage at concerts and the facebook live stuff. Is that an extension of those singing circles? Is that kind of what the impetus was for that? Oh, I'll throw in a song. It's more something to do. I used to do a lot of stage at concerts, and then I lived in a place with really bad internet for years. And so the broadcasting wasn't possible I kept trying to do stage. I would just get knocked line. Just before. You know just kind of. The shit hit the fan with Cova da I upgraded my. Upgraded my Internet again started into to that and so It was good timing so. Yeah and I'd had an audience from having done it. You know so far back so. the stage was great I'd never done a facebook live thing before, and now I'm doing. It was doing five a week now I'm doing three a week. and And, that's. kind of cool been able to raise a lot of money for charities and You know every night. I try to have a donate button there and you know support some other kind of covid related nonprofit, and there's a ton of them, yeah, and so. yeah, it's kind of been. Gee, I love those shows so we. My wife and I just We'll watch him every evening or during the week, and just throw it on the TV and and it's great. It's a it's Super Fun I. Know You've had technical difficulties as we all do, but A. it's a good time. Just working out like having too hard now, hard wire the Internet instead of trying to do the a Fi and the fact is like the cable company here they're. They're out every day like trying to increase the infrastructure and make it work better. Guy Was saying and your neighborhood is seventy percent overcapacity. Like oh that explains a thing. To shut off every other vice in the house it's. You know we are completely straining all the local ISP, so it's it's kind of amazing, actually how much extra throughput they're able to handle, but that doesn't mean the whole neighborhood doesn't like, plummet and crash every once in a while, so since these type of like livestream concerts and things have kind of come out of a necessity from the whole cove in nineteen situation. Do. You think they'll continue afterwards. Is it something like you and you've said that you enjoy doing it, but for you and for other bands for that matter? Do you think it will continue afterwards? And do you think people will be as generous paying for for the arts? Following this I mean I. Don't know there's already a little bit of diminishing return on it. which which I get, you know. This is lasting long time And At the same time I think music is a lot of what gets people through. You know there are and there's so much. Every musician is doing this right, so you kind of find your little corner and I'm glad I, have enough people that I'm still being able to pay the rent off of it with. I'm blown away by. So. You know at the current rate of decline. We'll see what I'm saying in six months. where I have to live, but. Still working pretty well so about that and. yeah I mean a stage. Know I loved doing that. When I was on the road and there were you know it used to be like there are people post you know these pictures of like you know. They make themselves to cheese tray and opened up a bottle of wine and put the kids to bed and do stage at a lot of people who would like to go to concerts, but either I hadn't been to their town in a while, or they were just at a place in their life, or they couldn't come out or people who are ill or you know it's just like. So there are a lot of people where It was this kind of meeting place. You could get together. It's pretty low overhead as far as the cost and You know there was that feeling of of. Community they kinda comes up through the chat. And it's the very same people who had never talked during his show, and they get to talk as much as they want during a broadcast. So they're having a great time getting to know each other and I. Mean I think it works pretty well for everybody so? On the one hand, I think people will be really excited to get back out and go to clubs, and at the same time I think people will be. will still value that experience in the friends. They've made along the way, but I mean pupil are going to be. Over the moon at if there's a point which they can just go to a club and not feel. Unsafe or like? They're putting others at school. To I, know you. You and and the band separate of you. Guys have always been super charitable, and all you've played concerts for Jack Nicklaus, and his children's Health Care Foundation Sierra Club and the one most associated with you guys because of holder down the rain organization, the rape, abuse and incest national network. Obviously, you feel strongly about these things. But. How did all this come about this passion for charitable work and stuff like that? It's just kind of. I don't know it just seems like. A reasonable thing to do if you have a bunch of people gathered together, you know you can. Do, a little bit of Hey, since you're all here, look at this thing. This is kind of cool. This is helpful and. So always seem, nor I mean examples growing up youtube. Rem Peter Gabriel doing all his work with Amnesty International. I mean you know been a lot of you know it's? It's one of the things you're able to do. if you get a bunch of people together looking in the same direction, you can direct a little bit of that attention to. Ways of you know either finding help or helping other people and just You know seems seems like a good effort to put in. and some years. We've been better at it than others some years. We've been trying to keep our own. Lives together and get along and get out on the. Earth. Some years. We kind of remember like Oh. Hey, we have like. Let's make this. Even more fun and have avid peaceful. So. These days I think there's a little bit of Choosing what will be? Beneficial and you know like. Choosing as things become more and more divisive. it's interesting to kind of pick a pick thing where you hope the conversation around it and not that. I even had this last week. Where every once in a while, I kind of boil over about the administration and I. We still in unwisely post something on facebook where nothing turns out good no. It always turns into the same conversation. I'm like. Damn it. I didn't I didn't want that I didn't want to have like five people. Right me and block me and tell me they'll never listen to me again. and I didn't want to see the petty arguments. I didn't want to see like demand planning on either side. I don't WanNa. See The people who agree with me politically taking cheap. Nasty shots at the people who you know it's like damn, the like and once again. The stuff that I'm angry. About is starting. You know and I don't feel. This is conservatives in general. I feel this is like. We're in a particular move and I know I know personally a lot of conservatives who are really unhappy with what's been going on. You know this isn't me. This is not what I said. This is not you know, but it's A. It's so kind of divisive in reactive that to try to figure out okay. How do I talk about the things they care about in frame them in ways that are. Entirely positive you know without invert starting a twitter war. If I believe in love and thousand people supporting each other. I should be able to describe those. Things in ways that don't push people away, and yes, my specific are gonna be different and and I think we're up against something that is beyond ideology right now. That is that is I think Y- patently evil and that that's hard to work with and fight when you're having to go like wait, you know. The Sky is blue. The grass is green. In Gravity pull stores large objects with massive like. Things haven't changed. A great hydrogen, his electron and you know. Like al.. and. It's odd when when things that just felt like i. don't know like the the solid ground. We all share by which we can start to have a a discussion are no longer. there. It's easy to kind of get. Frustrated and start lashing out, and so it's it's. It's always interesting to try to figure out how to have that conversation away. and not to like back away from conflict, but to ask what's the most benefit? And what are you actually want to achieve you know and. You know it's and. You know so, and and where do you draw the line? You know it's like Yeah, so Some people get upset about the. Sierra Club because it's restricting their freedom to do whatever they want in the wild extract whatever they want from the wild. I don't care if they get upset. Anyone ever had a problem with rain. I really don't care if you have a problem with rain. It's like I'm not going to spend time soothing. You Sir. You know and same with amnesty. International I felt like prisoners of conscience, people being tortured like now. That's you know basic human rights stuff. I'm going to stand up for that so and I think those conversations are all. You know once again I. don't need everybody to think like me I think people can come to really intensely different conclusions you know based on that starting point of like yeah, I love people. I want people to be safe and happy well, and you know we have these metrics of trust. The private sector! Do you trust government more? It's like neither neither nobody. What are we going to do because it's all we have so lake. And then you can start a conversation rather than going. Government can't do anything right and private sectors all about money and greed. You can have a conversation. That's like well. We want this to be a better place right. Yeah, I can agree on, and so, what are the tools? We have private sector in government. How do we want to use them well? That's the beginning of a conversation and I get that from time to time and I I just go. With people yelling at each other, and I've been the guy who instigated it. I'm like damn it, I did it again fell for it. I think that's become culturally. What's what what happens now is? That now. Are Timeframe is so short now for for remembering things that have happened because everything happened so fast now and we're so plugged into it I. Think you're absolutely hit the nail on the head. It's just we forget that you know you have to have a base. You have to have a starting place where everybody can say this is proven. This is where we need to start from now. Let's launch off from there and make things better. I think it's really refreshing to hear that, too. Because there's so many people that don't understand that and the ones that do oftentimes won't admit it won't come out and say no. We need to stop. We need to step back and we need to say. We have to come up with a starting point. Yeah, well, and and we have to be willing to be wrong. And willing to learn you know and I mean. You know when I go into science, and this is one of those things that I don't know if people understand about science, and you know, it's just like the scientific method is not based on. You have a theory, and then you try to prove it correct. Scientific method is based on. You have a theory. Then you try to prove it wrong. Yeah like. You do a whole lot of research and you test the theory in every way, you can imagine to test it to see if it holds up. And you know positive results result they get a as one of the difficulties and sciences, the human desire to. Get more accolades if you. If you got A. You had a good idea and it was right right right? people who do like a really brilliant thesis turns out to have been slightly off, don't. They don't prizes. You know and but they do really important research, because all the people would like Oh. What if things work this way? Get to look at that paper and go. Oh, I! Guess, maybe they don't. Fast Good. Agree, GIVES A. Lot of work but You know we reward positive results in a different way, but that understanding that that it's not just everybody has a hunch. And, then his only collecting the information that backs up their hunch. It's like it's really. Trying to design systems that work around those that human desire to be right, and that put in, fail safe so that hopefully what you end up with is the truth instead of the thing you wanted, and I think the more we apply that to our politics and everything else that the better off will be, but that stuff is that stuff is really hard. I mean I I've spent a lot of time in a kind of pre Internet days I think partially because so many of toads live Eric's are so I. Use a lot of you know. Christian imagery today Christian imagery because that's. Kind of. Those are the metaphors. Those are the midst of our culture. Right? That are you can? I find it fascinating. Read a ton. You. Know read a lot about early Christian history and I thought it was fascinating and So using that language, there are a lot of people in the church you kind of. Thought that we were. Part of that world, and who are actually really shocked when they meet me and I'm like a Buddhist leaning. Liberal! and. And so I learned a have like really beautiful conversations. You know in person when you can slow down and avoid triggering, and I can remember that these people on the right really love their families, they really. Want to do what's best for you know the people around them and I can show them that I I'm you know? I don't know that you know. I can be the exception to the rule for the liberal as well as somebody who listens and isn't like angry in crazy and you know. And so? I think the more we get closed. The more we realize you know were were two sides of the same coin, but. I. Don't know what you do. When when you know basic reality I. Don't know if there are things that start to just. I. Do a lot of practice in trying to empathize and trying to understand how somebody can think something really different than me and sometimes it it's it's more strained process than it used to be just when I'm looking at things that seem so. Violent and I end of angry and and divisive in their core and. I'm expected to react to them Anna in A. Gentle Way I. Sometimes really takes a lot for me to figure out how to do it or even if I'm capable, so yeah So, yeah, it's it's interesting. So you've been a part of Toad, and or making music for most of your life since you were a teenager at least right since you were in the band. of music hadn't worked out for you like it has What did YOU WANNA? Do you have other career aspirations, or was it music music alone? Oh No I. I was I started in theater I always knew I'd been the arts in some way or another. and I had. Thought that I was going to be a high school teacher. I was planning I mean. The band got signed kind of by accident. We'd we'd made a couple of records. Just as a local band, we put out a tape in town and we were recording our second record. We're recording Pale. And the plan was that we you know. put it out. Play a few gigs in town, and then I was going to go to San Francisco and go to San Francisco State I wanted to live in the city and was. GonNa! Teach high. School! And then I remember it was. We were in dead week in two of the guys were at UCSB I was at City College, in Santa, Barbara and we were supposed to be studying for finals instead we flew out to New York and signed a record deal with Sony. Later, we were the road and so And they put out the records we done. That was when I was eighteen. And I think he at that time I was like our. We're GONNA get dropped. And, but we're going to have a real story. I'm going to be able to tell people like yeah. I was in a band. We were like we aren't Columbia records and. and. I just thought it would be this thing that happened and you know now here I am certainly no longer on a major label. Become my life in a way that I could never have Predicted and even with that I mean I had decided at age sixteen. I had a theater teacher in high school, and it was his I. Mean I've told this story before, but it was his first year teaching and He came in and he's like. Hey, you're my first class. You know I've been here. He was there the year before when I wasn't there as a student teacher but he's like. Basically. I'm here because I. Love the theater more than anything. And I saw my friends going to New York Chicago and Los Angeles and I realized I didn't WANNA have to. I wanted to be in the theater. DidN'T WANNA be auditioning? I didn't want to be selling myself I didn't want to. Have that world. It. was that important that I be the guy? I just wanted to be in the theater because I love and I realized that reaching was the way that I could do that and I remember at sixteen. I'm like yes. Absolutely. The idea of going out in the world and promoting myself. was just. Frightening. and. I realized I. I'm a sensitive person. I mean I've always. been prone to depression I've always you know had? I don't know Kinda thick skin. A thin skinned sorry Alec. The reading reviews seeing nasty comments like it just tears me up, and unlike perfect that way I can do art my whole life. Encourage other people to do art, and I don't have to sign up for ridicule and that sounded like A. Really great deal to me, and then so of course instead I'm like I i. was one of the people had the repeated dream of like? The dream of like you give your book report. And then you look down and you notice your naked and everyone's laughing. Yep Yeah, that was my repeated nightmare, and so I chose to do that for a living. By everything, just face your fears head on. Literally Yeah well, and you know I, it's. It's a constant process that way you know that in many ways and there's there's like. They're smart. You know there's your true instinctual fear, which is telling you about actual problems, and then there's. you know whatever kind of fears you know. I. Don't know based in trying to idiot proof, life, and you know. I find myself over and over having to having to come up with ways to lake. Overcome that and my fear's huge. It's like can knock me down for you know at the beginning of this thing on Asli I'll my big story as a kid like all the Scifi I loved distill Byan post-apocalyptic stuff, and. It was my worst fear. You know maybe some of it. I got from my dad. Just this fear. It's like no, this is too fragile. It's too weird. It's all going to fall apart in. It's GonNa fall apart in a quick and violent and terrifying way. And I found myself. You know curled up. Like just. Convinced the there things. We're going to be mad max in six months, and this was the beginning of it, and my worst here was happening and you know. Had to kind of scoot myself off the floor and go into that and be like well is like. Anything I do now going to make a difference if that happens like nope by it's not I I guess I could take like self defense. You Know Jason, cross or something. Like really I'm I'm a lover, not a fighter, so screw it like if it should falls apart all apart and That'll be the end of things if that's the end of things and I. Had you know I repeatedly have to go all the way into it. I mean I think there's ways of looking. Specially with things like I'm willing to say for myself. Mental illness or you know or complexity, extra sensitivity that. Leaning into it. And Not in an indulgent. Were? All the stories happen, but in a way where I. Get to look at the feeling. Follow it all the way through. Not Run away from it. Not Try to squash it, and I always find on the other end of it. There's a kind of freedom and You Know I. Think you can let. You can let those mental things. Shut you down and try to hide away from them, or you can use them as a launchpad to kind of develop. An extra kind of bravery in response to them and L that it doesn't have to be an excuse to go. I can't do that. 'cause I'm anxious I. can't you know it's like instead? You gotta go back, Nope? I'm frigging anxious. My my entire life is facing my fears and so answer coming to them I am about fifty fifty these days, but you know. Well. Interesting compare because there's so much Like toads lyrics over the years, because I've been listening since the Pale record were melancholy I guess would be the best way to to. To say it and I remember the first time that I took my wife to see you guys live and she was really expecting that. kind of to permeate everything that kind of melancholy. Lyrical Style and she walked away gone, and he's hilarious because you were telling jokes between. Songs and you're. You're having a good time and it didn't so you were clearly I don't know if that's that's what you're using Kinda to fight those fears. You know it. It's not a serious as it necessarily sounds, but it's a you're having a good time. The music is the tool where I get to go into the dark and deal with it, and it allows me to be a much happier person in the rest of my life. and. Yeah and the shows you know it's like. We're GOOFS I'm a I'm a goof and You know I remember. The same thing happened with the cure like. I! You know thinking that. Eventually it turned around lie. And I be. They eventually got. Overtly silly and fun. But I remember early, you know Robert Smith I remember when Robert Smith turned thirty, and all the goths and in the at the high school where like Oh my God. He's GonNa die. He said he wouldn't live past thirty. It's like they were holding preemptive vigils for him. His dead. He did disintegration right as he was thirty because we just did an episode about that. He was convinced that he was never going to write anything. Worthy of being listened to ever again I haven't wrote I haven't written my masterpiece, and I'm about to turn thirty, so my life's over. Yeah, what an! Idiot and Yeah Robert Smith I like I. Think of all these people who I you know. There's something about like just because you can go to the. Those particular depths doesn't actually mean you're a Maudlin person and for me. It's like and I think it's something that you know. But Elton John Sad song says so much. It's like there's some about it because you're not alone and you know someone's felt something close to what you felt and what you're feeling and you know. I've found in recent years like through the the singing circles, and even somewhat in my own writing. It's like Oh. Happy Son can do it for you to and trying to kind of learn. That you know, I call them. It's the van Morrison Trick of writing a song that seems happy on the surface, but. It's not light like you know brown eyed girl. Somebody was like. Oh, Brownie! Girl is secret is she's dead? Like there's something underneath it that he's not like denying the darkness. And you. Balance Like I don't know why I can handle a song. That's all devastation, but if I hear a happy song I want there to be some admission of real life in there I wanted to i. want the light to always contain the shadow I want to shadow noted. And if it's too light, than I have no interest, and if it's. If, it's like also contains the shadow then I'm riveted, and so like it's all light I. Don't take it seriously. Yeah, and maybe if it's all dark the same. Hope and they're. So yeah, I take back my earlier statement. I needed in both. But. It's Yeah, just because you right? Serious stuff doesn't necessarily mean you're always like. Shoe gazing in the and. Thank you. So speaking of Toad I know a lot of fans will be listening to this Can I ask? Randy is doing. He hasn't been on the road with you. Guys for two or three years now right? Yeah I just talked to him a little bit ago. He's down in San Diego these days. He's doing well good, he's. You know. Got Some studio. like you know students and staff and hanging out with his son and Yeah, he's doing good. obviously Kovic probably hampered a lot of stuff, but any thoughts of new record or ep for Toad or you. Or both yeah working. I actually started A. I started a record and then decided to kind of switch things over and make a toad record because I realized now towed hasn't done. Don't hasn't done record in a lot longer than I have done a record in though. Record. You know. I, I should have done a record sooner, so towed was more than I was so I've yeah, so we're working on it. In saw were mailing stuff back and forth we managed to get. Like two days in the studio to cut some drums and Get The you know a little bit of basic stuff, and now we're just you know. Drop boxing tracks to each other and She is single out in the next month or two. Strange time, so we're doing this record like. You know where we can't can from our homes. So I've seen you four times a year in Vegas through the years Ebony, you have any fond memories of playing in Las Vegas Fond memories any many. Many memories of Vegas I think Miami my favorite times there. Were probably. Well I enjoyed playing the red rocks casino. 'cause it's kind of out of town. That's off the streets in. The we play the bar. There just felt more local. There's there's an element of some vegas like. I've liked the Vegas stuff where. You know and certainly don't tell anyone at Caesar's those because we love to play there. Actually had a really good time opening L. God as far as the stuff on the Strip was at the Luxor where we opened for counting crows at the pool. Yeah. That was pretty. Like. Everybody's just standing knee-deep in the water and. That was a lot of fun outdoors. It was cool I liked playing in the old downtown. Thing the festival there in the streets just out and. That was a really cool show that was like temperature was. must it was in the hundreds? It was so hot sons norm Yeah, so those are probably my favorites there. I mean it's possible sometimes to play. You know if you're on the Strip. Sometimes, it's just it's the it's like it's more. The tourist audience, which is fine and happy to have them there, but it's like. It's got to be a thing for for you guys to in Vegas of like you want shows where like it's not just us there. Shouldn't you want shows where everybody's into it? Sure and it's like they just looked at the list and we're like well. We're here. Let's see a show you know. And Vegas audience I feel like when you get off the Strip and play like a legit shot our I think we played it a college. Way Back. When and Like I feel like when you get away from the Strip, audiences are extra into it there. like when it's local indefinite Yeah. I actually got. Oklahoma Oh one of I I had a Back in the day with toad when we were practicing, you know at our in our garages The we did have one day where I forget what Song We'd been working on, but we've been practicing my garage for a long time and my next door, neighbor This older guy. Smitty all of a sudden like the garage door like there is this. Loud booming, shattering noise, and we ran outside, and he was out there in a wife beater with a sledgehammer. Like. Just. Beating on the on the garage door like just so angry. Go Out! You ever stopped on. You have any decency trying to have. Looked at me and I was wearing I had there's a? D Do. You know the Las Vegas? punk band. Fuck, Shit piss no. From Day, I had my fuck. Shit Piss t shirt on. Just like look meetings like fuck. Shit Paris, same to you buckle. At An. Anyway there's there's my. Little Bit of Vegas until memory I like that. I actually got you into the Brooklyn. Bowl one time you were coming back dinner or or something, you didn't have yeah your credentials with you. And my wife and I were waiting out front to get into the VIP area. I said hold on because I. Recognize right away, and I ran over ticket booth and said you probably should let this guy in, or the show is going to suck, and they let you in so i. Yeah, I mean once again I. Just don't have that thing I. Have Walked in venues with people who weren't in the ban, but who looked like rockstars and they let them in. and. I'm like the guy. You're like Nope nope. No you can't come in you. Obviously, you're obviously work with it or something. So, are there other songs Are there some that you wish you guys would perform again or never performed from your catalog that you always wanted to do. Because I know I've never heard. She cried live I. Always wish I would've heard that live. You gotTA. Tell me that again. I'm sorry I. Actually just went off the ranch. One second I was trying to remember. Actually did or not. And I actually. Function guns in Bolland guns and bullets LV h see a way of life. To the one way with it anyway, you can look them up later. Sorry, what were you asking? I asked. If there were any songs that you, you guys wish you would urge. You personally would wish. He would perform again or never performed from your catalog, but always wanted to, and just didn't no, not really I think we do. There's a few we pulled back. You know we didn't play. Golden Age when or enough when the record new constellation first came out, and if added those back in and I love playing those. Probably be fun to play butterflies again. We haven't done that for a while. and. Little Buddha I always liked. We don't really play that but because. There's something about i. just never liked the lyric on Corporal Brown. People ask all the time. I like the music I just can't stand the song. the part that I'm. Todd wrote the music music's Great. I wrote the lyric I just don't like it. So, your your your tour for this summer you were you were going to be on a tour with what Jim Blossoms and bare naked ladies. And that's been delayed at least temporarily delayed till next summer. Is that correct? It's still a year. Okay? Last summer on Earth, tour, which is ironic name considering what's happening? There I. EH, which that was still up on toads website as like the banner and. Called Management of a month. I hadn't looked at the facebook on like. Thank last summer on. Earth has become creepy. Take it down. To on point for right now. It's kind on the nose so. That is to spooned, so it was the second to last summer owner. The pinch runner. And the. Yet so that's that's put off and we have a bunch of other shows that are delayed till October November, but I. Had, some solo shows moved to November. I hope they happen. but I'm also feeling like you know live concerts. Are GonNa last thing to to come back on just because of what they are. I'm not going work anytime soon. Yeah. I mean I would love it if that were the case, but as it is I just I. seriously doubt it so. I don't know. Maybe it will work out things where it's like you know. The Band is People aren't allowed to sing along, and you know. The band is behind plexiglass. That's. But but you know short of that I. Don't think there's a way to safely do it once again until we have. You know things like testing. At the very least and hopefully. yeah, some treatments that actually work so. Fingers fingers crossed. So speed, Gaba ration- warp speed. So normally. Logo has that. And the and the Space Force Low. Thing Off Star Trek, insignia! Did you see somebody posted the to Gibson? Guitars was going to sue them, because it's the same as the flying V, shape of the guitar. I is this BS wouldn't sue for like. It's. It's not subtle. Buying the is not the flying the. It's really the Star Trek. It's got the curve of the Star Trek Insignia. Line! Curve. Yeah. Imaginations? Anyway we've on Super duper. As. Yes, so okay. What was I I was lost? That's where I was usually last thing I do on an interview I'm going to ask you a question here, so you're about to be dropped off on a deserted island, but luckily you have a record player I. Don't know how you're going. GonNa run. It probably coconuts Gilligan's island style, not sure exactly how, but you can only take five records with you. What are you taking with you? Well, that's hard. Amazing how much the answers vary the yes, I'd want some variety in there I'd probably want the Brandenburg concertos. I would probably want. Man. That is a really hard one. Only because it has the line of bamboo needle on a SHELLAC of Chopin. Late in the evenings, acid him open with the bamboo needle on Shellac Chopin since I would have a bamboo needle I would have to have all this useless beauty. As Elvis Costello is a great record. So that I could laugh at it every time it came. I have a bamboo needle, and then I would probably have to have something by Chopin. into. As much so Always harder question than I want it to be maybe the Weatherman I. Just I can't stop listening to the Weatherman by Gregory on Ice Gov great wrec. and. I don't know something to dance to so. Maybe some funke delic just because you could sing along. That's funny. That's somewhat before. Yeah danceable in Groovy and you can sing your own song over it. You know which is probably a good thing something that doesn't add so much content. You can't make up your own deal to it. And my at three or four now. Kyle, so that's four the Brandenburg Concerto. All this useless beauty, the weatherman and functional. Yeah and then beyond that. I don't know do I. WanNa go for Soup, passing beauty or or it's really this is. This is just. Do I learn a language. Language on record. John Record. You know you could do it. It would be a multiple record set. Maybe the wall just because that was like. My favorite vinyl is a kid. That'd be great in the middle of the, ocean, night. Nothing. I'd be good. Added some Lionel Ritchie to that hidden. You can have a bonus. Can I have a bone? Living on the ceiling. Now that's good. See in in the the best part about that is if if I called you back ten minutes from now and ask you give me five. They'd be completely different. Yeah. and. That's the great thing about. That's a great thing about music so I could changes it evolves. You know your tastes adapt a little and you're like. Oh! I want to listen to that anymore. I'll take some. People ask constantly. It's like what's your favorite you know. What's your favorite song? It's just Stephen of my own or anybody else's. It's like I. It's an impossible question. Possible question except moment to moment there's probably a song like day or right now, but Yeah once again there's an endless supply. It's a good thing. It is a good thing. Glenn we are. We are so grateful that you took some time to talk to us today. I appreciate it. Is There A. Is there any way I guess? I got two questions where he is there anything you WANNA plug. And, what's the best way for fans to help you out to either buy music or by your merger or whatever Yeah my merged? I don't have any management or anything right now. I need to do some print on demand Stuff I guess I need to get that taken care of anyone wants to help me. Make merge be great so I need to set up a print on demand thing I am on facebook. Live and I gotTA figure out the. Trying to find a twenty dollar a month as opposed to a forty dollar month service that allows you to cross post also to Youtube. And I'm seeing zoom you post. Either to facebook or to Youtube, but not to both. so. Anyway but I'm on at this point On facebook live Monday. Wednesday Friday six PM On Pacific Time and I do a five PM Sunday stage it. And so those so far are holding their time slots. I may move them eventually, so is to have a better evenings here and more time with my girlfriend, but good. So. Those happen and diamond. then. Mo Glenn Philip Apple G. Capital P. I'm the one with the guitar and the Plaid Shirt and Glenn Glenn Phillips Dot Com at a papal, and you can just send me money if you WanNa send me money. I owe that and and honestly it's been really sweet. A lot of people have been saying you know. I just keep getting like you know somebody gone. Hey, thank you for the last thirty years and. Thank you for the free shows and keep doing it. And meanwhile the shows on facebook are all benefits so I i. still haven't figured out. The back into facebook is truly terrible. So I'm able. I'm broadcasting them from my page and I can have donate button on my page, but I am cross posting on the toad page. I can't have a donate button there. So that's frustrating. It's weird trying to. Of It. Yeah, it's really annoying. When you cross post, you can add like selling stuff information, but not giving stuff information, or if you. To add it, it changes it from a notification, a show or an event to just donate post. Yeah. Gay, facebook! There's so many things where he tried to save like your progress like you create I don't know if you've had this your lake create a livestream, and then you hit the gas on schedule, and it just makes the whole page. Go down the fresh. The Pager on your like did I posted it or not. And so you do another one I ipad it where I found like. Oh I I've. Scheduled five concerts and Because it doesn't actually give you the feedback that it exists, and if you put on the donated, doesn't anyway. It's so annoying. I'm going on too long about that stuff so Monday. Wednesday Friday six PM Pacific on Facebook, and if you don't see a donate button, I will figure out another way. Keep trying to figure out ways around the stuff that's broken. Perfect fool, thank you so much again. Looking forward to a new single and whatever else you put out and yeah, and the concerts to the facebook concerts and the stage at concerts. It's a Nice family event here at House, so it's very sweet. And yet it's been interesting to keep pulling songs out that I haven't played. Months. yeah anyway I got a schedule one for tonight. I only have four out, and now you run out of time. So thanks again and you know. Let you get back to your day and and we appreciate the time. Thank you, sorry for a missing the call at the top. No problem. Yeah, no worries men. Are you stay safe you, too. Thanks bye. So thank you so much. Glen coming to talk to us. MATTY's face is making me giggle right now. I don't know why. thank you so much Glen. Glen Phillips for coming to talk to us. Today was a or I. Guess Talk to us by skype. Today was great talking to you. If you want to you can get in touch with him. FACEBOOK DOT COM for slash Glen, Phillips, music at Glen Phillips Twitter Glen. PHILLIPS DOT COM. If you WANNA, check out he did say he was gonNA work on some new merch warrior interviewing him so hopefully get a world hopefully by the time you hear, this it'll be might have up. and I'm sure there's some other stuff on there too, or toad, the wet sprocket dot com. You WanNa hear some of their stuff by some I'm sure there's merchant. There is merchant. But plenty then Yeah, you can also get in touch with us. Let us know if you have some good to the wet sprocket memories from the past I go back and if you haven't go back and listen to our very first episode with the pilot episode pilot episode, you can tell us whether we get any better worse. I feel really feel like it's worse. It's worse. You can get in touch with US Info audio judo dot, com. I mean. We sound better. 'cause. Randy's got better. That's true ran his gotten much. We learned a lot and improved dry wease. Yeah, we. We don't know we're talking about anymore. Making it up, did bring these beers those. That's true over we INFO audio Judaica. You can email us. They're probably the way to get in touch with us. we are on facebook dot com forward slash audio, Judah at audio judo on both twitter and Instagram we do have four is we get a little bit emergent stuff you want to throw a couple of bucks for some beer, audio, judo, dot, com, and then click on store up at the top there. We're going to be updating some other stuff on there hopefully soon. If you WANNA see pictures of us so. Scary. I know those might be on there. Soon of boy. one of thing we need to mention. We're now part of the Pantheon podcast network There's a whole bunch of other music related podcasts on there. So if you go to Pantheon PODCASTS DOT COM, you can check out all the music related podcasts in the network. You will for sure if you like our podcast, you'll probably find others that you like in there and if you're happened to be. Be Coming from The Pam podcast network and listening ours for the first time. Welcome Netzer that's it for this episode of Audio Judah and whoever's been here since the beginning. Thanks for joining us for the whole year. Yeah, we do appreciate you, and if you're new welcome and tell your friends and we'll keep doing this long as my wife Plate Haiti electrical. Yeah, so other than that. We will talk to you soon. Have a good day, everybody. By.

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Ep. 312 - The College Admissions Scam Was Inevitable

The Michael Knowles Show

46:00 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 312 - The College Admissions Scam Was Inevitable

"Federal prosecutors have charged nearly fifty people in college admission scandal that involves wealthy parents and celebrities bribing testing companies in colleges to get their kids into elite universities including Stanford, Georgetown. And of course, your old Yale. We will explain why the big college bust was inevitable. Then media matters takes other shot at Tucker Carlson. The Greenpeace co founder says that the green new deal would end civilization and Nancy Pelosi finally comes out against impeachment. I'm Michael Knowles. And this is the Michael Knowles show. This is basically breaking news. It's within about the last hour. This is come out the biggest scandal ever to face American higher education. It was so predictable. We knew it was going to happen. There are a lot of victims here. They're basically only victims here. We will explain in great detail the path forward had avoid things like this in the future. 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This is this is a really big deal. At this includes Laurie Laughlin, Laurie Laughlin was on full house. This includes Felicity Huffman, Felicity Huffman was on desperate housewives. Parents apparently paid consultants twenty five million dollars from twenty eleven through this year to cheat the system and get their kids into these schools. So what is going on? Why? When I saw this. I, you know, I I don't watch desperate housewives. I don't you know, tune in every night. But I've heard the name, Felicity Huffman. I thought why on earth would a well known celebrity actress get involved in such a sordid crime, such as this, and the reason is obvious because these college degrees, really really matter in our society. These college degrees, especially at elite universities carry a ton of weight in the society, they're incredibly valuable, and so parents. Who want to give their kids a leg up? We'll do anything they can to get their kids in there. But at the same time, there's a flip side to this. Which is that people got away with cheating their way into these schools. They got away with it for years. And now, what are we on the eighth year of this because it's a lot harder to get in than it is to stay in. I know this just from personal experience. I you know, I wasn't on college all that long ago. And it is very hard to get into Yale. It was very hard. You need basically perfect SAT's valedictorian top whatever you need to have chick every box class. President all these things it's very very hard. Parents put their kids through all these study courses, SAT prep courses, they do a zillion extracurriculars. I did I did all these things. And even then it's very hard to get it. Once you get in. However, it's a lot easier to stay in. So you can the I mean these days, it's still hard. I guess to get an A but to get an A minus ruby. Plus, it's pretty easy. It's actually probably hard to get a c I never got anything below a B. I don't think don't I don't think I'd certainly never got to see in my entire time in college. And it's not because I was paying attention in class all the time when I was in college, I was doing zillion extracurricular activities off campus a lot doing politics and still it's very hard because there is great inflation. They protect you once you're in they want to make sure they have a high graduation rate. So these kids who didn't even get the highest score. They just cheated their way, and they were able to stay in. It means that higher education has become an empty husk of what it once was largely a facade. So so there are a lot of questions that are raised. First of all is it just these kids. I don't think it's just these kids who who cheated. That's that's not the only knock against them meritocratic college system. We have what about athletes one way actually that these kids were cheating to get in is that the parents would pay these consultants to bribe coaches at all of these elite universities to coaches would pretend that they were recruiting the kids for athletics they pocket the money where they'd give the money to the schools athletic program than the kids would get to the school. And then all of a sudden, they would drop out of the sport because these elite universities, you don't actually have to play the sport. Once you're there. I remember this from meal, I had a good friend at Yale. He was recruited for football. He comes over to Yale. And he decides he wants to become a serious scholar. He wants to really devote all of his time to classics into thinking. I guess it's sort of the opposite of this scam. It's the opposite of these kids. He actually wanted to become much more academically rigorous, so I think his freshman year eke with. The football team doesn't matter because of these elite schools your scholarship your financial aid. You whatever is not tied to athlete six. So you can get in for football, or whatever they lowered the academic standards for you. And then you quit football immediately. So okay, that's one aspect of it. But let's not also forget that very often the the super rich, not just the very rich. Not just the these parents, not just the Felicity Huffman rich, but the super duper rich the captains of industry, they just by their kids way into the schools by building a dormitory or building a lecture hall or something. And so once once they do that, they give a hundred million dollars or something fifty million dollar donation. How come that's not cheating, but this is cheating? Well, in part, it's because at least the rich people are honest about it. They're saying here's my check. Here's my money. You can see that donated to it. My name is on the front of the building there and my kid happens to go here, you do the math one thing that these. Parents were doing was cheating. They were pretending that their kids passed all of the academic rigor. They were pretending that the kids merited their place at the university. Now, I've heard that a lot of elite schools. It's basically fifty fifty fifty percent athletes in legacies people whose parents went to the school and then fifty percent got in on their own academic merit. And I gotta tell you something. This is one aspect of college that I really liked. It's something that I think is losing cachet in America. But it's very important, which is that because I I didn't come from a super wealthy family. I didn't know the Felicity Huffman could've bought my my into college. So I- legitimately had the privilege of considering myself in the people in college who merited getting in academically studied for the tests got good grades on the tests got good grades in school. I got to be there that gives you a feeling of self worth. That gives you a feeling of confidence that gives you a feeling of belonging of not being lesser than and for these kids who got in because mommy, cheated. They don't have that feeling. I mean, even people who do it the old fashioned way where daddy buys a building or something. They don't have that feeling as much when I got into college. I had a family friend say to me, Michael you ought to be really proud. And I said, oh, you know, people get into good colleges all the time. And he said, right? But for my kids, I wrote a check and your parents didn't write a check. So you know, that actually does make you feel good when you earn something it feels a lot better than when something is just handed to you. And this is true, not just of the admissions. But of the whole college process now, this is the whole thing. I mean, you just see the tail wagging the dog in every way why or the colleges prioritizing athletics over scholarship, why are they prioritizing pulling in money over? Pulling in the best students and scholars why are the parents so desperate to get their kids into these schools? This is I think a problem of an overly democratic culture because in this culture in democracies, we hate when people have different things different privileges democratic cultures a gala -tarian cultures. Alexis de Tocqueville recognize this in in democracy in America, they tend to level. And so all of a sudden if somebody has something everybody else needs to have something everybody else needs to have that privilege. So now, we are told that everybody has to go to college. So that only the most elite degrees seem to count for anything. You know, when I was in college. I studied with probably the greatest living historian, Donald Kagan, Donald Donald Kagan went to Brooklyn college. That's where he graduated from. Now. These days. There's such a difference. There's such a a feeling that if you go to Brooklyn college, you could never end up at a very elite university. But in those days that wasn't true. Because Brooklyn college was a very very rigorous college. When Donald Kagan went to that college. There wasn't a sense that every single person in the country had to go to college. So if you went to college, you wanted to be there you wanted to learn something you were motivated you were paying for it yourself, very likely or GI Bill was paying for it. And you already paid your dues in the service. There was you had some skin in the game. You had some real stakes into it. Now that isn't the case. So now, everyone is going to college college is considered a good thing. It's good for everyone. College is a good thing for some people. It's not a good thing. Forever. A four year. College degree is not only not a good thing for some people. It is a bad thing for some people. If you want to study the liberal arts if you wanna study history or English. Or philosophy or something, and you wanna have a general education, then you want to specialize, and then you want to generalize again at the top a sort of it looks like the letter, I that's the kind of traditional career when you go to get a liberal education. If you want to do that if you were suited to do that if that is your path, then you should go to college it as a positive good to go to college. If that is not your path if you want to be a very, very narrow specialist. Let's say you wanna be anything from a plumber or an electrician to an engineer. Let's say that's what you you don't need to go get a four year liberal arts college degree. Why would you need to do that? Let's say you want to be an actor or an actress you don't need to get a four year college degree. Let's say you want to be a musician. Let's say you want to I don't know you want to be an athlete you want to you don't need to get a four year college degree to want to work in the service industry depends on what the job is. But you don't need a four year college degree, so many if you wanna. To be a computer program where you don't need a four year. College degree all the biggest billionaire famous computer geniuses of our era dropped out of college. You don't need that. It for certain jobs that helps for certain jobs. You don't need it. In fact, the liberal arts very specifically or not designed to get you a job they're designed for what you do in your free time. How you make sense of your freedom. What have you make sense of your leisure? How we earn our freedom in a free society. But that is not what ideologue what leveling leftist ideologues. Tell us. They tell us. Everybody has to go to college. So now, of course, parents are going to pay a lot of money to cheat their way to get their kids into college in this society. If that college credential is so important, they're going to do everything that they can of course. And this raises another question. What do we do about the kids who got in? So let's say Felicity huffman's kid gets into college. See someone else's kid is still there. What if the kid is getting four point? Oh, GPA actually some colleges. Now, don't even have cheap Brown University. Doesn't. GPA? So you can't even tell what the grades are. So they're doing fine. You're doing just as well. If not better than other kids who got a sixteen hundred on the SAT or whatever. Well, true. We kick them out. Is that the right thing to do know? The problem goes a lot deeper. The problem is the university itself when you think about who the victims are here. A lot of people are going to say the kids who didn't get in because mommy, cheated. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. Those kids are victims that would have been awful. I mean, I remember the stress of college mission season. It's really tough kids because there's a lot of value put on it in our society. Kids put a lot of pressure on themselves. So the kids who worked very hard who didn't get in their victims. The universities are victims that universities which have been watered down democratized in hollowed out and destroyed their victims of this scandal. And the kids of these very rich people are victims because they have no sense of accomplishment, and their parents are crooks imagine that you're you're growing up. You know, your two formative age sixteen seventeen and your parent tells you, you know, Johnny you're just not smart enough. You're not smart enough and good enough to merit getting into an elite university. So we're gonna do is cheat and rob another kid of that educational opportunity. So that you can get in even though you don't deserve. Can you imagine being that kid? That's what you hear. You think? Well on the downside. My parents think that I'm a failure. But on the bright side, at least, they're criminals least, my parents or criminals. This is there are no winners. There is no winner here. Nobody nobody wins. So what is the solution? This the first Aleutian is you've got to push up against the worst instincts of democratic and egalitarian culture, you've got to push back against it. What democratic into gala -tarian culture wants to do is make everybody exactly the same. Put everyone on exactly the same path waste. Everybody's time. Will you need to do is allow for variety and diversity? It's ironic. I sound like I'm talking like a leftist. I'm using the words that leftist use the differences that I actually mean it you need to permit variety and diversity if somebody early on has an aptitude for I don't know engineering or something coding, learn to code probably going to get kicked off Twitter for saying that if somebody has an aptitude for that put him on a track for that. This is it's called tracking. The Europe has tracking the United States had this for a long time, but are overly democratic nature will not permit it we want everyone to have every opportunity forever. You never need to choose anything. You never need to pick a path unit. No, no, no, just generalized generalized generalize. But event you that only works to a degree. Eventually you need to take all of that potential and turn it into some actuality, and it wastes so much time just to constantly be all potential constantly be generalizing. Put people on tracks. If you know if a kid is just not cut out for the classroom. Just doesn't like school doesn't like reading books isn't gonna start liking to read books. He wants to work in a trait. Let's say say wants to become an intellectual or something put him on that track before he's twenty two years old and two hundred thousand dollars in debt. What good does that do anybody because if you get into these schools, and you really can't do anything first of all maybe you can't do anything at the university? Maybe some schools don't have too much grade inflation, you flunk out that just puts you in debt, and you're even more of a failure. Or let's say you graduate. You've got all of this debt now, and you have no skill when you have no interest, and you have no path. What good that hasn't done? Anybody any good at just mismatches you for your future. So maybe put that kid on a path to a trade. Maybe someone wants to join the military right out of high school. They don't need to go to a four year college right away. Maybe if they want to be an officer a career guy, then they can do that. Or maybe they want to. Enlist do that allow for variety and diversity stop homogenising? Everything people are different. This is a beautiful aspect of life. I get a great thrill out of different people telling me different opinions having different experiences. The next thing you've got to do is reduce the federal college subsidies. I'm not saying cut them all off. I don't think there should be totally radical drastic change in mmediately. I think that disadvantages kids who have been waiting their turn in this college cycle and to cut off their opportunities radically tried to change the culture is fundamentally anti-conservative, and it's not gonna work. What you need to do is steadily decrease federal subsidies for colleges. These federal government subsidies have created very perverse incentives. They've given colleges the ability to raise a lot of administrative bloat. They have given colleges when you guarantee the fed the student loans they've given colleges a free check to increase tuition, which saddles kids with hundreds of thousands of dollars. Of debt. This has created terrible incentives. And it's made the university's relying on the government. It's made them more politically, correct. It's made them more willing to politically censor people, very bad idea. Jen slowly, gradually you've got to reduce those subsidies. And speaking of the administrative bloat, fire them all fire every single one of them. The deputy assistant deputy dean of inclusion and diversity and nothing needs to be fired yesterday ended that is awful. They do nothing all they do is sit in their office and try to justify their ridiculous and useless job and stir up trouble on campus and destroy liberal education. Fire them immediately next reduce the role of sports in colleges. Reduce the they it's just too dominant. Creates too much opportunity for corruption and too much opportunity to corrupt scholarship and the purpose of the university next. Eliminate fake academic disciplines. We joke about. Byan dance theory. There are really ridiculous disciplines out there women's sexuality and gender. Studies. Ethnicity race in migration studies virtually any department that ends in studies with expose the exception of the language departments. Because some of those end in studies, but other than ancient or modern languages when we're just talking about cultural studies dead. That's not an academic discipline. That is not serious scholarship. That is just idiot does have to go away because those departments attract professors and students who are not fit to be at a university. They are generally less intelligent and less educated. And they make up words, and they don't mean anything, and they damaged the credibility of the university. You have to get rid of those and finally the other way to fix this is for employers to stop putting so much credibility lending so much credibility to a meaningless certificate. If you get into a good college. What does that mean until this scandal it meant that you were pretty intelligent? You had a pretty high raw intelligence you had a pretty good. I q maybe you did well on high school, you did very well on a standardized test that Matt is it matters. If if your employees intelligent, but it's not all that matters education matters to what you can do skills matter to there's a kind of funny thing we joke about this. I'm backstage at the daily wire where Ben went to Harvard law drew went to Berkeley, I went to Yale. So the people with the shows went to these very elite colleges and our bosses didn't go to college. None of them went to college. And so really it tells you something about the value of an education. If if what you wanna do if what really gets you going is talking about Edmund Burke all day long as it does for me then. Yes, you probably need to go to college. If you wanna. A run a gigantic business. If you want to be an entrepreneur start a gigantic business anything from us to Facebook to Microsoft, or whatever I don't see any evidence that you need a college degree. I don't see any evidence that you need to graduate. I don't know that you need to go in the first place different tracks. It's okay and employers, really good employers know, this you look at the resume. Okay. Then throw it at see what the person can do see what the person is like to talk to see what their horrid skills. Are. This will be the only way if you institute even two-thirds of those suggestions, you will go a long way to stopping this this big college scam. Not just the particular scam of cheating to get in. But the big scam overall, which is that our education has been watered down a joke with my friend that he and I are just complete dunces, and I'm only half joking because if we had had our education sixty years ago, we would have had to learn Latin. Ancient Greek maybe Hebrew. Through these days. If you graduate from Yale with honors with Sumiko laude degree in English, you can do all of that without ever reading. Shakespeare that is a scandal. That's the big college scam. And it's very important a free society cannot remain free very long if it doesn't take education. Seriously. This is where I differ from my more rock ribbed. Maybe you know, kind of populist conservative friends who say who cares burn all of education to the ground. No, no, no free society will dissolve in two seconds. Once education is truly eliminated once liberal education is eliminated. So it really matters. You can save this. You have to go out and try to bring it back. And you know, one one way that we try to do this in a popular way. Just as part of the show is we go around and do all of these college speeches and so right now, I'm actually with Ben at Michigan. And Ben is giving a speech tonight at university of Michigan. And just it's as though. Old nature is but unknown to the the universities make our point before we can even say it, which is that he's getting protests. They didn't want him to come. And now the history department is holding a rival event to Ben speech called when provocateurs dabble in history. Ben Shapiro and the in whiten mint. The in whiten -ment there is the history, but this is supposed to they were the serious guys were the serious academic history department, Ben he's just dabbling. He's just a provocateur and yet the super-duper series history department uses ridiculous idiological made up word gold in white and meant listen to this is what they say. They sent out a letter. They said, hi historians. Joined the history club in the history department tomorrow for an important and exciting event in response to Ben Shapiro's visit to campus when provocateurs dabble in history. Ben Shapiro and the environment will feature speakers and panelists responding to Shapiro's attacks on campuses and academia, along with his new history book the right side of history. Ben Shapiro's attacking campuses, you've been Shapiro's attacking. I could you're attacking academia with stupid made up terms like that and trying to get speakers van from campus. Your the ones doing it? You're the ones hollowing out higher education. You don't even know here's just a little evidence. They said we're honored to be joined by dean Angela Dillard, professor and Brugge professor John Carson and professor Hussein fancy. Oh, these see they brought professors not Ben Ben's just a provocateur who dabbles in history they are bringing the real professors. So I said, okay, I bet that these professors are total joke. I just it was unsure I had call it a good bit. I got pretty good betting instincts. So Google them. Guess what turns out I was right for at least half of them. Angela Dillard, she's a dean already makes me suspect of her. She has a BA in Justice, morality, constitutional democracy. So fake degree fake undergraduate degree. She has a master's degree. In American culture, so fake master's degree and a PHD in also American culture. So she has three or four degrees in nothing. In fake, everything that is that is nothing. I do I have a degree in American culture. I go to the movies once a week is that is that a degree? And Berg, that's the other super historian here. First of all not a professor, she's a lecturer here. She is from Michigan. I guess when they got a PHD Michigan. She studies film and public leisure in Nazi Germany as well as the politics. This was a direct quote the politics of waste and recycling in the Third Reich. If if I were going to if I were writing the producers or something for writing a total parody of academia what I would do. I would have the professor specialize in the politics of waste and recycling in the Third Reich. How frivolous? A couple a couple of the other professors are apparently more legitimate. But at least half, the panel total frauds. Ben Shapiro is much more of an historian than those people. But this is what they do. It's the PHD they call themselves. Professor, even though they're not really professors they with their they have an academic pedigree. He it's a facade. It's fake. We have fake news. Now, we have fake scholarship fake, academia. And they have to have a counter event at a university university a real university. Typically, you would go and hear somebody speak. Someone wants to give a lecture. You agree. You disagree? You don't know. If you agree you go and hear them speak. And then maybe later, you give a response, which would would a university brings everybody together, then you share ideas, and then you come up with other ideas. But here in American universities today instead of going to the event you try to get the event shutdown. You try to get the person censored you try to get kicked off campus. And then when that doesn't work you go to the deputy dean of inclusion or whatever. And then you you, I don't you hold a counter protests event. And then you and you just go to your separate events. And that's it. No, one talks to anybody. It's not university. And if they're not going to behave like universities, don't treat them as such if you're an employer give credit to it. If you're the federal government stopped funding it and if your parents and children. Have the courage to make what are really the better academic Joyce's for your kids, regardless of what that is. We have a lot more to get to media matters taken another shot at Tucker. We've got Nancy Pelosi coming out against impeachment. And then Greenpeace telling us that the Greenpeace co-founder telling us that the green new deal will end civilization all of that in just a second. But first you have to go to daily wire dot com. Daily wire dot com. Ten bucks a month one hundred dollars for an annual membership. What do you get what don't you get? You get me with the Andrew claybin show. You get the Ben Shapiro show. You get them out wall show. You get to ask questions in the mail bag. That's coming up. There is you guys to ask questions backstage. That's coming up tomorrow, by the way tomorrow. Tune into our next episode of daily wire backstage, March madness addition daily wire God king, Jeremy boring. Ben shapiro. Andrew claybin Alicia crass myself will be smoking stogies drinking, whiskey and laughing laughing at this wild crazy political culture of ours. As always only daily wire subscribers get to ask the question. So make sure to subscribe today. Go to daily wire dot com. Get the leftist. Here's tumbler. Lest you have to drink out of these sad little cups. Like, I'm drinking out of now on the road daily dot com. We'll be right back. Media matters is going after Tucker Carlson again, by the way. This really drives me this is a really side point. This is a really minor point. But I have to make it. Media matters is such a stupid organization that they don't even know that the word media is plural. Media is the plural of medium. So you have a medium you have this medium the newspapers or the television or the radio or this media? Multiple mediums equals media. So really the organization should be called media matter for American not media matters. But I'm not surprised that an organization like this doesn't know how to use the English language aside point. Now, they're going after Tucker again, we talked about what they were doing yesterday. So they're going after him again, they have a headline quote unearthed audio shows Tucker Carlson using white nationalist rhetoric and making racist remarks. Okay. First of all these guys are are so over using the phrase white nationalist that that word like racist is basically now deprived of meaning it used to have a meaning it racist used to have a meaning. Now, they don't they don't have because they use them against Tucker Carlson. And so there's no credibility. But media matters did a good job here in the sense that they got the one two punch they released a few audio clips yesterday and Tucker comes at defend themselves. Some okay that one didn't quite take them off the air. So then they hit him again today with these new clips if you haven't heard them yet here or the here's the white nationalist, basically, Adolf Hitler, himself reciting mind com fund, Fox News Tucker Carlson, rock is a crappy plates filled with a bunch of, you know, semi literate on keeping I have zero sympathy for them or their culture, a culture where people just don't use toilet paper forks. Women. I agree with you there. Their culture is your in their homeland. You know, white man, you know, contributed some I would say like creating civilizations and stuff. I think they've done a pretty I wanted her. Obama would kick your playing basketball. Yeah. I'll of course, we would. Fall khan. He's black saying, he's a real brother. Hey, do you know how black is? What was he black for one thing? One white parent one black. So that makes him well use lies any white. There's some really good. I mean immigrants. I just think it's, you know, people come to this country would have something to offer the hot, really smart. You know what I mean? Especially the last one people are going to this country ought to have something to offer. So look he's on a shock jock show. It's the same show like the Bubba Gump love show, or so I don't remember the name of it. And he's speaking in a joking manner. Obviously, I don't think that if Tucker Carlson were the president of the United States, he would say and his immigration policy. They have to be hot. Or really smart? You know, I don't think would say that. But that's a good joke. And in a fair point that he makes which is if you come to this country, you should have something to offer. And if you don't have something to offer this country, you shouldn't come into this country. Does that's the immigration policy of every other country on earth as well. We happen to have the most generous one, but that makes sense. And so would Tucker says be hot, it'd be really smart. Okay. What else you know, some of the points? He's making here which he makes in an offensive way. Nobody says he's not making them in an offensive way. In fact, he's intentionally making them in an offensive way because he's on a shock jock show shock jock. It's not. Not feel really pleasant jock. It's shock jets was to shock you. So he I'm sure he would say that. Yes. These these were very offensive, but some of the points that he's making most people would agree with he jokes about all of the animus in the popular culture against white men. He said, I think white men have done something that you know, they were not so bad. They like, you know, created civilization. What we call civilization western civilization, or I guess what we call civilization broadly. The thing we know is civilisation the thing that we live in is civilization the civilization that has spread throughout the whole world that we have spread from sea to shining sea and far beyond it. Is european. It comes from Europe. Comes from Rome comes from London. It comes from Greece. Guess it comes from Jerusalem as well comes from the Jews as well. I don't know where the Jews white or not out of this is a big debate among the left. I guess, but that is your that the point he's making that civilization has come from your is true. He says how is Barack Obama black? He's also white. It's also a fair point. Why is Barack Obama is mother's white? He was raised largely by white family. If not exclusively. Why is he not considered white will the left might say? Because of because the very fact that he had black skin means that he did not have the privileges that white people have even though he's half white because he had black skin. He doesn't have those privileges. Why don't know he went to a very good school in Hawaii. Then he went to Columbia and Ivy league school, then he went to Harvard Law School an Ivy league school, then he became. State Senator very quickly. Then he became a US Senator at age five, and then he wrote two memoirs about himself that both got published and then he became the president. He's like the most privileged guy ever. What are you talking about? So that the point that Tucker is making their also fair enough point. Then he says the things about the Iraqis he called that's not nice, not nice. Nobody would want to do that. Nobody should ever suggest that human beings are not human beings. Don't you agree congresswoman Ilana more? Story. Judy set the record straight. So we get your side of it. You'd think seems not that is silly to even being an equivalent to one is human the other is visitors. And you just think that he's more polished than Trump's awkward, and by the way, Tucker Carlson was making jokes in a shock jock. You'd think. Show Alana Morris speaking seriously in the halls of congress, both saying the human beings aren't humans? A lot worse when they Lana. Mar does it isn't it? It's exactly the same thing with exactly the same words. Yikes. That's not good almost exactly the same words. Same point. So awkward. Yeah. Of course, you shouldn't do that. What I guess you might say what Tucker Carlson was saying was an offensive joke. Would you say that I guess you could but he's saying offensive things. No. You can't defend offensive things. You can you can you don't defend the points. I guess, but you defend saying offensive things because of context. If you're on a shock jock show, you're gonna talk like that. Now, you might say, well, he shouldn't have gone on that show. Okay, fun. You can give Tucker Carlson career advice. I guess fair enough. Here's an example, though. Here's the example, white context, really matters. I try my best not to use curse words on this show. I don't think I have before maybe I have once or twice, but I certainly intend not to know if I'm at the bar at midnight with the boys smoking a cigar. I will use curse words. It doesn't make me a hypocrite. Because I don't use curse words on the show. If I say them at the bar because context matters context matters a lot. It's inappropriate to say these sort of things in a polite civilized forum. It is much more appropriate to say these things if you're telling a joke with the boys or if you're talking to a shock jock. Now, the the real question because we've done we've bought into media matters hands. We've done what they want us to do. Why are we talking about Tucker Carlson? Why are we talking about him at all? You know, they use the phrase audio was unearthed. It didn't just dig itself up from the ground. It's not like a potato growing. No. It didn't it didn't do that media matters paid somebody a lot of money to find anything that they could find to try to take down Tucker Carlson, why because media matters believes that Tucker Carlson's voice, and his show is a threat to the left's agenda as why if Tucker Carlson, we're in threat media matters wouldn't have spent a lot of money to pay somebody to dig up dirt on Tucker Carlson to try to shut him up. And what did they find? They find that. He talked to a shock jock once whether they're gonna find on me, they're going to find I talked to a guy in a bar, and I used some naughty language. That's the word Tucker. You said I used naughty language with a shock jock. Yeah. That's the appropriate word to describe it. What are they going to find? They're going to say, oh my gosh. So and so made a joke fifteen years ago off with his head. They're not doing it because they're offended by the jokes the doing it because they want to silence his serious work. What does this matter? What does it matter? Tucker Carlson is a media figure. He is not a politician is not serving in congress. Even if Takoradi and made those jokes today on his FOX show. He is still a media figure. He is still not a legislator. It's a very different than he Llano more. Who used exactly the same points that Tucker did? Now, there is a flip side to this. Because I will grant the reason that we're talking about this media matters thing the reason that they're attacked worked is because in politics were political media. Your language is your instrument your words, or the instrument of politics politics is just meaningful speech. Tucker knows this. So when he goes on the shock jock show, he talks a shock jock. You it. It'd be like. Let's say that you are classically trained violinist and you love to play Brahms. You don't join a rock band to play Brahms. You don't show up to the rock band rehearsal and start playing the Brandenburg concerto or something or the mass and be minor. You don't do that. You play the rock music were you don't join the rock band. This. So this is why I mean, this is why the fair criticism is Tucker shouldn't have gone on this show. I don't think I would go on a show like that. Probably if I did maybe I'd try to be a little less salty. But who knows people, you know, people go through different phases in their careers and their life in their personalities. This is why people have to be very careful with words in this day and age is because everything you say is recorded forever. But what really matters. Okay. I'm willing to grant that speech, really matters speech, rather, speech matters in politics. But what really matters at this moment in this context. Listen to Chris Cuomo's, take this BS is currency for them. They get paid for this. The base likes their heroes to be base. They've seen this president make it to the White House in part by doing the same thing. Now a lot of this stuff. That's coming up at least about Carlson is from years ago when he was desperate for attention. Here's the test. Would he say the same things today? No, no. He's too busy playing the victim. He. Only say that he was naughty. But he wouldn't repeat them tonight. Why not come on big man read, the list of all the things that you said and do it again and show that you mean it? Come on. You're not more about the money now than you are about the truth or you. He says apologizing to the mob cost people their jobs what a coward. Why don't you repeat? What you said if it's not such a big deal. You're not going to apologize. He's being treated unfairly. By those criticizing the same break. See this guy and the others for what they are. If you mean it own it, don't just protect your money, and you fame or infamy in your case apologize if you want, but that takes character that is strength. That is integrity own that, you did something wrong. Character integrity own that, you do something wrong. The mainstream media along with media matters think that Tucker is dangerous to their agenda, and what's the agenda? Well, here's just one example, Chris Cuomo's brother Andrew Cuomo just legalize the killing of babies as they're being born in the state of New York and he took away the protections. Where if their mother is killed that would be counted as double murder now, that's not Canada's double murder, even if she's nine months pregnant, and then he cheered it on. And then he said, God bless you to all of the infanticide maniacs. Who were there clamoring to kill babies? They're being born. That's Chris Cuomo's, brother. That's one. Okay. That's one thing to consider and Tucker Carlson. Thirteen years ago told offensive jokes on a shock jock show. What matters here. The reason. They're connected. The reason this isn't the the left likes to accuse us of what aboutism the reason. This isn't what aboutism is that. The left is an actually upset about the salty language left uses plenty of salty language themselves with the left is upset about is that Tucker Carlson is having an impact on our politics is influencing people to oppose their agenda, and what is their agenda killing babies is they're being born whose agenda is it not just the left broadly. Not just some wacko in Virginia. Chris Cuomo's brother Quist, grow was the frayed of woman. I sound like Chris Cuomo, Chris Cuomo's brother, he talks about integrity about character. I'll I'll take the man who uses salty offensive language any day over the one who kills a baby is being born. Context really really matters you which is more important, by the way, media matters. They'll do it to everyone of us. They will do it to every single one of us anyone that they deem a threat. They'll find something we said, you know, at I don't know Howard Stern's bar mitzvah in one thousand nine hundred one or something, and they'll and they will use it. They will use it to try to shut you up. It has nothing to do with what they said, we are not debating what Tucker Carlson said what Tucker Carlson said is meaningless. It doesn't matter at all. It is just an excuse to fight an actual battle battle over policies over which direction. This country is going to go. So much more to get to. We gotta talk about why it is that it always seems like big people on the left move over to the right, but big people on the right? Don't move over to the left talk about that. With regard to Greenpeace end impeachment. But ran out of time I will be back in the studio tomorrow. So I guess we'll see you then we'll have to talk about it tomorrow. In the meantime, I'm Michael Knowles. This is the Michael Knowles show. The Michael Knowles show is produced by Robert Stirling, executive producer, Jeremy Bori, senior producer Jonathan. Hey, our supervising producer is Mathis Glover, and our technical producer is Austin Stevens. Edited. By Danny d'amico, audio is mixed by Dylan case hair and makeup is by Jessica, ovarian production assistant, Nik Sheehan. The Michael Knowles show is a daily wire production copyright, daily wire. Twenty nineteen today on the Ben Shapiro show. Tucker Carlson responds to his detractors and YouTube talks about censoring conservatives. That's today on the bench appear show.

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355. Where Does Creativity Come From (and Why Do Schools Kill It Off)?

Freakonomics

1:16:50 hr | 1 year ago

355. Where Does Creativity Come From (and Why Do Schools Kill It Off)?

"I don't understand why you're not in prison in China. Sounds like obviously, they did it for a little while. Why choose I tried to sink about on the suddenly just this moment. I realized that sir that you in China's non large enough to put me, what do you we just to large my ideas, penetrates. Are your ideas big enough to penetrate walls? His apparently are my name is I weigh sixty one year. So I was born nineteen fifty seven painting China, but the year was born my father was exiled and our previous episode. We asked the art economist David gallons to name true, creative genius. I mean, I way way is a giant wear. I wear I believe it's not only the most important painter in the world. He's the most important person in art IWay has changed the world with his art. He has made a contribution to political discourse. This is unique person in art almost in the last hundred years. So we went to Berlin to visit IWay we interviewed him in his subterranean studio, a former brewery in the former east Berlin. And how do you describe what you do? Now that has been a confusing because version because most and I did this relate to so called art so people call me artist. But since I being also working. In defending humour is or freedom of speech or human condition. So they call me activist. You care what people go to really care. I think for my life at the care if I still come with Cup next morning. I carry come walk to school become my song. You can see why people are confused by what exactly I way is. Or does. He spends a lot of time making things, but also a lot of time on Twitter calling out institutional hypocrisies or cruelties he wants created a museum-piece comprised of a hundred million handmade porcelain sunflower seeds. He also made a series of photographs in which he drops Han-dynasty earned to the ground and smashes it to bits lately, he's been consumed with the global refugee crisis. He hung fourteen thousand life vests around Berlin 's main concert hall, installed a sprawling public art project in New York called good fences, make good neighbors. And he made a documentary film called human flow officials came here and told him there's no way you're going to get papers to continue either you go entirely or rearrested Aiways enduring obsession has been to stick his finger in the eye of. The Chinese government. He helped design the Olympic stadium for Beijing two thousand eight games. But by the time was Bill he attacked the organizers for cronyism and corruption after the two thousand earthquake in Sichuan that killed tens of thousands. He launched a citizens investigation into the poorly built schools for so many children died he gathered up the mangled rebar from quake sites. And he turned it into a sculpture cold street when the government placed him under surveillance. He responded by making the sculpture called surveillance camera in two thousand eleven I was kidnapped and jailed by the Chinese government charged with subversion of state power upon being set free. He decided it was best to leave China since I was born I would be seen as. See as sung of the enemy of the people. This. You are dangerous to see your someone who. Could have a potential to to make big trouble. They were rate perfectly rights, but I try to leave up the towards the kinda conditions. The one that did we always other? I ching was a prominent poet and intellectual before the communist revolution. He was considered a leftist subversive would Mao took over ching started out in the new regime's good graces, but eventually fell out of favor and the family was exiled from Beijing. So groping Xinjiang province, which is desert and spend about eighteen years in location. So when you were kid, you're growing up in we call them labor camps or reeducation camps. I don't know what you call. It. We call it. Harry education comes to remake you to become a better part of society. It didn't seem to have worked on you. Did it though? Oh. The work company. Well, if the state was trying to re educate, you you, but that is very important because. Beauty your reactionary to this. Wash our limit individuals rights and freedoms speech. So you you kinda. Some hall immune to this kind of. Attacks for several years. The family lived underground cavern for two decades. I ching did not write my father's sa-. So he is no single day comes home on not physically shaking because he's being so mistreated, and he tried to kill himself several times, I understand his temper street times you. How did he try? You know, he wants the electric. Hanako that socket. I've caved, of course, a sh- the whole light one off because the shortage on the one say Trent hung himself on dates so lucky as a nail loosen, and you were a teenager, then or younger about eight or nine and did you know what happened? I don't know how he told me later. Concerning. I -ways upbringing at least two questions come to mind, both of them probably unanswerable, the first what are the odds that boy living in a labor camp in the Gobi desert would become one of the most influential artists in the world, and how much did that environment have to do with who he became today. Frigging radio. The second episode our series called how to be creative ideas big enough to penetrate walls, where do they come from? How does an artists or inventors family and background shape? Their creative lives. We'll hear from well known creatives who are the offspring of well-known creatives like the singer and writer Rosanne cash. Well, that was complicated for me because my dad was a very famous musician. We'll look at what science can tell us about the predictors of creativity this factors so powerful. That you can actually tell by going to someone's dorm room in college. We'll talk about how well or even if our schools encourage creativity. I don't think it's impossible to reorient the way we teach. It's not going to be easy. But I think we can do it. I think we have to do it and the small topic of how creativity and family intersect. Did you say that's a small topic? God. From Stitcher, and w productions this is freakonomics radio the podcast that explores the hidden side of everything here's your host, Stephen dubner. I -ways childhood was of course, a typical and a lot of his art is clearly a response to his family's treatment during China's cultural revolution. But is there any way to say that his upbringing was a cause of his creativity? Yeah, that's very important. We actually have a term for we call. It diversifying experiences. Dean Simon is a professor emeritus of psychology at the university of California Davis. He spent decades studying the biographies of great artists and scientists to help understand where creativity comes from what diversifying experiences means as you're exposed to one or more events in childhood or Atta leci- that put you on a different track from everybody else. So instead of being raised just like all the other kids on your block, and very conventional fashion. You all of a sudden, find yourself different. You see yourself as different. You have different goals and these diversifying experiences can take a lot of different forms and often. You look at the lives of a lot of creative genius. You see more than one of them operating. So so you're saying that diversifying influences would lead would tend to lead to higher creativity. Then tend to lead to create a genius. I didn't realize that he was a spy until you know, a teenager. That's the scientists Pat Brown. He grew up all over the world in Paris Taipei in Washington DC where I figured out was that a good friend of mine. My dad was his boss and away. And he made some mentioned the fact that his dad worked for the CIA thought. Well, that's weird because for a time Brown was best known as an inventor of method of genetic analysis called the DNA micro array, which has become useful for the study of cancer. Was this research, primarily within the context of solving cancer addressing cancer or no, no, no. It originally was let's let's put this why it's kind of hard to for so many of these things that that I would do are. You know, any scientists do it's not necessarily there's this single reason why you're doing it. You just realize it if we could do this. There's all these cool things that you could apply to okay. And and in fact, you know, in the early days when we had I got this thing working, we had a few good ideas reason enough to do it. And then as you're actually doing experiments realize, oh, we could do this. Oh, we could do this until a few years ago. Brown was a sort of high end researcher without portfolio at Stanford. And then he took a massive left turn and founded startup with rather modest goals. I'm currently the CEO and. Founder of impossible foods, which is a company whose mission is to completely replace animals as a food production technology by twenty thirty five. I asked Brown whether he saw any connection between his globetrotting childhood with CIA dad and to scientific career. I think the fact that I traveled in lived in multiple place in the world. And and you know, in those days kids were a lot more like free range at a young age. And I felt like I had a lot of freedom to explore all these places and so forth. I think had an impact on me in the sense that it just made me aware of the fact that there's basically no place on earth that an accessible probably the base of everything that I do is a fantastic curiosity about people, and tense empathy. That we're all in this in this kind of rural struggling role heroic too. Just even wake up in the morning. That's my recounting. And I am an illustrator and author and she's got a son. My name is Alex Cowman. And I am a designer curator creative director writer editor and someone with generally many aunts in their pants can one or both of you. You can take turns. You can interrupt whatever you want just describe briefly the family, that's a small topic. But just a little bit about the family growing up in until now did you say that's a small topic? Yeah. It's an epic. I think that's an that's the epic topic. There's no there's no bigger topic than the family. Myra common is best known for her children's books, and her illustrated edition of the elements of style and her work for the New Yorker cluding one of its most famous covers ever cold New Yorker, STAN, you don't know it go, look it up. Her work manages to be wims ical and melancholy at once paintings of cake and dogs and demure old, ladies and Plumey hats. She wants bought a pair of the conductor Arturo Toscanini pants at auction just to have them actually she bought the whole suit, but his pants have. There have a lot more panache when you say his pants for years. My recommen- was best known as the right hand woman to her husband Tibor, Cowman a wildly creative and influential designer he died young nearly twenty years ago when their two children were young I've known. N- them since around that time. Pretend I don't know. Either of you at all, and we're sitting next to each other on an airplane or something and say, oh, you guys are mother, and you know, tell me a little bit about yourselves, what kind of family was this where did you live? And what was that household lake? I think we'd say. Swap seats. So that we don't have to sit next to each other on. Prefer not to talk. Actually, I'm going to be in business class. And he's going to be on. Alex Myra collaborators to they created an installation called Sarah Berman's closet. Sara Berman being Myers, mother and Alex's grandmother. And the installation consisted of the contents of Sarah's closet. Artfully curated and arranged. It's appeared at the Metropolitan Museum of art in New York. So I was curious what the Cowman house was lake to grow up in. It was a really joyful and kind of wild and fund childhood. I know that we're all very close. And we went on many adventures and days were filled with with looking around and making books when we were bored and cooking dinner and listening to music from all corners of the earth and just a real really deep exposure to everything and. Anything that was not familiar in our day today. And I thought that house where we're making books and dancing and making costumes and train the furniture upside-down is that's you. How could you not do that so creativity in the home in the family was a sense of play in a sense of loving language and art and music by that, you know, real creativity? Isn't this thought to say okay, now, let's be creative. It's just a kind of a natural feeling understanding of saying vis is all opportunity to play with all these rules are opportunity to create new rules or bend certain rules and the joy in kind of that type of experimentation and that type of play hopefully with some result that is meaningful or profound or funnier. Entertaining. My parents to their enormous credit were really not that pussy. That's a composer. Nico mueller. The youngest person to ever have a commission from the Metropolitan Opera in New York. He grew up in New England with a painter mom and a documentary filmmaker dad, and you know, it's the usual you have to be driven to the thing. And then you have to get all the books, and you have to pay for these classes, and whatever. And then so they were really great about that. But it wasn't it wasn't this version of the thing where it's like, we're going to press you so hard to become a conservationist, nor was it. You know, isn't this acute hobby, but you need to work for Goldman Sachs. I think they found the good the good middle point. It's less about them being artists and more them creating a household in which were spoken about. And I think that's the real luxury of childhood was was not necessarily being surrounded by art in in that way. But by people who read. Thought about a million things and channel that into not just artistic expression. I mean, we I think we all know, we we all we all have our stories of people raised by artists horror stories, maybe but also success stories growing up in a creative. Household means learning not only a creative life is possible. But if you pay attention, you can learn how to do it that was the case with Elvis Costello, the singular singer songwriter, whose father was a singer with a popular dance band. Nobody would regard them as hip in the slightest, but the leader Joe loss managed, a Fronta ban from the late twenties to the to the, you know, he was a remarkable character aiding light entertainment. They weren't fighting means with the rock and roll vibe or anything like that. Young Elvis actually, his name was Declan macmanus back then young Declan would hang out in the darkened balcony of the Hammersmith Palais in London during the band, Saturday afternoon, set watching his father emerge into the limelight in jacket and tie, which is why to this day. Elvis Costello pretty much always wears a jacket and tie Juve have assaultive Amerasian for your parents ability to do whatever it is do that was just you know, that was one perspective of performance, and he brought music into the house that he was leading for the weekly broadcasts. They don't after my parents separated, you know, he his life transformed. He he then sort of took on an appearance closer to sort of pita cells, and what's new pussycat, he grows halon, and they started way fashionable clothes and listen to contemporary music because he left the safety of the nightly gig with the span then decided they want to do is thing. So that striking out and being independent thing was sort of like from his example, no matter what the music was all the style and Behrmann Mike Tyson music changed like any teenager from every it was all about one thing. The next day. It was all about another. It was always about the song. I'd spent the last two years of schooling and Liverpool which at that time was musically. Very quiet and the seventies and tried to make my own way. Playing my own songs out of partner. We sang in Bosnian any evening the way they would let us on the stage. Really, we're making tiny little bits of money just about covered our expenses and a little bit how to do it. But I never really thought that I was, you know, the the television every Thursday to see top of the pops in Seoul the distance between the way, I looked fell and sounded and what was the pump singer right them, which was a lot of people in bake affoil with I'm makeup on that was that was the music of that moment, the glitz glamour moment that seem very distant from seventeen year old. You know, did you kind of wish you could do? I wanted to do. I might be the only person in English pump music. You know, the made a record. Would that never wanted to be David Bowie while still loving everything? He did. My father really struggled a lot. He could make money plan. Modern jets Wynton Marsalis is one of the most celebrated musicians alive a jazz and classical trumpeter who also composes teaches and runs the landmark jazz at Lincoln center program. His father Ellis Marsalis is also an accomplished jazz musician piano player. He played great musicians. But the people really want to hear the style of music. They will play in the nineteen sixties and seventies. When Witton was growing up in New Orleans, the dominant popular music was funk R&_B, not the modern jazz. Father played. Up around music. So my father numb played listen to their music. No one else was this into. But I heard it so Ellis Marsalis supported the family by teaching. Well, my daddy. You know, a first jobs. My father had paid like five thousand dollars a year six thousand dollars. He was a abandoned rector for segregated high schools. In in towns, like oppa Lewis's, Louisiana brokerage Louisiana Ellis was still an influential musician in New Orleans and for his son. Who's kind of nudity was people in the neighborhood respected him for his opinions. You can't say nothing to jazz musicians Z, they know stuff, you know, the barber shop or something and also because in the barber shop at the height of kind of black nationalism. My father was always the one who was not nationalistic that was great embarrassment for me. Now, it'd be saying man while you you waste talking to stuff there's against what everybody is saying. And he would always be very philosophical, man. You know, you don't attack people is not dare you got to tell the people in front of you what they don't wanna hear. And he was he was always a big one. He was always the all of everybody. Never does anything though. If you said, they he would always say who is they may can you tell you, do, you know them wouldn't aims Whitten's. Mother was also a big influence mama was unique and she had an originality. There was co food tastes different. She had only of doing stuff as she was a big creative kind of personally, she decorated your house understand artistic. Yeah. Everything about everything. She she grew up. She's from the projects, so she's very unusual because she was very much head street element, which is become a cliche now. Then it wasn't as cliche, and she was also was I graduate from college. He went to gramling university is extremely intelligent in terms of just ability to do. She do my chemistry homework when I was in high school in any any kind of spatial problem. She understood, but she also had a very deep social consciousness that was not once was not. Cliche and Wynton Marsalis distinguished himself at a very young age played the the highest Trump controlled enormous for my when I was fourteen and the Brandenburg concerto with the New Orleans youth orchestra when I was sixteen. How did you recognize that Trump? It was gonna be what you're good at. Well, I didn't know till I was twelve I was going to be interested in and then it was just amount of plan practicing and stuff. So notice if you practice you got better because the guy my neighborhood was always picked on. And he saw Bruce Lee into the dragon, and he decided to get some nunchucks man, he was wing these sticks. And then all of a sudden, it may be like five months of him swinging sticks every day it became Virgil. Also, Ed, then it was no more picking on him. Calling him fat taking his money stuff to people like to do all of a sudden say say fat comes wing them sticks. Was you know, fence is. Is is name was Theodore of we call it that, oh, we when a country can Louisiana black sides, segregate aside, and I noticed one day he had in common with a guy named we call big poll after that incumbent. He definitely was not picked on. And I thought man practicing his something guy six months ago picking on him. Now, he practicing, and he sticks and his whole position in a hierarchy of this this food chain has changed and understood from from watching him did just to kind of diligence in in repetition. Intelligent, repetition. You could become better at things. Couple years later Winton and his brother Branford joined a funk band was good at making a baselines, I'm left handed. So they would always put a baseline on his breath. So I put a baseline or something. We we've rehearsed in the night would with a band called the creators at time in New Orleans. My brother, and I would have to youngest musicians on the whole funk scene. I was thirteen in Brentwood fourteen. I'll ban was Maine. Old men maybe in the early twenties teen late teens. Maybe ten to thirteen bands. They all had named like cool in apprise flashback stop Inc. Vietnam blackmail. The family play. So we would have battles at a bands. We play dances, we play gigs everywhere, wedding, receptions. We did a series of talent shows that the police department was sponsor to to make make community relations and people come up out at audience out what they played words areas. Enormous the most fun we have a head, and they will come up and sing play. And we had to learn if Tina twenty songs, and we learned if we'd never looked at music, of course, most of the times, it was never music. We just learned to music, and we played in we. It was great. I didn't want to join the band. I did when I was twelve I wanted to play jazz. And my dad is the one that say man play in the band. Yeah. He said bad join the band because why because you have to you have to have experiences to to know what something is you can't don't don't cut yourself out of experience when you're young. He was always saying don't take my prejudices develop. You'll. Jay. And I were just kind of like this little two person team. That's the filmmaker and actor Mark do plus one half of another Norrland's brotherhood. We would sleep in j single bed together for like way too late like J at Ardy like gone through puberty. I mean, it was kind of weird. But I think we started to develop this sense of we might try to become artists, and that seems like an impossible thing to do and be financially sustainable, so we better link arms and souls, Mark and Jay do plus both right act and direct sometimes together. Sometimes not they had a pretty standard issue suburban upbringing like mom's home with us well dad's cranking away fifty to fifty five hours a week kind of building the American dream. So like we can one day take vacation that's not in the car like one day fly to vacate. That was like that was like the goal, you know. So what that meant practically for me in Jay is that we didn't have a lot of stuff. Our parents give us a lot of emotional support and a lot of love, but they didn't buy a lot of stuff. So we were very bored. And I think when cable arrived which was like a marker of success. My dad was like where getting cable and way are doing it. That's when HBO came into our lives, and that really lit us up as storytellers because you know, for those of you who don't remember in the in the early to mid eighties. There was no curation as to win a certain kinds of movies were shown they generally leave the Allred movies for the nighttime now, but back then we would come home from school, and you know, it was ordinary people and so forth choice. And and you know, we were just enjoying the hard hitting dramas the late seventies early eighties. And and I think it really shaped a lot of who we were. I'm curious like, so you guys are what you're maybe like ten and Jay's fourteen or something at this point right around right around that age. Yep. Yep. Yet. So you're watching ordinary people and so forth choice, but you're not exactly teen or tween fair. Were you aware that you were outliers in that regard? It was it was still very subconscious because we would take our. Bikes to the streets and still play with the other kids and and play football. They really wanted to talk about Star Wars, and we were fine. And we watch those movies to keep up. But it was this feeling which I think a lot of people have maybe later in high school when you start to realize like, oh, this is not my tribe. I know how to play this game. I know how to talk about the things to get along. But when I go home, I've got my one or two people that really are my tribe, and we're talking about that stuff that that sort of dynamic happened to me in j much earlier than most people talk about it happening. The do plus brothers pretty much built their mental model of a creative life from scratch for Rosanne cash. The opposite was true. She is the daughter of country music legend, Johnny cash and his first wife Vivian as for Roseanne following in his footsteps, my mother was afraid of the life. It would lead to. So she didn't encourage me that much. My mother was very creative in other ways. She you know, she crocheted and she painted and she was president of her garden club. And she was creative in some domestic rooms that writing in music just carried a, you know, a lingering fog of fear around it for her. But I remembered my dad was on the road. I remember secretly writing him when I was twelve and saying everything I wanted to do with my life that I wanted to be a writer that I wanted to do something important that I wanted people to read my words that I loved language that music was so important to mean had changed my life. I told him all of these things, and he wrote me back, and he said, I see that you see as I see it was powerful even to a twelve year old at gave me encouragement prepare got divorced round this time. Her father had become a heavy drinker and the drug addict this made her rethink putting music at the center of her life. Well, that was complicated for me because my dad was a very famous musician. And I grew up thinking that fame was a terrible thing that happened to you like a disease and. I thought why would I go into that? Why would I try to attract that kind of attention, and you never have any privacy and privacy is so important to may because a writer needs privacy. And I don't want to go on the road. And I don't want to take drugs and get divorced. Well, actually, I did wanna take drugs in the beginning. So that was okay. So, but, you know, most of that imprint came from my mom because she was really afraid of fame because of what happened in her life with my dad Rosanne cash, it was a cautionary tale. But in the end not enough to stop her. Yeah. I started writing songs, and then I wanted to sing them myself. And then I made demos, and then I showed them to a record label and there's no turning back. Rosanne cash went onto put up many records, mostly country and pop some of them big hits. She's also written four books. She's about to release a new record called. She remembers everything childhood like hers, a musician father, always traveling drugs and now call theme, and it's a tendon burdens her parents divorce. It's practically the model for what we think of as a dysfunctional family and having a dysfunctional family is often seen as the model for living a creative life. It's false. That's Theresa a mob. Really a social psychologist from Harvard who studies creativity many, creative people do have dysfunctional families. But not every creative person has it is functional family of there's there's some interesting research on this by David Feldman, and Robert Elbert and. A number of other people who have looked at the the biographical backgrounds of people who have distinguished themselves for their creativity. Very often they faced a lot of adversity in childhood. Maybe they had a serious illness themselves. Maybe a parent was seriously ill or died. Maybe there was a gli acrimonious divorce or they lost a sibling, those kinds of vents can crush a child. They can they can lead to a lot of problems. They can lead to substance abuse. They can lead to various forms of emotional illness. They can also lead to incredible resilience and. Almost superhuman behaviors saving -ly if people can come through those experiences intact. I don't know if we we being the field in general have discovered what the keys are what makes the difference for for kids. It is true. However that eminent people in a range of fields are much more likely than the average person to have lost a parent at a young age in the US. The rate of parental death before age sixteen is eight percent for high performing scientists. The rate is twenty six percent for US presidents thirty four percent for poets fifty five percent. But we should know the rate of parental death is also disproportionately high for prisoners. So it may be that a parent's death is a shock to any child system. But that it's hard to predict the direction of that shock too much. Depends on the circumstances. Like how talented the kid is or whether they have some key guidance. Sometimes it's one key adult who can somehow rescue them in their lives in the sometimes it seems to just be a trait of the kid something within themselves. There's also the notion that creativity itself can be kind of coping mechanism as it was for the graphic designer Michael Barut. I was really good like elementary school engine is going high school artists. I was I was very accomplished. I could do very realistic drawings that impressed people. And boy, did I take pleasure in impressing people, you know, otherwise, you know, most of my other physical attributes San mannerisms where the kind of things that would provoke many strangers just a beat me up. But but this magic ability to draw things actually seem to be a a kind of thing that even bullies would be impressed. By and and so, you know, early on I kind of started associated creativity. Not with just something that I would do in a lonely room for my own satisfaction. But something that somehow would give me a way of operating in the larger world, you know, if you were designing a poster for the school play you got to go to rehearsals. So even if you couldn't saying or dance or act you got to make a contribution to the overall effort that went into bringing that play to the stage. Well, that's another example of diversifying experience being on out group dean silent and again being a minority as long as you're not oppressed. I mean, this is the problem a lot of minorities are oppressed. And and so they're not going to realize the potential even though they are more inclined to think outside the box. If they can't get a job then as can help. Much. I mean, a good example of that. Is that shoes in Europe? Are well known to be over represented in a lot of demands of creativity. Particularly and sciences the for example, Nobel prizes in the sciences. The Jews are overrepresented some like twenty percent or something. Yeah. But guess what? That's most likely to be in the case where Jews were emancipated where they were no longer subject to the kind of anti-semitism that they saw in medieval Europe, so I can Switzerland and number the countries, so Switzerland that kind of disproportion is much much higher than you see like in Russia, which actually has many more choose but had much longer history of antisemitism. I used to use the Nazis invading my studio as a motivator to to finish an assignment that. I was kind of dragging Meyer Kelman again, and I would say, well if the Nazis came and. Two hours. Would it be done? What if they came in one hour, would it be done then and that was a kind of? Expecting the worst. And my was brought up of course, my family, especially for my father that sense of you never know what's going to happen horrible. Things will happen. Come and grew up in Israel, her parents, seven escaped Belarus before the holocaust. But the rest of her father's family did not make it out in our family. All roads lead to the holocaust. That's kind of an inescapable part of a section of our lives. And it's a reference point for so many things, you know, when we talk about politics or things being bad, and basic, it's not the holocaust. So, you know, get a grip. When I visited Cowman recently in her Greenwich Village apartment one room was dominated by cardboard boxes recently freed from storage. They contain the possessions of her late husband. She and her son Alex are planning to make documentary about Tibor Calman fun to open a t were buffs. And to see what's. I mean, it could be I'm oh, you know, what I take. Let's open this box this box. Is. Yes. Okay. This is he used to take this extendable fork. To a restaurant, and he'd opened the extendable fork. And then all of a sudden, this is the states to be repaired, but he would kind of reach over to another p another play customer is next to us take the food out of their plate. You're you're no not at our table. What would have been the fun of that the fun of this was that he would reach over into somebody else's table and take their food. He didn't in Italy and everything is much more jolly in festive there, and everybody's laughing at this guy who's reach over. And these are Karl Marx communist potato chips, which I made for the TB Rossiter show, we created among store, and this is this is after he died, of course. And I thought shouldn't we have Chromebooks communist potato chips as if that was part of our collection Myra and Tibor Calman son, Alex is now thirty three years old. It's pretty obvious that a lot of his creative spirit comes from his mouth. Other and his father his main project at the moment is a small museum called museum. That's m m u s e u m he calls it a contemporary natural history museum and a form of object journalism. This is where Sarah Berman's closet originated before it landed. At the met museum is very very small. How small it's housed in an old free elevator about three people can fit comfortably. And yet. It is a museum says nicely gun. Quality. It is museum quality seriously. Well museum. Yeah. There's certain rules before we had to follow. And if we did that in this other rules play with. So this collection is called modern religion. And it's basically exploring how these ancient traditions. Stay relevant in today's society and one way of saying relevant is redesigning the elephants the tools of that religion to fit in with modern trend so today, everybody's free. So now, there's. Communion wafers. Or on the go. So there's on the go communion kits. And so it's looking at these seemingly banal objects, and this one here is the really it looks like a piece of Nicorette and owes at wine and a little hosting. That's right. Yeah. You know, the idea in is that we want to touch on many different notes of what it means to be human. So there's things in here that are totally devastating. There's things in here that are continuous. And we don't want to be on you. We want you to be also kind of a part of it. I asked Calman how his father and his father's death influenced him as a human. And as a creative. They're always felt of the really deep and natural and profound connection between Myra and heave or and Lulu. Emmy Lulu is Alex is sister. So there's just a sensibility a way of kind of feeling an interacting and thinking doing and why we're doing what we're doing that feels very just binding and natural. And I often think that kind of subconsciously that the work that I do today feels like a way of maintaining a dialogue with Tibor, and he feels very present and very active in all. Coming up after the break, if a childhood environment and dramatic events like the death of a parent can have a strong influence on how creative someone turns out to be how influential are things like incentives for being creative. So this showed very clearly that intrinsic motivation can be undermined by the expectation of reward. So how does creativity happen? There's the expression we get ideas. We don't get ideas, we make ideas. And what does it take to make? Maybe it's my arrogance. But it didn't a custom is that I can be an architect or stretch religion or anything for that. Messa. That's coming up right after this. 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With a proven partner to see how brands invest smarter and grow faster with Admiral visit Admiral dot com slash freakonomics. Dean Simonsen, you will recall gives a psychology professor who has studied the biographies of creative geniuses get back to just pure psychology. There's something called the big five personality factors. The big five are conscientiousness extroversion slash introversion. Agreeable nece Naroda schism and one of those big five actors is the openness to experience factor, and it and it has a lot of different facets to its openness to values openness to actions. You know, you're willing to try out different foods or try out different music, you know, all sorts of different things, and this factor is so powerful as a predictor of human behavior that you can actually tell by going to someone's dorm room in college whether or not they're higher low in openness to experience. Okay. Well, it turns out this correlates, very very. Highly with with creative genius. Okay. Creative genius tend to be very very high in openness experience. They're willing to explore different values different approaches. We did find a lot of openness to experience in the creatives. We've been speaking with often starting in childhood, I was very much interested in the arts is a child. That's Margaret Geller pathbreaking astrophysicist. Then my mother who was a walking dictionary and loved literature used to take me to the beautiful Morristown, New Jersey library was an very old building. And one of the things that we read together were plays by oh, the famous American playwrights, and from that, I really inherited a love the language, and I became fascinated by the theater and by the human condition, so demanded. That I go to acting school. I don't think my father was that phoned of this idea, but it was impossible not to do it. Gillers father was a chemist at bell labs, the famous tech incubator. I think he's started taking me there when I was around ten and he is to have a mechanical calculator, probably nobody listening, virtually nobody knows what one of those are, but they were called Monroe calculators. And the fascinating thing was all in noise, they made and the best thing was to say divide one by three. So it would just go talk to. At that. It put out all the threes. It could I learned how to load an x Ray camera. And I learned how to measure an x-ray diffraction photograph how to use a Vernier and people would come in and chat with me. Also, bell apps had in its lobby Phooko pendulum, which I used to be fascinated by very many stories high the inventor James Dyson, he of the multibillion dollar vacuum. Fortune was not predestined for a life of engineering. My father was head of classics department of my school to died. My brother was a classic scholar. A my mother was an English scholar. So those there was no engineering manufacturing architecture anything in sight. So how'd that happen? So I knew about creativity or the creative thing I did a school was all. I went off to school to university to pursue a career as a painter in. But when I go this is in London, I discovered that you could do quite a large number of forms of design finishes on interior design on Kentucky. Ceramics printmaking sculpture, filmmaking and soul, and I became interested in design but ended up doing Kentucky. Gotcha. And while I was doing Katiba discovered that I was very interested in structural engineering. Why except that that time it was the time of the Fulla and his tribe structures. GED's stretches and file to with cable tension stretches. It was a time that the concrete and for that much bricks disappearing the structure of buildings and being replaced by steel steel structures. One soldier another. And I realized that architecture was going to be about the structure in the engineering and not so much the full. And I found engineering fascinating. I've never come across in my life before I'm curious if you were at all intimidated by the notion of architecture engineering as much as it appealed to you. Did it strike you as something that lay outside the realm of possibility for boy who came from a family where the classics were. You know, the the foundation that it seem at first just too hard. Notable you have to remember, maybe it's my IRA guns. But then you have to. Amid six is in London. But anything was possible didn't a customer that. I couldn't be knocking or structural engineer or anything for that. Meta. Probably no coincidence that moving to a big city like London changed the way James Dyson thought about his creative prospects the same thing happened. I way way years ago when he lived in New York City for several years. Basically, the whole universe is. So quiet. Not everywhere say the the world has gotten increasingly urban in the past few decades. And that's probably a good thing for the sake of creativity and innovation economists like Harvard's Eglise argue that cities play an outsized role in economic growth. I think the city is our greatest invention because it plays to something that is so fundamental inhumanity plays to our ability to learn from one another ability to learn from one another in cities ideas colliding on purpose and by accident. Also, there's competition in cities and with that competition comes strong incentives to create but this raises its own. Larger question is creativity. Best served by external incentives, motivation or intern. When Whitmer sows was I thinking about pursuing a career in music. His father warned him said don't do it unless you truly. Love it. Don't sit around waiting for publicity money. People saying, you're great. He told him because that might never happen. Things obviously worked out well for Wint Marcellus, but he remembers his father's message. Well, Andy passes it along to his own students in the jazz program at Juilliard teaches my first thing, I have my students do is write a mission statement. And that mission statement is three sentences would do I want to do it. And why am I doing and based on that mission statement, I teach them, and I have fundamental teaching them is I want you to rise above the cycle of punishment and reward, I'm not gonna reward you. Huckle pundits. You this is information. And you can do what you want with this information. So you always actualising and always tell them if if you want to learn some can't stop you. If you don't wanna learn it. I cannot teach you what else Marsalis taught Wynton, and what went and teaches students is supported by the academic research on creativity and children a few decades ago, the Stanford psychologist Mark Lepper ran an experiment with. With nursery school students in which he I watched them doing various activities one of which was drawing with markers Theresa mob. Yele who studied under leper when she was getting your PHD tells the story he then took all of the children if they had shown any real interest in these markets. He put them into his experiment and had them go into a separate room and they were randomly assigned to one of a couple of conditions. The experimental condition was one where the children of sat down experiment said. Hi, I've got some magic markers and some paper here for you. I wonder would you be willing to make a drawing for me with these materials in order to get this good player award, and the experiment of then held up this little award certificate with a big shiny gold star on it and place to ride in the child's name. And so that was the expected. Award condition. The kids in this group as promised got the certificate for making a drawing a second group of kids were invited to make drawing with no mention of a reward and got the certificate as a surprise afterwards. This was called the unexpected reward condition and a third group of kids control group made drawings, but we're neither promised to reward nor surprised with one. The results were amazing. They were very strong the kids who were in the control condition who were in the unexpected reward condition or just as interested in playing with those markers and drawing pictures in their free playtime as they had been before they went into the experimental room. The kids who are in the promised reward condition the contract for reward condition where significantly less interested in playing with those markers. So this showed very clearly and there were many. Any subsequent experiments showing that intrinsic motivation intrinsic interest in children and adults can be undermined by the expectation of reward. This finding that extrinsic motivation can erode someone's intrinsic desire to create came as a surprise. It was revolutionary at the time which was the early nineteen seventies. Because behavior ISM still held sway in much of psychology. The notion that rewards are purely good that they motivate behavior that you can shape behavior with reward. And that is true it, in fact is still true that rewards can be very powerful shapers of behavior. But Mark discovered this very counter intuitive. Unexpected unintended negative consequence of reward a mob. Yele herself in follow up experiment explored. How extrinsic motivation affects the quality of creative work. She gave kids. Of art supplies and ask them each to make a collage without a really strict time limit, although we generally guide people to finish the collage and fifteen to twenty minutes the kids were divided into two groups. The first group was not promised any sort of her word. The second was told that the best collages would win an EPA sketch or a magic eight ball. This was called the competitive reward condition now all Mobley needed were some judges. I brought in people from the art department at Stanford individually and asks them to rate each collide, relative to the others on creativity on nine point scale, something like that. And when I analyze the data, I found that the kids in the competitive reward condition made collages that were significantly less creative than the ones made by the kids in the other condition based on this research and more. It would seem that the promise of extrinsic rewards the kind of incentives that economists. Think encourage productivity that actually discourages creativity and decreases, the quality at least for kids in these settings. It's impossible to generalize. But the evidence is strong enough for a mob relate to draw some conclusions. I think that the biggest mistake we make in our skulls, and I'm talking about everything from kindergarten now up through college is to focus kids too much on how their work is going to be evaluated part of that is the extreme focus on testing in the United States right now. And and for the past several years part of it is away curricula have been structured even before the current major push on testing. There's too much focus on what is the right answer. What are people going to think of what I'm about to say and too little focus on? What am I learning? What cool stuff? Do. I know now that I didn't know last week or year ago. What cool things can I do now that I couldn't do before. And I think that if we could if we could switch that focus. We would do a lot to open up kids creativity. Kids come intrinsically motivated to learn, and we stamp that out of them through the educational system. I don't think it's impossible to reorient the way we teach. It's not going to be easy. But I think we can do it. I think we have to do it. I think we all see kid to slightly rebellious who talked that the question that t took that's Walter Isaacson who's written biographies of Steve Jobs. Leonardo Davinci Benjamin Franklin and Albert Einstein. And at a certain point, the teacher, either spend more time and let the imagination wonder or punish them and says, you know, questioning me Einstein ran away from his school in Germany because he was expected to learn by rote, and he was. You know, swatted down every time he tried to question that teacher. So he was lucky he gets run away and go to Switzerland with they have a new type of school system that nurtures questioning authority. One institution. That is raised the questioning of thirty to an art form is the MIT media lab. It has research units called opera of the future and biometrics and lay phone kindergarten that last one is run by a professor of learning research. My name is Mitch Resnick Resnick argues that randomized controlled experimentation, the gold standard of a lot of science just doesn't work very well for subject like creativity. What problem with his it changes one favorable time? And I don't think anyone variables going to be the key to creativity. So I think that what we see is the most creative environments have lots of different things that worked together in an integrated way. So it's really not so easy to take the classic approach of of know make a tweak and one variable and see the changes, I don't think is going to be the way that we're gonna get a deeper understanding of the creative process. Resnick argues that the lack of clear quantifiable outcomes is a big reason why schools don't prioritize creativity schools ended up focusing on the things that are most easily assessed rather than focusing on the things that are most valuable for kids viable, thriving in today's society. So what we need to do is to focus more on trying to you know. Assess the things we've Al you rather than value if things that are most easily assessed Resnick and the lifelong kindergarten group developed software that lets kids make things like animated stories or interactive LEGO models, very often traditional learning taking the form of delivering information delivering instruction, and the view has been if we just find a better way to deliver the instruction kids will learn more. But I think research has shown that learning happens when kids and adults for that matter actively construct new ideas, you know, there's the expression, we get ideas. We don't get ideas, we make ideas. So I think that yes, there's some role for just you know, delivering information. But I think the most important creative experiences come when kids are actively engaged in making new ideas through their interactions with the world the program's called lifelong kindergarten because Resnick thinks the ideas should extend well beyond childhood. We focus on four guiding principles. That I call the four Ps of creative learning projects passion peers and play. So we feel that the best way to support kids developing as creative thinkers and developing their creative capacities is to engage them and working on projects based on their passions in collaboration with peers in a playful spirit, we lead most of our lives by work on projects. You know, marketing manager coming up with a new ad campaign is work on a project journalist writing article is working on a project in a personal life. We plant someone's birthday party that's a project. So we want to learn about that process of making projects. We also want them to work on things that they're passionate about we've seen over and over that people are willing to work longer and harder and persist in the face of challenges when their work on things they really care about. They also make deeper connection to ideas with they're working on projects that they really care about. The third P of peers we've seen that learning is a social activity that the best learning happens in collaboration and sharing with others. We learn with and from others and then the final P of play. I sometimes call the most misunderstood pay often with people think about play. They just think about fun and laughter. I've nothing against fun and laughter. But that's not the essence what I'm talking about. I see play not just as an activity type of attitude and approach for engaging with the world when someone has a playful approach. It means they're constantly experimenting trying new things taking risks testing the boundaries. And I think the most creative activities come about when we're willing to experiment. Take risks. I remember when I would come home from school, and no one was home. And I didn't have a plan. There is this kind of almost mysterious excitement that I would feel about just being alone. That's the writer Jennifer Egan who won Pulitzer prize for her novel visit from the gun squad. I have to say I feel like I I lost touch with that through maybe even decades of my life where I was so worried about whatever else was doing how I measured up how what I should be doing as opposed to what I was doing. Whether there was some important thing everyone else was doing that. I should be doing to. And and this was before social media. I think this is this is like a scourge for young people now from everything I hear, but if I can get that out of my head, which I find easier and easier as I get older, there's a feeling that there's sort of a mystery that's waiting for me that I can possibly enter somebody childhood narratives that are really about this. I mean. The secret garden all of the narnia books, you know, about passing through a membrane or border or door or jumping into a pool and being another world. It's a really basic fantastical longing. This wish to be at a distance from one's own life, and to touch something outside at which is first of all thrilling in and of itself and second of all returns you to your real life in charged in some way. That's what fiction writing for me. Well, I think that when we were young we really indulge. I wonder years Walter Isaacson again, you know. You know that notion of playing and being a magin tiv- and having downtime. Will you can be creative that something we sometimes lose in our school systems today. One beneficiary of this creative downtime. Leonardo da Vinci. He had the great fortune to be born out of wedlock, which meant that. He couldn't go to one of the Latin schools that middle class families of the renaissance lent to and so he's self taught. He sits by a stream and puts rocks and different obstacles in it to see how the water swirls he draws it. And then he looked at. How was all of these things you get to you do when you're young you're full of wonder, and you're using your imagination. We see that. In Ben Franklin is a young kid just being interested in why does condensation form on the outside of a cold Cup. The type of thing that maybe we thought about. Out. But somehow we quit thinking about. So that's the number one secret of being imaginative in creative is almost being childlike in your sense of wonder Albert Einstein said that he said, I'm not necessarily smarter than anybody else. But I was able to retain my child like sense of wonder at the models of creation in which we find ourselves, but Walter Isaacson lake Mitch Resnick and Theresa a mob. Yele isn't calling for a ban on conventional instruction think that creativity is something you can Notre and even try to teach but more importantly creativity without skill creativity without training and learning can be squandered if Louis Armstrong had not found somebody king Oliver to teach them how to play the cornet all of his imagination would have been lost. So we should not disparage role of training of learning. A main the same is true of Einstein is a little kid. He's wondering how the compass needle twitches and points north Wisconsin important that he goes to the Ruhr. Ick polytech and starts understanding the concepts behind Maxwell's equations, so people who think we should just know to creativity without the skill sets and the training that allow creativity to be turned into action to allow for things like applied creativity there being too romantic about it Leonardo had to work in Voro Cao's workshop and learn how to do a brush drug there are, of course, plenty of obstacles that may keep a person from gaining both proper instruction and the latitude to play an imagine Nores every kid lucky enough to grow up with two parents as talented and creative as Tibor in my recommen-. Or with parents like Margaret Geller's taking her to bell labs and indulging passion for acting. These are privileges not rights, and they're not always Felipe reshi. It'd here's John Hodgman, the comedian author and former daily show correspondent people who are hand mouthing and are really economically anxious. Of course, they're gonna have a disadvantage to say affluent white dude from Brookline Massachusetts who is an only child who had the full benefit of all of his parents love and never had to share anything in his life. Like, I had a lot of time to sit around thinking and daydreaming to the point where when I went to college. You know, my dad said, I I don't care what you do in college. I ask you only that you take a single course in bookkeeping and finance. So you know, how that world works. And I was like dad, I love you. But no way. Even that really big ass. And yet a spoiled brat. You're totally. This is what I'm saying. I've regretted it every day of my life. But you know, but it was it was it was an incredibly selfish and ridiculous thing to do because I was spending his money to go to college. And yet I was like, no I'm going to sit on the grass and read one hundred years of solitude for the fifth time. You could make an argument that it paid off for me to a certain degree. But I mean, look art comes out of all communities everywhere. Communities of of means and communities of of no means I mean, the greatest art movement of the twentieth and twenty first century that is probably the most the most globally meaningful. Art movement is the development of hip hop, which was an creation in the South Bronx by by young people who were obviously not affluent. John hodgman. Sure sounds like he's got a grip on the causes and consequences of creativity. When you say and that he's got his own creative ducks in a row. He's had a lot of creative and commercial success. But do not be deceived. If you think prior success insulates, the creative person from anything, you should think. Again. I mean, let me put it this way. I am a person for whom being creative is terrifying. It is the most rewarding thing that I can do. But it is a constant struggle with a very clear feeling that I am out of gas every day every day. And and that I will not be able to support myself for my family because I have now finally run out of ideas for sure this time. I mean it. It's not even a fear. It is a certainty that I'm done that. I have no further ideas, and I've been doing this, and this and only this whatever this is now for twenty one years. We will explore that fear and many other aspects of creativity in future episodes of the series until then keep your ears open. For a bonus episode. My full conversation with Elvis Costello who's had one of the most extraordinary careers, in modern music is just put out a wonderful new record called look now. Coming up next week on freakonomics radio. What if I told you that our political system is not at all what you thought it was always thought politics as a public institution that the rules were somehow codified in the rule of law, and in our constitution, but politics is really about competition between largely private actors, and at the core of it is what we call the duopoly are the Democrats and Republicans really just like coke and Pepsi. With worst. TV ads is our political system really just an industry primarily interested in making money in creating jobs. That's next time on freakonomics radio. No, you don't forget to vote. Freakonomics radio is produced by Stitcher, and w productions this episode was produced by Stephanie Tam, Matt Fresca with help from Harry Huggins and Alison Craig low our staff also includes Greg Rippin, Alvin Mela and Zach Lipinski theme song, Mr. fortune hitchhikers the rest of our music was composed by we scare you can subscribe different radio on apple podcasts or every get your podcast. The entire archive is available on the Stitcher app or at freakonomics dot com. Where we also published transcripts show notes and more. If you want the entire archive ad free. Plus, bonus episodes, go to Stitcher premium dot com slash freakonomics. We can also be found on Twitter, Facebook and Lincoln were Email at radio at freakonomics dot com. Radio also plays on most of your better NPR stations. Check your local station for details as always thanks for listening. Stitcher. Hi, I'm nor gorry. I thought I understood sex trafficking in the US the criminals the victims. But when I actually met the people doing sex work. I realized I didn't know half the story, you know, I really want to try to do sex work on my own lake without somebody else, forcing me to do it. And it was a really positive empowering experience. Come with me on a journey across the country to meet the real people who are part of this world. I never knew method about him Jaffa and never knew that. I was Banus blowed. It are trafficking in drugs connected. Absolutely. Like to be honest. I used to like talk down on it like paying someone for sex like. But now, my whole mindset changed, and I'm a part of it. And by the end, I promise you will never look at the sex trade the same way. Again. Join me on sold in America. Subscribe now. In Stitcher, apple podcasts, or wherever you listen.

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Daily Wire Backstage: March Madness Edition

The Ben Shapiro Show

1:47:07 hr | 1 year ago

Daily Wire Backstage: March Madness Edition

"Hey, folks, your about to listen to our latest episode of daily wear backstage. It's me and Andrew klavan and Michael moles whose terrible and God king, Jeremy boring. We're gonna talk about all the things you want to know we're going to answer your questions from daily wire subscribers. I think are going to love it. Enjoy big laugh in three two. Stage March madness, what is marched on writes? This crap is that the one with looking basketball. Yeah, it's where you pay somebody to say that your kids basketball star. So they can get enough. March madness. That's how I got into junior college. We've really didn't do terms of titling these shows. It's a slow news month. My friends, I'm Jeremy boring, God king of the daily wire with a lower case g and lower case K and tonight, we are going to do are honest best to fill something like ninety minutes. That always been our theme song. God knows. Tonight. We're gonna talk politics. We're going to talk culture, we're gonna talk about Tucker Carlson's response to media matters hit job, and why that matters to all of us, and we'll also be taking questions from our subscribers go over to daily wear dot com slash subscribe. Give us your measly ninety nine bucks a year. We're gonna send you leftist. Here's hundred cold tumbler. And we're going to do something tonight that we have never done before so pay attention. If you sign up and become a daily wire annual subscriber during this actual live broadcast tonight you and a guest will be entered into a raffle to win drum roll don't do drugs. A free trip to Los Angeles to sit in on a taping of this very show. Somebody to say it all again, if you give us your one hundred dollars, you will not only get access to the greatest conservative content online. The Ben Shapiro show. The Michael Knowles show. Whatever it is that drew does for a living. You will not only get the leftist tears, hot or cold tumbler. You will also get to get onto an. Airplane? Fly your rear end to Los Angeles put on some sort of masks. So that you can cut through the cigar smoke and sit in on a taping of the daily wire backstage, we look forward to getting to meet you take one picture with you never talk to you again. All right with me tonight. Ben shapiro. Andrew claybin, Michael Knowles, and the lovely Alicia crafts. Why are they always make me take the lovely leash across? Imagine. If what I said with me tonight, the lovely been the key. Nose piercing claybin Andy Lucia oppressed. She'll be joining us here. A bit later to bring us your questions. Get over to Delaware dot com slash subscribe, become a subscriber interfere chance to fly out here and meet us as we tape an episode of this show in the meanwhile, st- Kate. Can we add to that offer that they sit in for me? Yeah. So it'll be like and appear for piercing. Analysis is Bob. Yeah. No. They can't sit in. I think meeting used the only reason anyone do this. Anyway, we're going to say to fly out. It's been today. Shadowing daily wire God king, Jeremy born. And then when even our own staffs at who's that? That's where we're gonna talk about all kinds of things. I Tucker Carlson. We're gonna talk about International Women's Day. Happened over the weekend. Still getting. Over the syllabi did see captain through is a sadist. Down there. I think we'll talk a little bit about college. And why you shouldn't go since I'm the only one who didn't go. I have a perspective on this. But I I know a lot of people. Tune in for my clunky segues. That's that's why. You know, who is named Bravo company manufacturing Pravo. It was trapped in the constitution. They enshrined bunch of rights. The first right was making sacred the right of the individual to share their ideas without limitation by the government. The second rate was your ability to protect that. I write with a gun. And that's where Bravo company manufacturing comes in. You know, how strongly I believe in the right of the people to keep and bear arms. If you're law-abiding citizen you should own a weapon Bravo company manufacturing was started in a garage by marine veteran or than two decades ago to build a professional grade product that meets combat standards BCM believes the same level of protection should be provided to every single American regardless of whether they are a private citizen or a professional BCM, not a sporting arms company. It's thing I'm big on guns are not just for hunting. They're not just for self defense. There. Also for protection of your family and your country and your principles every components of obesity. I'm rifle is handed sampled and tested by Americans to a life saving standard. These GM works with leading instructors of marksmanship from top levels of America's special ops. Forces from Marine Corps force reconnaissance to US army special ops forces who can teach the skills necessary to defend yourself, your family or others to learn more. About bravo. Company manufacturing head on over to Bravo company. M F G dot com, and there you can discover more about their product special offers upcoming news, Bravo company and FDA dot com. Met the founders of the company there's been tackler people in their product is great. If you need more convincing, check them out at YouTube dot com slash Bravo company. USA that is YouTube dot com slash Bravo company. USA Bravo company manufacturing. Not only a great sponsor of the show. Not only pretty great product. But is a great sponsor of the show. And you're if you're like me, you're particularly grateful for sponsors on a Newsweek like this week when we're watching Tucker Carlson face down, a hit job from media matters. Media matters worse organization, America. Yeah. They're they're truly the it's an evil organization. It was started for Filipino the background. And media matters media matters was started by essentially, Hillary Clinton as a as a way to target the so-called vast right wing conspiracy. This regarding g. Roy smear artist who the the formerly allegedly cocaine addled smear artists who has spent his entire career just going after his political opponents while mistreating has an employee's allegedly. And media matters was specifically designed to go after people on the right? It is not a media watchdog the media lie to people they say, oh, it's a media watchdog, Noah media watchdog is an organization that follows the entire media and then calls people out on their mistakes. Media matters is the kind of organization where internal memos showed several years back that they were actively talking about hiring private investigators shadow hosts at Fox News to dig up crap in their private lives. So they could use it against them. And take them off the air media matters is now designating obviously the Tucker Carlson some poor sap who's using their sociology degree to good benefit. I watching one hundred hours listening to one hundred hours of Tucker Carlson on old episodes of about the love sponge from two thousand six. This was this. And we have been told that what Tucker said on there is deeply important to everyone. They are deeply offended couple quick notes. And then and then ended up giving the Android here. Couple quick nuts media matters badly motivated. We all know this. When joy Reid of MSNBC was caught in battle blog posts, Angela Corsa and the head of MFA MFA media matters for America came out and said, no this is a right wing smear. Of course, we shouldn't go after any of advertisers. It's all a right wing smear. He himself has now been caught in a bunch of old posts. There will be no consequence to any of that media matters to play a bunch of protesters to Fox News, not to call four Tucker's ouster, but to call for a complete advertising boycott of the entire network a Fox News because they don't like Fox News because Tucker Carlson was on Fox News when he said those things he's on him. He's him at all. And here is the here's the kicker to to all of this media matters designed as a hit group is being given all sorts of credibility. Why people who do not give two craps what? Tucker said, I I was never found shock jock radio. I don't like shock jock radio. A lot of what? Tucker said was jokes from what? Tucker said wasn't it shocked radio specifically designed for people to go on and say the most offensive things they can possibly say for the listener. And the attempts to go after Tucker for this old stuff is not in good faith. It's not attempt to ask him what he meant by it. It's not an attempt to garner his views. It is the same deal. They do with every prominent conservative figure they tried to go back find something that they can cast embarrassing and then call for an apology if you apologize and they step on your neck. And so you did something wrong, obviously, that means advertiser should pull if you don't apologize. They say you, obviously still believe that bad stuff. So your advertisers should pull they go after you to destroy you. It is it is despicable. It is despicable. Because again, it's not about you said something in the here. And now that was bad. And now we're all reacting to the here. Now, it is you pretending to be. Outraged about a thing about what are eminently non. It's also funny to me you bring up that. It was on a shock jock radio show. You know, if you if you take yourself back in time ten years, the heady days of yesteryear. Conservatives weren't the audience for that show. Right. Right. So Tucker Carlson, of course, at the time on MSNBC, those on Bubba the love sponge, something that almost every conservative in America. When they read the story yesterday thought who what because that entire format existed? Basically as a rebuke of the right at basically was a left-wing comedy format and to me, that's actually the the worst aspect of. It is we now live we talked last time we were together about how we live in a graceless age. I think that's really important subject matter. We also live in an in an era where there is no comedy. Absolutely, no comedy is allowed. You're not allowed to be satirical. Satires dead. You're not allowed to parody parody or totally through the looking glass on parody. I'd never like you. I've never cared for the shock format. Maybe when I was sixteen years old. I might have grinned a few times listening to the Tom leykis your. Once or twice, but never a format that really. Did anything for me? But we live in a better country when someone can go on a shot talk radio show and say outrageously terrible things in everyone Snickers at them. And then we move on with their there's something I want to add to the media matters picture, though. David Brock was the former boyfriend of the guy who ran the pizza. Parlor that was the center of pizza gate when the win the pizza gate. Rumors started that was when the idea of fake news before Trump took it over started to spread and David Brock said, we said openly, we're going to use this to impose on social media censors who cut down conservative voices. Barack Obama picked up the thread, Hillary Clinton picked up very very sophisticated organization meant to silence the voices of the opposition. It's not as you say it is not meant to call people out. His is not meant to question ideas. And this thing I mean, look as far as I'm concerned for that day that when Tucker Carlson stood up to these guys and made that incredibly precise opening speech about the. Outrage mob for that one minute. He was the most important person in America. And the reason I say that is the right to joke around and make stupid jokes and say things that maybe you shouldn't say that's part of free speech. And I don't think it should cost you your job. And by the way, this whole thing he said at ten years ago. I don't care if you said it yesterday. I don't care if he was sitting in a bar and somebody heard him have a couple and say something he shouldn't have said that's part of being a human being is part of being a guy, especially guy say stupid things we like to step over dealer. We're jocular. We'd like to step up the one we say them sometimes to make a point sometimes because they strike us as funny in the in the moment, we all do it. And. I will say I do think there's a difference between old material new material new material we get to react in real time to the stuff. That's being said. Now, there's something particularly off pudding. Yeah. About digging up old stuff there not outraged over a decade ago. I now you're re. Listing which we have to distinguish between the joked people make and the things that they are saying, of course, I agree that we should make a distinction between jokes and people's activities. Of course, I believe that we that we should be able to say terrible jokes. I think that it's it's not only fundamental to freedom. It's like, it's a it's an essential aspect of how men express themselves gets a form of de escalation like racist jokes. That's there are two kinds of racist. Jokes are racist jokes that are meant to demean people of other races and people who make those jokes are racist. Then there's racist jokes which are meant to defuse differences between the races. And those shows traditionally were made by all kinds of people of good faith, you you would have comedy troupes where these jokes would be made between the racist toward each other. And that was part of the de escalation during the civil rights during the civil rights movement. So this brings me to what I actually hate. And the reason that I mentally agree that even worse to go back into the past. It's because the rules have. Changed? I disagreed with the new rules. But I do recognize that there are new rules. I wanna fight against some push back against them. But we push back within a certain framework. It's particularly disturbing to go back to a time. When. Next. We're going to go back to Howard Stern and start finding all kinds of things were set on the Howard Stern already having right? They go back to friends, and they say you can't watch the show friends anymore. Those popular show the nineteen ninety s you're not supposed to watch it anymore because there are episodes in which people are joking about gay marriage or people are making jokes about fat people or people making racial jokes. Like, oh here trying to superimpose modern sensibilities. Yes, back onto people in a in a different era who abided by different. I mean, it's fundamentally dishonest in an extraordinary way. And that is that once you what are they what exactly is the ask? So if you're if you wanna make society better there has to be an ask. So what exactly is the asking? So I say something on my show today. That's wrong. And the ask is, okay. I have to come on the show tomorrow. And I have to correct it. That's a fair ask I say something that is offensive or terrible. It's my job to apologize to the people that I that I was wrong to I'm not going to say that the people who were offended because that puts the onus on them. If I did something wrong the onus is on me. But what is the ask when somebody said some? Bad thirteen years ago. And no one took offense is Tucker supposed to apologize to media matters because those people can go f- themselves. Now, it's sucker supposed to apologize to people who are offended now by comments that didn't make a dent thirteen years ago. I mean, like here's a situation in which I would say Tucker should apologize. So Tucker, for example, said made some comments about Warren Jeffs who was I guess tried and convicted for facilitating rape for he's the leader. And he was hitting a child marriages between twenty seven year old and sixteen year old and Tucker made some comments about how he thinks that guy should be free. Let's say that Warren Jeffs victims had come forward and said, I was offended by that. And Tucker said listen, I was on the love sponge. I was saying stupid stuff. I apologized that seems to me that would be a fair recompense. But who is Tucker supposed to apologize to the world at large? He's just like his own Mia. Damn thing isn't being something that he said why this is what the left does the left gets offended on behalf of other people you'll you'll notice nine times out of ten is always white liberals who are pretending to be offended on behalf of every. Edgeley aggrieved minority, and it is it's even further. Context is so important context particular circumstances or important to everything in life. And so when I speak in public, I don't swear I just try not to I I don't like to do it when I'm at the bar. I talk like dirty sailor. And I'm not sorry that I do that. I don't think it's wrong that I'd do that. I think it is. Right. And just I think it was perfectly appropriate to those contexts. So Tucker Carlson is invited on the shock jock show. Now, you could say maybe you shouldn't go on a shock jock show. Maybe that's career advice. Maybe the leftists at MSNBC should've told them to stay off of it instead of encouraging him to go on. But instead he goes on the show. He's he's supposed to go and play Bach in a rock band. Is that what he's going to do is it going to go start playing the Brandenburg concerto. When he's with the beat. This is interesting. And I think that the feminization of Christianity which led to the feminization of American society, generally really contributes to this which is men do compartmentalize. Behaviors women comm to generally speaking compartmentalise relationships. There's a lot that's interesting to unpack from both of those points from both of those distinct from that distinction. But if you take men who compartmentalize behaviors it doesn't just apply to behaviors within a within a sexual or romantic relationship it. It is a compartmentalizing of all kinds of behaviors within certain contexts, and and it is a legitimate there. I agree with you. There is a legitimate argument to be made that what is wrong in one context is not wrong in another. I mean, obviously, we can come up with huge examples killing someone in war is different than killing someone on the street. So that you can take his killing someone on Bubba the love sponges different than, but even but even with coarse language, even with body jokes, even with sort of the sort of ways that men used disparagement as a form of camaraderie. Yes, things like that are not always appropriate. There's not like I'm not saying universally. People should be allowed to behave. This way, I'm saying in certain contexts, it's appropriate for people behave. This is a weapon sation shock, and it's been used now for thirty forty years against the entire tired of western culture before the show began. We were talking about all the references anti Jewish references that go like a thread through all of western literature now when they teach literature they go back and say, well, here's an anti female thing. Here's an anti lactate. You know, every the famous one was the attack on Jane Austen for supporting the English empire. Simply the British empire simply by writing her books. I mean that was it was I-I argument. It's been an attempt to silence all of western civilization by the targeted outrage that doesn't extend to everything that everybody does. I mean, nobody is going to say, oh, Don lemon demonized white people, which he did white men. Nobody's exit. Here's a great example of this. I've heard you talk about with our friend. Dave rubin. That in one context your position towards Dave Reuben's heart is political, and and and as part of your public advocacy that you do as a political voice in another context. It's congenial because it's based on your friendship with they've Ruben your general support of his well being in his happy. Right. Another example might be the use of certain pronouns. Right. I said this about transgender absolutely exactly right in public. If somebody says are transgender pronouns, the right, pronunciation, I will say no because I don't believe that there is a set of pronouns that is not connected, biological segregate. If I'm sitting across the table from a person who's transgender I'll use whatever pronouns they feel like because we're out to dinner. Why would I just bullied? Because context does matter when trying to make a moral determination about someone's Bank. Of course, the way that you can tell that this is soup. Frene bad faith is the the pod Bros today. Pod positive America. They came for the the Obama rose they came forward, and they were actively stumping for 'em to for people to attend M F as rally outside of Fox News. These guys make their money the same way that we do make money off advertising on programs like this one then because I make my money off this. I hope this position before we ever did this. Of course, the with that said understanding how how advertising works in the space, and that advertisers should be able to advertise on a wide variety of political programs without being perceived endorsed any of the views on those political programs. I have never called nor would I call from Waco against the pod save America, rose, even though I think that they are actively promoting policies that are detrimental to the country actively promoting a vision of American that I think is false dangerous and harmful. I still think that the advertisers advert. Impolitic America have every right to do. So and in boycotting them is morally wrong, and it's good for America. That many of the people who advertise on pod save America. Aval advertise with that. Exactly. Right. We should. But the the comfort level you can see the tool of power because the people of positive America, if they truly believed that the that the boycott the boycott ability was mutual if they truly feared the possibility that we were all going to go after their advertisers. They their position in. But this is what it was so good about Tucker statement is that he pointed out that we're not playing by the same rules. We're in a conversation, their new jihad, we're trying to argue our point of view and win. They're trying to silence us. They do it everywhere. And when what Tucker said was that the right to often plays along the right to often pretends that this is something that some kind of legitimate thing going on, and we have to pull back, and I don't think we do especially I mean, because I do all the satire, I say all these absurd things that I know are absurd, and you know, certainly, and I'm kidding around. But I know that you could take those out of context and now me with my just don't care because I do not feel I do. Not feel. They have the right to do that to me. So I feel it's only right for me to stand up to him. I think that is the this is where the left really plays on. I think the morality of the right? Meaning that we all acknowledge, for example, that that Tucker said some stuff that we don't like, of course, right on. Okay. That stuff is wrong. So instead of so what left will do is. They'll find the thing that they say is what he did wrong. We may agree that it's wrong. And we'll say a broader principle, we're not gonna call for boycotts or his destruction. For thing. He said thirteen years ago and say you agree with the thing that he said thirteen years ago. This is this is where and you saw some of this from the right? There's word Tucker is right and the but the lesson can be extended too far in the other direction. So we're Tucker is right. Is he says, okay? Well, what you guys are doing is in bad faith. You're not attempting to police the dialogue. You're attempting to come after me and destroy me on the basis of these old statements, and there are people on the right from fall for this. And you saw this sauce some people on the right going. Well, Tucker is not the hill design, you really want to die on this hill defending this wrestle. We're in which is a bunch of nonsense a bunch of nonsense because if there's any hill the diet, and it's. Hill of you. Don't get to dig up people's old crap use it against them. Without even asking them. What their opinion is on it now specifically in bad faith to destroy their career? Like, you don't get to do that too bad thing to do. But the, but on the other side, what will happen is people will say, okay. Well, then I'm just gonna on everything. So somebody says something bad Judeh like a ba- like an actual bad thing. And it's today should that person. Apologize for it. And people on the right will go. Listen. I apologize. I'm acknowledging the left point. No, sometimes you have to apologize. This was what I liked about Tucker's monologue. Tucker said good people when they do something wrong. They apologized, but I'm not going to apologize to hyenas. I'm not gonna apologize to the jackals have no interest in receiving percent. Donald persuade Hawaiian who are are looking to destroy me on the basis of this old stuff as I said, if I'm sure that a victim of Warren Jeffs came Tucker and said, listen to what you said on Bubba the love sponge in two thousand seven I found I didn't even know about it. Now, I heard about it. I'm offended. I'll bet you the Tucker would say, you know, what I shouldn't have had it. It was the wrong thing to say. But this brings us back to our conversation. Last time we were together what we're discussing the graceless civilization. And you made the point that from a tactical point of view. It's always wrong now to apologize. Yes. It's if you apologize now, it is you're you're putting your neck indicated becoming you saw it with Chris Pomo. Did you see Chris Cuomo did this insane? Monologue core, objective objective journalist, Chris Cuomo block of wood less smart of the little brothers. An amazing, Chris formal. Chris formal didn't he didn't mind whiled on CNN where he said Toca Carlson is a coward. How do I know? He's a coward because he's not apologizing for these statements, and he's also not going on his show tonight and saying the same statements over again, right and say okay in that in that one sentence you've set up a catch twenty two for him. But which is if he apologizes, then you're going to say, you see he knows that he was wrong. And that's why he should be boycotted because he's that kind of person. You should never have said it in the first place, and even he acknowledges that. And if he doesn't apologize said, well, he's not apologizing because he still agrees with it. So why does interest doubled down on it today? But beyond this. This is something that really bothers me as the entire definition of the fence, usually it's racism, they come after us for the entire definition of racism has now become any glitch any tribal glitch in the human mind that causes you to behave in a certain way. When for instance, a black guy gets on an elevator. If you if you get in a car near side swipe, the car, and you see the guy in the car is black or Jewish or female, you hear very likely to shy. Out. You know, you stupid blank, whatever. Whatever the kind of person. I'm sorry. That's not racist. That's a little glitch in the human person that we can overcome by goodwill. You know, it's not it is not racism to sort of think like, oh, you know. I I grew up with people who look like you. I kind of feel more comfortable with that you can overcome all those things, and what the left does is takes these human foibles, which we all have. And we all say, and it makes turns them into an aspect of your philosophy. Which is not true racism is a philosophy. I knew racist people. I know people who believe that other people are inferior to them. Because of the way they were born that is that it's true racism. I oppose it with all my soul. I truly do you guys. You guys know, I do you heard me rant about it? But it's not the same thing as the fact that we're all human beings that we have these flaws. We have these little tribal glitches add to call people out for that lamp is elevating perfectionist is the only acceptable standard for maybe the Senate has to be perfect perfection because if you were ever imperfect, this is like you can't even tell a story. About how you were once in 'perfect as a cautionary tales. And and what they do is. They take one instance what you're talking about. And I'll disaggregated these center, I think that if you're in the car and somebody sideswiped you, and it's a woman, and you just start shouting at her as a woman that that would be a sexist incident. But that does not mean that you are a, sexist and other words, right? I think we're saying the same thing I'm trying to hone in a little more nicely a racist. A racist moment does not make you a racist for your entire life. Because you already are isn't been beings are a series of moments. That's all we are. And then the way we judge her character is by weighing up the totality of those moments and your viewpoint, and that's how we decide whether you're a good person with your racist or not whether you're somebody who should trust or not the there's no one who's perfect on this earth. And what we have decided is that we're going to take one instance one moment where you did a wrong thing, and we will use that as the key moment that that that is the flash point that shows your behavior, the left does is about merica, by the way, this is their favorite thing that I was ranting about this on my show. I think yesterday. It was really terrible. There's a young man in Victor, I think Victor macaroni. And he was a young black man who was shot to death near USC just last week in his his mother is a city councilwoman in Oakland. And the reason that this hit my radar is because somebody emailed me and said, this is a person who asked you a question at USC at your appearance just a couple of months ago when I remembered the kid is twenty one, and he was he was really nice cordial disagreed with maybe really cordial is really warm hearted. And really, and it didn't make the national news for more than it didn't because he was killed by people who who were killing him as part robbery. It was just a criminal act in a high crime neighborhood near USA. And so this doesn't make the national news. If you've been killed by a white cop than it makes the national news and that connected. This to the fact that there was this long article in the New York Times magazine about what they called the tragedy of Baltimore where they're talking about. How Baltimore has completely fallen apart and ever since Freddie, gray, particularly the murder rate has skyrocketed because the police have just stopped releasing because they don't want to be. Held up on all of the on that every time they go out there. There's ten people with cameras who are attempting to get them fired win. They're like put them in jail. So they've just stop police the murder rates have risen in Baltimore. What the left likes to do is pick instances that reinforce a narrative that they have already pre written. That's what's happened with Tucker. That's what happens with people like me or rush or Mark Levin or anybody who has any level prominence in the conservative movement. And it's what the left does with America instead of looking at the broad trend of where his crime happening, and why is it happening, by the way, it's happening in areas where there is high level of single motherhood not enough men in the community and not enough police that the answer that's where all crime is happening, and that that's not a racial thing that's from white communities to instead of looking at those trends, instead what they'll do is they'll pick out as incident that they think reinforces the true narrative that the real problem in America is racism, though, feature it for months on TV then there's a riot about the false narrative. And then they say, well that that riot is proof positive that our narrative was for in the first, you know, what it is to especially on this point of these incidents these series of incidents these series of. Actions the way it works. We're all guilty of it. The left takes it to an extreme is we judge others by their actions. We judge ourselves by our intentions, and so Andrew Caruso, the head of media matters. He had these blog posts on earth from two thousand five around the same time that Tucker was going on Bubba. The love sponge, and they were degrading and mocking transgender people then called transvestites to creating Japanese women who were sexually abused degrading Bangladesh's Jews as well. Of course is always. I mean. This throwing the juice, right? Yeah. And all of these people, but they though, of course, not go after him for at first of all because media matters itself is a bad faith organization, but also because the left judges itself on its intention solely on its intentions when they say, vile things about Sarah Palin file things that Nikki Haley, whoever they can't be misogynists because they support abortion. They have wonderful intentions for women. They're feminists deep deep down and us one action one little incident. One guy yelling at a car who side swiped him. You are dead your wicked. You're evil. You're bound to prediction. I think we can all agree that if you're going to boycott Tucker Carlson, it should be over that let crappy said about stopping driving vehicle. Get rid of that. I do want to say in the interest of disclosure three of the four of us went worked for an organization that then and I started together called truth revolt in our premise was to be a right wing sort of answer to media matters. And we did successfully lead a few actions against a few prominent left wing people who said not jokes. They said some legitimately forum thing Monsieur talks about excreting into Sarah Palin now. Correct. But there was nothing disingenuous about ritual. No, it was so on we had a mission statement. And our mission statement was this is a vile horrible tactic. That has no place in a free in a free society. But the only thing more immoral than doing this action is allowing this action to continually be done to one side with absolutely no answer so been and I had this premise of mutually assured destruction which was when the left stops doing. This will stop doing it until the left stops doing this. They have to also know what it feels. Like to lose your advertising base, and we we pursued that for a short amount of time and then enter successful. And this other thing that I think that advertisers need to start understanding true. Is that all this crap is astroturf? It is. Absolutely. That's that's right. There have been good studies on the effectiveness of boycotts. What cuts are almost never effectively. It's almost impossible to name ineffective. Boycott. You remember when they tried to boycott Chick-fil-A and Chick-fil-A stop went up. It's going to raise example. Yeah. Every single time. There's an attempt to nightime stock went up. Colin kaepernick. This is correct. Anytime you piss people off in there in the headlines more the truth is that the sales tend to go up because all earned publicity is publicity. The Wall Street Journal a piece about the university of Wyoming with they had their thing. There should be more Cowboys the world needs more Cowboys. And of course, the faculty came in and said, oh, this is eliminationist and has heterosexuals and all of a sudden they told him to go pound sand. He made thousands of dollars their their applications went up. It's like stand up to the the reason I mentioned this is because since we know this from the inside since we actually did this operation only, it's not hard astroturf this stuff. People assume that media matters has this vast crowd of people who are doing things they got like five people to show up for this protests. And that's all it takes by the way, if advertisers. Don't actually sit there for forty minutes and think to themselves guys is this real is this like an actual thing. Because here is the truth of the thing. Okay. When we did it to MSNBC, we did it when after a couple of advertisers. We've got a couple of advertisers to pull Martin Bashir at Monmouth mature ended up losing his show. We had eighty activists. I kid you not eighty active. We send them an Email. And it said, here's. The number for the customer service line at MSNBC. Here's the customer service line for this advertiser. Call them up and tell them you're angry at them for advertising on Martin Bashir within two days Martin mature show had been pulled. Okay. That was not a vast ground swell of people were never going to shop with his advertiser again that was and again, it's a bad tactic. And we said openly, it's a bad tactic. We said, you know, what, you know? What would be great is if we didn't have to do this tactic now? So how about this you guys stop all this crap? We'll stop all this crap. And then we can go back to a system where you can advertise wherever you want. And that's that you shop wherever you want. If you don't you you know, what the actual boycott should be. If you don't like Tucker show, don't watch. Boycott Mme showed up off my show, a single person pissed off at Tucker Carlson has ever watched two eight episodes of taco bells and not a chance in the world. This is again why I'm so appreciative for our advertisers. And you know, who's a advertiser with a genius policy. The Greek Seguin that was a fan. Policy. All right. This guy's a broadcasting genius. That's pretty impressive. I will say that that those those pictures are so strong that when I die. I hope that they read them other. I should actually warned make sure. That's where policy genius. You've got a mortgage or kids or anybody who depends on your anytime, you need to be an adult. Go. Get some life insurance right now policy genius is the easy way to get life insurance. Two minutes. You can compare quotes from top insurers and find the best policy for you. When you apply online. The advisers policy genius will handle all the red tape for you. They'll negotiate your rate with the insurance company, no commission sales agents, no hidden fees. Just helpful advice, personalized service and policy. Genius. Doesn't just do life insurance. They also do home insurance and auto insurance and disability insurance are your one stop shop for financial protection. So if you find life insurance puzzling head on over to policy genius dot com in two minutes. Compare quotes find the right policies. Save up to forty percent doing it policy genius. Again, the easy way to compare and buy life insurance bureau, responsible human don't be irresponsible to make sure that your family is taking care of don't be buried into poppers grave checkout. What did you offer? Phobic ly is. So we're going to check in with our daily wire subscribers they keep the lights on as much as our advertisers, do and some lucky daily wire subscriber who subscribes during this broadcast at Delaware dot com. Subscribe and becomes an annual subscriber will win a chance to sit in this room. Breathe in our second hand car and see how the magic it's say the second, I suppose you don't have to come right? Alicia Crouse for chicken with the to hear from our subscribers. Our y'all can't see we we're happy. Eddie, you know, happy to be here. You know, where where are you? Well, I'm on backstage where women are either prostitutes or barefoot and pregnant in the. Which one are you? Are you actually barefoot and actually pregnant and actually in the daily work, and yeah, yeah. That's. Organization. I mean, I at least it's the shiny new kitchen. Right. And I'm making chocolate chip cookies. Don't worry. None of them were for you there for me come off entirely for the baby. So I will be down here at least not in Michael Knowles. Broom closet anymore, but I wanna down here taking subscriber questions and don't forget, how do you submit those questions. Well, become a subscriber. And not only could you win the chance to maybe be stuck barefoot and pregnant in the kitchen with me, you also get to sit in on a future episode of backstage, if you become a subscriber right now, and you get to ask a question of the guys. So go to the daily wire backstage banner on the top of the page to watch the livestream and submit your questions there. And now we can't smoke around deletion true say. That why was set down a whole floor. Officially become the most conservative house. I do actually one comes from William he wants to know, what's the constitutional definition of a natural born citizen. If a person is born in the US to to illegal aliens can that person go on to be president, Michael moles? Well, because I'm the one who went to Harvard law. They're actually correct me. When I inevitably get something wrong. There is a longstanding debate over the exact meaning of natural born citizen. It seems to me that if you are born to the child or if you are the child of an American citizen, you are a natural born citizen at the time of your birth. You are an American citizen. So the whole birther conspiracy was a little bit superfluous because Barack Obama even if he were born on Mars would have been a natural born citizen. This seems to be in dispute in any case. But if you're born to illegal aliens here in America, you are also a natural born citizen since at least that case in eighteen ninety eight. Yeah. The one the one that's right. The one case after that, it seems to be resolved that you are a natural born citizen. There's been some discussion of repealing birthright citizenship or clarify birthright citizenship, we've had that since two thousand sixteen but the question as far as I can tell remains somewhat unresolved. That's right there. There's one phrase in the fourteenth amendment specifically that is read two maybe. Clued birthright citizenship the truth is that in the British empire. The birthright citizenship was sort of so going back to Blackstone the notion that of natural born citizenship is fairly well established Anglo American wall. The the the sort of countervailing viewpoint at that in the fourteenth amendment says that if you're bored in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof. So it's the phrase subject to the jurisdiction thereof. Yup. That comes up in these legal debates because the question is if you are a citizen of another country, like you're let's say, you're Mexican citizen, and you commit a crime in the United States. Well, then they have to contact the consulate of Mexico because you are Mexican citizen your child presumably is not subject. Do you have an accepted American upon yourself? So you're not subject to the jurisdiction of American law. Neither is your child that at least is the argument against birthright citizenship. You know, I think that it's it's an open debate. It's all it's a live debate. It's interesting to remember that the subject to the jurisdiction thereof payment to play when John McCain was seeking the nomination to be president. But because he. Throwing in Panama. So to American parents so worn as citizen of the United States. Right. You're born born with the opportunity to be a citizen of the United States. The question was was Panama at that time. Was he subject juristic? That's exactly right. And the way that the courts traditionally have interpreted subject to the jurisdiction there of would be to exclude for example for ministers. So if you're a foreign minister from from Mexico, and you have a kid in the United States or kid is not necessarily a subject of the United States because you're a foreign minister and therefore jurisdiction of the American. And this is the part that does pain me as someone who thinks I think is probably wielded the earthrights citizenship has been abused. It's created very bad incentives at the southern border. Is it does seem explicitly to take out diplomats to take out the children of diplomats or whatever. But other people even if you were four national in this country, perhaps you are subject to the jurisdiction of. Yeah. It's not supreme clear as the truth of it. But it's it's also not a precedent. That's going to change anytime soon. So. Conceived naturally born that's the question. This political dialogue. Interesting to think about it from the point of view of the framers of the constitution at the time that they were conceptualizing these ideas that no person in America was in natural born citizen of the United States. So they were they were specifically thinking about loyalties, right? They were thinking about where you're where your your loyalty would be what sovereignity would your wilty. They didn't want someone to be elected president of the United States who had a divided a divided since of national allegiance. And I think that. That's at the very least the spirit of it. Which is why I think that, you know, probably if a an American diplomat if John Quincy Adams had been born in France or have been born in the Netherlands, he was not. I still think that that that would not have at the time at their time. They would not have thought of him is not eligible to become president. He was it took a long time to travel back then he was born over there because his father was here in service of the country. So we so they would have seen John. They would have seen that then read more about the debate. John takes one side of the debate in favor of natural born citizenship. And and Mark Krikorian the folks at center from operation. Studies tend to take John Eastman. They tend to take the other side of the debate. Interesting alicia. Western. I just wanna to know can Dan Crenshaw run for president. And he wasn't born on American soil. That's the most important thing. Interesting. I believe that a military base in Germany, so military bases are exempt too, right? I just wanted to ask guard. His birthday is coming up, by the way. Yeah. Because he's never going to forgive him for making me for making the arm wrestle. Humiliating wasn't the closest. It is actually true though that that's what was determined in. The McCain question is that since he was born on a military base. He was still in that Russell four of us. We all go flying. All right here comes the question from Joe about college education. He wants to know for those of us who are majoring in a useless liberal arts major with the intent of entering the academy. What do you believe is the best mode by which we can improve it? Unfortunately, I know too much about this. But you know, ever since two thousand and eight thousand people have been talking about the liberal arts. Collapsing for a long time but ever since two thousand eight the liberal arts have collapsed, and there are very few jobs in the liberal arts. And if you do get one of them, the thing that really has to be changed as you have to understand what it is to teach the liberal arts to teach the liberal arts means to teach first of all the history of the liberal arts, for instance, literature the history of literature, but also to teach what the people who were speaking at the time, we're trying to say in their moment. It's not about telling them how they can be eradicated by me overlaying my philosophy on top of them. It is what Plato was trying to communicate what Shakespeare was trying to communicate. These are. Hard things to study and really worth knowing because they make you wiser and they make involved in your culture. I didn't go to an actual university. I went to junior, college and majored in country music. Dropped out. That's true. I told this story about you. Yeah. But but with my limited amount of education that I have I know that the word liberal is associated with liberty. And that therefore the liberal arts could be translated literally to mean the freedom arts, and that the entire purpose of a liberal education as we understand it in in later days in the west with so that you could learn the art of freedom, you mature studying the architecture of the west that the philosophical and and logistical and literary history of the west. So that you would understand the art of being to understand and earn your freedom that we? Fancy degrees. That is actually what the liberal arts or that is the entire purpose. Absolutely seemed for you know, people don't even know this. And this is why the debate actually matters. I think a lot of conservatives want, you know, we're kind of reactionary way, we wanna say get rid of it. I we hated all the liberal arts really really matter. A free society is not going to remain free for even five seconds if liberal education dissolves, and the the problem is already dissolved. With over there. Could count on one hand the number of programs in the liberal arts that are still actually carrying on that a in my new book, not pitch it. But the right side of history available right now, but not really vailable until next Tuesday. It is kind of a layman's read on western philosophy there. People who spent generation study miss this way, the hell better than I do, and my very basic gloss, which you guys have read. It's and it is I think it's quite good. But it's obviously not to the level of expertise is is people have spent their entire like, your son Spence's entirely studying this stuff knows this stuff better than I do, you know, that it has been completely lost to the extent that if I even speak about this. There was a I smoked at university of Michigan last night. The history department has not read my books not out yet. They held a panel called dilettante in history. The power of the environment. You. And all you got from it is it's white people. Then that's you don't know what the hell you're talking about and the classics are, I think heavily attended. What professors? I think they ended up with about thirty five people we had by contrast at thousand people showed up to RS an overflow room with another one hundred six thousand people on the waiting list, while university of Michigan's there's some appetite for this stuff, but the which shows how badly the universities of Bochum because there is appetite for for all of this stuff. But you know, quick note that this person is asking they're already in the liberal arts and they intend on teaching. So you're actually doing a career path that makes sense I've ripped on a liberal arts as a career path if you don't actually intend on going into the liberal arts because it seems to me that you know, this whole college scandal. It's happening right now, these Uber rich parents who are paying for their kids to get into places like AOL there. Two questions that deserve to be answered one is why would Uber rich people pay for their kids to get into gale. When you could just give your kid the five hundred thousand dollars and you set them up for for life in trust fund or something. That's question number one. And number two. If these kids are really unqualified if they're getting into gale with twelve hundred SAT's shouldn't they fail out in the first year, it shouldn't they have in the hard to get in. But it's very easy to stay. Well. And this. This is the point that I make about about colleges. What the public thinks colleges are for is not actual college. The report. So we all think that it's for developing a skill set and being educated and learning about western civilization bulls. That is not what colleges are for houses are for two things in reality. Unless you are studying in the in the maths or the scientists in which case, you're actually learning something. No it it's not about skill set. It what it is about is two things credentialing and social group. That's it. That's the only thing colleges for. That's why all these thing that Michael got out of college. It was treated with penicillin. I count that a social group for Michael created his own human social. Back and take response. Very poor. Long. But this is why these rich parents will pay because they want the credential for their kid and the credential matters because it's the premature that you're a member of the elite, and they want their kids to be members of this air sets social fabrics. They can go to the alumni dinners, and they can no friends in very powerful positions. And I know this because when I went to a very high falutin universe way to Harvard Law School the very first day. I was at Harvard Law School at orientation Elena Kagan who was then the dean of law school. Now, she's supreme court Justice. She gets up in front of a class of five hundred of us. And the first thing she says is you know, you're worried it's going to be a paper chase can be super competitive. You're going to have to really compete for your slot. You're going to have to work really hard. Let me tell you already one. You're in the competition is over you'll all have jobs, you'll be she said, you'll be running the world that people in this room will be running the world. But you're right. Let your left. These are the people who are going to be running the world. I remember thinking myself really why why like because we did well on our else. That's that's why we should run the world. But here's the question. But here's the question was how to improve this. And I mean, I think you're absolutely right agree with everything you're saying, but it doesn't have to be that way. I mean the way so let me give you my quick solution on how to improve all of this one employers need to stop using universities for credentialing, and they need to start taking the princess's directly out of high school to learn how to do a business because most people in America learn to do their job by actually doing their job. Not by going to some program that taught them philosophy like philosophy majors. Make a lot of money because their lawyers, right? That's that's why philosophy majors make a lot of money because their accountants and their lawyers and they're in marketing, and how many of them are philosophy professors three, right? So when people say philosophy major teaches you something it may teach you something, but it's not worth two hundred thousand dollars of something that agree is worth two hundred thousand dollars because it's a credential, but what you learned in your philosophy courses. Pushback into this a little bit. I was a terrible student. I was an awful student, and I really got my education after I left school. When I read all the books that I bought in school. But while I was in school. I did kind of listen to kind of filtered in and I remember walking down the street and this'll sound like the dopey est thing on earth. But I remember walking to the campus of the university of California Berkeley and suddenly thinking, a wait a minute. I get it. I came Greece. Yeah. Then came room, then came your then came us and each one of those things built on the other and reflected on the other. And actually was changed by the fact that the other existed, and when I saw that that changed everything for me. And that's that today. I I completely disagree. When you attended the university of Berkeley in the late eighteen hundreds. Liberal arts degree was was an elite thing to accomplish and inexpensive thing comparatively. You've got to accomplish an valuable thing that requires rigor in order to accommodate you can't you can't connect that experience. I think one of the two major who what is now one of the major problems at the modern academia is that people send their children there, and they send their children there because they hear things like oh American campuses are liberal, and they kind of finally hearken back to twenty five years ago when they were in spilling. They're like. Yes. I remember I had that one professor who were a beanie and that one professor who talked in a black sand, even though they were white. And you know, what would it was a one of the early black studies professor, and we all knew that they were kind of a dope. But they did expose us to some ideas. We had never thought my kid can make it because I made it what they fundamentally don't understand. That is not what the university today is. Now, if you want to know how to fix academia, you don't fix it from the. Side, you fix it. With the government. I say that as a conservative who believes that the government isn't the solution to anything, but the government created our current university fiasco, and they created it when they basically decided that they would fund schools on the basis of square footage. How many square footage of buildings would determine how much money you actually, receive from the federal government, and they started this this enormous push at the university level to grow the physical footprint of universities to grow the structural footprint that universities and to fill those big buildings with as many people as possible. And that's when it became the case. Yes, that this is a credential no longer has value because it's no longer that the elite go to college up everyone goes to college college is high school with a quarter million dollar price tax. This is your role might, but why should the government fix the government fixes it by stopping paying over? I'm a believer that the government should get completely out of the business of college. If you want to go and study the classics at university, then go out and get a second job and my job to to do the IRA. I'm with him, by the way, civic education should not be taking place at the college level. You should be knowing a lot of the stuff that you're supposed to know. This is long before you're eighteen years old, then my gender. Overlooking though, the thing that we're we're looking here is the point that Elena Kagan made to you which is true, which is that the this isn't true in the world of business. But this is true in the world, at least government, the people who run the government went to Yale Horford Princeton. They all went to at least an expensive private school. Whatever it is Alexandria, Casio Cortez is the evidence that we need to rethink and rehabilitate the liberal arts because stem, broadly speaking, at least engineering is a skill. It's a job at trains you for a job the liberal arts. Don't do that they train you to think about the world to understand your own civilization. If you don't understand your past you won't understand your future. And the idea that we now have someone in the government like AO see who was scolding Tim Sloan of Wells Fargo a man who's IQ is seven times. What is let me I'm gonna push back. Again, you went to Yale for how. Well, you know. It depends on the you know, I went for forty. We went for four years. How long did you go to public? School before that thirteen years for thirteen years. So it doesn't make sense to me if the government's going to pay for education, and that education is opposed to result in you know, in a finger to and being prepared for the real world. How is it possible that they should be able to accomplish this in or years? You're would they have been unable to accomplish anything of the sort in your your point is so right? The I mean the way to fix it. Because I am actually a great defender of liberal arts education over the trade schools it like it really matters for some people. But the problem with democratic a Galateri in society is we've decided if one person goes to a four year private college everybody has to go to a four year. And if everybody's going to do it, then the government has to pay for it. And then everyone is going to get in standards are going to be lowered a bunch of fake academic disciplines are going to be created ever. It's just utterly leveling. It horns people who have two hundred fifty thousand dollars worth of debt, it harms taxpayers arms that government it harms the union yet. Parents and students have been lied to. They were told that when the when they sent their kid to college a couple of things we're going to happen one the earning potential would inevitably rise. No matter what they did in college. And to they were going to exit with the skill set. And both of those things are are essentially false. Yup. The the earning potential may rise. But only as a as an adjunct of sorte, meaning that employers look at a person who wants he'll differently than a person who entered yuko. That's just the way that works. Even if the person who went to Juku ends up being much better business person than the person who went I mean, this is this is a point. I mean, I I made this point on my show. I told the story that that probably shouldn't have told about a human who will remain name cursing, you out for not having gone to college. Because this is what they went after all this person did go to Harvard, and and that was deeply deeply important because it was credentialing they knew that in the elite strata of American society that credential matters. But the reason originally the criminal matter was not for this ordering is because the assumption was not only that you were smarter. If you went to the university that you learn more and better things at these top level, universities that is no longer true. The only thing that Ivy leagues provide is the credential on the wall unless you are learning an actual thing. But this and they actual things. And here's the thing. Once once it got watered down, and you weren't wearing actual things anymore. And it was just the credential. This is how you get to the point where colleges now have an active interest in not exposing people to uncomfortable ideas. Because if you go there just for the credential and just to build the social fabric. The last thing you want is somebody spoiling the party with things like tough grades or ideas. You've never heard this. My Harvey Mansfield was forced not to give an actual grades to his own students at below inflation with bad as an inherent bed at what point does the fact that you can go on the internet and learn so much of this stuff and get even classes and lectures from people who actually know things will get the great courses DVD's overseas, CDs and listen to those at what point does that kind of overcome. The brandy being full of crap. It's really about the employers. His the fact is that if there were not a market interest in you spending two hundred thousand dollars to for a four year education, which you learn nothing. Okay. Because if you're a policy major, I'm apologize agent. You didn't learn anything of for eight and learn how to write how think you learned nothing. Okay. If learning to create country rift on the piano, legitimately you've probably learn more and yuko studying country music than I did studying political science at UCLA, if if employers were instead to look like, they're honestly you want to know the actual solution to this real credentialing. Okay. What this would be is you take the we wouldn't go to college the SAT energy. Would turn where he weren't good published. You just right there, you go straight to trade school on the basis because that's what they're doing. Okay. That is exactly how you well. We'll you've identified the problem, which is there is this idea that we all have now, which is that four year liberal arts. College is supposed to give you a skill. That isn't true. You're not supposed to get a skill from the liberal arts. You were explicitly not supposed to have any skill. You were supposed to study history. Math. You haven't seen the art of freedom. That's right. Yeah. That's right. I I want to get to another question, but I'll close out with this. I I have a theory in the five percent here. Alcoholics anonymous has a success rate of approximately five percents if you're an alcoholic, and you go through the program of AA five percent of you will get clean. J A figures your time. The the interesting aspect of that is that if you don't go throughout the Hollick synonymous you also have a five percent chance of getting sober. So statistically a drunk in alcoholics anonymous has the exact same chance of getting sober as drunk outside of alcoholics anonymous, and you could look at that and say, we'll see Colloton animus is a sham. I don't put a pen right there. My theory is that this same thing will apply across the board. Dave Ramsey's a pal of our kind of a hero in in broadcasting and somebody that I personally look up to an awful lot for the business that he's built. I have some disagreements with Dave Ramsey's. Financial philosophy. I think it has a great sort of. Understanding of human nature. But I think I think, but I think that it also has a few problems with it. I suspect that something like five percent of people who adhere to the Dave Ramsey philosophy actually managed to save up a successful nest egg for retirement, and I suspect that also five percent of people who don't listen to Dave Ramsey will manage to save up a successful nest egg for retirement, I think college and a liberal arts degree, your son Spencer's at grand example, Spencer nosy thing or two about the liberal arts for his trouble. I suspect that five percent of people who go through the university system will walk out knowing a thing or two about the liberal arts. I suspect by people who don't go through the system will no longer to about the liberal arts. I've used you as an example, you're kind of a hybrid you went through the system. Learn nothing about the liberal arts. That's got out. On stack. This is my five percent theory. Doesn't mean that a liberal education is bad. It doesn't mean that. Dave Ramsey's financial freedom universe is wrong. It doesn't mean that alcoholics anonymous is useful. It means that some small part of the population. Yep. Is going to find the answers and four that small part of the population the answers that are provided in the form of alcoholics anonymous in the form of Dave Ramsey in the form of a liberal arts education, a university education, but come the mechanism by which they they affect that betterment. And similarly, they might find some other path they might find a book by some other financial theorist other than Dave Ramsey approval program other than call it's anonymous they might read the books that they didn't read in college. The only the only part of this. I disagree with because I basically agree with that. But the only part of this I disagree with this in the system that teaches civics history. Math science in in the lower grades not in the. College which you have a better society. And that has actually brought if what you're saying is that we ought to have those things then I think we all agree. I take what we're saying. We don't. But we well, I think that is right. We are sharing that we don't. But we are showing that there's no reason that we should give up on that the win. The guy says when the guy asked the question, how do I improve this? That is what we should be this is where we disagree. My solution is fire. I think you saw the university of public fire. I don't think I think that is so bad in so rampant and so big. Yeah. A trillion dollars today. They don't think that you can throw 'incrementalist fits university those left the left took it over by incremental was him. I don't know why we can't take it back because we don't we don't operate the way that. Maybe a mistake. Oh, I don't think the left ticket of buying -cremento as I think there was a massive revolution of the nineteen sixties, and they aren't everything on its head. Yup. And then just wait for the old people to die. But they, but they did know, but they did move into the university's on purpose with with perp. Dada man at Yale was written in the fifty s Buckley's first. Yeah, that's right. And there's no reason we can't do that. Except that we won't. I mean, you're right that we don't. But I think there should be like fifteen colleges in the country. That's this is exactly the thing. This is very fewer people should go to college. The government shouldn't pay for it. The people who should not go to college should will thrive. Doing something else. They won't be burdened kids kids unless you wanna be a doctor or a lawyer or a rocket. Visit a rocket scientist congresswoman from New York fee like me. Millionaire. I mean, all you really need to know about colleges is that Michael Knowles got into Yale and his mommy and daddy did not pay them five. Oxford. If they'd actually why. In on on a water polo. A super implode. It was real weird. The percentage it up to the pool riding a horse. This is the guy that actually posted a picture on Instagram from the university of Michigan while tagging his location at the university of Michigan and said where am I? There were a transvestites. Now, I'm sounding like the media matters. All righty. So speaking of Knowles illegitimate children that you probably created at Yale. Ryan says he's been saying some interesting Twitter parenting advice floating out there. Ryan don't follow the Twitter parenting advice. It says quote, never punish or praise your children. What are your thoughts? That's the stupidest idea. So those children get. Yeah. No. That's absolutely. All right. They did turn my mic is turned out. Great. Well, firstly you've met my wife. You know, you understand. Why out? Well, but I mean, no, that's of course. Absurd. What you shouldn't do is you shouldn't praise your kids for nothing, and you shouldn't punish them for nothing. You know, there should be you have a moral system. And when when you say something is gonna is gonna hold. This is the most important thing you can be as a parent is consistent when you say something is not going to be done. It's not going to be done. You say there's going to be a consequence that consequences. Gotta be there. It doesn't have to be fire and sword it's just has to be some kind of limitation away. Yes. The biggest threat. Good. The biggest threat to consistency appearance is not your kid. It's you. That's why because it sucks to be consistent. So terrible right show to ruin you have to punish your kids off the worst thing in the world when you when you threaten like we're not going to act, and you know, that everybody wants to do act in five minutes on the apologizes. You're still gonna wanna do you wanna Bill back on it? And then you can't it's just awful. You want to remain goodness. On a good piece of advice. It's your responsibility that's your everything's responsive. And if parents really understood that from education feeding their kids now, then it would solve ninety eight percents of the problems in the United States. Heart. It's hard to be. You're saying that parents have to be good and responsible and you're against abortion. I understand why you're forcing children to live in world with sub optimal parent. Only after birth. So funny last so speaking university of Michigan and guy got up, and he was asking me about the food stamps program. Now, there's yet to be an trial twit nutrition who specifically asking about school lunches, and the fact that they're really not nutritious. And the fact is that Michelle Obama tried to make the mortgage vicious the kids didn't need it. They threw it out and all the rest. What's your solution to that? I said abolish school lunches and have parents their own damn kids because I am parent. You know, my number one priorities and the only priority matters feeding my child, and if you can't feed your trials, you shouldn't have that child be removed from your home, the the notion that it is the government like you legitimately the one thing you have to today's feed your kit end of story, and we have a society or no you're not if I don't feel feeding my kid today. We'll just make sure that the government feeds my cat or if I don't punish them. I can't get educated at school. If in your seeing it parents advocating duties to it's not just public schools. Parents religious parents abdicating religious education too religious schools. Okay. I'll send my kid there. That's where the learn everything they need to know about religion or my kids bad. Disciplined problem. Anything at home? That's their teachers job. The experience. I have I have a visceral memory of this. I can call it up in my skin is bringing that first baby home, and realizing Ono I have to do this. This is my responsibility. This kid lives were dies on me. I've gotta make a living. I've gotta keep rains. There. Cannot be water on my kid be a roof over that kids that to me is the moment you grow up. That's. Last thought Michael knows do thought parenting, which is this for all the people that have ever been told that Michael Knowles is their father. There's a lot of cats that name. If you're showing this conversation what's wrong with you? If you think I'd like to be in a smoke filled over overly hot studio with these guys as they do this live. We'll go over to daily dot com slash subscribe, come an annual subscriber. That's where you give us ninety nine bucks. Not only do you get the shows get the leftist. Here's hot or cold tumbler here, by way, I know there's a lot of imitations out there. There's a lot of posers. And they are also useful not for drinking out for other things. You get the leftist. Here's hot or cold. Tumbler you get the Andrew klavan show. You get the mic on those show. You get deep bench appear nine hours. Hours of the radio show, which are now available exclusively to our subscribers on demand, and you will get into a chance if you do at during this broadcast, you'll be entered for a chance to fly out here in the future at our expense. And you know, hang out with God king of the daily wire. Correct and small Chica how to get our scotch for charged real. You're running. Places that the answer is obvious. You had them served in those glasses instead, and they left us here. Scott. No matter how much you drink it, just automatic automated. The popcorn here. Just doesn't have enough flavor. That's better. Gives you that special thing. So it is International Women's Day just past Friday. And I actually just feel like it wouldn't be Christian or whatever been is of not. Talk briefly about the certainty that is international women's to celebrate a Caitlyn Jenner. All those track and field stores. Condescending, do you know, nobody knows this one day? Percents population at one three hundred sixty. International Women's Day destroyed the twentieth century on very few people. The international women's Dan maar. In one thousand nine hundred seventeen started the Russian revolution. And Leon Trotsky, no, less communist, credited International Women's Day, which had been invented in one thousand nine in New York by the socialist party it then spread in nineteen ten there were couple celebrations it later fast forward in Russia. They had an International Women's Day demonstration Trotsky credited with launching the revolution. Which is why Lennon made it a national holiday in the Soviet Union. Not only that once you give the vote they stopped letting us have alcohol. This is one of the things there's only one thing about International Women's Day, captain marvel came out only. Only has been finally we haven't female superhero, the other one from wonder woman. Seventies guys posters on. Not like any of the Electra saw that wasn't movie, by the way, that's true quality. If if women can make superhero movies that bomb at the box office, then they are equal to. But yeah, I International Women's Day is always it's always shocking to me that on International Women's Day. We're supposed to worry about how difficult women have it in the free society in the history of humanity for women where they constitute a majority of voters, the majority of people who get college degrees and a higher earning cohort when they first get out of college before they start having kids and taking time off from the workforce. This is the real trouble. We across the sea where women are forced into Asia. When where there were they are forced into abortion and China or whether they were their victims with gentle genital mutilation. Yeah. Yeah. We talk about any of those things on International Women's Day. You know, actually, helping women who are suffering interactive attendant. True suffering is that took twenty one marvel movie, not very mediocre an rehearsing finally be cast in a marvel movie with a female lead superhero. Now, Scarlett Johansson. I know what would it look like if we celebrated men I I want to celebrate the things that men discovered like you get every everything I want to things we invented like every every Tucker Carlson medium. You could argue that the greatest thing that meant in addition to discovering the entire everything uranium. That one of the greatest achievements of men, particularly in the west in in particularly in this country is that men afforded to women the right to vote absolute is the largest peaceful transfer voluntary transfer of power probably in all of human history in which the group of people men who had all political power one hundred percent of it chose to give all of the political power, not half of it all of it because in an electoral democracy democracy. Whoever has the majority of the votes has the political power and by the way, women or or over fifty percent of the population. But the voter gap gives women fifteen point advantage women vote at Cigna, man and men voluntarily gave that power to women because they recognized in Sorek Justice. They thought that there is a better way as you often say they built on the foundations of previous generations move the world toward freer for your place, and they elected to give women. This nor the fact that for a long time, and continually men are monks. All this when we say men, invented everything, of course, the automatic counterargument is right because women weren't in the workforce men didn't want them in the workforce. There's truth to that too. But it is also true. That men did a lot of things like I understand why we can't just recognize that both sexes have given enormous amount well civilization or two or the automatic denigration of women who have chosen mothers which. The whole problem. That's the whole problem. The whole problem is that feminism has posed emasculate values on everybody. So so that women are actually less under feminism than they were. When said oh, women the other half of the of the civilization who've given birth to every single human being made every homemade every writer. I mean, the idea that it was somehow more important to be build a civilization that we built to protect women than to be the woman that was being built to protect is insane. It is insane to sell two women that the only way that they can succeed is to be essentially man is cut short when it is to be willing to this though that this is something that that I said after the death of George H W Bush that it's harder to be a good man than it is to be a great man it being a great man is about fame and being in a moment where are needed and watts who you are and you step forward and you pick up the flag during the paintings and stuff it's a lot harder to be the person who is actually making the world work now and the truth is that for the vast majority of human history. It was men were the people who are in the position to be the great men women were not in the position to be the quote, unquote. Great women. It was women who made the world work, of course. Because women make every homework they make every civilization our. Yeah. Nor nor the historic. One of the feminism is that it actually ignores the contributions that women maids westerns history. It's like, oh, yeah. You guys actually agree. With the statement that you were making half Asli that men created everything like, yeah. You guys printed everything all the good all the bad the entire civilization after just give us all the power that will change everything. It's like, no you guys. Thank the joke. Once you impose male values on everybody men win. You know, once you do that we should out to though in the realm of political power, perhaps the most famous politicians political leaders ever were women. Elizabeth I Queen Victoria, Catherine in Russia. I mean, they're they actually yet women did have a fair share of governance, and in many cases, glorious governance that just that is acknowledged I guess by a feminist. Also, sometimes missed by us, and it probably shouldn't be that women are smarter than feminists swimming in this country. Have fifty three percent of the population is women as you said, they have a fifteen point spread in terms of electoral vote, which means they have if they chose to Marshall at as in a monolithic way. One hundred percent of political power often think it's funny when people say if if we had if we were truly an equitable society, then women would have fifty three percent of representatives in congress and men would have forty seven. And I always you don't actually know how. If all women voted for women, it wouldn't be fifty three percent of congress would be women all of congress would be women would win every single race. Right. But fortunately, women are smarter than feminists and women aren't just trying to create this false equality in in the world women are using their votes. They use them more than men do and they don't just use them in these sort of brainless identity politics, feminist ways, they use them to elect people who they think are going to good job and that results in a world that again have there been historic injustices. Of course, there have been if you go back and say, I mean up in the early in the early days of the twentieth century women couldn't vote and I would say, yes. And if we are in the early days of the twentieth century that would be a compelling argument for why things are wrong. But of course, as time has gone by the we've done a fairly good job of extending the benefits of of our free society to. Previously underrepresented people. And fortunately on top of that women have started that in a fairly good way. And haven't haven't embraced this? Now, it's our turn. We're gonna kick all them into the curb. I mean, liberal feminist women have that point of view, but the majority of women who vote it's a it's a bigger point. Also about activists versus people like the when you take feminist versus women gay activists versus gay people. Black activist first black people, it really, they really they're the people they represent or pretend to represent a terrible name because these activists are the worst of of the group almost always and the majority of the people are often times, incredibly smart, incredibly commonsensical. I think that's true of all people have ties to other members of the civilization. Activists are their own little bubble. That's right means that they're only associated with members of the bubble and everybody else's the outgrow for them to fight going back to what you said, by the way about men giving women power, which is also true Protestants giving Catholics power, and you know, and Christians giving people. Other religions power if a little bit of gratitude or injected into the civilization. I can't see how that would be a bad thing. I can't see how the idea should be where here now, and you're the old people you should get out. I kiss y it's not thank you very much for letting us in great ideas that you came up with and I hope we can participate in our own great ideas. I don't understand what that's not a better idea. No better approach. The world would be a much better place with some gratitude. Which is I if you're if you're a man in the world, you should be grateful for good women everyday not just on one time in holiday every year. And if you're a good woman, you should be grateful for all the stuff. For captain marvel made him watch it Orval out. I'll save you guys. If you don't wanna go. I mean, you know, I'll be very honest. I hate the Sean I despise genre. I liked dark Knight and Logan. Those are the two superhero movies. I like, so I'm putting that out at least you picked two good ones too. Good west. I've seen most of these movies, probably at least half of them. This movie was subpar. Even by the John restored. The reason is that it was extraordinarily boring. It had no stakes whatsoever female super. Because it had this feminist ideology injected into it, the problem with the feminist superhero is she can't do anything wrong. She's just perfect. It's like superman without the kryptonite there. She starts out awesome. She ends awesome. So there's never any stakes whatsoever. End the movie it self had no story. I mean, there was no storyline. It was new narrative whatsoever. It was so tedious. It was so boring by the John Reid standards. It was only like thirty percent worse than most of these formulaic movies. But it was thirty percent. Moore's and they say that only male critics are knocking the movie that is not true, major female critics are knocking the movie, it's just bad. And it tells you a lot about our society that rotten tomatoes is completely redoing their voting system there. Purging negative comments from the board to protect an ideology, even through a terrible. Defense. I would like to say that I calculated how much longer Knowles has to live and how much longer I live in if I'd gone to see it. It would have been relatively like spending three months in the movie. The point about the about the rotten tomatoes. Things said amazing that the left will shift the the identification required to sound off on captain marvel, but they're against boating. I mean, I haven't seen captain marvel yet I do plan on seeing it at some point out. One wonder woman was actually the movie of a really good one. Wonderful wonder woman was good because it was not self consciously feminist meeting, the sort of just assume that the characters feminist now, and then gal Gadot, actually played woman with actual womanly qualities. But this is my grip on the atomic lawn with with Charleston on so she basically plays JAMES BOND, but it's like ten just play JAMES BOND. They make her quasi, lesbian and all the stuff, and it it's legitimately it, which is the Braga, but what is true is that you could have substituted a male for character would not have changed one line of dialogue for the entire film. If that's true written a bad movie really characters are specific. This is my problem with captain marvel in it's it's not a problem with the film. I have not seen the film. It's a problem with the the celebration of captain marvel as an archetype for a strong woman, and it set I love Buffy, the vampire slayer, I think phase one of the greatest TV things that's ever happened in the history of of television. People would always be a strong, powerful woman, integrate example, the little girls everywhere, and I thought no into every generation born a slayer and she's infused with SuperNet tower, given to her centuries to fight vampires, and it's sort of like the conversation we've had about Black Panther where it's like, you know, the the magic space rock falls down. And and then Africa got to be Europe. And that's actually kind of racist premise, it's also kind of sexist permits to me to say women are just as powerful as men if they're given gamma radiation and a secret laser from magic and magic like I see Buffy is a great story with with a female lead. And that might be novel and interesting to women, but. But but he can fight men because Buffy has supernatural powers, and you captain marvel can fight men because captain marvel has supernatural powers superman can stop bullet. Not because he's a man it's because he's super. So I'm not supposed to look to superman and go that's just proof that all men are more powerful than a locomotive. No proof that superman. There is a kernel of an interesting idea in captain marvel this is not spoilers because I think this was even some of the previews very early in the movie physically. She's she's not as strong as the men. She can't jump the rope or whatever. And actually, the main problem she has if she gets to emotional and their emotions run away with her, and it's actually making a sort of comment on sex in the real problem facing her is pride. This is quite interesting. This is something that we all face trying to people will warned her against. Yes. You can't make that jump or you can't make that. Yup. And she'll do it anyway pride. Yeah. And there was that little kernel there that really could've made captain marvel pretty good, and they just just overwhelmed it with boring story, tedious slogans ideology, and it was week. It actually could have probably been a pretty good movie. And it's kind of it's kind of sad thing that we fight over these stories as if it mattered. I mean, this is the new theory, basically on the materialist left is that everything. We have as human beings is based on stories kind of Yuval Harari idea that nations are story money is a fiction human rights fiction. God is a fiction, and these are just stories that we tell and create something real because we all agree with them. And therefore, it matters the stories somehow are much more important than you think. Somehow, you know, I wonder we'll move picture. I really enjoyed it. But winning critics intellectuals cried that movie as if somehow change the estate of women, and that's just not true that is not the way stories work, and it's not the effect that stories have I was by taking panther got really tight about it. Yeah. My my blowback Black Panther is not that it was a bad movie. I thought it was really enjoyed it. Honestly. But I had some problems with some basic concepts in it, again, the very notion that natural resources are the rationale for the for civilizations growing. Right. Is not very good one. But with that said, my real problem was of lead up. To it as like lack people knew nited states finally had been powered by this movie with a with a bunch of black people playing superheroes. If you're finding your meaning in superhero movies to the extent that you feel that your entire the entire history of race in America has been deeply affected by a superhero movie in two thousand nineteen let me suggest that you enter the real world for seconds. And I would say the same thing about Jewish superhero. I mean, this this is not raise specific. Yeah. But people got so angry. This is how dare you take this away from your just mad. There's a black. I don't care there's a black sheep here on. That's my point point is. I don't care if there's black superhero, that's fine. Who cares that I think that's exactly right in the fact that people are fighting over the first shows the bigger they don't have enough to do. Everything is when people forecast opposition that isn't there like all look at all these guys are really angry, captain marvel you're angry aren't drilling. No, not in the know, your that's tell you're really not fifty percent of leftist arguments, all of those days all of it. This is something that you're angry new. I know pretty much not agreeing Larson insults. Fifty percent of the audience. Yeah. And I'm pissed that marvel insults. The entire audience by acting like they're making history. The fact that there's a female captain marvel doesn't bother me in the fight. Right. I'm mostly in marvel things they get away with this crap where they pretend they killed Spiderman. Nonsense was that anyone who cried at the end of the vendors. Anyone who cried at the end of an event is your Nydia. Joy. Adventures Infinity war the minute they kill Black Panther. If you're crying are. So. So stupid. I actually love I let him finish war. I think it was a fundamental mistake in the by the filmmakers, pick Spiderman and blackmails horse of everyone. Okay. That's real. It is a reset. Maybe they're really going to kill these people then two of their billion dollar industry. You guys are sliding. I want to go for one more round of questions with our daily wire subscribers they keep the lights on they give us their sweet sweet mammon. And if they've signed up as annual subscribers during this broadcast, which we got a little time left to sign up during this broadcast. You could win a flight to LA paid for by Ben Shapiro healing. With anybody around to sit in on a live taping of this your favorite daily wire show. The daily wire backstage leash Krause going gonna read some questions from some of our fair subscribers Lucia, what do you got for she's given birth? Making a nice little team. I love international. You know, if I'm going to be stuck in the kitchen, I figured myself hot toppy. You can't drink when you're pregnant. Betty, draper. We do have questions from worse than Scribner's Nicole wants to know, do you think the key to having a successful business is to start it in your garage or might I Lisa at the God kings pool house. Who's definitely the key to us having six. No, I think that the key to having a successful businesses to start wherever you can. And the key to having a successful business to understand that not all of your businesses will be successful. Almost everyone who's successful and business has failed at business businesses. Very hard. It's sort of I've made this show on the show before I hate it. When guys leave the hospital after having their first child, and they've got the world's greatest dad Volcafe and always take you're not even a mediocre. Other for literally there's got to be more that you're gonna have to learn what you have acquired the gift. The same with business. You're you're gonna learn an awful lot. When you set about to be in business, you're gonna fail. You're gonna have to get back up. You have to learn from your mistakes where should you do it in your garage? Sure. If you've got an idea that can start your garage, not every idea can somebody's require seed capital that require angel investors. They require larger amounts of capital than can be sort of acquired at those levels. And you're not gonna take twenty million dollars worth of investment capital capital. Start something in your garage. Every business is unique every opportunity is you need. I have I have speech that I give to young typically it's young people move to Hollywood 'cause they wanna make it in the in the movements. And they're all everybody moves out. Here is looking for the same wisdom. They wanna know how do I make it? And when I moved out I had the same thought like Steven Spielberg. He could tell me how to make movies time smart guy. He could tell me then I could do it. What I came to realize over time that if I ever got that meeting with spill Berg. I'd go. I'd be like, Mr. still. Longtime listener how do I make a movie and he would say oh making a move easy. So here's what I do. I I read a book or magazine article that I really respond to and I call it my lawyer, and I say, hey, are the rights bailable to this. They say, hey, we'll kick it around. We'll dig for it. They call me back a week later that hey, you know, we tracked down the author. The the rights are available cusp of million dollars. Great pick it up. So we write a check for million dollars the rights to the book. Then I said, well, I'm gonna screenwriter. So I call up my agents oversee a and they go look for a good screenwriter. We set up a bunch of meetings with a bunch of guys a higher guy who had a great hit last year. As one of the biggest hits at the box office. I pay million dollars draft descrip-. He comes back six months later. I read the script in. No, it's not what I was hoping for. So I go to number two on the list, and I pay him a million dollars. He does a patron rewrite of the thing at the end of the year, though, I've got a strip that I'm really happy with. So now, I call up my my party's over universal and say, hey, you know, that I look deal that I've got where you have to. Guarantee forty five hundred screens for one movie for me every year because I'm Steven over. And they go yet. And I have I got the movie for you. And they're like, okay, cool. We'll open up forty five hundred screens. So then I call my business partners over trimmers. And I'm like, we're going to need one hundred and eighty million dollars to make this. They say cool, we'll architect half of out of our domestic then we'll go to a Bank and Indian put the resting and before you know, it three years later, I'm on set with two hundred and fifty employees, and I'm making a movie, that's awesome. Stevens over. How do I make a move and he'd go? Oh, how do you make a movie on the hill? Right. So I always get the speech to young people in Hollywood, and it applies to people in business too. And it's this it's all my accumulated wisdom, and it's about those who do and those who don't do what I have observed having lived on this life affair bit. Now gotten a few grey hairs met people who've started podcasting my full house and become the biggest podcasters in the country. I have friends who star in these big superhero movies that we talk about. I have friends who've started businesses worth hundreds of millions of dollars. I have friends who still tables I have people for into washed out move back home. I have friends who found other things like me to do that weren't what they originally anticipated. But they've gone on and have had success. I've I know somebody who's done at all. And what I discovered is that the difference between those who do and those who don't do is that those who do do and those who don't do great. It don't shoot that is great. When I give this advice. People are so disappointed because. Was it doesn't satisfy because what you're looking for the thing that would satisfy you does not exist. There is only those who do and those who don't do don't do the Christmas usually know those who do long before they have done like I have a pretty good average now being able to size somebody up and determine will they do it may be a decade before they do. But they're doers. And they're doing and those who do do what does it mean? It means they do whatever they're always doing. They're learning from the things that they've done and trying to do something else. They're not waiting by the phone for an agent to call them. They're not waiting by the phone for somebody to discover them down at the soda shop in cast them. You're the next big thing kit. They're out there making their way. And the other thing that they do is they respond to what God brings into their lives. They basically take the opportunities that come before them. They don't try to will the world into complete conformity. With their vision. Which by the way, a vision that they formed before they done anything and therefore for they knew anything they are willful people by large they're strong. Let me say it differently. They're strong willed people, but they have the humility to guy Bhagat and not them, and those people do so if you wanna be successful business person you wanna make it in the movies. You wanna be one who does? That's great advice. Nothing. That's my question would be. Then what does Michael Knowles do will do by not doing? Speaking of Michael, this comes from subscriber named Michael let's hope that his last name is not an old or you've been really busy up there with your phone tweeting way questions he wants to know how can the left and the right converse? When they can't even agree on facts. I actually think it's a language problem. The problem is the only way that you can converse with anybody is if you speak the same language, right? There is an objective reality outside of two people. In your using words, and symbols and always things outside here to make whatever's going on in your head accessible to whatever's going on in somebody else's hit. And with the left. Does is it constantly perverting language? It's always undermining languages inverting language, sometimes to the opposite of what it actually means. They do this famous with Justice. Right. Justice is social Justice means the opposite of Justice political opposite of correct, right? So you have to do is be so precise about language when we were Michigan yesterday. I came out. To talk to some of the protesters, and they had a sign. It said trans women are women. And I said, okay, I want I'm not trying to set you up. You I want you to explain your point of view. We're talking about you use this phrase trans women, which is very ambiguous. We're talking about somebody born a man has all the male genitals as the male chromosomes Etta short haircut when he was a kid now, he identifies as a woman should as I said the words that I am not how dare you. I will not speak to you. If you use that pronoun, heat to refer to her which used to be him, and this person that I was just asking please give a million people will see what you have to say, give your point of view. He walked away because he he refused to converse. You can't make somebody come to the table and converse with you the best way that you can try to make yourself understandable mic someone else's views. Understandable is to use really really clear language. But if they're on willing to talk, you're not gonna make them. Do it offended USA. What do you think you talked to a lot of people that disagree with you? I mean, I think the only way to have a conversation two things one a common understanding that a fact is a fact the fact insist and to you need to have a common understanding the rules of the conversation because otherwise you end up falling apart because what you'll do is. You'll start a conversation about facts, somebody gets emotional, and then all of a sudden you're into character attacks, and that's not a conversation anymore. He's basically a conversation is sort of like, you're building tower out of blocks with somebody. And if you put down a block and the person mmediately takes that block away the tower doesn't get built there's no second level to the conversation. The best conversations are the ones that are happening. Once you get three or four levels up in the conversation, but you actually have to build the foundations together. So one of the mistakes people make they tried to build on the third floor of the of the building when the first two floors don't exist. There's no common agreement as to the rules of the conversation. What are the what are the limits of the conversation, which issue are we talking about is it insulting for me to use phraseology? With us. You say if you don't agree on the on the fundamental framework of is the building one gay square, or is it going to be an octagon, then you and you start arguing about what sort of minaret put atop the building. There's there's no conversation to be had aleisha. All right. This is a pretty good question. One that I've wondered myself this comes from subscriber named Mike which don't forget that. If you subscribe right now during this barred cast YouTube could be stuck here with me. Signed up for that. How do I unsubscribe? I have no idea I've been trying out anytime you like never leave. He makes us. Hey, guys. Just the political right run the risk of giving a oh, see too much exposure. And thus giving her more credibility. It seems Democrats did this with Trump in two thousand sixteen. No, no, yes. Yes. In the sense that she's prominent because we give her attention important. That's important. I think that's total crap. I'm gonna stop you right there. That is garbage. And it his crap is no it is not a reason. She is really really think we contribute to know. I think that the left the left date is they put her on the cover of every magazine, they elevated to national prominence they feature her at every conference. And then they say, oh, she pisses you off doesn't shake, right? She really annoys she's in. And you're like, no, I think ride users bad. It's exactly we're talking about before in the no, no, she really annoys. We'll show you three times as much of her until you're like, I think bad idea. Here's why it's about idea. Oh, you're obsessed with virtue because I didn't put her on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. And if I'd never talked about her, you know, what she would be on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. I'm so tired of this. And by the way, I don't even agree with it about from. I don't think that people had ignored a Trump from just going away. I think it's such wishful thinking that you're in control the universe that you're not in control of Donald Trump was never going away. Who's one of those famous people in the United States people knew who he was people thought, it was hilarious people wanted to hear it. He had to say. And you know, what every other candidate in the race tried to do with Donald from ignore him. That's what they did. I mean, go back to the primaries Republicans, ignore Donald Trump. And you know, what happened? He won the nomination. Really, we're talking I was talking to the Cruz campaign and the Rubio campaign guys can't ignore him except your attacking each other. And you think he's just gonna go. Do you not you don't think billion two billion dollars worth of free media helped him out? I think he was going to get that regardless. And I think that the media that was providing him that coverage were Plymouth where left-wingers Android winners. Okay. Boston, friends Bilton. The guy was gonna get media coverage. He's a celebrity. Celebrities media coverage has star power. She's a celebrity. You wanna see how this works? Let's all pay attention to AB club for we conceive. She suddenly media throw a desk at the reason why I. I give her a lot of coverage even things that aren't on the cover of Rolling Stone. I play her all the time. The reason I don't think it's a bad thing to give her a lot of coverage is because AO see takes leftist arguments to their logical conclusion and their wacky crazy conclusions than knocked down every building, and so much more honest, Bernie, totally honest. I love you. Important. She's inherently important you have to cover and she is the avatar of socialism attractive? She self-confidence she's ignorant destructive. And that is central with socialism is socialism looks beautiful. You know, she's very attractive. It says I'm gonna solve all these problems for you. And she says that it knows nothing about human nature or economics. And ultimately destroys everything it touches. She is social she said, the great thing this week, which is so honest, which is that that if automation comes none of you will have jobs that'll be great. But the able to learn languages and art music and Bill whittle very famously talked about this almost a decade ago because this is a common socialist communist argument with that one day, you won't have to work so hard, and then you'll be able to learn these language will be able to do all this art of able to play the violin. And Bill said yet that happened though. It was called the iphone capitalism gave it to us. It gave us one hundred percent of all the cumulated knowledge of man that we carry around in our pocket, you wanna learn a language. There's an app. You wanna learn music? There's an app you want to know about you know, the Peloponnesian war. There's an and what do you do? Yeah. Look at foreign. Really, I know. By the way, did didn't have you on your shows this week cover. Mommy, porn from the UK. The headline. And then I close. Actually read the story. These mothers in the United Kingdom saw online pornography for the first time that their that their teenage children were watching and they were moved two of them said that they vomited because it's so disgusting. What actually takes place in online pornography, which it's anything the the worst thing that the mind can see about. And so they were trying to think what do we do about this that our children are being those to these horrible dehumanizing objectify ING images of women all of these exploited sexual positions. And their idea was let's make mommy approved pornography for our children to watch. So they contact a pornographic production company, and they hire them to make mom approved porn, which is pornography that sort of adheres to the normal customs of sex. You know, there's a little foibles and people's bodies aren't perfect. And it doesn't always work the way you think it's gonna work and it required requires conversation and looking at each other's eyes. And a great storyline. And then they premiered the movie and made their children's sit with off with their mothers and watch mommy approved. You know, before I mean, obviously, it's like the worst thing. I've ever heard these women are clearly the shrewdest mothers in they know anything that. Mommy, does or mommy thinks is cool like instantly. You'll reject might be able to single handedly. There will be no, grandchildren. Hire a story about this believe it or not it has nothing. My own mother. So when I was at UCLA studying things that really matter you had to take some some kind of generalized, G E courses one. Of course, I had to take a course in Israel film. So Isreaeli film in particularly it's gotten a lot better now, but in the nineteen nineties in two thousand space euro porn. So it was just like everything that was the trashy est of European TV was what Israel has made this particularly for like nineteen sixty nineteen nineteen seventy on Israel was just getting on speeds the country. So there's a famous Israeli actress who son was in the class, and they decided that they were going. She was gonna come in interesting to speak about this film, and they're gonna show this film, and in this film, she she's completely nude and she is having pretty graphic sex with a couple of different dudes on the screen and her son is in the classroom watching this. So this is already awkward enough. And she and during the Cuban a she she asked her how did you feel watching three awkward mom, and it was a couple of weeks later where we're back in the class. And you know, I'm an orthodox Jew. Right. And I'm sitting there most of the Israeli film class. Most of the kids are Jewish. So behind there. I'm sitting with the sun and a couple of other kids, and they turned to me, and they're like us your orthodox right now. So you've never had sex. Right. Your virgin until marriage. Like, right. That's my religious principle. I've never had sex, and they're like well have you and they start getting mocking, and they go so have you ever seen a naked woman? And I was like, well, yeah, I lived in western culture. It's almost impossible not to see a naked woman at one point. And and one of them goes, well, who's last naked woman? You saw the geigo your mom. He'll save us from ourselves. I don't know if I can I'm currently sadder than betas dog looked in that entire thread. Wants to know. Hey, guys. What are your thoughts on the spread of conservatism among millennials? It's lucrative. And for nine ninety nine. You have just by the way, only a few minutes left to become a subscriber annual subscription during this broadcast entered into a chance to win a trip out to see us do this again in the future. Here's what I would say about millennials and conservative. It's it's a pretty amazing thing to see of YouTube was interviewed by care. Swish. Swish code Swisher. Who is a fixture really in reporting on Silicon Valley, very famous time. Yeah. Very famously interviewed Bill Gates, and Steve Jobs together was a huge thing that she made happen once and in the interview Switzer actually asks for YouTube to ban the Ben Shapiro show. And what I loved about it. She says she says the Ben Shapiro's at eight way drug to the far worse things. The Andrew claybon show. Because she says they watch me. And then they watch Jordan Peterson than they watch Nazis. But the beautiful thing is the come back into tack. You. The cycle of violence. Reason she knows about Ben Shapiro is because she walked in to her living room and her son was watching something on U2., and she could hear the violent hate filled bigoted rhetoric coming from his screen. She walked over. And he was watching. Yeah. Her son, son. Why are you watching this evil evil been spirit? And he said, well, no that's been Shapiro. He's super smart. She says this in the interview been Peres, super smart. She's I know he's not smart. He's clever, but he's an idiot. And he's immoral and he's terrible. And and and the YouTube says, you don't want us to you're not suggesting we've band Ben Shapiro, if she says, I would I would. I can't. But then the best thing that she says is anyway, don't worry about my son. He's already lost. And I wouldn't have wouldn't amazing thing that we live in a generation where if you are a millennial American today and you want to rebel against your parents. Yes, what usually go over to the YouTube, and you look for most religious button down by orthodox few in America when he pops up, and he says things like, hey, kids get a degree get a job, but don't have sex before marriage that you'll be successful. And it's like your parents are like oh. Our we're having this amazing. Spoke at U of M last night. And there's a tweet last night from a person who's conservative said, they brought a liberal friend. And after lectures, over liberal friends firm to this conservativeness documents that he's not racist. And it's like. Right. Of course. But this is this is why I think that there is hope still for the millennials is that a certain point reality doesn't Trud. I mean, this fantasy world that we've been living in where you can rip on all the evils of capitalism, well benefiting from every aspect of capitalism imaginable, where you can talk about how terrible personal responsibility is while living in the free country in the history of the world where you are told your victim every day while being the most privileged people who have ever lived. And where you're told the people who are racist legitimately not racist. And are in fact anti-racist, and you are told that true racism is not acknowledging that grew by density should Trump. Individualized, real racism, and a certain point reality and Trajan just go these people are are joyless. They're they're annoying McNish. The it's it's really is that the left has gotten so irritating and annoying, and this is not a female term, Bossie, male and female Bossie. It's just like I don't want. Bernie sanders. Running my life. I don't want ASU running my life. And when I say this. I think are a lot of millennials like a. Yeah. That's that's basically, right. That's basically, right. And as they get older, and they realized just how Bossie these the leftists have what they have in mind. It's gonna get worse. This is why and Bernie Sanders are wonderful because they're just stripping away. All Britain's like yet, no hamburgers. To the car is going to get rid of the airplanes. You're gonna watch all of our favorite entertainment. Brennan's are good breadline red wines. Red. Little bit distinction to between the millennials who came of age with Barack Obama. They'll fell in love with them. There's not a red America. There's not a blue America, and the gen Z the group Acuras younger than millennials that we were talking to yesterday Michigan that we see on college campuses, those are different groups. And I think that group has come vague in the age of the woke skulls in the age of censorship in the age of inbred lines, and the touting of socialism, those are very different moments that happened very close to one another. And it gives me a lot of hope for those youth these days of gen Z, and hopefully, maybe the millennials can learn something from them. Yeah. Because if the left is not us anything that you learn exclusively from the children. My friends. My friends our time together and didn't get in your subscription, your annual subscription over a daily, wire dot com slash subscribe. It's too late for you. If you're watching this later on demand, it's too late for you. It was only during the live broadcast. Still subscribe, we could really use the support. And we'll probably do this thing again in the future because we want to give opportunities to meet more of our subscribers take more questions from our subscribers. So for Ben for Andrew for Michael for ille-. I'm sorry for Ben for Michael for the lovely and for myself and all of us at the day. The thanks for giving us, you know, all of your time and life works this evening audience. Howdy.

Tucker Tucker Carlson America MSNBC US Barack Obama Fox News Bubba basketball Hillary Clinton Ben shapiro Warren Jeffs Michael Knowles Los Angeles John McCain president Jeremy boring Bravo company Andrew klavan Tucker Carlson
Daily Wire Backstage: March Madness Edition

The Andrew Klavan Show

1:47:10 hr | 1 year ago

Daily Wire Backstage: March Madness Edition

"Hey, there your about to listen to our latest episode of daily wire backstage where I joined Ben Shapiro. Michael Knowles and daily wire God king, Jeremy boring for an in-depth conversation on politics and culture, and where we answer questions from daily wire subscribers enjoy bake laugh in three two. Stage March madness what is March? Writes, this is that the one with. Looking. Hoop. Yeah. It's where you pay somebody to say that your kid's basketball star. So they can get enough. March madness. That's how I got into junior college. We've really didn't do terms of titling these shows. It's a slow news month. My friends, I'm Jeremy boring, God king of the daily wire with a lower case g and a lower case K and tonight, we are going to do are honest best to fill something like ninety minutes. Has that always been our theme song? God knows. Tonight. We're gonna talk politics. We're gonna talk culture, we're gonna talk about Tucker Carlson's response to media matters it job, and why that matters to all of us, and we'll also be taking questions from our subscribers over to daily wear dot com slash subscribe. Give us your measly ninety nine bucks a year. We're going to send you leftist. Here's hundred cold tumbler. And we're going to do something tonight that we have never done before so pay attention. If you sign up and become a daily wire annual subscriber during this actual live broadcast tonight you and a guest will be entered into a raffle to win drum. Roll don't do a free trip to Los Angeles to sit in on a taping of this berry show, some say it all again, if you give us your one hundred dollars, you will not only get access to the greatest conservative content online the bench show. The Michael Knowles show. Whatever it is that drew does for a living. You will not only get the leftist tears, hot or cold tumbler. You will also get to get onto an. Airplane? Fly your rear end to Los Angeles put on some sort of masks. So that you can cut through the cigar smoke and sit in on a taping of the daily wire backstage, we look forward to getting to meet you take one picture with you never talk to you again. All right with me tonight. Ben shapiro. Andrew claybin, Michael Knowles, and the lovely Alicia crass. Why are they always make me take the lovely Lisa crafts imagine? If what I said with me tonight, the lovely the key. Oh, my. Nose piercing. Claybin Andy Lucia press. She'll be joining us here. A bit later to bring us your questions get over to wear dot com slash subscribe. But come a subscriber interfere chance to fly out here and meet us as we taped an episode of this show in the meanwhile, st- Kate can we add to that offer that they sit in for me. Yeah. So it'll be like and appear for piercing medical analysis is Bob. Yeah. No. They can't sit in. I think meeting us. The only reason anyone do this. Anyway appeal. To say you get to fly out. It's been today. Shadowing daily wire God king, Jeremy born. And then when even our own staff said who's that? We're gonna talk about all kinds of things than I Tucker Carlson. We're gonna talk about International Women's Day. Happened over the weekend. Over the syllabi did see captain through is a sadist. I think we'll talk a little bit about college. Why you shouldn't go since I'm the only one that didn't go. I have a perspective on this. But I I know a lot of people. Tune in for my clunky segues. That's that's why. You know, who is named Bravo company manufacturing Pravo. Failures trapped in the constitution. They enshrined bunch of rights. The first right was making sacred the right of the individual to share their ideas with elements action by the government. The second rate was your ability to protect that. I write with a gun. And that's where Bravo company manufacturing comes in. You know, how strongly I believe in the right of the people to keep and bear arms. If you're law law-abiding citizen, you should own a weapon Bravo company manufacturing was started in a garage by marine veteran or than two decades ago to build a professional grade product that meets combat standards BCM believes the same level of protection should be provided to every single American regardless of whether they are private citizen or a professional not exporting arms company. It's thing I'm big on guns are not just for hunting. They're not just for self defense. They're also for protection of your family and your country and your principles every components of Meriva was handed symbols and tested by Americans to a life saving standard ECN works with leading instructors of marksmanship from top levels of America's special ops. Forces from marine fork force reconnaissance to US army special ops forces who can teach the skills necessary to fend yourself your family or others to learn more. About bravo. Company manufacturing head on over to Bravo company, MFG dot com, and there you can discover more about their product special offers upcoming news, Bravo, company and dot com. Met the founders of the company there's been tackler people in their product is great. If you need more convincing, check them out at YouTube dot com slash Bravo company. USA that is YouTube dot com slash Bravo company. USA proba company manufacturing. Not only a great sponsor of the show. Not only produces a great product. But is a great sponsor of the show. And you're if you're like me, you're particularly grateful for sponsors on a Newsweek like this week when we're watching Tucker Carlson face-down. Yeah. A hit job from media matters. Media matters is the worst organisation merica. Yeah. The they're truly the it's an evil organization. It was started for Filipino the background. And media matters media matters was started by essentially, Hillary Clinton as a as a way to target the so-called bass right wing conspiracy. This regarding g. Roy David Brock smear artist who the the formerly allegedly cocaine addled smear artists who has spent his entire career just going after his political opponents while mistreating his own employees, allegedly and media matters was specifically designed to go after people on the right? It is not a media watchdog the media lie to people they say media watchdog, no immediate watchdog is an organization that follows the entire media and then calls people out on their mistakes. Media matters is the kind of organization where internal memos showed several years back that they were actively talking about hiring private investigators shadow hosts at Fox News to dig up crap in their private lives. So they could use it against them. And take them off the air media matters is now designating obviously the Tucker Carlson some poor sap who's using their sociology degree to good benefit. I watching one hundred hours. We're listening to one hundred hours of Tucker Carlson on old episodes of about the love sponge from two thousand six. This was this. And we've been told that what Tucker said on there is deeply important to everyone. They are deeply offended now. Couple quick notes. An and the ended I'm skinny the Android. Couple quick notes media matters valley motivated, we all know this. When joy Reid of MSNBC was caught in battle blog posts Angela cross and the head of MFA MFA media matters for America came out and said, no this is a right wing smear. Of course, we shouldn't go after any of advertisers. It's all a right wing smear. He himself has now been caught in a bunch of old posts. There will be no consequence to any of that end media matters to play a bunch of protesters to Fox News, not to call for Tucker's ouster, but to call for a complete advertising boycott of the entire network of Fox News because they don't like Fox News because Carlson was on Fox News when he said those things on he's on his. Him. Oh, all and here is the here's the kicker to to all of this media matters designed as a hit group is being given all sorts of credibility. Right people who do not give two craps what? Tucker said, I I was never found shock jock radio. I don't like shock jock radio. A lot of Tucker said was jokes from what? Tucker said wasn't it shock jock radio? It's specifically designed for people to go on and say the most offensive things they can possibly say for the listener. And the attempt to go after taco for this old stuff is not in good faith. It's not an attempt to ask him what he meant by it. It's not an attempt to garner. His views is the same deal. They do with every prominent conservative figure it tried to go back find something that they can cast as embarrassing and then call for an apology if you apologize and they step on your neck. And so you did something wrong, obviously, that means advertisers should pull if you don't apologize. They say you, obviously still believe that bad stuff. So your advertisers should pull they go after you to destroy you. It is it is despicable. It is despicable. Because again, it's not about you said something in the here. And now that was bad. And now we're all reacting to the here. Now, it is you pretending. Outraged about a thing about with your eminently, non it's also funny to me you bring up that. It was on a shock jock radio show. You if you if you take yourself back in time ten years, the heady days of yesteryear. Conservatives weren't the audience for that show. Right. Right. So Tucker Carlson, of course, at the time on MSNBC, those on Bubba the love sponge, something that almost every conservative in America. When they read the story yesterday thought what because that entire format existed. Basically as a rebuke of the right at basically was a left-wing comedy format and to me, that's actually the the worst aspect of. It is we now live we talked last time we were together at how we live in a graceless age. I think that's really important subject matter. We also live in an in an era where there is no comedy. Absolutely, no comedy is allowed. You're not allowed to be satirical. Satires dead. You're not allowed to parody parody. Totally the looking glass on parody. I'd never like you have never cared for the shock doc format. Maybe. See when I was sixteen years old. I might have grinned a few times listening to was the Tom leykis your once or twice, but never a format that really did anything for me. But we live in a better country when someone can go on a shot talk radio show and say outrageously terrible things in everyone Snickers at them. And then we move on with you, don't there's something I want to add to the media matters picture, though. David Brock was the former boyfriend of the guy who ran the pizza. Parlor that was the center of pizza gate when the win the pizza gate. Rumors started that was when the idea of fake news before Trump took it over started to spread and David Brock said, we said openly, we're going to use this to impose on social media censors who cut down conservative voices. Barack Obama picked up the thread, Hillary Clinton picked up the thread, this very very sophisticated organization meant to silence the voices of the opposition. It's not as you say it is not meant to call people out. His is not meant to question ideas. And this thing I mean, look as far as I'm concerned for that day that when Tucker Carlson stood up to these guys and made that incredibly precise opening speech about the outrage mob for that one minute. He was the most important person in America. And the reason I say that is the right to joke around and make stupid jokes and say things that maybe you shouldn't say that's part of free speech. And I don't think it should cost you your job. And by the way, this whole thing he said at ten years ago. I don't care if you said it yesterday. I don't care if he was sitting in a bar and somebody heard him have a couple and say something he shouldn't have said that's part of being a human being is part of being a guy, especially guy say stupid things we like to step over there. We're jocular we'd like to step up the one we say them sometimes to make a point sometimes because they strike us as funny in the in the moment, we all do it. And. I will say I do think there's a difference between old material new material new material we get to react in real time to the stuff. That's being said. Now, there's something particularly off pudding. Yeah. That digging up old stuff there. You're not outraged over a decade ago. I re-. Listening which we have to distinguish between the joked people make and the things that they are actually saying, of course, I agree. Yeah. It we should make a distinction between jokes and people's actually, of course, I believe that we that. We should be able to say terrible jokes. I think that it's it's not only fundamental to freedom. It's like, it's a it's an essential aspect of how men express themselves gets a form of de escalation like racist jokes. That's there are two kinds of racist jokes. They're racist jokes that are meant to demean people of other races and people who make those jokes are racist. Then there's racist jokes which are meant to defuse differences between the races and those jokes. Traditionally were made by all kinds of people of good, faith, you you would have comedy troupes where these jokes would be made between the racist toward each other. And that was a part of the de escalation during the civil rights during the civil rights movement. So this brings me to what I actually hate. And the reason that I found a mentally agree that it's even worse to go back into the past. It's because the rules. Have changed? I disagree with the new rules. But I do recognize that there are new rules. I wanna fight against some push back against them. But we push back within a certain framework if particularly disturbing to go back to a time when like next we're going to go back to Howard Stern and start finding all kinds of things that were set on the Howard Stern show. They haven't been ready to go back to friends, and they say you can't watch them. Right. A show friends anymore. Those popular show the nineteen ninety s you're not supposed to watch it anymore because there are episodes in which people are joking about gay marriage or people are making jokes about fat people or people making racial jokes. It's like oh here trying to superimpose modern sensibilities. Yes, back onto people in a in a different era who abided by different. I mean, it's fundamentally dishonest in an extraordinary way. And that is that once you what are they what exactly is the ask? So if you're if you wanna make society better there has to be to ask. So what exactly is the asking? So I say something on my show today. That's wrong. And the ask is, okay. I have to come on the show tomorrow. And I have to correct it. That's a fair ask I say something that is offensive or terrible. It's my job to apologize to the people that I that I was wrong to I'm not gonna say that the people who were offended because that puts the onus on them. If I did something wrong the onus is on me. But what is the ask when somebody said something bad thirteen years ago? And no one took offense is Tucker supposed to apologize to media matters. Because those people can go after Zolt now sucker supposed to apologize to people who are offended now by comments that didn't make a dent thirteen years ago. I mean, like here's a situation in which I would say Tucker should apologize. So Tucker, for example, said made some comments about Warren Jeffs who was I guess tried and convicted for facilitating rape for he's the leader. And he was facilitating child marriages between twenty seven year old and sixteen year old and Tucker made some comments about how he thinks that I should be free. Let's say that Warren Jeffs victims had come forward and said, I was offended by that. And Tucker said listen, I was on the love sponge. I was saying stupid stuff. I apologized that seems to me that would be a fair recompense. But who is Tucker supposed to apologize to the world at large? He's just like here's an old Mia. Damn thing isn't Ownby. NBN opponents or something that he said why this is what the left does the left gets offended on behalf of other people. You'll notice nine times out of ten is always white liberals who are pretending to be offended on behalf of every allegedly aggrieved minority, and it is it's even further context is so important context particular circumstances or important to everything in life. And so when I speak in public, I don't swear I just try not to I I don't like to do when I'm at the bar. I talk like a dirty sailor. And I'm not sorry that I do that. I don't think it's wrong that I'd do that. I think it is. Right. And just I think it's perfectly appropriate to those contexts. So Tucker Carlson is invited on the shock jock show. Now, you could say maybe you shouldn't go into a shock jock show. Maybe that's career advice. Maybe the leftists at MSNBC should have told him to stay off of it instead of encouraging him to go on it. But instead he goes on the show is he supposed to go and play Bach in a rock band. Is that what he's going to do is? You're going to go start playing the Br. Brandenburg concerto with the beat. This is interesting. And I think that the feminization of Christianity which led to the feminization of American society, generally really contributes to this which is men do compartmentalize behaviors women comm, generally speaking compartmentalise relationships. There's a lot. That's interesting to unpack from both of those points from both of those distinct from that distinction. But if you take men who compartmentalize behaviors it doesn't just apply to behaviors within a within a sexual or romantic relationship it. It is a compartmentalizing of all kinds of behaviors within certain contexts, and it is a legitimate there. I agree with you. There is a legitimate argument to be made that what is wrong in one context is not wrong in another. I mean, obviously, we can come up with huge examples killing someone in war is different than killing someone on the street. So that you can take his killing someone on Bubba the love sponge different. But even but even with coarse language, even with body jokes, even with sort of the sort of ways that menus disparagement as a form of camaraderie. Yes, things like that are not always appropriate. There's not like I'm not saying universally people should be allowed to behave. This way, I'm saying in certain contexts, it's appropriate for people. Hey, this is a weaponization of shock, and it's been used now for for thirty forty years against the entire tired of western culture before the show began. We were talking about all the references anti-jewish references that go like a thread through all of western literature now when they teach literature they go back and say, well, here's an anti female thing. Here's an anti you know, every the famous one was the attack on Jane Austen for supporting the English empire. Simply the British empire simply by writing her books. I mean that was it was I-I argument. It's been an attempt to silence all of western civilization by this targeted outrage that doesn't extend to everything that everybody does. I mean, nobody is going to say, oh, Don lemon demonized white people, which he did white men. Nobody's here's a great example of this. I've heard you talk about with our friend, Dave Rubin that in one context your position towards Dave Reuben's heart is political. And and and as part of your public advocacy that you do as a political voice in another context. It's congenial. Because it's based on your friendship with Dave Rubin. Your general support of his being and his happy, right? Another example might be the use of certain pronouns. Right. I said this about transgender absolutely exactly right in public. If somebody says are transgender pronouns, the right pronunciation, I will say no because I don't believe that there is a set of pronouns that is not connected by logical. If I'm sitting across the table from a person who's transgender I'll use whatever opponents they feel like because we're out to dinner. Why wouldn't I just? Just because context does matter when trying to make a moral determination about someone's Bank. Of course, the way that you can tell that this is soup. Frene bad faith is the the pod rose today. Pod positive America. They came for the the Obama rose they came forward, and they were actively stumping for 'em to for people to attend M F as rally outside of Fox News. These guys make their money the same way that we do make money off advertising on programs like this one then because I make my money off this. I held this position before we ever did this. Of course, the with that said understanding how how advertising works in the space, and that advertisers should be able to advertise on a wide variety of political programs without being perceived of endorsed any of the views on those political programs. I have never called nor would I call from Waco against the pod save America, rose, even though I think that they are actively promoting policies that are detrimental to the country actively promoting a vision of American that I think is false dangerous and harmful. I still think that the. Advertisers who advertise on politics America have every right to do. So and in boycotting them is morally wrong, and it's good for America. That many of the people who advertise on punt save America, avocado advertise without that. That's exactly right. But the the the comfort level you can see a tool of power because the people of America, if they truly believed that the that the boycott the boycott ability was mutual if they truly feared the possibility that we were all going to go after their advertisers. They chipped their position in a hard. But this is what it was so good about Tucker statement is that he pointed out that we're not playing by the same rules. We're in a conversation, their jihad, we're trying to argue our point of view and win. They're trying to silence actually, do it everywhere. When what Tucker said was that the right to often plays along the right to often pretends that this is something that some kind of legitimate thing going on, and we have to pull back, and I don't think we do especially I mean, because I do all the satire, I say all these absurd things that I know are absurd, you know, certainly, and I'm kidding around. But I know that you could take those out of context and now me with my just don't care because I do not. Feel I do not feel they have the right to do that too. So I feel it's only right for me to stand up. And that is the this is where the left really plays on. I think the morality of the right? Meaning that we all acknowledge, for example that. Tell that Tucker said some stuff that we don't like, of course, right on. Okay. That stuff is wrong. So instead of so what the left will do is. They'll find the thing that they say is what he did wrong. We may agree that it's wrong. And we'll say like gives a broader principle. We're not going to call for boycotts or his destruction. For thing. He said thirteen years ago, they say, you agree with the thing that he said thirteen years ago, this this is where and you saw some of this from the right? This is where Tucker is right. And but the lesson can be extended to in the other direction. So we're Tucker is right. Is he says, okay? Well, what you guys are doing is in bad faith. You're not attempting to police the dialogue. You're attempting to come after me and destroy me on the basis of his own statements. And there are people on the right who fall for this. And you saw this saw some people on the right going. Well, Tucker is not the hill design, you really want to die on this hill defending this wrestle. We're in which is would mention nonsense a bunch of nonsense because if there's any hill the die on the hill of you don't get to dig up people's old crap use it against them without even asking them. What their opinion on is is on it now specifically in bad faith to destroy their career. Like, you don't get to do. That's a bad thing to do. But the but on the. Otherside what'll happen is people will say, okay. Well, then I'm just going to hold on on everything. So somebody says something bad today like like, an actual bad thing. And it's today should that person. Apologize for it. And people on the right will go. Listen. I apologize. I MC knowledge in the left point. No, sometimes you have to apologize. This was what I liked about Tucker's along Tucker said good people when they do something wrong. They apologized, but I'm not going to apologize to hygiene us, I'm not gonna apologize to the jackals and of no interest in receiving and who are who are looking to destroy me on the basis of this old stuff. It's as I said, if I'm sure that if a victim of Warren just came Tucker and said, listen to what you said on bubble love sponge in two thousand seven I found I didn't even know about it. Now, I heard about it. I'm offended. I'll bet you the Tucker would say, you know, what I shouldn't have said it. It was the wrong thing to say. But this brings us back to our conversation. Last time we were together what we're discussing the graceless civilization. And you made the point that from a tactical point of view. It's always wrong now to apologize. Yes. It's if you apologize now, it is you're you're putting your neck indicated that's becoming. You saw it with Chris Cuomo. Did you see Chris Cuomo to this insane? Monologue core, objective, objective journalist, Chris Cuomo block of wood, less smart of the cool. Brothers an amazing. He didn't mind while on CNN where he said Toca Carlson is a coward. How do I know? He's a coward because he's not apologizing for these statements, and he's also not going on his show tonight and saying the same statements over again, right and say, okay in that in that one sentence you've set up a catch twenty two for him, which is if you polish sizes, then you're going to say, you see he knows that he was wrong. And that's why he should be boycotted because he's that kind of person. You should never have said it in the first place, and even he acknowledges that and if he doesn't apologize. He said, well, he's not apologizing because he still agrees with it. So why does he just double down on it today? But beyond this. And this is something that really bothers me is the entire definition of defense. Usually, it's racism, they come after us for the entire definition of racism has now become any glitch any tribal glitch in the human mind that causes you to behave in a certain way. When for instance, a black guy gets on an elevator. If you if you get an car near side swipe, the car, and you see the guy in the car is black or Jewish or female. You're very likely to shout. You know, you stupid blank, whatever. Whatever the kind of person. Did I'm sorry. That's not racist. That's a little glitch in the human person that we can overcome by goodwill. You know, it's not it is not racism to sort of think like, oh, you know, I grew up with people who look like you. I kind of feel more comfortable with that you can overcome all those things, and what the left does is takes these human foibles, which we all have. And we all say, and it makes turns them into an aspect of your philosophy. Which is not true racism is a philosophy. I knew racist people. I know people who believe that other people are inferior to them. Because of the way they were born that is. That's true racism. I oppose it with all my soul. I truly do you guys. You guys know, I do you heard me rant about it? But it's not the same thing as the fact that we're all human beings. We have these flaws. We have these little tribal glitches to call people out for that as elevating perfectionist as the only acceptable standard for maybe the Senate has to be perfect perfection because if you were ever imperfect, this is like, you can't even tell a story about how you were once in 'perfect as a cautionary tales Lee. And what they do is. They take one instance what you're talking about. And I'll disagree with you to the extent that I think that if you're in the car and somebody sideswipes you, and it's a woman, and you just start shouting at her as a woman that that would be a sexist incident. But that does not mean that you are a, sexist and other words, right? I think we're saying the same thing I'm trying to hone in a little more nicely a racist. A racist moment does not make you a racist for your entire life. Been beings are a series of moments. That's all we are. And then the way we judge her character is by weighing up the totality of those moments and your viewpoint, and that's how we decide whether you're a good person with your racist or not whether you're somebody who should trust or not the there's no one who's perfect on this earth. And what we have decided is that we are going to take one instance one moment where you did a wrong thing, and we will use that as the key moment that that that is the flash point that shows your behavior the left does is about merica, by the way. This is your favorite thing to do. I was ranting about this on my show. I think yesterday I it was really terrible. There's a young man in Victor, I think Victor macaroni. And he was a young black man who was shot to death near USC just last week in his his mother is a city councilwoman in Oakland. And the reason that this hit my radar is because somebody emailed me and said, this is a person who asks you a question at USC at your appearance just a couple of months ago when I remembered the kid is twenty one and he was who's really nice cordial. He disagreed with me. Really Cordial's really warm hearted. And really, and it didn't make the national news for more than it didn't because he was killed by people who who were killing him as parv robbery. It was just a criminal act in a in a high crime neighborhood near USA. And so this doesn't make the national news. If you've been killed by a white cop, then it makes the national news and that connected. This to the fact that there was this long article in the New York Times magazine about what they called the tragedy of Baltimore. They're talking about how Baltimore has completely fallen apart and ever since Freddie, gray, particularly the murder rate has skyrocketed because the police have stopped policing because they don't want to be held up on all of the on that every time they go out there. There's ten people with cameras who are attempting to get them fired win their life put them in jail. So they're just stopped releasing the murder rates have risen in Baltimore. What the left likes to do is pick instances that reinforce a narrative that they have already pre written. That's what's happened with Tucker. That's what happens with people like me or rush or Mark Levin or anybody who has any level prominence in the conservative movement. And it's what the left does with America instead of looking at the broad trend of where's crime happ-. And why is it happening, by the way, it's happening in areas where there is high level of single motherhood? None of men in the community and not enough police that is the answer. That's where all crime is happening, and that that's not a racial thing that's from white communities to instead of looking at those trends instead with they'll do as though pick out ace incident that they think reinforces the truth. Aaron of that the real problem in America is racism, though, feature it for months on TV then there's a riot about the false narrative. And then they say well that that riot is proof positive that our narrative was through in the I do know what it is to especially on this point of these incidents these series of incidents these series of actions the way it works. We're all guilty of it. The left takes it to an extreme is we judge others by their actions. We judge ourselves. And so Andrew Caruso, the head of media matters. He had these blog posts on earth from two thousand five around the same time that Tucker was going on Bubba. The love sponge, and they were degrading and mocking transgender people then called transvestites to creating Japanese women who were. Sexually abused degrading. Bangladesh's Jews Jews as well. Of course. It always. I mean. Throwing the juice, right? Yeah. And all of these people, but they though, of course, not go after him for it. First of all because media matters. It self is a bad faith organization, but also because then left judges itself on its intention solely on its intentions when they say, vile things about Sarah Palin file things have Nikki Haley, whoever they can't be misogynists because they support abortion. They have wonderful intentions for women feminists. Deep deep, Dan and us one action one little incident. One guy yelling at a car who side swiped him. You're dead your wicked. You're evil you're bound to perdition. I think we can all agree that if you're going to boycott Tucker Carlson, it should be over that let crappy said about stopping driving vehicles. Get rid of that. I do want to say in the interest of disclosure three of the four of us once worked for an organization, then an I started together called truth revolt than our premise was to be a right wing sort of answer to media matters. And we did successfully lead a few actions against a few prominent left wing people who said not jokes. They said some legitimately forum thing aren't Michelle talks about excreting into Sarah Palin now. Correct. But there was nothing disingenuous about tripled. No, it was so on we had a mission statement, and our mission statement was this is a vile horrible tactic. That has no place in a free in a free society. But the only thing more immoral than doing this action is allowing this action to continually be done to one side with absolutely no answer so been and I had this premise of mutually assured destruction which was when the left stops doing. This will stop doing it until the left stops doing this. They have to also know what it feels like to lose your advertising base. And we. We we pursued that for a short amount of time and then enter successful. And this is the thing that I think that advertisers need to start understanding true. Is that all this crap is astroturf it. That's right there. There've been good studies on the effectiveness of boycotts. What cuts are almost never effectively. It's almost impossible to name ineffective. Boycott. You remember when they tried to boycott Chick-fil-A and Chick-fil-A stop went up is gonna raise example. Yeah. Every single time. There's an attempt to nightime stock went up, Colin Kaepernick. This is correct. Anytime you piss people off in there in the headlines more the truth is that the sales tend to go up because all earned publicity so publicity. The Wall Street Journal doodoo piece about the university of Wyoming with they had their thing. There should be more. Cowboys the world needs more Cowboys. And of course, the faculty came in and said, oh, this eliminationist and has heterosexuals and all this. The sudden they told him to go pound sand. We make thousands of dollars their their applications went up. It's like stand up to the wouldn't. The reason I mentioned this is because since we know this from the inside since where she did this operation away. It's not hard to astroturf this stuff. People assume that media matters has this vast crowd of people who are doing things they like five people to show up for this protest. And that's all it takes by the way, if advertisers. Don't actually sit there for forty minutes and things to themselves guys is this real it's like an actual thing. Because here is the truth of the thing. Okay. When we did it to MSNBC, we did it went after a couple of their advertisers. We've got a couple of advertisers to pull Martin Bashir and mature ended up losing a show. We had eighty activists. I kid you not eighty activists. We send them an Email. And it said, here's the number for the customer service line at MSNBC. Here's the customer service line for this advertiser. Call them up and tell them you're angry at them for advertising on Martin Bashir within two days Martin mature show had been pulled. Okay. That was not a vast ground swell of people were never going to shop with advertiser again that was us and again, it's a bad tactic. And we said openly, it's a bad tactic. We said, you know, what, you know? What would be great is if we didn't have to do this tactic? So how about this? You guys stop all this crap. We'll stop all this crap. And then we can go back to a system where you can advertise. Wherever you want. And that's that you shot wherever you want. If you don't you you know, what the actual boycott should be. If you don't like Tucker show, don't watch. Boycott by damn show. My show a single person pissed off at Tucker Carlson has ever watched to episodes of taco bells and not a chance in the world. This is again why I'm so appreciative for our advertisers. And you know, who's a advertiser with a genius policy. The Greek Seguin amazing. Policy. All right. This guy's a broadcasting genius. Pretty impressive. I will say that that those those pictures are so strong that when I die. I hope that they read them. I should make sure. Genius comes in. And we've got a mortgage or kids or anybody who depends on your anytime you need to be an adults. Go get some life insurance right now policy genius is the easy way to get life insurance. Two minutes. You can compare quotes from top insurers and find the best policy for you. When you apply online. The advisers policy genius will handle all the red tape for you, the Lagos shit your rate with the insurance company, no commission sales agents, no hidden fees. Just helpful advice, personalized service and policy. Genius. Doesn't just do life insurance. They also do home insurance and auto insurance and disability insurance. They're your one stop shop for financial protection. So if you find life insurance puzzling head on over to policy genius dot com in two minutes. Compare quotes find the right policy. Save up to forty percent doing it policy genius. Again, the easy way to compare and buy life insurance bureau, responsible human don't be irresponsible to make sure that your family is taking care of don't be buried into poppers grave. Right. Phobic ly is right. So we're going to check in with our daily wire subscribers they keep the lights on as much as our advertisers, do and some lucky daily wire subscriber who subscribes during this broadcast at Delaware dot com. Subscribe and becomes an annual subscriber will win a chance to sit in this room. Breathe in our second hand car and see how the magic a second price for spas. You don't have to come right? Alicia Krause for checking in with the had to hear from our subscribers. Our y'all can't see we're we're happy to hear from, you know, happy to be here. You know, where where are you? Well, I'm on backstage where women are either prostitutes or barefoot and pregnant in the. Which one are you? Are you actually barefoot and actually pregnant and actually in the daily work kitchen? Yeah. Yeah. That's. Organization. At least it's the shiny new kitchen. Right. And I'm making chocolate chip cookies. Don't worry. None of them were for you there for me entirely for the baby. So I will be down here at least not in Michael Moses. Broom closet anymore, but I wanna be down here taking subscriber questions and don't forget, how do you submit those questions. Well, become a subscriber. And not only could you win the chance to maybe be stuck barefoot and pregnant the kitchen with me, you also get to sit in on a future episode of backstage, if you become a subscriber right now, and you get to ask a question of the guys. So go to the daily wire backstage banner on the top of the page watch. The livestream and submit your questions there. We can't smoke around deletion. So. Say that why was set down the whole floor officially become the most conservative house. I do actually one comes from William he wants to know, what's the constitutional definition of a natural born citizen. If a person is born in the US to to illegal aliens can that person go on to be president Michael knows well because I'm the one who went to Harvard law. That's right. This actually is correct me when I inevitably get something wrong. There is a longstanding debate over the exact meaning of natural born citizen. It seems to me that if you are born to the child or if you are the child of an American citizen, you are a natural born citizen at the time of your birth. You are an American citizen. So the whole birther conspiracy was a little bit superfluous because Barack Obama even if he were born on Moore's would have been a natural born citizen. This seems to be in dispute in any case. But if you're born to illegal aliens here in America, you are also a natural born citizen since at least that case in what eighteen ninety eight. Yeah. The one. That's right. The one case after that, it seems to be resolved that you are a natural born citizen. There's been some discussion of repealing birthright citizenship or clarify birthright citizenship, we've had that since two thousand sixteen but the question as far as I can tell remains somewhat unresolved. That's right there. There's one phrase in the fourteenth amendment specifically that is read two maybe. Clued birthright citizenship the truth is in the British empire. The birthright citizenship was sort of tradition. So going back to Blackstone the notion that of natural born citizenship is fairly well established Anglo American wall. The the sort of countervailing viewpoint is that in the fourteenth amendment says that if you're bored in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof. So it's the phrase subject to the jurisdiction thereof. Yup. That comes up in these legal debates because the question is if you are a citizen of another country, like you're let's say, you're Mexican citizen, and you commit a crime in the United States. Well, then they have to contact the consulate of Mexico because you're a Mexican citizen your child presumably is not subject. Do you have an accepted American law upon yourself? So you are not subject to the jurisdiction of American law. Neither is your child that at least is the argument against birthright citizenship. You know, I think that it's it's an open debate. It's all it's a live debate. It's interesting to remember that the subject to the jurisdiction thereof came into play. When John McCain was seeking the nomination to be president. But he. Throwing the and Hannah Mahanama so to American parents so born as citizen of the United States, right? You're born born with the opportunity to be a citizen of the United States. The question was was Panama at that time was he action. That's exactly right. And and the way that the courts traditionally have interpreted subject to the jurisdiction there of would be to exclude for example, foreign ministers. So if you're a foreign minister from from Mexico, and you have a kid in the United States, your kid is not necessarily a subject of the United States because you're a foreign minister and therefore subject uterus diction of the American, and this is the part that does pain me as someone who thinks I think is probably wielded birthright citizenship has been abused. It's created very bad incentives at the southern border is it does seem explicitly to take out diplomats to take out the children of diplomats or whatever. But other people even if you were four national in this country, perhaps you are subject to the jurisdiction of supreme clear is the truth of it. But it's it's also not a precedent. That's going to change anytime soon. So. Conceived naturally born that's the question this raises. This race. It's also interesting to think about it from the point of view of the framers of the constitution at the time that they were conceptualizing these ideas that no person in America was in natural born citizen of today. So they were they were specifically thinking about loyalties, right? They were thinking about where you're where your your loyalty would be to what's opportunity, which are the world TV. They didn't want someone to be elected to be president of the United States who had a divided a divided sense of national allegiance. And I think that that's at the very least the spirit of it. Which is why I think that, you know, probably if a diplomat American diplomat if John Quincy Adams had been born in France or have been born in the Netherlands, he was not. I still think that that that would not have at the time at their time. They would not have thought of him is not eligible to become president. He was it took a long time to travel back then he was born over there because his father was here in service of the country. So we so they would have seen John. They would have seen that read more about the debate John you takes one side of the debate in favor of natural born citizenship. And and Mark Krikorian the folks at center from operation. Studies tend to take John Eastman. They tend to take the other side of the debate. Alicia. I just wanna know can Dan Crenshaw run for president. And that he wasn't born on American soil. That's the most important thing. Interesting. I believe that a military base in Germany, so military bases are exempt to ask guard. Coming up, by the way. Yeah. Because he's never going to forgive him for making me for making me arm. Wrestling. Humiliating was the closest. So go. Is actually true though that that's what was determined in. The McCain question is that since he was born on a military base. He was still in that Russell four of us. We all go flying up. All right here comes the question from Joe about college education. He wants to know for those of us who are majoring in a useless liberal arts major with the intent of entering the academy. What do you believe is the best mode by which we can improve it? Unfortunately, I know too much about this but ever since two thousand and eighty people who've been talking about the liberal arts collapsing for a long time but ever since two thousand eight the liberal arts have collapsed, and there are very few jobs in the liberal arts. And if you do get one of them, the thing that really has to be changed as you have to understand what it is to teach the liberal arts to teach the liberal arts means to teach first of all the history of the liberal arts, for instance, literature the history of literature, but also to teach what the people who were speaking at the time, we're trying to say in their moment. It's not about telling them how they can be eradicated by me overlaying my philosophy on top of them. It is what Plato was trying to communicate what Shakespeare was trying to communicate. These are. Hard things to study and really worth knowing because they make you wiser and they were involved in your culture. I didn't go to an actual university. I went to junior, college and matron and country music. Dropped out. That's true. I told this story about you. Yeah. But but with my limited amount of education that I have I know that the word liberal is associated with liberty. And that therefore the liberal arts could be translated literally to mean the freedom arts and that the entire purpose of a liberal education. As we understand it in in later days in the west was so that you could learn the art of freedom, you that you were studying the architecture of the west that the philosophical and and liturgical and literary history of the west. So that you would understand the art of being rude understand and earn your freedom that we? Fancy degrees. That is actually what the liberal arts or that is the entire purpose. Absolutely seemed for you know, people don't even know this. And this is why the debate actually matters. I think a lot of conservatives want in order kind of reactionary way, we wanna say get rid of it. I we hate it all the liberal arts, really really matter. A free society is not going to remain free for even five seconds. If liberal education sing dissolves, and the the problem is already dissolved. With his name over may. Count on one hand the number of programs in the liberal arts that are still actually carrying on that a in my new book, not pitch it. But the right side of history available right now, but not really vailable until my stews day. It is kind of a layman's read on western philosophy there people who've spent generation studying this this way, the hell better than I do, and my very basic gloss, which you guys have read. It's and it is. And I think it's quite good. But it's obviously not to the level of expertise is people have spent their entire like, your son Spence's entirely studying this stuff does this stuff better than I do, you know, that it has been completely lost to the extent that if I even speak about this. There is a I spoke at university of Michigan last night. The history department has not read my books not out yet. They held a panel called dilettantes in history. The power of the white men. If you. All you got from it is it's white people. Then you don't know what the hell you're talking about and the classics are, I think heavily attendant? What professors? I think they ended up with about thirty five people we had by contrast at thousand people showed up to RS an overflow room with another one hundred six thousand people on the waiting list, while university of Michigan's there's some appetite for this stuff, but the which shows how badly the universities of Bochum because there is appetite for for all of this stuff. But you know, quick note that this person is asking they're already in the liberal arts and they intend on teaching. So you're actually doing career path that make sense I've ripped on a liberal arts as a career path if you don't actually intend on going into the liberal arts because it seems to me that, you know, this whole college scandal a tapping right now, these Uber rich parents who are paying for their kids to get into places like Yale there two questions that deserve to be answered one is why would Uber rich people pay for their kids to get into gale. When you could just give your kid the five hundred thousand dollars and just set them up for for life in trust fund or something. That's question number one. And number two. If these kids are really unqualified if they're getting into gale with twelve hundred SAT's shouldn't they fail out in the first year, it shouldn't they have in the hard to get in. But it's very easy to stay. Well, and this. This is the point that I make about about colleges what the public thinks college are for is not actual college. Therefore, so we all think that it's for developing a skill set and being educated and learning about western civilization bull. That is not what colleges are four houses are for two things in reality. Unless you are studying in the in the maths or the scientists in which hits you're actually learning something it's not about skill set. It what it is about is two things credentialing and social group. That's it. That's the only thing colleges for. That's why all these thing that Michael got out of college. It was it was. Social group for Michael created his own human social. Back and take response. What new haven's very poor. But this is why these rich parents will pay because they want the credential for their kid and the credential matters because it's the premature that you're a member of the elite, and they want their kids to be members of this air sets social fabrics. They can go to the alumni dinners, and they can no friends in very powerful positions. And I know this because when I went to a very high falutin universe way to Harvard Law School the very first day. I was at Harvard Law School at orientation Elena Kagan who was the dean of law school. Now. She's supreme court Justice. She gets up in front of a class of five hundred of us. And the first thing she says is, you know, you're worried it's going to be a paper. Chase me super competitive. You're going to have to really compete for your slot. You're going to have to work really hard. Let me tell you already one. You're in the competition is over you'll all have jobs, you'll be she said, you'll be running the world that people in this room will be running the world. But you're right. Let your left. These are the people who are going to be running the world. I remember thinking myself really why why like because we did well on our L sats. That's why we should run the world Harrison. The question was how to improve this. And I mean, I think you're absolutely right agree with everything you're saying, but it doesn't have to be that way. I mean the way so let me give you my quick solution on how to improve all of this one employers need to stop using universities for credentialing, and they need to start taking the prince's directly out of high school to learn how to do a business because most people in America learn to do their job by actually doing their job. Not by going to some program that taught them philosophy philosophy majors. Make a lot of money because their lawyers, right? That's that's why philosophy majors make a lot of money because their accountants and their lawyers and they're in marketing, and how many of them are philosophy professors three, right? So when people say philosophy major teaches you something it may teach you something, but it's not worth two hundred thousand dollars of something that agree is worth two hundred thousand dollars because it's a credential. But what you learned that your philosophy courses? A little push back into this a little bit. I was a terrible student. I was an awful student, and I really got my education after I left school. When I read all the books that I bought in school. But while I was in school. I did kind of listen to kind of filtered in and I remember walking down the street, and this will sound like the dopey est thing on earth. But I remember walking to the campus of the university of California at Berkeley and suddenly thinking, wait a minute. I get it. I came grease. Yeah. Then came room, then came your then came us and each one of those things built on the other and reflected on the other. And actually was changed by the fact that the other existed, and when I saw that that changed everything for me. And that's that today visibly now. I completely disagree. When you attended the university of Berkeley in the late eighteen hundreds. Liberal arts degree was was an elite thing to accomplish and inexpensive thing comparatively. You've got to accomplish an valuable thing that requires rigor in order to accommodate you can't you can't connect that experience. I think one of the two major we wouldn't is now one of the major problems at the modern academia is that people send their children there, and they send their children there because they hear things like oh American campuses are liberal, and they kind of fondly hearken back to twenty five years ago when they were in. They're like, yes, I remember I had that one professor who were of beanie and that one professor who talking black sand, even though they were white. And you know, what would it was a one of the early black studies professor, and we all knew that they were kind of a dope. But they did expose us to some ideas. We had never thought my kid can make it because I made it what they fundamentally don't understand. That is not what the university today is. Now, if you wanna know how to fix academia, you don't fix it from the. Side, you fix it. With the government. I say that as a conservative who believes that the government isn't the solution to anything, but the government created our current university fiasco, and they created it when they basically decided that they would fund schools on the basis of square footage. How many square footage of your buildings would determine how much money you actually, receive from the federal government, and they started this this enormous push at the university level to grow the physical footprint of universities to grow the structural footprint at universities and to fill those big buildings with as many people as possible. And that's when it became the case. Yes, that this is a credential no longer has value because it's no longer that the elite go to college up everyone goes to college college is high school with a quarter million dollar price tax. This is your own want. But why should the government fix the government fixes it by stopping paying over? I'm a believer that the government should get completely out of the business of college. If you want to go and study the classics at university, then go out and get a second job. And he's not my job to to do the IRA on with him, by the way, civic education should not be taking place at the college level. You should be knowing a lot of the stuff that you're supposed to know before you're eighteen years old gender. Overlooking though, the thing that we're we're looking here is the point that Elena Kagan made to you which is true, which is that the this isn't true in the world of business. But this is true in the world, at least of government, the people who run the government went to Yale Harvard, Princeton, they all went to at least an expensive private school. Whatever it is. A Alexandria Casio Cortez is the evidence that we need to rethink and rehabilitate the liberal arts because stem, broadly speaking, at least engineering is a skill. It's a job at trains you for a job the liberal arts. Don't do that they train you to think about the world to understand your own civilization. If you don't understand your past you won't understand your future. And the the idea that we now have someone in the government like AO see who was scolding Tim Sloan of Wells Fargo a man who's IQ is seven times. What is I'm gonna push back. Again, you went to jail for how long well, you know. It depends on the you know, I went for forty you went for four years. Helen, did you go to public school? Before that thirteen years for thirteen years. So it doesn't make sense to me if the government's going to pay for education, and that education is supposed to result in you know, in a finger to and being prepared for the real world. How is it possible that they should be able to accomplish this in or year? You're would they have been unable to accomplish anything of the sort in your your point is so right? The I mean the way to fix it. Because I am actually a great defender of liberal arts education over the trade schools it like it really matters for some people the the problem with democratic Galateri in society is we've decided if one person goes to a four year private college everybody has to go to a four year. And if everybody's going to do it, then the government has to pay for it. And then everyone is going to get in standards are going to be lowered a bunch of fake academic disciplines are going to be created EV it's just utterly leveling. It horns people who have two hundred fifty thousand dollars worth of debt, it harms taxpayers arms government, it harms the survey above three yet. Parents and students have been lied to. They were told that when the when they sent their to college a couple of things we're going to happen one that running potential would inevitably rise. No matter what they did in college. And to there were going to exit with the skill set. And both of those things are are essentially false. Yup. The the earning potential may rise. But only as a as an adjunct of sorte, meaning that employers look at a person who wants he'll differently than a person who entered yuko. That's just the way that works. Even if the person who went to Juku ends up being much better business person than the person who went to Yale. I mean, this is this is a point that. I mean, I I made this point on my show. I told the story that that probably shouldn't have told about a human who will remain on name cursing, you out for not having gone to college. Because this is what they went after all this person did go to Harvard, and and that was deeply deeply important because it was credentialing they knew that in the elite strata of American society that credential matters. But the reason originally the criminal matter was not for the sorting is because the assumption was not only that you were smarter. If you went to this university that you learned more and better things at these top level, universities that is no longer true. The only thing that Ivy leagues provide is the credential on the wall unless you are learning an actual thing. But if they actual things, and here's the thing once once it got watered down, and you weren't wearing actual things anymore. And it was just the credential. This is how you get to the point where colleges now have an active interest in not exposing people to uncomfortable ideas. Because if you go there just for the credential and just to build the social fabric. The last thing you want is somebody spoiling the party with things like tough grades. Where ideas you've never heard. Harvey Mansfield was forced not to give an actual grades to his own students at Harpo inflation with that as an inherent at. What point does the fact that you can go on the internet and learn so much of this stuff and get even classes and lectures from people who actually know things will get the great courses DVD's overseas, CDs, and listen to those at what point does that kind of overcome the brandy what being full of crap it's really about the employers. His the fact is that if there were not a market interest in you spending two hundred thousand dollars to for a four year education, which you learned nothing. Okay. Because if you're a policy major, I'm apologize agent. You didn't learn anything for aid and learn how to write doesn't learn. How thank you learned nothing. Okay. If he and learning to create country rifts on the piano. Legitimately you'd probably learn more Juku studying country music than I did studying political science at UCLA, if if employers were instead to look like, they're honestly you want to know the actual solution to this real credentialing. Okay. What this would be is you take the SAT wouldn't go to college. The SAT energy pie would Termine where he were published. You just right there, you go straight to trade school on the basis because that's what they're doing. Okay. That is exactly how you well. Well, you've identified the problem, which is there is this idea that we all have now, which is that four year liberal arts. College is supposed to give you a skill. That isn't you're not supposed to get a skill from the liberal arts. You are explicitly not supposed to have any skill. You were supposed to study history. Math. You have seen the art of freedom. That's right. Yeah. That's right. I want to get to another question, but I'll close out with this. I have a theory and it's the five percent. Erie alcoholics anonymous has a success rate of approximately five percent of the. If you're an alcoholic, and you go through the program at AAA five percent of you will get clean. Hey. The the interesting aspect of that is that if you don't go throughout the Hollick synonymous you also have a five percent chance of getting sober. So statistically a drunk in alcoholics anonymous as the exact same chance of getting sober as drunk outside of alcoholics anonymous, and you could look at that and say we'll see how it's anonymous is a sham. I don't put a pen right there. My theory is that this same thing will apply across the board. Dave Ramsey's a pal of a kind of a hero in in broadcasting and somebody that I personally look up to an awful lot for the business that he's built. I have some disagreements with Dave Ramsey's. Financial philosophy. I think it has a great sort of. Understanding of human nature. But I think and I think, but I think that it also has a few problems with I suspect that something like five percent of people who adhere to the Dave Ramsey philosophy actually manage to save up a successful nest egg for retirement, and I suspect that also five percent of people who don't listen to Dave Ramsey will manage to save up a successful nest egg for retirement, I think college and a liberal arts degree, your son Spencer's at grand example, Spencer nosy thing or two about the liberal arts for his trouble. I suspect that five percent of people who go through the university system will walk out knowing a thing or two about the liberal arts. I suspect five percent of people who don't go through the system, we'll know finger to about the liberal arts at gives you as an example, you're kind of a hybrid you went through the system. Learn nothing about the liberal arts got out. On stack. This is my five percent theory. Doesn't mean that a liberal education is bad. It doesn't mean that. Dave Ramsey's financial freedom universe is wrong. It doesn't mean that alcoholics anonymous is useful. It means that some small part of the population. Yep. Is going to find the answers and four that small part of the population the answers that are provided in the form of alcoholics anonymous in the form of Dave Ramsey in the form of a liberal arts education, a university education become the mechanism by which they they affect that betterment. And similarly, they might find some other path they might find a book by some other financial theorist other than Dave Ramsey program. Other than alcoholics anonymous, they might read the books that they didn't read in college. The only thing the only part of this. I disagree with because I basically agree with that. But the only part of this I disagree with in the system that teaches civics history. Math science in the lower grades not in the. College. You have a better society. And that has actually brought if what you're saying is that we ought to have those things then I think we all agree. I saying we don't. But we well, I think that is right. We are saying that we don't. But we are saying that. There's no reason that we should give up on that the win. The guy says when the guy asked the question, how do I improve this? That is what we should be this is where we disagree. My solution is fire. I think he saw the university of public fire. I don't think I think that is so bad in so rampant and so big. Yeah. A trillion dollars alone today. I don't think that you can through 'incrementalist fixed. Universities those left the left took it over by incremental was him. I don't know why we can't take it back because we don't we don't operate the way that. Maybe a mistake acid on think. That's true. I don't think the left ticket buying -cremento as I think there was a massive revolution in the nineteen sixties hundred everything on its head. Yep. Wait for the people to die. But they, but they did know, but they did move into the university's on purpose with with perp Godman at Yale was written in the fifty s Buckley's first. Yeah, that's right. And there's no reason we can't do that. Except that we won't. I mean, you're right that we don't. But I think there should be like fifteen colleges in the country. That's this is exactly the thing. This is very fewer people should go to college. The government shouldn't pay for it. The people who should not go to college should will thrive. Doing something else. They won't be burdened kids kids unless you wanna be a doctor or a lawyer or a rocket fizz, a rocket science congresswoman from New York fee like me. I mean, all you really need to know about colleges is that Michael Knowles got into Yale and his mommy and daddy did not pay them five. Talks for it. If they'd actually. Why not in on on a water polo? Superimpose and it was real weird. The percentage of to the pool riding a horse. This is the guy that actually posted a picture on Instagram from the university of Michigan while tagging his location at the university of Michigan and said where am I? Degree. There were transvestites now in sounding like the media matters. All righty. So speaking of Knowles illegitimate children that probably created at Yale. Ryan says he's been seeing some interesting Twitter parenting advice floating out there. Ryan don't follow the Twitter parenting advice. It says quote never punish were praise. Your children. What are your thoughts? That's the stupidest thing. So those children. Yeah. No. That's absolutely. All right. They did turn my mic is turned out. Great. Well, firstly you've met my wife. You know, you understand why Mike gets turned out. Well, but I mean, no, that's that of course. Absurd. What you shouldn't do is you shouldn't praise your kids for nothing, and you shouldn't punish them for nothing. You know, there should be you have a moral system. And when when you say something is going to is going to hold. This is the most important thing you can be as a as a parent is consistent when you say something is not going to be done. It's not going to be done. When you say there's going to be a consequence that consequences. Gotta be there. It doesn't have to be fire and sword it's just has to be some kind of limitation away. Yes. Yes. The biggest threat to contain very good. The the the biggest threat to consistency as appearance is not your kid. It's you that's why because it sucks to be a consistent. It's so terrible right show to ruin you have to punish your kids off the worst thing in the world when you when you threaten like we're not going to act, and you know, that everybody wants to do act in five minutes when the kid apologizes, you're still gonna wanna do extra. You don't wanna go back on it? And then you can't it's just awful ring. Wondering ream you want to remain goodness on that piece of advice. It's your responsibility. That's your everything's you're responsive in if parents really understood that from education defeating their kids now, then it would solve ninety eight percents of the problems in the United States. It's hard. It's hard to be it's hard. I mean, it's. You're saying the parents have to be good and responsible and you're against abortion. Understand why you're forcing children to live in world with sub optimal parent foreign portion but only after birth. This is so funny I'd lesson. So last night or speaking university of Michigan and a guy got up, and he was asking me about the food stamps program. Now, there's yet to be an trial twit nutrition who specifically asking about school lunches, and the fact that they're really not nutritious. And the fact is that Michelle Obama tried to make the mortgage Tristesse the kids didn't need it. They throw it out and all the rest and he asks what's your solution to that? And I said abolish school lunches in have parents feed their own damn kids because I am a parent. You know, my number one priority is the only priority. The matters feeding my child, and if you can't feed your trials, you shouldn't have that child to be removed from your home. Now, the the notion that is the government like you legitimately the one thing you have to do today's feed your kin end of story, and we have a society where it's like, no, you're not if I don't feel like feeding my kid today. We'll just make sure that the government feeds my cat or if I don't feel like punish Mike kid. Once you're Mike. He'll get educated at school. If and you're seeing it parents advocating duties to to it's not just public schools parents religious, parents abdicating religious education too religious schools. Okay. I'll send my kid there. That's where the learn everything they need to know about religion or my kids bad disciplined problem Ellen show. Anything at home? That's their teachers job. You're not have the experience the experience. I I have I have a visceral memory of this. I can call it up in my skin is bringing that first baby home, and realizing Ono I have to do this. This is my responsibility. This kid lives were dies on me. I've gotta make a living. I've gotta keep rains. There. Cannot be water on my kid is going to be a roof over that kids that to me is the moment you grow up. That's. First. And last thought Michael Knowles. I do I do actually have a thought on parenting, which is this for all the people that have ever been told that Michael Knowles is their father. There's a lot of cats with that name. So if you're enjoying this conversation what's wrong with you? If you think I'd like to be in a smoke filled over overly hot studio with these guys as they do this live. We'll go on over to daily wire dot com slash subscribe, become an annual subscriber. That's where you give us ninety nine bucks. 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Just doesn't have enough flavor. That's better. That's what gives you that special thing. So it is International Women's Day just past Friday. And I actually just felt like it wouldn't be very Christian or whatever been as of not at all. Talked briefly about the absurdity that is international women's to celebrate a Caitlyn Jenner. All those track and field stores and ice house has condescending do you know, nobody knows this one day. Three percent of the population. You know, one three hundred sixty day. It's not International Women's Day destroyed the twentieth century on God, very few people. The international women's Dan March. In. What was it one thousand nine hundred nineteen seventeen started the Russian revolution? And Leon Trotsky. No, less a communist, Russky, credited International Women's Day, which had been invented in one thousand nine hundred nine in New York by the socialist party it then spread in nineteen ten. There were a couple of celebrations it eight later fast forward in Russia. They had an International Women's Day demonstration Trotsky credited with launching the revolution. Which is why Lennon made it a national holiday in the Soviet Union. And not only that once you give them the vote, they stopped letting us have alcohol. I haven't this is one of the things there's only one thing that matters about International Women's Day, captain marvel came out. Finally, we haven't female superhero. Now, the other one from wonder woman, they're the ones actually seventies guys had like posters up on this. Not like not like any of the not like Electra one saw that wasn't movie, by the way, that's. That's true equality. If if women can make superhero movies that bomb at the box office, then they are equal to. Yeah. I International Women's Day is always it's always shocking to me that unintentional Women's Day. We're supposed to worry about how difficult women have it in the free society in the history of humanity for women where they constitute the majority of voters, the majority of people who get college degrees and a higher earning cohort when they first get out of college before they start having kids and taking time off from the workforce. This is the real trouble. Like, we can't look across the sea. Where women are forced into job when we're there were they are forced into abortion and China or whether they were there their victims with genital genital mutilation. Yeah. Yeah. We can't talk about any of those things on International Women's Day. You know, like actually helping women who are suffering interactive pretend that true suffering is that it took twenty one marvel movie not very mediocre and in to finally be cast in a marvel movie with a female lead superhero now Scarlett Johansson. What what would it look like if we celebrated man I want I want to celebrate the things that men discovered? Like, you get every everything I want us to do things we invented like every every day. Okay. Tucker carlson. Media. You could argue that the greatest thing that meant in addition to discovering the entire everything. Uranium. That one of the greatest achievements of men, particularly in the west and in particularly in this country is that men afforded to women the right to vote actual, which is the largest peaceful transfer voluntary transfer of power probably in all of human history in which the group of people men who had all political power one hundred percent of it chose to give all of the political power, not half of it all of it because it an electoral democracy democracy. Whoever has the majority of the votes has the political power. And by the way, so women are or over fifty percent of the population. But the voter gap gives women a fifteen point advantage women vote at a significant men and men voluntarily gave that power to women because they recognized in the Sorkin Justice. They thought that there is a better way. They as you often say they built on the foundations of previous generations and move the world toward a freer and for your place, and they elected to give women this, nor the fact that. This nor the fact that for a long time, and continually men are monks all of this is true. And when we say men, invented everything, of course, the amount automatic counterargument is right because women were in the workforce has men didn't want them in the workforce. There's truth to that too. But it is also true. That men did a lot of good things. Like, I remember stand. Why we can't just recognize that both sexes have given enormous amount. Well, civilization or two or the automatic denigration of women who have chosen be mothers, which. The whole problem. That's the whole problem. The whole problem is that feminism has imposed a masculine values on everybody. So so that women are actually less under feminism than they were when I said, oh, women the other half the of the civilization who've given birth to every single human being made every home made every raider. I mean, the the idea that it was somehow more important to to be build a civilization that we built to protect women and to be the woman that was being built to protect is insane. It is insane to sell two women that the only way that they can succeed is to be essentially man is cut short. What it is to be a willing the nature. This though that this is something that that I said after the death of George H W Bush that it's harder to be a good man than it is to be a great man that being a great man is about fame and being in a in a moment where are needed and watching a little you are and you step forward and you pick up the flag during the paintings and stuff. It's a lot harder to be good person. Yeah. Who is actually making the gym vices? The world work now when the truth is that for the vast majority of human history. It was men were the people who are in the position to be the great men women were not in the position to be the cornhole. Great women. It was women who made the world work, of course. Because women make every homework they make every civilization our now and ignoring that sweet nor the historic like, the one of the problems. I have a feminism is that it actually ignores the contributions that women maids westerns history. It's like, oh, yeah. You guys like to actually agree with the statement that you were making half ac-? She Asli that men created everything. Like, yeah. You guys predate everything all the good all the bad the entire civilization after just give us all the power. And we'll change everything. It's like, no you guys. That the joke. Once you impose male values on everybody men win. You know, once you do that we we should point out too though in the realm of political power, perhaps the most famous politicians political leaders ever were women. Elizabeth I Queen Victoria, Catherine in Russia. I mean, they're they actually yet women did have a fair share of governance, and in many cases, glorious governance that just that is ignored. I guess by a feminist ideology. Also, sometimes missed by us, and it probably shouldn't be that women are smarter than feminists swimming in this country. Have fifty three percent of the population is women as you said, they have a fifteen point spread in terms of the electoral vote, which means they have if they chose to Marshall it as a monolithic way one hundred percent of political power often think it's funny when people say if if we had if we were truly an equitable society, then women would have fifty three percent of representatives in congress and men would have forty seven. And I always say, you don't actually know how it went. Twirl the mom if all women voted for women. It wouldn't be that fifty three percent of congress would be women all of congress would be women would win every single race. Right. But fortunately, women are smarter than feminists and women aren't just trying to create this false equality in in the world women are using their votes. They use them more than men do and they don't just use them in these sort of brainless identity politics, feminist ways, they use them to elect people who they think are going to do a good job and that results in a world that again have there been historic injustices. Of course, there have been if you go back and say, I mean up in the early in the early days of the twentieth century women couldn't vote and I would say, yes. And if we are in the early days of the twentieth century that would be a compelling argument for why things are wrong. But of course, as time has gone by the we've done a fairly good job of extending the benefits of of our free society to. Previously underrepresented people. And fortunately on top of that women have started that in a fairly good way. And haven't haven't embraced this? Now, it's our turn. We're gonna kick all them into the curb. I mean, liberal feminist women have that point of view, but the majority of women who vote it's a it's a bigger point. Also about activists versus people like the when you take feminists versus women gay activists versus gay people black activist versus black people it really they really get their the people they represent or pretend to represent a terrible name because these activists are the worst of of the group almost always and the majority of the people are often times, incredibly smart, incredibly commonsensical. I think that's true of all people have ties to other members of the civilization. Activists are are their own little bubble. That's right means that they're only associated with members of the bubble in everybody else's the outgrowth for them to fight going back to what you said, by the way about men giving women power, which is also true Protestants giving Catholics power, and you know, and Christians giving a people. Of other religions power if a little bit of gratitude were injected into the civilization. I can't see how that would be a bad thing. I can't see how the idea should be wear here now. And you're the old people knew should get out. I kiss why. It's not thank you very much for letting us in great ideas that you came up with and I hope we can participate in our own great ideas. I don't understand why that's not a better idea. No better approach. The world would be a much better place with some gratitude. Which is I if you're if you're a man in the world, you should be grateful for good women everyday not just on one timeliness holiday every year. And if you're a good woman, you should be grateful for all the stuff. Machine for captain marvel you made him watch it Orval. I'll I'll save you guys. If you don't wanna go. I mean, you know, I'll be very honest. I hate to Sean I despise genre. I liked dark Knight and Logan. Those are the two superhero movies. I like, so I'm I'm putting that out at least he picked to good ones too. Good west. I've seen most of these movies, probably at least half of them. This movie was subpar, even by the Rhys standards. The reason is that it was extraordinarily boring. It had no stakes whatsoever female super. Because it had this feminist ideology injected into it, the problem with the feminists superhero is she can't do anything wrong. She's just perfect. It's like superman without the kryptonite issue. Starts out awesome. She ends awesome. So there's never any stakes whatsoever. End the movie it self had no story. I mean, there was no storyline was new narrative whatsoever. It was so tedious. It was so boring by the John Ruth standards. It was only like thirty percent worse than most of these formulaic movies. But it was thirty percent worse. And they say that only male critics are knocking the movie that is not true, major female critics are knocking the movie, it's just bad. And it tells you a lot about our society that rotten tomatoes is completely redoing their voting system there. Purging negative comments from the board to protect an ideology, even through a terrible. My own defense. I would like to say that I calculated how much longer Knowles has to live and how much longer I live in if I'd gone to see it. It would have been relatively like spending three months in the movie theater yet. Point about the about the rotten tomatoes. Things said amazing that the left will shift the the identification required to sound off on captain marvel, but they're against boating. I I haven't seen captain marvel yet I do plan on seeing it at some point. I'll point out that wonder woman was actually the movie of a really good one wonder woman was good because it was not self consciously feminist, meaning the they sort of just assume that the characteristics minist- now, and then gal Gadot actually played a woman now with, you know, actual womanly qualities. But this is this is my grip on the did you see the movie atomic lawn with with Shirley's thrown? So basically she plays JAMES BOND, but it's like to just play JAMES BOND. They make her quasi lesbian and all of the stuff, and it it's legitimately at which is you know, they're it. But what is true is that you could have substituted a male for her? Character would not have changed one line of dialogue for the entire film. If that's true Britain, a bad movie, really the characters are specific the best. This is my problem with captain marvel in it's it's not a problem with the film. I have not seen the film. It's a problem with the the celebration of captain marvel as an archetype for a strong woman. And it's that. I love Buffy the vampire slayer Buffy is one of the greatest TV things that's ever happened in the history of of television, and people would always be she's a strong powerful woman in a great example, two little girls everywhere. And I thought no into every generation is born a slayer, and she's imbued with supernatural powers, given to her across the centuries to fight the vampires, and it's sort of like the conversation we've had about Black Panther where it's like, you know, the the magic space rock falls down and then Africa got to be Europe. And that's actually kind of a racist premised. Yeah. It's also kind of a sexist permits to me to say women are just as powerful as men if they're given gamma radiation and a secret laser from magic and magic I see Buffy is a great story with with a female lead. And that might be novel and interesting to women, but but but he can fight men because Buffy has supernatural powers, and you captain marvel can fight men because captain marvel has supernatural powers superman can stop bullet. Not because he's a man. It's because he's super. Yes. So I'm not supposed to look to superman and go that's just proof that all men are more powerful than a locomotive. No. It's proof that superman. There is a kernel of an interesting idea in captain marvel I this is not spoilers because I think this was even in some of the previews very early in the movie physically. She's she's not as strong as the men. She can't jump the rope or whatever. And actually, the main problem she has if she gets to emotional and their emotions run away with her, and it's actually making a sort of a comment on sex in the real problem facing her is pride. This is quite interesting. This is something that we all face trying to do people will warned her against. Yes. You can't make that jump or you can't make that. Yup. And she'll do it anyway cry. Yeah. And and there was that little kernel there that really could've made captain marvel pretty good, and they just just overwhelmed it with boring story, tedious slogans ideology, and it was week. It actually could have probably been a pretty good movie. It's kind of it's kind of sad thing that we fight over these stories as if it mattered. I mean, this is the new theory, basically on the materialist left is that everything we. We have that. As human beings is based on stories, kind of the usual Harari idea that nations are restoring money is a fiction human rights were fiction. God is a fiction, and these are just stories that we tell and they create something real because we all agree with them. And therefore it matters. The story stories somehow are much more important than you think. Some somehow, you know, I thought wonder we'll move a good picture too. I really enjoyed it. But women critics intellectuals cried at that movie as if it's somehow change the estate of women, and that's just not true that is not the way stories work, and it's not the effect that stories have I was my take a Black Panther people got really uptight about it. Yeah. My my blowback Black Panther is not that it was a bad movie. I thought it was a fine. Milli. I enjoyed it. Honestly. But you know, I I had some problems with some basic concepts in it, again, the very notion that natural resources are the rationale for the for civilizations growing. Right. Is not a very good one. But with that said, my real problem was of a lead up to. To it as like black people knew United States finally had been empowered by this movie with a with a bunch of black people playing superheroes. It's like if you're finding your meaning in superhero movies to the extent that you feel that your entire that the entire history of race in America has been deeply affected by a superhero movie in two thousand nine hundred nine let me suggest that you enter the real world for a second. And I would say the same thing about eight Jewish superhero. I mean, this this is not race specific. Yeah. But people got so angry at this. How dare you take this away from people? You are just mad. There's a black super. I don't care. There's a black superhero. That's my point point is. I don't care if there's a black superhero. That's fine. Who cares that I think that's exactly right in the fact that people are fighting over the first of all shows they got they don't have enough to do. My favorite thing is when people forecast opposition that isn't there like all looking all these guys are really angry, captain marvel dig you're angry, aren't drilling. No, not not in know, you're pissed that's gonna tell your pessimistic not really not fifty percent of leftist argument. It's like all of those days, it, this is something that you're angry newly no pretty much not Adrian Larson. Insults. Fifty percent of the audience. Yeah. And I'm pissed that marvel insults. The entire audience by acting like they're making history. The fact that there's a female captain marvel doesn't bother me in the fight. And I mostly pissed in marvel things they can get away with this crap where they pretend they killed Spiderman. What kind of nonsense was that? By the way, anyone who cried at the end of the vendors. Anyone who cried at the end of an event your Nydia? Joy, adventurous, Infinity war the minute. They kill Black Panther. If you were crying are so surfing. One of his oh stupid. I actually love. I let them Finnity war. I think it was a fundamental mistake in the by the filmmakers, pick hill Spiderman and blackmails horse of everyone guide. Okay. It is reset maybe they're really going to kill these people. And then they come off two of their billion dollar industry while you guys. You guys are sliding. So I want to go for one more round of questions with our daily wire subscribers they keep the lights on they give us their sweet sweet mammon, and if they've signed up as annual subscribers during this live broadcast, which we still got a little time left to sign up during this broadcast. You could win a flight to L A paid for by Ben Shapiro. He's the only one with anybody around here to sit in on a live taping of this your favorite daily wire show, the daily wire backstage, they leash Krause it's gonna read some questions from some of our fair subscribers aleisha, what do you got for she's already given birth? What did she do? Making a nice little t. I love international. How you you know, if I'm going to be stuck in the kitchen, I figure I'd make myself a hot toddy. You can't drink when you're pregnant. Betty, draper. We do have questions from worse than Scribner's Nicole wants to know, do you think the key to having a successful business is to start it in your garage or might I Lisa add the God kings pool house. Who's definitely the key to us having success. No, I think that the key to having a successful businesses to start wherever you can. And the key to having a successful businesses to understand that not all of your businesses will be successful. Almost everyone who's successful and business has failed at business businesses. Very hard. It's sort of like I've made this show on the show before I hate it. When guys leave the hospital after having their first child and they've got the world's greatest dad ball cap and always take you're not even a mediocre fall. Other for literally hours like there's got to be more that you're going to have to learn than what you have acquired. The same business. You're you're gonna learn an awful lot. When you set about to be in business, you're gonna fail. You're gonna have to get back up. You have to learn from your mistakes where should you do it in your garage? Sure. If you've got an idea that can start your garage, not every idea can some ideas require seed capital that require angel investors. They require larger amounts of capital than can be sort of acquired at those levels. And you're not gonna take twenty million dollars worth of investment capital capital and start something in your garage. Every business is unique every opportunity is unique. I have I have a speech that I give to young typically it's young people move to Hollywood because they want to make it in the in the movies. And they're all everybody who moves out here is looking for the same wisdom. They wanna know how do I make it? And when I moved out I had the same thought like if I could meet Steven Spielberg, he could tell me how to make movies. I thought it was smart guy. He could tell me then I could do it. What I came to realize over time is that if I ever got that meeting with spill Berg. I'd go up to him. And I'd be like, Mr. still very longtime listener percent caller. How do I make a movie and he would say oh making a movie Ceesay? So here's what I do. I I read a book or magazine article that I really respond to and I call it my lawyer, and I say, hey, are the rights available to this? They say, hey, we'll kick it around. We'll dig for it. They call me back a week later that hey, you know, what we tracked down the author the the rights are available. They're gonna cuss about a million dollars. I'm great pick it up. So we write a check for a million dollars to get the rights to the book. And then I said, well, I'm gonna need a screenwriter. So I call up my agents oversee a and they go look for a good screenwriter. We set up a bunch of meetings. I meet with a bunch of guys I hire a guy who had a great hit last year. As one of the biggest hits at the box office. I pay him a million dollars to write a draft the descrip-. He comes back six months later. I read the script in. No, it's not what I was hoping for. So I go to number two on the list, and I pay him a million dollars. He does a page one rewrite of the thing at the end of the year, though, I've got a script, and I'm really happy with so now, I call up my my partners over universal and say, hey, you know that. That I look deal that I've got where you have to guarantee forty five hundred screens for one movie for me every year because I'm Steven Spielberg. And they go yet. And I have I got the movie for you. And they're like, okay, cool. We'll open it up forty five hundred screens. So then I call my business partners over DreamWorks. And I'm like, we're going to need one hundred and eighty million dollars to make this. They say cool, we'll architect half of out of our domestic funds, then we'll go to a Bank and Indian put the rest together. And before you know, it three years later, I'm on set with two hundred and fifty employees, and I'm making a movie, that's awesome. Stevens Gobert, how do I make and he'd go? Oh, how do you make a movie on the hill? What? Right. So I always give a speech to young people in Hollywood, and it applies to people in business too. And it's this it's all my accumulated wisdom, and it's about those who do and those who don't do. And what I have observed having lived on this life a fair bit now gotten a few grey hairs met people who've started podcasting my full house and become the biggest podcasters in the country. I have friends who star in these big superhero movies that we talk about. I have friends who've started businesses worth hundreds of millions of dollars. I have friends who still wait tables. I have friends who washed out and move back home. I have friends who found other things like me to do that weren't what they originally anticipated. But they've gone on and have had successes. I've I've I know somebody who's done at all. And what I have discovered is that the difference between those who do and those who don't do is that those who do do and those who don't do great. It don't shoot that is graded by when I give this advice. People are so disappointed because. Because it doesn't satisfy because what you're looking for the thing that would satisfy does not exist. There is only those who do do and those who don't do don't do the Christmas, you usually know those who do long before they have done like I have a pretty good average now of being able to size somebody up and determine will they do it may be a decade before they do. But they're doers. And they're doing and those who do do what does it mean? It means they do whatever they're always doing. They're learning from the things that they've done and trying to do something else. They're not waiting by the phone for an agent to call them. They're not waiting by the phone for somebody to discover them down at the soda shop in cast them. You're the next big thing kit. They're out there making their way. And the other thing that they do is they respond to what God brings into their lives. They basically take the opportunities that come before them. They don't try to will the world into complete conformity. With their vision. Which by the way is a vision that they formed before they done anything and therefore for they knew anything they are willful people by in large. They're strong. Let me say it differently. They're strong willed people, but they have the humility to let God be God and not them and those people do so if you wanna be a successful business person you wanna make it in the movies. You wanna be one who does? That's great advice. Nothing bad. My question would be then what does Michael Knowles do will do by not doing? Speaking of Michael, this comes from subscriber named Michael let's hope that his last name is not an old or you've been really busy up there with your phone been tweeting way questions he wants to know how can the left and the right converse? When they can't even agree on facts. I actually think it's a language problem. The problem is the only way that you can converse with anybody is if you speak the same language, right? There is an objective reality outside of two people. In your using words, and symbols and always things outside here to make whatever's going on in your head accessible to whatever's going on in somebody else's hit. And with the left. Does is it constantly is perverting language. It's always undermining light, which it's inverting language. Sometimes to mean, the opposite of what it actually means. They do this famously with Justice right Justice is no social Justice means the opposite of Justice political correctness opposite of correctness. Right. So you have to do is be so precise about language when we were at Michigan yesterday. I came out. To talk to some of the protesters, and they had a sign said trans women are women. And I said, okay, I want I I'm not trying to set you up. You I want you to explain your point of view. We're talking about you use this phrase trans women, which is very ambiguous. We're talking about somebody born a man has all the male genitals as the male chromosomes had a short haircut when he was a kid now, he identifies as a woman should then as I said the word that I am not how dare you. I will not speak to you. If you use that pronoun, heat to refer to her which used to be him, and this person, I was just asking please give a million people. We'll see what you have to say, give your point of view. He walked away because he he refused to converse. You can't make somebody come to the table and converse with you the best way that you can try to make yourself understandable mic someone else's views. Understandable is to use really really clear language. But if they're unwilling to talk, you're not gonna make. Do it. I'm offended use of them. In. What do you think he talked to a lot of people that disagree with you? I mean, I think the only way to have a conversation we need to things one a common understanding that a fact is a fact the facts exist, and to you need to have a common understanding of the rules of the conversation because otherwise you end up falling apart because what you'll do is. You'll start a conversation about facts, somebody gets emotional, and then all of a sudden you're into character attacks, and that's not a conversation anymore. It basically a conversation is sort of like, you're building a tower out of blocks with somebody. And if you put down to block and the person mmediately takes that block away the tower doesn't get Bill. There's no second level to the conversation. The best conversations are the ones that are happening. Once you get three or four levels up in the conversation, but you actually have to build the foundations together. So one of the mistakes. I see people make is they try to build on the third floor of the of the building when the first two floors don't exist. So there's no common agreement as to the rules of the conversation. What are the what are the limits of the conversation are which issue are we talking about is it insulting for me to use phraseology with you? As you said, if you don't agree on the on the fundamental framework of is the building one gay square, or is it going to be an octagon, then you and you mmediately start arguing about what sort of minaret to put it out the building. There's there's no conversation to be had aleisha. All right. This is a pretty good question. One that I've wondered myself this comes from a subscriber named Mike which don't forget that. If you subscribe right now during this barred cast, you too could be stuck here with me so Hobie sign up for that Alicia. How do I unsubscribe? I have no idea I've been trying to check out. Check out anytime you like. He makes us. Hey, guys. Just the political right run the risk of giving eo see too much exposure. And thus giving her more credibility. It seems Democrats did this with Trump in two thousand sixteen. No, no, yes. Yes. In the sense that she's prominent because we give her attention important. That's important. I think that's total crap. I'm gonna stop you right there. That is garbage. And it is crap. It's no it is not a reason she has promised really really think we can. You don't think we contribute to it? No. I think that the left so what the left day is. They put her on the cover of every magazine, they elevated to national prominence they feature her at every conference. And then they say, oh, she pisses you off doesn't shake, right? She really annoys. She's inter inter like, no. I think ride users bad. It's exactly we're talking about before in. No, no, she really annoys. We'll show you three times as much of her until you're like, no, I think it's a bad idea. Here's why thing it's about idea. Oh, you're obsessed with virtue because I didn't put her on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. And if I'd never talked about her, you know, what she would be on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. I'm so tired of this. And by the way, I don't even agree with it about from. I don't think that if people had ignored a Trump from put of just going away. I think that such wishful thinking that you're in control the universe that you're not in control of Donald Trump was never going away. He was one of the most famous people in the United States people knew who he was people thought it was hilarious people wanted to hear what he had to say. And you know, what every other candidate in the race tried to do with Donald Trump, ignore him. That's what they did. I mean, go back to the primaries Republicans, ignore Donald Trump. And you know, what happened? He won the nomination. Really, we're talking I was talking to the Cruz campaign and the Rubio campaign, I was like you can't ignore him. Stop ignoring you're attacking each other. And you think that he's just gonna go. Do you not you don't think a billion two billion dollars worth of free media helped him out? I think he was going to get that regardless. And I think that the media that was providing him that coverage were Plymouth where the left-wingers Android winners. Okay. Fox and friends Bilton the guy was going to get media coverage. She's a celebrity celebrities. Get media coverage has star power. She's a celebrity. You wanna see how this works? Let's all pay attention to AB claw, which are for a week. And see if she suddenly immediately throw a desktop. That's the reason why I I mean, I give her a lot of coverage even things that aren't on the cover of Rolling Stone. I play her all the time. The reason I don't think it's a bad thing to give her a lot of coverage is because AFC takes left distort uments to their logical conclusion and their wacky crazy conclusions than knocked down every building in a much more honest than Bernie, totally honest. I love you. Important accused she's inherently important you have to cover and she is the avatar of socialism yeses attractive? She self-confidence she's ignorant destructive. And that is accepting central with socialism is socialism looks beautiful. You know, she's very attractive. It says I'm going to solve all these problems for you. And she says that it knows nothing about human nature or economics. And ultimately destroys everything it touches. She is socialist. She said the great thing this week, which is so honest, which is that that if automation comes none of you will have jobs, and that'll be great. But the able to learn languages in art music, Bill whittle, very famously talked about this almost a decade ago. Because this is a common socialist communist argument with that one day, you won't have to work so hard, and then you'll be able to learn all these language you'll be able to do all this art of able to play the violin. And Bill said yet that happened though. It was called the iphone capitalism gave it to us. It gave us one hundred percent of all the accumulated knowledge of man that we carry around in our pocket, you wanna learn a language. There's an app you wanna? To learn music. There's an app you want to know about you know, the Peloponnesian war. There's an app and what do you do? Yeah. Look at foreign. Really, I know. By the way, did any of you on your shows this week cover? Mommy, porn from the UK. God. The headline. And then I close, Mike. Actually read the story. These mothers in the United Kingdom saw online pornography for the first time that their that their teenage children were watching and they were moved two of them said that they vomited because it's so disgusting. What actually takes place in online pornography, which is anything the the worst things that the mind can see about. And so they were trying to think what do we do about this that our children are being exposed to these horrible dehumanizing objectify ING images of women in all of these exploited sexual positions. And their idea was let's make mommy approved pornography for our children to watch. So they contact a pornographic production company, and they hire them to make mom approved porn, which is pornography that sort of adheres to the normal customs of sex. There's little foibles and people's bodies aren't perfect. And it doesn't always work the way you think it's going to work, and it requires you know, it requires conversation and looking at each other's. Is in a great story line. And then they premiered the movie and made their children sit with them off with their mothers and watch. Mommy of proof. You know before. I mean, obviously, it's like the worst thing. I've ever heard these women are clearly the shrewdest mothers. And they know anything that. Mommy does or mommy thinks is cool like instantly you'll renew might be able to singlehandedly. There will be no, grandchildren. I have a story about this believe it or not it has nothing with my own mother. So when I was at UCLA studying things that really matter you had to take some some kind of generalized GE courses one. Of course, I had to take a course in Israeli film. So Isreaeli film in particularly it's gotten a lot better now, but in in the nineteen ninety s and two thousand basically your porn. So it was just like everything that was the trashy est of European TV was what the Israelis may this particularly for like nineteen sixty nine hundred seventy s when when Israel was just getting on its feet is a country. So there's a famous as rarely actress whose son was in the class, and they decided that they were going. She was gonna come in interesting to speak about this film, and they were going to show this film, and in this film, it she's completely nude and she is having pretty graphic sex with a couple of different dudes on the screen and her son is in the classroom watching this. So this is already awkward enough. And she and during the Cuban a she she asked her said, how did you feel watching? What was pretty awkward mom, and it will show a couple of weeks later where we're back in the class. And you know, I'm an orthodox Jew. Right. And I'm sitting there most of the cygnus rarely film class. Most of the kids are Jewish. So behind me there. I'm sitting with the sun and a couple of other kids, and they turned to me, and they're like us your orthodox right now. So you've never had sex. Right. Your virgin until marriage. Like, right. That's my religious principle. I've never had sex, and they're like well have you and they start kind of getting mocking, and they go so have you ever seen a naked woman? And I was like well, yeah. I mean, I live in western culture. It's almost impossible not to see a naked woman at one point. And and one of them goes, well, who's last naked woman? You saw the geigo your mom. Correct. He'll save us from ourselves. I don't know if I can I'm currently sadder than betas dog looked in that entire thread. King wants to know. Hey, guys. What are your thoughts on the spread of conservatism among millennials? It's lucrative. And for nine ninety nine. The daily wire subscriber you have just by the way, only a few minutes left to become a subscriber in annual subscription during this broadcast entered into a chance to win a trip out to see us do this again in the future. Here's what I was saying about millennials and conservatism, it it's it's a pretty amazing thing to see of YouTube was interviewed by CARA. Swisher cara. Swisher code Swisher who who is a fixture really in reporting on Silicon Valley, very famously time. Yeah. Very famously interviewed Bill Gates, and Steve Jobs together was a huge thing that she made happen once and in the interview Switzer actually asks for you to to ban the Ben Shapiro show. And what I loved about it. If she says, she says, the Ben Shapiro said date way drug to the far worst things they need to be healthy. So. The Nazis because she says they watch me. And then they watch Jordan Peterson than they watch Nazis. I'm Sean, but the beautiful thing is the come back into tax. You. The cycle of violence. Reason she knows about Ben Shapiro is because she walked in to her living room and her son was watching something on YouTube, and she could hear the violent hate filled bigoted rhetoric coming from his screen and she walked over. And he was watching. Yeah. She says her son, son. Why are you watching this evil evil spirit? And he said, well, no that's been Shapiro. He's super smart. She says this in the interview. Now, it's been super smart. She's I know he's not smart. He's clever, but he's an idiot. And he's immoral and he's terrible. And and and the CEO of YouTube says that you don't want us to you're not suggesting we've band Ben Shapiro, if she says, I would I would. You can't I can't. But then the best thing that she says is anyway, don't worry about my son. He's already lost. I wouldn't have we what an amazing thing that we live in a generation where if you are a millennial American today and you want to rebel against your parents. Yes, what you would go over to the YouTube, and you look for most religious button down here. Worth a few in America. And when he pops up, and he says things like, hey, kids, get a degree get a job, but don't have sex before marriage that you'll be successful. And it's like your parents are like, oh, I can our. We're having sex people start smoking at U of M last night. And there's a tweet last night from a person who's conservative who said they brought a liberal friend. And after the lectures over liberal friends firm to this conservativeness announcement said he's not a racist. And it's like. Right. Of course. But this is this is why I think that there is hope still for the millennials is that at a certain point reality doesn't Trud. I mean, this this fantasy world that we've been living in where you can rip on all of the evils of capitalism, well benefiting from every aspect of capitalism imaginable, where you can talk about how terrible personal responsibility is while living in the free country in the history of the world where you are told your victim every day while being the most privileged people who have ever lived. And where you're told the people who are racist were legitimately not racist. And are in fact anti-racist, and you are told that true racism is not acknowledging that group identity should Trump. Individualized real racism at a certain point reality intrusion. You just go. These people are are joyless theirselves. They're annoying. The mkx mission. It it's it's really is that the left has gotten so irritating and annoying, and this is not a female term, Bossie, male and female Bossie. Yeah. It's just like I don't want. Bernie sanders. Running my life. I don't want ASU running my life. And when I say this, I think there are a lot of millennials like a. Yeah. That's that's basically, right. That's basically, right. And as they get older, and they realized just how Bossie these the leftists have what they have in mind. It's gonna get worse. This is why AFC and Bernie Sanders are wonderful because they're just stripping away. All pretence like yet. No hamburgers. Me over to the car is going to get rid of the airplanes. You're gonna watch all of our favorite entertainment. Brennan's are good bread legs red wines. Red. A little bit of a distinction to between the millennials who came of age with Barack Obama. They all fell in love with them. There's not a red America. There's not a blue America, and the gen Z the the group Akron younger than millennials that we were talking to yesterday Michigan that we see on college campuses, those are different groups. And I think that group has come of age in the age of the woke skulls in the age of censorship in the age of AFC inbred lines and the touting of socialism, the those are very different moments that happened very close to one another. And it gives me a lot of hope for those youth these days of gen Z, and hopefully, maybe the millennials can learn something from them. Yeah. Because if the left is taught us anything that you learn exclusively from the children. The base my friends. My friends our time together to an and you didn't get in your subscription, your annual subscription over a daily, wire dot com slash subscribe. It's too late for you. If you're watching this later on demand, it's too late for you. It was only during the live broadcast. Still subscribe, we could really use the support. And we'll probably do this thing again in the future because we want to give -tunities to meet more of our subscribers take more questions from our subscribers. So for Ben for Andrew for Michael for Lisa. I'm sorry for Ben for Michael for the lovely and for myself and all of us at the day, the wire, thanks for giving us, you know, all of your time and life works this evening audience.

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Daily Wire Backstage: March Madness Edition

The Michael Knowles Show

1:47:13 hr | 1 year ago

Daily Wire Backstage: March Madness Edition

"Hey, everybody. This is Michael your about to listen to our latest episode of daily wire backstage where I joined Ben Shapiro and replaced an end the man who will one day fire me for real daily wire. God king Jeremy boring for a great conversation on politics and culture, and where we answer questions from daily wire subscribers without further ado here is backstage make laugh in three two. Next stage March madness what is March? Writes this crap is that the one with. Looking basketball hoop? Yeah, it's where you pay somebody to say that your kids basketball star. So they can get enough. March madness. That's how I got into junior college. We've really didn't do well in terms of titling these shows, it's a slow news month. My friends, I'm Jeremy boring, God king of the daily wire with a lower case g and a lower case K and tonight, we are going to do are honest best to fill something like ninety minutes. Does that always been our theme song? God knows. Tonight. We're gonna talk politics. We're going to talk culture, we're gonna talk about Tucker Carlson's response to media matters it job, and why that matters to all of us, and we'll also be taking questions from our subscribers over to daily wear dot com slash subscribe. Give us your measly ninety nine bucks a year. We're going to send you a leftist. Here's hundred cold tumbler. And we're going to do something tonight that we have never done before so pay attention. If you sign up and become a daily wire annual subscriber during this actual live broadcast tonight you and a guest will be entered into a raffle to win drum. Roll don't do a free trip to Los Angeles to sit in on a taping of this berry show, some say it all again, if you give us your one hundred dollars, you will not only get access to the greatest conservative content online the bench show. The Michael Knowles show. Whatever it is that drew does for living. You will not only get the left his tears hot or cold tumbler. You will also get to get onto an. Airplane? Fly your rear end to Los Angeles put on some sort of masks. So that you can cut through the cigar smoke and sit in on a taping of the daily wire backstage, we look forward to getting to meet you take one picture with you never talk to you again. All right with me tonight. Ben shapiro. Andrew claybin, Michael Knowles, and the lovely Alicia crass. Why are they always make me take the lovely leash across imagine. If what I said with me tonight, the lovely Ben Shapiro. The key. Nose piercing is Cleveland. Andy leash oppressed. She'll be joining us here. A bit later to bring us your questions. Get over to Delaware dot com slash subscribe. Come a subscriber interfere chance to fly out here and meet us as we taped an episode of this show in the meanwhile, st- can we add to that offer that they should in for me. Yeah. So it'll be like and appear for piercing political analysis is Bob by. Yeah. No. They can't sit in. I think meeting us. The only reason anyone do this. Anyway appeal. Get to fly out and spend a day shadowing daily wire God king, Jeremy born. And then when even our own staff said who's that? We're gonna talk about all kinds of things, and I took her Carlson, we're gonna talk about International Women's Day. Happened over the weekend. The syllabi did seek captain who is a sadist. There. I think we'll talk a little bit about college. And why you shouldn't go since I'm the only one that didn't go. I have a perspective on this. But I I know a lot of people. Tune in for my clunky. Segues not. That's that's why. You know, who is named Bravo company manufacturing Pravo, come. Plot trapped in the constitution, they enshrined to bunch of rights. The first right was making sacred the right of the individual to share their ideas with elementary by the government. The second rate was your ability to protect that first rate with a gun. And that's where Bravo company manufacturing comes in. You know, how strongly I believe in the right of the people to keep and bear arms. If you're law-abiding citizen you should own a weapon Bravo company manufacturing was started in a garage by marine veteran or than two decades ago to build a professional grade product that meets combat standards museum believes the same level of protection should be provided to every single American regardless of whether they a private citizen or a professional BCM, not a sporting arms company. This thing I'm big on guns are not just for hunting. They're not just for self defense. They're also for protection of your family and your country and your principles every components obesity rifle was handed symbols and tested by Americans to a life saving standard PCM works with leading instructors of marksmanship from top levels of America's special ops. Forces from marine fork force reconnaissance to US army special ops forces who can teach the skills necessary to defend yourself, your family or others to learn more. About bravo. Company manufacturing head on over to Bravo company MFG dot com, and there you can discover more about their product special offers upcoming news, Bravo company, empty dot com. Met the founders of the company there's been tackler people in their product is great. If you need more convincing. Check them out at YouTube dot com slash Bravo company. USA that is YouTube dot com slash Bravo company. USA Bravo company manufacturing. Not only a great sponsor of the show. Not only produce a great product. It is a great sponsor of the show. And you're if you're like me, you're particularly grateful for sponsors on a Newsweek like this week when we're watching Tucker Carlson face down, a hit job from media matters. Media matters is the worst organisation merica. Yeah. The they're truly it's an evil organization. It was started for those who don't know the background of media matters. Media matters was started by essentially, Hillary Clinton as a as a way to target so so-called bass right wing conspiracy. This regarding JV. Roy smear artist who the the formerly allegedly cocaine addled smear artists who has spent his entire career just going after his political opponents while mystery his own employees, allegedly and media matters was specifically designed to go after people on the right? It is not a media watchdog media lie to people they say to media watchdog, no immediate watchdog is an organization that follows the entire media and then calls people out on their mistakes. Media matters is the kind of organization where internal memos showed several years back that they were actively talking about hiring private investigators shadow hosts at Fox News to dig up crap in their private lives. So they could use it against them. And take them off the air media matters is now designating obviously with Tucker Carlson, some poor sap who's using their sociology degree to good benefit. I watching one hundred hours. We're listening to one hundred hours of Tucker Carlson on old episodes of about the love sponge from two thousand six to eleven. This was this. And we have been told that what Tucker said on there is deeply important to everyone. They are deeply offended now couple quick notes. And then and the I'm seeing the Android. Couple quick nuts. Media matters valley motivated, we all know this yet when joy Reid of MSNBC was caught in battle blog posts ngelo cross and the head of MFA MFA media matters for America came out and said, no this a right wing smear. Of course, we shouldn't go after any of advertisers. It's all a right wing smear. He himself has now been caught in a bunch of old posts. There will be no consequence to any of that n media matters to play a bunch of protesters to Fox News, not to call for Tucker's ouster, but to call for a complete advertising boycott of the entire network a Fox News because they don't like Fox News because Carlton was on Fox News when he said those things on he's on him. He's he's at all. And here is the here's the kicker to to all of this media matters designed as a hit group is being given all sorts of credibility. Right people. Do not give two craps what? Tucker said I never found shock jock radio. I don't like shock jock radio. A lot of Tucker said was jokes from what? Tucker said wasn't shock jock radio. It's specifically designed for people to go on and say the most offensive things that can possibly say for the listener. And the attempts to go after talk for this old stuff is not in good faith. It's not an attempt to ask him what he meant by it. It's not an attempt to garner. His views is the same deal. They do with every prominent conservative figure it tried to go back find something that they can cast as embarrassing and then call for an apology if you apologize and they step on your neck. And so you did something wrong, obviously, that means advertisers should pull if you don't apologize. They say you, obviously still believe that bad stuff. So your advertisers should pull they go after you to destroy you. It is it is despicable. It is despicable. Because again, it's not about you said something in the here now that was bad. And now we're all reacting to the here. Now, it is you pretending. Outraged about a thing about what your eminently non. It's also funny to me you bring up that. It was on a shock jock radio show. You if you if you take yourself back in time ten years, the heady days of yesteryear. Conservatives weren't the audience for that show. Right. Right. So Tucker Carlson, of course, at the time on MSNBC, those on Bubba the love sponge, something that almost every conservative in America. When they read this story yesterday thought who what because that entire format existed? Basically as a rebuke of the right of basically was the left-wing comedy format and to me, that's actually the the worst aspect of. It is we now live we talked last time we were together at how we live in a graceless age. I think that's really important subject matter. We also live in an era where there is no comedy. Absolutely, no comedy is allowed. You're not allowed to be satirical. Satires dead. You're not allowed to parody parody. Or totally took the looking glass on parody. I'd never like you have never cared for the shock doc format. Maybe. When I was sixteen years old. I might have grinned a few times listening to was the Tom leykis your once or twice, but never a format that really did anything for me. But we live in a better country when someone can go on a shot talk radio show and say outrageously terrible things in everyone Snickers at them. And then we move on with our, you know, there's something I want to add to the media matters picture though. David Brock was the former boyfriend of the guy who ran the pizza. Parlor that was the center of pizza gate when the win the pizza gate. Rumors started that was when the idea of fake news before Trump took it over started to spread and David Brock said said openly, we going to use this to impose on social media. Censors who cut down conservative voices. Barack Obama picked up the thread, Hillary Clinton picked up the three of very very sophisticated organization meant to silence the voices of the opposition. It's not as you say it is not meant to call people out. His is not meant to question ideas. And this thing I mean, look as far as I'm concerned for that day that when Tucker Carlson stood up to these guys and made that incredibly precise opening speech about the outrage mob for that one minute. He was the most important person in America. And the reason I say that is the right to joke around and make stupid jokes and say things that maybe you shouldn't say that's part of free speech. And I don't think it should cost you your job. And by the way, this whole thing he said ten years ago. I don't care if he said it yesterday. I don't care if he was sitting in a bar and somebody heard him have a couple and say something he shouldn't have said that's part of being a human being is part of being a guy, especially guy say stupid things we like to step over there. We're jocular we'd like to step up the one we say them sometimes to make a point sometimes because they strike us as funny in the in the moment, we all do it. And. I will do you think there's a difference between old material new material new material we get to react in real time to the stuff. That's being said. Now, there's something particularly off pudding. Yeah. That digging up old stuff there. You're not outraged over a decade ago. I know you're re. Which we have to distinguish between the joked people make and the things that they are actually saying, of course, I agree it, we should make a distinction between jokes and people's actually's. Of course, I believe that we that we should be able to say terrible jokes. I think that it's it's not only fundamental to freedom. It's like, it's a it's an essential aspect of how men express themselves gets a form of de escalation like racist jokes. That's there are two kinds of racist jokes. They're racist jokes that are meant to demean people of other races and people who make those jokes are racist. Then there's racist jokes which are meant to defuse differences between the races. And they'll show traditionally were made by all kinds of people of good, faith, the way, you you would have comedy troupes where these jokes would be made between the racist towards each other. And that was a part of the de escalation during the civil rights during the civil rights movement. So this brings me to what I actually hate. And the reason that I found a mentally agree that even worse to go back into the past. It's because the rules. Have changed? I disagree with the new rules. But I do recognize that there are new rules. I wanna fight against some push back against them. But we push back within a certain framework. It's particularly disturbing to go back to a time. When like next we're gonna go back to Howard Stern and start finding all kinds of things that were said on the Howard Stern show haven't been right. They go back to friends they say, you can't watch the show friends anymore. Those popular show the nineteen nineties. You're not supposed to watch it anymore because there are episodes in which people are joking about gay marriage or people are making jokes about fat people or people making racial jokes. It's like okay here trying to superimpose modern sensibilities. Yes, back onto people in a in a different era who abided by different. I mean, it's fundamentally dishonest in an extraordinary way. And that is that once you what are they what exactly is the ask? So if you're if you wanna make society better there has to be an ask. So what exactly is the asking? So I say something on my show today. That's wrong. And the ask is, okay. I have to come on the show tomorrow. And I have to correct it. That's a fair ask I say something that is offensive or terrible. It's my job to apologize to the people that I that I was wrong to I'm not gonna say that the people who were offended because that puts the onus on them. If I did something wrong the onus is on me. But what is the ask when somebody said something bad thirteen years ago? And no one took offense is Tucker supposed to apologize to media matters because those people can go after them zones. Now, it's supposed to apologize to people who are offended now by comments that didn't make a dent thirteen years ago. I mean, like here's a situation in which I would say Tucker should apologize. So Tucker, for example, said made some comments about Warren Jeffs who was I guess tried and convicted for facilitating rape for he's the leader. And he was facilitating child marriages between twenty seven year old and sixteen year old and Tucker made some comments about how he thinks that guy should be free. Let's say that Warren Jeffs victims had come forward and said, I was offended by that. And Tucker said listen, I was on the love sponge. I was saying stupid stuff. I apologized that seems to me that would be a fair recompense. But who is Tucker supposed to apologize to the world at large? He's just like his own Mia. Damn thing isn't being. Pound or something that he said, why this what the left does the left gets offended on behalf of other people. You'll notice nine times out of ten is always white liberals who are pretending to be offended on behalf of every allegedly aggrieved minority, and it is it's even further. The context is so important context particular circumstances or important to everything in life. And so when I speak in public, I don't swear I just try not to I I don't like to do it when I'm at the bar. I talk like dirty sailor. And I'm not sorry that I do that. I don't think it's wrong that I'd do that. I think it is. Right. And just I think it was perfectly appropriate to those contexts. So Tucker Carlson is invited on this shock jock show. Now, you could say maybe you shouldn't go into shock jock show. Maybe that's career advice. Maybe the leftists at MSNBC should have told him to stay off of it instead of encouraging him to go on it. But instead he goes on the show. He's he's supposed to go and play Bach in a rock band. Is that what he's going to do is? You're going to go start playing the Brandenburg concerto with the beat. This is interesting. And I think that the feminization of Christianity which led to the feminine ization of American society, generally really contributes to this which is men do compartmentalize. Behaviors women to generally speaking compartmentalise relationships, there's a lot that's interesting to unpack from both of those points from both of those distinct from that distinction. But if you take men who compartmentalize behaviors it doesn't just apply to behaviors within a within a sexual or romantic relationship it. It is a compartmentalizing of all kinds of behaviors within certain contexts, and and it is a legitimate there. I agree with you. There is a legitimate argument to be made that what is wrong in one context is not wrong in another obviously we can come up with huge examples killing someone in war is different than killing someone on the street. So that you can take his killing someone on Bubba the love sponges different. But even but even with coarse language, even with body jokes, even with sort of the sort of ways that menus disparagement as a form of come rotary. Yes, things like that are not always appropriate. There's not like I'm not saying universally. People should be allowed to behave. This way, I'm saying in certain contexts, it's appropriate for people behave this. The weaponization shock and has been used now for for thirty forty years against the entire tired of western culture before the show began. We were talking about all the references anti Jewish references that go like a thread through all of western literature now when they teach literature they go back and say, well, here's an anti female thing. Here's an anti black every every the famous one was the attack on Jane Austen for supporting the English empire. Simply the British empire simply by writing her books. I mean that was it was I-I argument. It's been an attempt to silence all of western civilization by this targeted outrage that doesn't extend to everything that everybody does. I mean, nobody is going to say, oh, Don lemon demonized white people, which he did white men. Nobody's going. Here's a great example of this. I've heard you talk about with our friend. Dave rubin. That in one context your position towards Dave Reuben's heart is political, and and and as part of your public advocacy that you do as a political voice in another context. It's congenial because it's based on your friendship with they've Ruben your general support of his well being in his happy. Right. Another example might be the use of certain pronouns. Right. I said this about transgender absolutely exactly right in public. If somebody says are transgender pronouns, the right pronuncia will say, no because I don't believe that there is a set of pronouns that is not connected biological cigarette. If I'm sitting across the table from a person who's transgender I'll use whatever opponents feel like because we're out to dinner. Why would not just still being bullied? Belay because context does matter when trying to make a moral determination about someone's Bank. Of course, the the way that you can tell that this supreme bad faith is the the pod rose today. Pod positive America, they came for the the Obama rose they came forward, and they were actively stumping for 'em to for people to attend M F as rally outside of Fox News. These guys make their money the same way that we do make money off advertising on programs like this one. And because I make my money off this this position before we ever did this, of course, the with that said understanding how how advertising works in the space, and that advertisers should be able to advertise on a wide variety of political programs without being perceived of endorsed any of the views on those political programs. I have never called nor would I call from Waco against the pod save America, rose, even though I think that they are actively promoting policies that are detrimental to the country actively promoting a vision of America that I think is false dangerous and harmful. I still think that the advertisers advertising. Has on politics. America have every right to do. So and in boycotting them is morally wrong, and then it's good for America. That many of the people who advertise on punt save America advertise with that. That's exactly right. But the the the comfort level you can see the digital of power because the people that have America, they truly believed that the that the boycott -able the boycott ability was mutual if they truly feared the possibility that we were all going to go after their advertisers. They chipped their position in a this is what it was so good about Tucker statement is that he pointed out that we're not playing by the same rules. We're in a conversation, their jihad, we're trying to argue our point of view and win. They're trying to silence actually, do it everywhere. And when what Tucker said was that the right to often plays along the right to often pretends that this is something there's some legitimate thing going on, and we have to pull back, and I don't think we do especially I mean, because I do all the satire, I say all these absurd things that I know absurd, and you know, certainly, and I'm kidding around. But I know that you could take those out of context and mail me with my just don't care because I do not feel I do. Not feel. They have the right to do that too. So I feel it's only right for me to stand up to my is the this is where the left really plays on. I think the morality of the right? Meaning that we all acknowledge, for example that. Tell that Tucker said some stuff that we don't like, of course, right on. Okay. That stuff is wrong. So instead of so what the left will do is. They'll find the thing that they say is what he did wrong. We may agree that it's wrong. And we'll say like a broader principle, we're not going to call for boycotts or his destruction. For thing. He said thirteen years ago say up you agree with the thing that he said thirteen years ago, this this is where and you saw some of this from the right? This is where Tucker is right, and they'll but the lesson can be extended too far in the other direction. So we're Tucker is right. Is he says, okay? Well, what you guys are doing is in bad faith. You're not attempting to police the dialogue. You're attempting to come after me and destroy me on the basis of these old statements, and there are people on the right who fall for this. And you saw this. You saw some people on the right going. Well, Tucker is not the hill design. They really want to die on this hill defending this. We're in which is I would mention nonsense a bunch of nonsense because if there's any hill the diet, and it's the hill of you don't get to dig up people's old crap use it against them without even asking them. What their opinion on is? It is on it now specifically in bad faith to destroy their career. Like, you don't get to a bad thing to do. But the but on the. Other side. What will happen is people will say, okay. Well, then I'm just going to open on everything. So somebody says something bad today like like, an actual bad thing. And it's today should that person. Apologize for it. And people on the right will go. Listen. I apologize. Let MC knowledge in the left point. No, sometimes you have to apologize. This. What I liked about Tucker's monologue. Tucker said good people when they do something wrong. They apologized, but I'm not going to apologize to hygiene us. I'm not gonna apologize to the jackal of no interest in receiving comically in who are are looking to destroy me on the basis of this old stuff as I said, if I'm sure that if a victim of Warren Jeffs came Tucker and said, listen to what you said on Bubba the love sponge in two thousand seven I found I didn't even know about it. Now, I heard about it. I'm offended. I'll bet you the Tucker would say, you know, what I shouldn't have said it was the wrong thing to say. But this brings us back to our conversation. Last time we were together what we're discussing the graceless civilization. And you made the point that from a tactical point of view. It's always wrong now to apologize. Yes. It's if you apologize now, it is you're you're putting your neck indicated that's better. You saw it with Chris Cuomo. Did you see Chris Cuomo did this insane monologue Koi? Objected objective journalist, Chris Cuomo block of wood, less smart of the little brother, an amazing formal. His formal didn't he didn't mind while on CNN where he said Toca Carlson is a coward. How do I know? He's a coward because he's not apologizing for these statements, and he's also not going on his show tonight and saying the same statements over again, right and say okay in that in that one sentence you've set up a catch twenty two for him. But which is if he apologizes, then you're going to say, you see he knows that he was wrong. And that's why he should be boycotted. 'cause he's that kind of person. You should never have said it in the first place, and even he acknowledges that. And if he doesn't apologize you said, well, he's not apologizing because he's still agrees with it. So why does he just double down on it today? But beyond this. This is something that really bothers me is the entire definition of the offense. Usually, it's racism. They come after us for the entire definition of racism has now become any glitch any tribal glitch in the human mind that causes you to behave in a certain way. When for instance, a black guy gets on an elevator. If you if you get in a car near side swipe in the car, and you see the guy in the car is black or Jewish or female here. Very likely to shout. You know, you stupid blank, whatever. Whatever the kind of person. I'm sorry. That's not racist. That's a little glitch in the human person that we can overcome by goodwill. You know, it's not it is not racism to sort of think. Like, oh, you know, I grew up with people who look like you. I kind of feel more comfortable with that you can overcome all those things, and what the left does is takes these human foibles, which we all have. And we all say, and it makes turns them into an aspect of your philosophy. Which is not true racism is a philosophy. I knew racist people. I knew people who believe that other people are inferior to them. Because of the way they were born that is that it's true racism. I oppose it with all my soul. I truly do you guys. You guys know, I do you heard me rant about it? But it's not the same thing as the fact that we're all human beings. We have these flaws. We have these little tribal glitches to call people out for that is the elevating perfectionist is the only acceptable standard for maybe the Senate has to be perfect perfection because if you were ever imperfect, this is like you can't even tell a story. About how you were once in 'perfect as a cautionary tales Liam. And what they do is. They take one instance what you're talking about. And I'll disaggregated with that the center that if you're in the car and somebody sideswiped you, and it's a woman, and you just start shouting at her as a woman that that would be a sexist incident. But that does not mean that you are a sexist in other words, I think we're saying the same thing I'm trying to hone in a little more nicely a racist. A racist moment does not make you a racist. For your entire life are been beings are a series of moments. That's all we are. And then the way we judge her character is by weighing up the totality of those moments and your viewpoint, and that's how we decide whether you're a good person with your racist or not whether you're somebody who should trust or not the there's no one who's perfect on this earth. And what we have decided is that we're going to take one instance one moment where you did a wrong thing, and we will use that as the key moment that that that is the flash point that shows your behavior the left does is about merica, by the way. This is your favorite thing to do. I was ranting about this on my show. I think yesterday. It was really terrible. There's a young man in Victor, I think Victor macaroni. And he was a young black man who was shot to death near USC just last week in his his mother is a city councilwoman in Oakland. And the reason that this hit my radar is because somebody emailed me and said, this is a person who ask you a question at USC at your appearance just a couple of months ago when I remembered the kid it's twenty one, and he was it was really nice cordial. He disagreed with Mehta's really cordial is really warm hearted. And really, and it didn't make the national news for more than it didn't because he was killed by people who who were killing him as parv robbery. It was just a criminal act in a in a high crime neighborhood near USA. And so this doesn't make the national news. If you've been killed by a white cop, then it makes the national news and that connected. This to the fact that there was this long article in the New York Times magazine about what they called the tragedy of Baltimore where they're talking about. How Baltimore has completely fallen apart and ever since Freddie, gray, particularly the murder rate has skyrocketed because the police have just stopped releasing because they don't wanna be held. Up on all of the on every time. They go out there. There's ten people with cameras who are attempting to get them fired win their life put them in jail. So they're just stop policing the murder rates have risen in Baltimore. What the left likes to do is pick instances that reinforce a narrative that they have already pre written. That's what's happening with Tucker. That's what happens with people like me or rush or Mark Levin or anybody who has any level prominence in the conservative movement. And it's what the left does with America instead of looking at the broad trend of where's crime happening. And why is it happening, by the way, it's happening in areas where there is high level of single motherhood not enough men in the community and not enough police that is the answer. That's where all crime is happening, and that that's not a racial thing white communities to instead of looking at those trends instead what they'll do as though pick out a incident that they think reinforces the true narrative that the real problem in America is racism feature. It for months on TV then there's a riot about the false narrative. And then they say well that that riot is proof positive that our narrative was for the I do know what it is to especially on this point of these incidents. These series of incidents these series of actions. The way it works. We're all guilty of it. The left takes it to an extreme is we judge others by their actions. We judge ourselves. And so Andrew Caruso, the head of media matters. He had these blog posts on earth from two thousand five around the same time that Tucker was going on Bubba. The love sponge, and they were degrading and mocking transgender people then called transvestites to creating Japanese women who were sexually abused degrading. Bangladesh's Jews Jews as well. Of course. It is always I mean. Throw in the juice, right? Yeah. And all of these people, but they though, of course, not go after him for it. First of all because media matters itself is a bad faith organization, but also because the left judges itself on its intention solely on its intentions when they say, vile things about Sarah Palin file things about Nikki Haley, whoever they can't be misogynists because they support abortion. They have wonderful intentions for women feminists, deep deep down and us one action one little incident. One guy yelling at a car whose side swiped him. You're dead your wicked. You're evil. You're bound to prediction. I think we can all agree that if you're going to boycott Tucker Carlson, it should be over that let crappy said about stopping driving vehicles. Get rid of that. I do want to say in the interest of disclosure three of the four of us went worked for an organization. Then an I started together called truth revolt than our premise was to be a right wing sort of answer to media matters. And we did successfully lead a few actions against a few prominent left wing people who said not jokes. They said some legitimately four thing aren't mature talks about excreting into Sarah Palin now. Correct. But there was nothing disingenuous about truth revolt. No, it was so on we had a mission statement. And our mission statement was this is a vile horrible tactic. That has no place in a free in a free society. But the only thing more immoral than doing this action is allowing this action to continually be done to one side with absolutely no answer so been and I had this premise of mutually assured destruction which was when the left stops doing. This will stop doing it until the left stops doing this. They have to also know what it feels. Like to lose your advertising base, and we we pursued that for a short amount of time and then enter successful. And this is the thing that I think that advertisers need to start understanding true. Is that all this crap is astroturf? It is. That's right. There have been good studies on the effectiveness of boycotts. Boycotts are almost never affectively. It's almost impossible to name ineffective. Boycott. You remember when they tried to boycott Chick-fil-A and Chick-fil-A stop went up is going to raise example, you know, every single time. There's an attempt to nightime stock went up, Colin Kaepernick. This is correct. Anytime you piss people off in there in the headlines more the truth is that the sales tend to go up because all earned publicity's publicity. The Wall Street Journal doodoo piece about the university of Wyoming with they had their thing that there should be more. Cowboys a world needs more Cowboys. And of course, the faculty came in and said, oh, this is a limitation and has heterosexuals and all of a sudden they told him to go pound sand. He made thousands of dollars their their applications went up. It's like stand up to the the reason I mentioned this is because since we know this from the inside since where she did this operationally. It's not hard astroturf this stuff. People assume that media matters is this vast crowd of people who are doing things they got like five people to show up for this protest. And that's all it takes by the way, if advertisers. Don't actually sit there for forty minutes and. To themselves guys is this real is like an actual thing. Because here is the truth of the thing. Okay. When we did it to MSNBC, we did it went after a couple of their advertisers. We've got a couple of advertisers to pull Martin Bashir and mature ended up losing a show. We had eighty activists. I kid you not eighty activists. We send them an Email. And it said, here's the number for the customer service line at MSNBC. Here's the customer service line for this advertiser. Call them up and tell them you're angry at them for advertising on Martin Bashir within two days Martin mature show had been pulled. Okay. That was not a vast groundswell of people were never going to shop with his advertiser again that was us and again, it's eight bad tactic. And we said openly, it's a bad tactic. We said, you know, what, you know? What would be great is if we didn't have to do this tactic? So how about this? You guys stop all this crap. We'll stop all this crap. And then we can go back to a system where you can advertise wherever you want. And that's that you shop wherever you want. If you don't you you know, what the actual boycott should be. If you don't like Tucker show, don't watch. You don't like my boycott by damn show to what's my show, a single person pissed off at Tokyo Carlson has ever watched two eight episodes of tuck Ralph and not in chance in the world. This is again why I'm so appreciative for our advertisers. And you know, who's a advertiser with a genius policy. The Greek Shuguang. Policy. Right. This guy's a broadcasting genius. That's pretty impressive. I will say that that those those pictures are so strong that when I die. I hope that they read them. I should. Make sure policy juniors comes in a mortgage or kids or anybody who depends on your income you need to be in adults. Go get some life insurance right now policy genius is the easy way to get life insurance. Two minutes. You can compare quotes from top insurers and find the best policy for you. When you apply online. The advisers policy genius will handle all the red tape for you. The Lugosi at your rate with the insurance company, no commission sales agents, no hidden fees. Just helpful advice, personalized service and policy. Genius. Doesn't just do life insurance. They also do home insurance and auto insurance and disability insurance. They your one stop shop for financial protection. So if you find life insurance puzzling head on over to policy genius dot com in two minutes. Compare quotes find the right policies. Save up to forty percent doing it policy genius. Again, the easy way to compare and buy life insurance bureau, responsible human don't be irresponsible. Make sure your family is taking care of don't be buried into poppers grave checkout. Checkout. Offers phobic ly. So we're going to check in with our daily wire subscribers they keep the lights on as much as our advertisers, do and some lucky daily wire subscriber who subscribes during this broadcast at Delaware dot com. Subscribe and becomes an annual subscriber will win a chance to sit in this room. Breathe in our secondhand cigars and see how the magic it's the second. I suppose you don't have to come right? Lisa Crouse for checking in with you had to hear from our subscribers. Our y'all. We're happy, you know, happy to be here. You know, where where are you? Well, I'm on backstage where women are either prostitutes or barefoot and pregnant in the future. Which one are you? Are you actually barefoot and actually pregnant and actually in the daily work kitchen? Yeah. Yeah. That's. I mean, I at least it's the shiny new kitchen. Right. And I'm making chocolate chip cookies. Don't worry. None of them were for you for me entirely for the baby. So I will be down here at least in Michael Moses. Broom closet anymore, but I wanna be down here taking subscriber questions and don't forget, how do you submit those questions. Well, become a subscriber. And not only could you win the chance to maybe stuck barefoot and pregnant in the kitchen with me, you also get to sit in on a future episode of backstage, if you become a subscriber right now, and you get to ask a question of the guys. So go to the daily wire backstage banner on the top of the page watch. The livestream and submit your questions there. And now we can't smoke around deletion true. So say that. That why would sit down a whole floor. We officially become the most conservative house. I do actually one comes from William he wants to know, what's the constitutional definition of a natural born citizen. If a person is born in the US to to illegal aliens can that person go on to be president Michel MOS? Well, because I'm the one who went to Harvard law. There actually is correct me when I inevitably get something wrong. There is a longstanding debate over the exact meaning of natural born citizen. It seems to me that if you are born to the child or if you are the child of an American citizen, you are a natural born citizen at the time of your birth. You are an American citizen. So the whole birther conspiracy was a little bit superfluous because Barack Obama even if he were born on Mars would have been a natural born citizen. This seems to be in dispute in any case. But if you're born to illegal aliens here in America, you are also a natural born citizen since at least that case in what eight ninety eight. Yeah. The one the one. That's right. The one case after that, it seems to be resolved that you are a natural born citizen. There's been some discussion of repealing birthright citizenship or clarify birthright citizenship, we've had that since two thousand sixteen but the question as far as I can tell remains somewhat unresolved. That's right there. There's one phrase in the fourteenth amendment specifically that is read two maybe. Clued birthright citizenship the truth is that in the British empire. The birthright citizenship was sort of tradition. So going back to Blackstone, the the notion that of natural born citizenship is fairly well established Anglo American wall. The the sort of countervailing viewpoint is that in the fourteenth amendment says that if you're bored in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof. So it's the phrase subject to the jurisdiction thereof. Yup. That comes up in these legal debates because the question is if you are a citizen of another country, like you're let's say, you're Mexican citizen, and you commit a crime in the United States. Well, then they have to contact the consulate of Mexico because you are Mexican citizen your child presumably is not subject. Do you haven't accepted American law upon yourself? So you are not subject to the jurisdiction of American law. Neither is your child that at least is the argument against birthright citizenship. You know, I think that it's it's an open debate. It's all it's a live debate. It's interesting to remember that the subject to the jurisdiction thereof came into play. When John McCain was seeking the nomination to be president. But because he. Throwing the and Hannam Panama. So to American parents so born as citizen of the United States, right? You're born born with the opportunity to be a citizen of the United States. The question was was Panama at that time. Was he subject juristic that? That's exactly right. And and the way that the courts traditionally have interpreted subject to the jurisdiction there of would be to exclude for example for ministers. So if you're a foreign minister from from Mexico, and you have a kid in the United States, your kid is not necessarily a subject of the United States because you're a foreign minister and therefore jurisdiction of the American. And this is the part that does pain me as someone who thinks I think is probably we older birthright citizenship has been abused. It's created very bad incentives at the southern border is it does seem explicitly to take out diplomats to take out the children of diplomats or whatever. But other people even if you were four national in this country, perhaps you are subject to the jurisdiction of it's not supreme clear is the truth of it. But it's it's also not a precedent. That's going to change anytime soon. Conceived naturally born that's the question. It's also interesting to think about it from the point of view of the framers of the constitution at the time that they were conceptualizing these ideas that no person in America was in natural born citizen of today. So they were they were specifically thinking about loyalties, right? They were thinking about where you're where your your loyalty would be to what sovereignity which are the world TV. They didn't want someone to be elected president of the United States who had a divided a divided sense of national allegiance. And I think that that's at the very least the spirit of it. Which is why I think that, you know, probably if a an American diplomat if John Quincy Adams had been born in France or have been born in the Netherlands, he was not. I still think that that that would not have at the time at their time. They would not have thought of him is not eligible to become president. He was it took a long time to travel back then he was born over there because his father was here in service of the country. So we so they would have seen John. They would have seen that zone. Read more about the debate, John you takes one side of the debate in favor of natural born citizenship. And and Mark Krikorian the folks at center from Gration studies tend to take John Eastman. They tend to take the other side of the debate aleisha. Western. I just wanna know can Dan Crenshaw run for president. And that he wasn't born on American soil. That's the most important thing. Interesting. I believe that a military base in Germany, so military bases are exempt too, right? I just wanted to ask guard. Coming up, by the way. Yeah. This because he's never going to forgive him for making me for making the arm wrestling. Humiliating was the closest. It actually true though. That's what was determined in. The McCain question is that since he was born on a military base. He was still in that Russell four of us. We all go flying. All right here comes the question from Joe about college education. He wants to know for those of us who are majoring in a useless liberal arts major with the intent of entering the academy. What do you believe is the best mode by which we can improve it? Unfortunately, I know too much about this but ever since two thousand and eighty people who've been talking about the liberal arts collapsing for a long time but ever since two thousand eight the liberal arts have collapsed, and there are very few jobs in the liberal arts. And if you do get one of them, the thing that really has to be changed as you have to understand what it is to teach the liberal arts to teach the liberal arts means to teach first of all the history of the liberal arts, for instance, literature the history of literature, but also to teach what the people who were speaking at the time, we're trying to say in their moment. It's not about telling them how they can be eradicated by me overlaying my philosophy on top of them. It is what Plato was trying to communicate what Shakespeare was trying to communicate. These are hard things to study and really worth knowing because they make you wiser, and they were involved in your culture. I didn't go to an actual university to junior, college and matron and country music dropped out. That's true. I told this story about you, did you. Yeah. But but. With my limited amount of education that I have I know that the word liberal is associated with liberty. And that therefore the liberal arts could be translated literally to mean the freedom arts and that the entire purpose of a liberal education. As we understand it in in later days in the west was so that you could learn the art of freedom, you that you were studying the architecture of the west that the philosophical, and and logistical and literary history of the west so that you would understand the art of being rude understand and earn your freedom that we like you have fancy degrees. That is actually what the liberal arts or that is the entire purpose. Absolutely seemed for you know, people don't even know this. And this is why the debate actually matters. I think a lot of conservatives want, you know, we're kind of reactionary way, we wanna say get rid of it. I we hate it all the liberal arts, really really matter. A free society is not going to remain free for even five seconds if liberal education dissolves, and the the problem is it's already dissolved. So. With his art over may. You could count on one hand the number of programs in the liberal arts that are still actually carrying on that TriNet, a in my new book, not pitch it. But the right side of history available right now, but not really billable until my stews day. It is kind of a layman's read on western philosophy there people who've spent generation studying this, and no this way, the hell better than I do, and my very basic gloss, which you guys have read. It's and it is. And I think it's quite good. But it's obviously not to the level of expertise is people who spent their entire like your son spends his internally studying this stuff this stuff better than I do. You know, that it has been completely lost to the extent that if I even speak about this. There is a I smoked at university of Michigan last night. The history department has not read my books not out yet. They held a panel called dilatot in history. The power of the environment. If you. Minute. All you got from it is it's white people. Then you don't know what the hell you're talking about and the classics are, I think heavily attended. What professors? I think they ended up with about thirty five people we had by contrast at thousand people showed up to RS an overflow room with another one hundred six thousand people on the waiting list university of Michigan's there's some appetite for this stuff, but the which shows how badly the universities of Bochum because there is appetite for for all of this stuff. But you know, quick note that this person is asking they're already in the liberal arts and they intend on teaching. So you're actually doing a career path that makes sense I've ripped on a liberal arts as a career path if you don't actually intend on going into the liberal arts because it seems to me that, you know, this whole college scandal happening right now, these Uber rich parents who are paying for their kids to get into places like AOL there. Two questions that deserve to be answered one is why would rich people pay for their kids to get into gale? When you could just give your kid the the five hundred thousand dollars and just set them up for for life in trust fund or something. That's question. Number one, number two. If these kids are really unqualified if they're getting into gale with twelve hundred SAT's shouldn't they fail out shoot in the first year shouldn't they have the for hard to get in. But it's very easy to stay. Well, and this. This is the point that I make about about colleges. What the public thinks colleges are for is not actual colleges before. So we all think that it's for developing a skill set and being educated and learning about western civilization bull. That is not what colleges are four houses for two things in reality. Unless you are studying in the in the maths or the scientists in which case, you're actually learning something it it's not about skill set. It what it is about is two things credentialing and social group. That's it. That's the only thing colleges for. That's why all these thing that Michael got out of college. It was treated with penicillin. I count that as social group for Michael created his own human social. Back and take responsibility. New haven's very poor. But this is why these rich parents will pay because they want the credential for their kid and the credential matters because it's the premature that you're a member of the elite, and they want their kids to be members of this air sets social fabrics. They can go to the alumni dinners, and they can no friends for it in very powerful positions. And I know this because when I went to a very high falutin universe way to Harvard Law School the very first day. I was at Harvard Law School at orientation Elena Kagan who was then the dean of law school. Now. She's supreme court Justice. She gets up in front of a class of five hundred of us. And the first thing she says is, you know, you're a word that's going to be a paper. Chase me super competitive. You're going to have to really compete for your slot. You're going to have to work really hard. Let me tell you already one. You're in the competition is over you'll all have jobs, you'll be she said, you will be running the world that people in this room will be running the world. But you're right. Let your left. These are the people who are going to be running the world. And I remember thinking myself really why why like because we did well on our L sats. That's why we should run the world Harrison. The question was how to improve this. And I mean, I think you're absolutely right. I grew with everything you're saying, it doesn't have to be that way. I mean the way so let me give you my quick solution on how to improve all of this one employers need to stop using universities for credentialing, and they need to start taking the prince's directly out of high school to learn how to do a business because most people in America learn to do their job by actually doing their job. Not by going to some program that taught them philosophy philosophy majors. Make a lot of money because their lawyers, right? That's that's why philosophy majors make a lot of money because their accountants and their lawyers and they're in marketing, and how many of them are philosophy professors three, right? So when people say philosophy major teaches you something it may teach you something, but it's not worth two hundred thousand dollars of something that agree is worth two hundred thousand dollars because it's a credential, but what you learned at your philosophy courses. Pushback in this a little bit. I was I was a terrible student. I was an awful student, and I really got my education after I left school. When I read all the books that I bought in school. But while I was in school. I did kind of listen kind of filtered in and I remember walking down the street and this sound like the dopey est thing on earth. But I remember walking to the campus of the university of California Berkeley and suddenly thinking, wait a minute. I get it. I came Greece. Yeah. Then came room, then came your then came us and each one of those things built on the other reflected on the other. And actually was changed by the fact that the other existed, and when I saw that that changed everything for me. And that's that today. Now. I completely disagree. When you attended the university of Berkeley in the late eighteen hundreds. Liberal arts degree was was an elite thing to accomplish and inexpensive thing comparatively. You've got to accomplish an valuable thing that requires rigor in order to accommodate you can't you can't connect that experience. I think one of the two major we what is now they wanna major problems with the modern academe Lia is that people send their children there, and they send their children there because they hear things like oh American campuses are liberal, and they kind of finally hearken back to twenty five years ago when they were in Spain. They're like, yes, I remember I had that one professor who were of beanie and that one professor who talking to black sand, even though they were white. And you know, would would it was a one of the early black studies professor, and we all knew that they were kind of a dope. But they did expose us to some ideas. We had never thought my kid can make it because I made it what they fundamentally don't understand. That is not what the university today is. No, if you wanna know how to fix academia, you don't fix it from the. Side, you fix it. With the government. I say that as a conservative who believes that the government isn't the solution to anything, but the government created our current university fiasco, and they created it when they basically decided that they would fund schools on the basis of square footage. How many the square footage of your buildings would determine how much money you actually, receive from the federal government, and they started this this enormous push at the university level to grow the physical footprint of universities to grow the structural footprint that universities and to fill those big buildings with as many people as possible. And that's when it became the case. Yes, that is credential no longer has value because it's no longer that the elite go to college up everyone goes to college college is high school with a quarter million dollar price tax. This is your own want. But why should the government six the government fixes it by stopping paying over? Is that the government should get completely out of the business of college? If you wanna go and study the classics at university, then go out and get a second job and pays job to to do the IRA on with him, by the way, civic education should not be taking place at the college level. You should be knowing a lot of the stuff that you're supposed to know. This is long before you're eighteen years old and gender. Overlooking though, the thing that we're we're looking here is the point that Elena Kagan may to you which is true, which is that the this isn't true in the world of business. But this is true in the world, at least of government, the people who run the government went to Yale Harvard, Princeton, they all went to at least an expensive private school, whatever it is Alexandria Casio. Cortes is the evidence that we need to rethink and rehabilitate the liberal arts because stem, broadly speaking, at least engineering is a skill. It's a job at trains you for a job the liberal arts. Don't do that they train you to think about the world to understand your own civilization. If you don't understand your past you won't understand your future. And the the idea that we now have someone in the government like AO see who is scolding Tim Sloan of wells forego. A man who's IQ is seven times. What is I'm gonna push back. Again, you went to Yale for how well, you know. It depends on the you know, I went for forty you went for four years. Helen, did you go to public school before that thirteen years for thirteen years? So it doesn't make sense to me if the government's gonna pay for education, and that education is opposed to result in you know, in a thing or two and being prepared for the real world. How is it possible that they should be able to accomplish this in or year, you're where they have been unable to accomplish anything of the sort in your your point is so right? The I mean the way to fix it. Because I am actually a great defender of liberal arts education over the trade schools it like it really matters for some people the the problem with democratic a gala -tarian society is we've decided if one person goes to a four year private college. Everybody has to go to a four year. And if everybody is going to do it, then the government has to pay for it. And then everyone is going to get in standards are going to be lowered a bunch of fake academic disciplines are going to be created ever. It's just utterly leveling. It horns people who have two hundred fifty thousand dollars worth of debt it harms taxpayers. Government it harms the books are available for free. Parents and students have been lied to. They were told that when the when they sent their to college a couple of things we're going to happen one that earning potential would inevitably rise. No matter what they did in college. And to they were going to exit with the skill set. And both of those things are are essentially false. Yeah. The the earning potential may rise. But only as a as an adjunct of sorting meaning that employers look at a person who wants he'll differently than a person who has do cO. That's just the way that works. Even if the person who went to Juku ends up being much better business person than the person who went I mean, this is this is a point. Doesn't. I mean, I I made this point on my show. I told the story that that probably shouldn't have told about a human who will remain on name cursing, you out for not having gone to college. Because this is what they went delivered. After all this person did go to Harvard, and and that was deeply deeply important because it was credentialing they knew that in the elite strata of American society that credential matters. But the reason originally the credential matter was not for the sorting is because the assumption was not only that you were smarter. If you went to this university that you learn more and better things at these top level universities that is no longer true. The only thing that Ivy leagues provide is the credential on the wall unless you are learning an actual thing, but Finn the actual things. And here's the thing. Once once it got watered down, and you weren't warning actual things anymore, and it was just the credential. This is how you get to the point where colleges now have an active interest in not exposing people to uncomfortable ideas. Because if you go there just for the credential and just to build a social fabric. The last thing you want is somebody spoiling the party with things like tough grades. Where ideas you've never heard this. My Harvey Mansfield was forced not to give an actual grades to his own. Students at hor blue inflation with that as an inherent bed. What point does the fact that you can go on the internet and learn so much of this stuff and get even classes and lectures from people who actually know things or get the great courses DVD's overseas, CDs and listen to those at what point does that kind of overcome? The brandy what full of crap it's really about the employers. Whereas the fact is that if there were not a market interest in you spending two hundred thousand dollars to for a four year education, which you learned nothing. Okay. Because if you're a policy major, I'm apologize agent. You didn't learn anything aid and learn how to write learn how thank you learned nothing. Okay. If and learning to create country rifts on the piano. Legitimately you. Probably learn more Juku studying country music than I did studying political science at UCLA if if employers were instead to look like, they're honestly you want to know the actual solution to this real credentialing. Okay. What this would be is you take the we wouldn't go to college the SAT energy would Termine where he weren't good publish those you just right there, you go straight to trade school on the basis because that's what they're doing. Okay. That is exactly how you well. Well, you've identified the problem, which is there is this idea that we all have now, which is that four year liberal arts. College is supposed to give you a skill. That isn't true. You're not supposed to get a skill from the liberal arts. You are explicitly not supposed to have any skill. You were supposed to study history. Math. You've had seen have the art of freedom. That's right. Yeah. That's right. I want to get to another question, but I'll close out with this. I have a theory in. It's the five percent eerie alcoholics anonymous has a success rate of approximately five percent of the. If you're an alcoholic, and you go through the program at AAA five percent of you will get cleaned J. You a your types? The the interesting aspect of that is that if you don't go throughout the Hollick synonymous you also have a five percent chance of getting sober. So statistically a drunk in alcoholics anonymous as the exact same chance of getting sober as a drunk outside of alcoholics anonymous, and you could look at that and say we'll see golics anonymous is a sham. I don't put a pen right there. My theory is that this same thing will apply across the board. Dave Ramsey's a pal of our kind of a hero in in broadcasting and somebody that I personally look up to an awful lot for the business that he's built I have some disagreements with Dave Ramsey's. Financial philosophy. I think it has a great sort of. Understanding of human nature. But I think I think, but I think that it also has a few problems with I suspect that something like five percent of people who adhere to the Dave Ramsey philosophy actually managed to save up a successful nest egg for retirement, and I suspect that also five percent of people who don't listen to Dave Ramsey will manage to save up a successful nest egg for retirement, I think college and a liberal arts degree, your son Spencer's at grand example, Spencer nosy thing or two about the liberal arts for his trouble. I suspect that five percent of people who go through the university system will walkout knowing a thing or two about the liberal arts. I suspect five percent of people who don't go through the system, we'll know finger to about the liberal arts. I've used you as an example, you're kind of a hybrid you went through the system. Learn nothing about the liberal arts. That's got out. On this is my five percent theory. Doesn't mean that a liberal education is bad. It doesn't mean that. Dave Ramsey's financial freedom universe is wrong. It doesn't mean that alcoholics anonymous is useful. It means that some small part of the population. Yep. Is going to find the answers and four that small part of the population the answers that are provided in the form of alcoholics anonymous in the form of Dave Ramsey in the form of a liberal arts education, a university education become the mechanism by which they they affect that betterment. And similarly, they might find some other path they might find a book by some other financial theorists other than Dave Ramsey program. Other than alcoholics anonymous, they might read the books that they didn't read in college. The only the only part of this. I disagree with because I basically agree with that. But the only part of this. I disagree with is in the system that teaches civics history. Math science in in the lower grades not in the. You have a better society. And that has actually brought if what you're saying is that we ought to have those things then I think we all agree. I think what we're saying. I think saying we don't. But we well, I think that is right. We are saying that we don't. But we are saying that. There's no reason that we should give up on that. When the guy says when the guy asked the question, how do I improve this that is what we should be this is where we disagree. My solution is fire. I think you saw the university of public fire. I don't think I think that is so bad so rampant and so big a trillion dollars today. They don't think that you can through 'incrementalist fixed. Universities those left the left took it over by incremental was I don't know why we can't take it back because we don't we don't operate the way that. Maybe a mistake. I don't think that's true. I don't think the west took it over by increments lists. I think there's a massive revolution of the nineteen sixties and everything on a tech. Yup. And then they just waited for the old people to die. But they, but they did know, but they did move into the university's on purpose with with perp. Dada man at Yale was written in the fifty s Buckley's first. Yeah, that's right. And there's no reason we can't do that. Except that we won't. I mean, you're right that we don't. But I think there should be like fifteen colleges in the country. That's this is exactly the thing. This is very fewer people should go to college. The government shouldn't pay for it. The people who should not go to college should will thrive. Doing something else. They won't be burdened kids kids unless you wanna be a doctor or a lawyer or a rocket fizz, a rocket science congresswoman from New York be like me. I mean, all you really need to know about colleges is that Michael Knowles got into Yale and his mommy and daddy did not pay them five. Doc suffered if they'd actually why. On on a water polo. Superimpose? It was real weird. The percentage up to the poor riding a horse. This is the guy that actually posted a picture on Instagram from the university of Michigan while tagging his location at the university of Michigan and said where am I? There were transvestites. Now, I'm sounding like the media matters going. All righty. So speaking of Knowles illegitimate children that probably created at Yale. Ryan says he's been seeing some interesting Twitter parenting advice floating out there. Ryan don't follow the Twitter parenting advice. It says quote never punish were praise. Your children. What are your thoughts? That's the stupidest thing. So those children. Yeah. No. That's absolutely, right. They did turn my mic is turned out. Great. Well, firstly you've met my wife. You know, you understand why Mike it's turned out. Well, but I mean, no, that's that. Of course is absurd. What you shouldn't do is you shouldn't praise your kids for nothing, and you shouldn't punish them for nothing. You know, there should be you have a moral system. And when when you say something is going to is going to hold. This is the most important thing you can be as a parent is consistent. When you say something is not going to be done. It's not going to be done. When you say there's going to be a consequence that consequences. Gotta be there. It doesn't have to be fire and sword it's just has to be some kind of limitation away. Yes. In your. The biggest threat to contain some very good. The the the biggest threat to consistency is appearance is not your kid. It's you. That's why because it sucks to be a consistent does it's so terrible right show to ruin you have to punish your kids off the worst thing in the world when you when you threaten like we're not going to act, and you know, that everybody wants to do acts like in five minutes when the kid apologizes, you're still gonna wanna do extra. You don't want to go back on it. And then you can't it's just awful wondering ream you want to remain goodness piece of advice. It's your responsibility. That's your. Everything is responsible. And if parents really understood that from education defeating their kids now, then it would solve ninety eight percents of the problems in the United States. Hard is hard to be. You're saying that parents have to be good and responsible and you're against abortion. Understand why you're forcing children to live and world with sub optimal parent. I'm. This is so funny lesson so last night or speaking university of Michigan and a guy got up, and he was asking me about the food stamps program. Now, there's yet to be an in childhood nutrition who specifically asking about school lunches, and the fact that they're really not nutritious. And the fact is that Michelle Obama tried to make the mortgage Tristesse the kids didn't need it. They throw it out and all the rest and he asks what's your solution to that? And I said abolish school lunches and have parents feed their own damn kids because I am a parent. My number one priority is the only priority. The matters feeding my child, and if you can't feed your trials, you shouldn't have that child be removed from your home. Now, the the notion that it is the government like you legitimately the one thing you have to today's feed your kid end of story, and we have a society where it's like, no, you're not if I don't feel like feeding my kid today. We'll just make sure that the government needs Mike it or if I don't feel like punish Mike. I'm sure Mike. He'll get educated at school. If and you're seeing it parents advocating duties to to it's not just public schools parents religious, parents abdicating religious education too religious schools. Okay. I'll send my kid there. That's where the learn everything they need to know about religion or my kids bad disciplined problem Ellen to anything. At home. That's their teachers job. You're not have the experience the experience. I I have I have a visceral memory of this. I can call it up in my skin is bringing that first baby home, and realizing Ono I have to do this. This is my responsibility. This kid does lives were dies on me. I've got to make a living. I've gotta keep rains. There. Cannot be water on my kid is going to be a roof over that kids that to me is the moment you grow up. That's the first. And last thought Michael knows I do I do actually thought parenting, which is this for all the people that have ever been told that Michael Knowles is their father. There's a lot of cats with that name. So if you're doing this conversation what's wrong with you? If you think I'd like to be in a smoke filled over overly hot studio with these guys as they do this live. We'll go over to daily wire dot com slash subscribe, become an annual subscriber that's one where you give us ninety nine bucks. Not only do you get the shows you get the leftist. Here's hot or cold tumbler here, by way, I know there's a lot of imitations out there. There's a lot of a lot of. And they are also useful. Just not for drinking out for other things. You get the leftist. Here's hot or cold. Tumbler you get the Andrew klavan show. You get the Michael Knowles show. You get the Ben Shapiro show nine hours. Our radio show, which are now available exclusively to our subscribers on demand, and you will get entered into a chance if you do it during this broadcast, you'll be entered for a chance to fly out here in the future at our expense. And you know, hang out with God king of the daily wire. Correct and small Chica how to get our scotch recharge. That's what this is real bad. You're running. I think that the answer is obvious. You had them served in those glasses data in the leftist here. No matter how much you drink it, just automatic automatic refills. Here's the popcorn here. It just doesn't have enough flavor. That's better. It gives you that special thing. So it is International Women's Day just past Friday. And I actually just feel like it wouldn't be very Christian or whatever been as of not. Talked briefly about the absurdity that is international women's to celebrate Caitlyn Jenner. All those track and field stores and ice house, condescending view. No, nobody knows this only one day. Three percent of the population. You know, one three hundred sixty five day International Women's Day, destroyed the twentieth century uh, God, very few people. The international women's Dan Morris. In. What was the one thousand nine hundred nineteen seventeen started the Russian revolution? And Leon Trotsky. No, less a communist. It's interesting credited International Women's Day, which had been invented in one thousand nine nine in New York by the socialist party it then spread in one thousand nine ten. There were a couple of celebrations it eight hundred later fast forward in Russia. They had an International Women's Day demonstration Trotsky credited with launching the revolution. Which is why Lennon made it a national holiday in the Soviet Union. Not only that once you give them the vote they stopped letting us have alcohol. This is one of the things there's only one thing that matters about International Women's Day, captain marvel came out. Has been she finally, we haven't female superhero. They've now the other one from wonder woman, the the ones actually seventies all the guys had like posters up on the. Not like not like any of the not like Elektra. No one saw that wasn't movie, by the way. That's. True quality. If if women can make superhero movies that bomb at the box office, then they are equal to. But yeah, I International Women's Day is always a it's always shocking to me that on International Women's Day. We're supposed to worry about how difficult women have it in the free society in the history of humanity for women where they constitute the majority of voters, the majority of people who get college degrees and a higher earning cohort when they first get out of college before they start having kids and taking time off from the workforce. This is the real trouble. Like, we can't look across the sea. Where women are forced into Asia. When we're there were they are forced into abortion in China or whether they or their victims with general genital mutilation. Yeah. Yeah. We can talk about any of those things on International Women's Day. You know, like actually helping women who are suffering interactive pretend that true suffering is that it took twenty one marvel movie not very mediocre relaxing to finally be cast in a marvel movie with a female lead superhero now Scarlett Johansson. What what would it look like if we celebrated meant I want I want to celebrate the things that men discovered. Like, you get every everything I want us to things we invented like every every day. Okay. Tucker carlson. Medium. You could argue that the greatest thing that meant in addition to discovering the entire everything except uranium. I think. That one of the greatest achievements of men, particularly in the west in in particularly in this country is that men afforded to women the right to vote actual, which is the largest peaceful transfer voluntary transfer of power probably in all of human history in which the group of people men who had all political power one hundred percent of it chose to give all of the political power, not half of it all of it because it an electoral democracy democracy. Whoever has the majority of the votes has the political power. And by the way, so women are or over fifty percent of the population. But the voter gap gives women a fifteen point advantage women vote at a significant men and men voluntarily gave that power to women because they recognized in the Sorkin Justice. They thought that there was a better way as you often say they built on the foundations of previous generations and move the world toward a freer for your place, and they elected to give women. This. That for a long time, and continually men are smokes all of this is true. And when we say men, invented everything, of course, the automatic counterargument is right because women were in the workforce has meant didn't want them in the workforce there's truth to that too. But it is also true. That men did a lot of good things. Like, I remember stand. Why we can't just recognize that both sexes have given enormous amount. Well, civilization or two or the automatic denigration of women who have chosen be mothers, which. The whole problem. That's the whole problem. The whole problem is that feminism has imposed a masculine values on everybody. So so that women are actually less under feminism than they were when I said, oh, women the other half the of the civilization who've given birth to every single human being made every home made every raider. How dare you? How dare you? I mean, the the idea that it was somehow more important to to be build a civilization that we built to protect women and to be the woman that was being built to protect is insane. It is insane. And to sell two women that the only way that they can succeed is to be essentially men is cut short when it is to be a willing of the truth is though that this is something that that I said after the death of George H W Bush that it's harder to be a good man than it is to be a great man that being a great man is about fame and being in a in a moment where are needed and watch me a little you are and you step forward and you pick up the flag during the paintings and stuff. It's a lot harder to be the good person who is actually making the gym. The world work now when the truth is that for the vast majority of human history. It was men were the the people who are in the position to be the great men women were not in the position to be the corner. Great women. It was women who made the world work, of course. Because women make more every homework. They make every civilization our. Yeah. And ignoring that, nor the historic like, the one of the prompts feminism is that it actually ignores the contributions that women maids westernization history. It's like, oh, yeah. You guys like actually agree with the statement that you were making half ac-. She Asli then created everything like, yeah. You guys predate everything all the good all the bad the entire civilization after just give us all the power. Then we'll change everything. It's like no you guys in the joke. Once you impose male values on everybody men win. You know, once you do that, we we should though in the realm of political power, perhaps the most famous politicians political leaders ever were women. Elizabeth I Queen Victoria, Catherine in Russia. I mean, they're they actually yeah. Women did have a fair share of governance, and in many cases, glorious governance that just that is. Lord, I guess by feminist ideology. Also, sometimes missed by us, and it probably shouldn't be that women are smarter than feminists. Swimming in this country. Have fifty three percent of the population is women as you said, they have a fifteen point spread in terms of the electoral vote, which means they have if they chose to marshal it as a monolithic way one hundred percent of political power. I often think it's funny. When people say if if we had if we were truly an equitable society, then women would have fifty three percent of representatives in congress and men would have forty seven. And I always say, you don't actually know how. Twirl the mom if all women voted for women. It wouldn't be that fifty three percent of congress would be women all of congress would be women would win every single race. Right. But fortunately, women are smarter than feminists and women aren't just trying to create this false equality in in the world women are using their votes. They use them more than men do and they don't just use them in these sort of brainless identity politics feminist ways, they use them to elect people who they think are going to do a good job in that results in a world that again have there been historic injustices. Of course, there have been if you go back and say, I mean in the early in the early days of the twentieth century women couldn't vote, and I would say, yes. And if we are in the early days of the twentieth century that would be a compelling argument for why things are wrong. But of course, as time has gone by the we've done a fairly good job of extending the benefits of of our free society to. Previously underrepresented people. And fortunately on top of that women have started that in a fairly good way. And haven't haven't embraced this? Now, it's our turn. We're gonna kick all them into the curb. I mean, liberal feminist women have that point of view, but the majority of women who vote it's a it's a bigger point. Also about activists versus people like the when you take feminists versus women gay activists versus gay people black activist versus black people, it really, they really they're the people that represent or pretend to represent a terrible name because these activists are the worst of of the group almost always and the majority of the people are often times, incredibly smart, incredibly commonsensical. I think that's true of all people have ties to other members of the civilization. Activists are are their own little bubble. That's right. And that means that they're only associated with members of the bubble in everybody else's the outgrowth for them to fight going back to what you said, by the way about men giving women power, which is also true Protestants giving Catholics power, and you know, and Christians giving people. Other religions power if a little bit of gratitude were injected into the civilization. I can't see how that would be a bad thing. I can't see how the idea should be wear here now, and you're the old people you should get out a kissy whites. Not thank you very much for letting us in great ideas that you came up with and I hope we can participate in our own great ideas. I don't understand what that's not a better idea. No better approach. The world would be a much better place with some gratitude. Which is I if you're if you're a man in the world, you should be grateful for good women everyday not just on one timeliness holiday every year. And if you're a good woman, you should be grateful for all the stuff. Machines. For captain marvel you made him watch it so Orval. I'll I'll save you guys. If you don't want to go. I mean, you know, I'll be very honest. I hate the Sean I despise genre. I liked dark Knight and Logan. Those are the two superhero movies. I like, so I'm Joe I'm putting that out at least you picked two good ones too. Good west. I've seen most of these movies, probably at least half of them. This movie was subpar, even by the standards. The reason is that it was extraordinarily boring. It had no stakes whatsoever female super. Because it had this feminist ideology injected into it, the problem with the feminists superhero is she can't do anything wrong. She's just perfect. It's like superman without the kryptonite issue. Starts out awesome. She ends awesome. So there's never any stakes whatsoever. End the movie it self had no story. I mean, there was no storyline. There was new narrative whatsoever. It was so tedious. It was so boring by the John Rhys standards. It was only like thirty percent worse than most of these formulaic movies. But it was thirty percent worse. And they say that only male critics are knocking the movie that is not true, major female critics are knocking the movie, it's just bad. And it tells you a lot about our society that rotten tomatoes is completely redoing their voting system there. Purging negative comments from the board to protect an ideology, even through a terrible. My own defense. I would like to say that I calculated how much longer Knowles has to in how much longer I have to live divide to see it. It would have been relatively like spending three months in the movie theater yet. About the about the rotten tomatoes. Things said amazing that the left will shift the the identification required to sound off on captain marvel, but they're against voting. I mean, I haven't seen captain marvel yet I do plan on seeing it at some point. I'll point out that wonder woman was actually the movie of really good one. Wonder woman was good because it was not self consciously feminist, meaning the they sort of just assume that the characters feminist now, and then gal Gadot actually played a woman now with, you know, actual womanly qualities. But this is this is my great rip on the did you see the movie atomic lawn with with Charlie's thrown? So basically she plays JAMES BOND, but it's like to just play JAMES BOND like they make her quasi, lesbian and all of this stuff. And it it's legitimately it, which is they're Braga, but what is true is that you could have substituted a male for her. Character would not have changed one line of dialogue for the entire film. If that's true, you've written a bad movie. Really if characters are specific the best. This is my problem with captain marvel in it's it's not a problem with the film. I have not seen the film. It's a problem with the the celebration of captain marvel as an archetype for a strong woman, and it's that I love Buffy the vampire slayer, I think phase one of the greatest TV things that's ever happened in the history of of television. And people would always be a strong powerful woman. And a great example, two little girls everywhere. And I thought no into every generation is born to Slater, and she's imbued with supernatural powers given to her across the centuries to fight the vampires, and it's sort of like the conversation we've had about Black Panther where it's like, you know, the the magic space rock falls down and then Africa got to be Europe. And that's actually kind of a racist premised. Yeah. It's also kind of a sexist permits to me to say women are just as powerful as men if they're given gamma radiation and a secret laser from chick. Imagine like, I see Buffy is a great story with with a female lead. And that might be novel and interesting to women, but but but he can fight men because Buffy has supernatural powers, and you captain marvel can fight men because captain marvel has supernatural powers superman can stop a bullet. Not because he's a man. It's because he's super. Yes. So I'm not supposed to look to superman and go that's just proof that all men are more powerful than a locomotive. No, it's proof that superman. There is a kernel of an interesting idea in captain more of like, this is not spoilers because I think this was even in some of the previews a very early in the movie physically she's she's not as strong as the men. She can't jump the rope or whatever. And actually, the main problem she has if she gets to emotional and their emotions run away with her, and it's actually making a sort of a comment on sex in the real problem facing her is pride. This is quite interesting. This is something that we all face trying to do people will warned her against. Yes. You can't make that jump or you can't make that. Yup. It she'll do it. Anyway of. Yeah. And and there was that little kernel there that really could've made captain marvel pretty good, and they just just overwhelmed it with boring story, tedious slogans ideology, and it was week. It actually could have probably been a pretty good movie. It's kind of it's kind of sad thing that we fight over these stories as if it mattered. I mean, this is the new theory, basically on the materialist left is that everything we. We have as human beings is based on stories. It's kind of the usual Harari idea. That nations are a story money is a fiction human rights for fiction, God is a fiction, and these are just stories that we tell and they create something real because we all agree with them. And therefore, it matters the stories somehow are much more important than you think. Some somehow, you know, I thought wonder we'll move a good picture too. I really enjoyed it. But winning critics intellectuals cried at that movie as if somehow change the estate of women, and that's just not true that is not the way stories work, and it's not the effect that stories have I was taking Black Panther people got really uptight about it. Yeah. My my blue back. Black Panther is not that it was a bad movie. I thought it was a fine movie. I enjoyed it. Honestly. But I had some problems with some basic concepts in it, again, the very notion that natural resources are the rationale for the for civilizations growing. Right. Is not a very good one. But with that said, my real problem was of a lead up to. To it as like black people knew nited states finally had been empowered by this movie with a with a bunch of black people playing superheroes. It's like if you're finding your meaning in superhero movies to the extent that you feel that your entire that the entire history of race in America has been deeply affected by a superhero movie in two thousand nineteen let me suggest that you enter the real world for a seconds. And I would say the same thing about a Jewish superhero. I mean, this this is not raise specific. Yeah. But people got so angry this like how dare you take this away from people? You're just mad. There's a black super. I don't care. There's black superhero. That's my point point is. I don't care if there's a black superhero. That's fine. Who cares that I think that's exactly right in the fact that people are fighting over the first of all shows they got they don't have enough to do. Favorite thing is when people forecast opposition that isn't there? They're like, oh, look at all these guys who are really angry, captain marvel dig you're angry, aren't drilling. No, not in the know, you're pissed that's gonna tell your pets. Not really not fifty percent of leftist argument. It's like all of those days. This is something that you're angry nearly no pretty much not Adrian remorse. Insults. Fifty percent of the audience. Yeah. And I'm pissed that marvel insults. The entire audience by acting like they're making history. The fact that there's a female captain marvel doesn't bother me in the fight. I'm mostly pissed in marvel things they can get away with this crap where they pretend they killed Spiderman. The nonsense was that by the way, anyone who cried at the end of the vendors. Anyone who cried at the end of an adventure Nydia. Joy, inventors Infinity war the minute. They killed Black Panther. If you were crying are so surfing. So stupid. I actually love I loved Infinity war. I think it was a fundamental mistake in the by the filmmakers pick you'll Spiderman and blackmails source of everyone. Been real. It is a reset. Maybe they're really going to kill these people and then off two of their billion dollar industry. Well, you guys are sliding. So I do want to go for one more round of questions with our daily wire subscribers they keep the lights on they give us their sweet sweet mammon, and if they've signed up as annual subscribers during this live broadcast, which means you still got a little time left to sign up during this broadcast. You could win a flight to L A paid for by Ben Shapiro. He's the only one with anybody around here to sit in on a live taping of this your favorite daily wire show, the daily wire backstage, they leash across is gonna read some questions from some of our fair subscribers Alicia, what do you got for she's already given birth? Went to she. Making a nice little team. I love international. You know, if I'm going to be stuck in the kitchen, I figure I'd make myself a hot toddy. You can't drink when you're pregnant. Betty, draper. We do have questions from worse than Scribner's Nicole wants to know, do you think the key to having a successful business is to start it in your garage or might I Lisa add the God kings pool. House who's definitely the key to us having six hundred. No, I think that the key to having a successful business is to start wherever you can. And the key to having a successful business systems or stand that not all of your businesses will be successful. Almost everyone who's successful and business has failed at business businesses. Very hard. It's sort of like I've made this show on the show before I hate it. When guys leave the hospital after having their first child and they've got the world's greatest dad ball cap. And I always say, you're not even a mediocre fall. Other for literally like, there's got to be more that you're going to have to learn than what you have acquired the shop. The same business. You're you're gonna learn an awful lot. When you set about to be in business, you're gonna fail. You're gonna have to get back up. You have to learn from your mistakes where should you do it in your garage? Sure. If you've got an idea that can start your garage, not every idea can some ideas require seed capital that require angel investors. They require larger amounts of capital than can be sort of a quired at those levels. And you're not gonna take twenty million dollars worth of investment capital capital and start something in your garage. Every business is unique every opportunity is unique. I have I have a speech that I give to young typically it's young people move to Hollywood because they wanna make it in the in the movies. And they're all everybody moves out. Here is looking for the same wisdom. They wanna know how do I make it? And when I moved out I had the same thought like if I could meet Steven Spielberg, he could tell me how to make movies. I a smart guy. He could tell me then I could do it. And what I came to realize over time is that if I ever got that meeting with spill Berg I'd. Groped him. And I'd be like, Mr. Spielberg longtime listener, first-time caller. How do I make a movie and he would say oh making a movie Ceesay? So here's what I do. I I read a book or magazine article that I really respond to and I call it my lawyer, and I say, hey, are the rights available to this? They say, hey, we'll kick it around. We'll dig for it. They call me back a week later. Have you know, we tracked down the author the rights are available. They're gonna cost a million dollars. I might pick it up. So we write a check for a million dollars to get the rights to the book. Then I said, well, I'm gonna need a screenwriter. So I call up my agents oversee a and they go look for a good screenwriter. We set up a bunch of meetings with a bunch of guys I hire a guy who had a great hit last year is one of the biggest hits at the box office. I pay him a million dollars to write a draft the descrip-. He comes back six months later. I read the script in it's not what I was hoping for. So I go to number two on the list, and I pay him a million dollars. He does a page one rewrite of the thing at the end of the year, though, I've got a script, and I'm really happy with so now, I call up my my partners over universal and say, hey, you know that. I look deal that I've got where you have to guarantee forty five hundred screens for one movie for me every year because I'm Steven Spielberg. And they go yet. And I have I got the movie for you. And they're like, okay, cool. We'll open it up forty five hundred screens. So then I call my business partners over DreamWorks. And I'm like, we're gonna need one hundred and eighty million dollars to make this. They say cool we'll architect half of out of our domestic fund, then we'll go to a Bank and Indian put the rest together. And before you know, it three years later, I'm on set with two hundred and fifty employees, and I'm making a movie, that's awesome. Stevens gobert. How do I make a move and he'd go? Oh, how do you make a movie on the hill with? So I always give the speech to young people in Hollywood, and it applies to people in business too. And it's this it's all my accumulated wisdom, and it's about those who do and those who don't do what I have observed having lived on this life a fair bit now gotten a few grey hairs people who've started podcast my full house and become the biggest podcasters in the country. I have friends who star in these big superhero movies that we talk about. I have friends who've started businesses worth hundreds of millions of dollars. I have friends who still wait tables. I have friends who washed out and move back home. I have friends who found other things like me to do that weren't what they originally anticipated. But they've gone on and have had successes. I've I've I know somebody who's done at all. And what I have discovered is that the difference between those who do and those who don't do is that those who do do and those who don't do great don't shoot that is great. When I give this advice. People are so disappointed because it doesn't satisfy because what you're looking for the thing that would satisfy does not exist. There is only those who do do and those who don't do don't do the Christmas usually know those who do long before they have done like I I have a pretty good average now of being able to size somebody up and determine will they do it may be a decade before they do. But they're doers. And they're doing and those who do do what does it mean? It means they do whatever they're always doing. They're learning from the things that they've done and trying to do something else. They're not waiting by the phone for an agent to call them. They're not waiting by the phone for somebody to discover them down at the soda shop in. Cast them. You're the next big thing kit. They're out there making their way. And the other thing that they do is they respond to what God brings into their lives. They basically take the opportunities that come before them. They don't try to will the world to complete conformity with their vision. Which by the way, it's a vision that they formed before they done anything and therefore for they knew anything they are willful people by in large. They're strong. Let me say it differently. They're strong willed people, but they have the humility to let God be God and not them and those people do so if you wanna be a successful business person you wanna make it in the movies. You wanna be one who does? That's great advice. Nothing bad. My question would be then what does Michael Knowles do will do by not doing? Michael. This comes from subscriber named Michael let's hope that his last name is not an old or you've been really busy up there with your phone tweeting way questions he wants to know how can the left and the right converse? When they can't even agree on facts. I actually think it's a language problem. The problem is the only way that you can converse with anybody is if you speak the same language, right? There is an objective reality outside of two people. In your using words, and symbols and always things outside here to make whatever's going on in your head accessible to whatever's going on in somebody else's hit. And with the left. Does is it constantly is perverting language. It's always undermining light, which is inverting language. Sometimes to mean, the opposite of what it actually means. They do this famously with Justice right Justice is no social Justice means the opposite of Justice political correctness opposite of correctness. Right. So you have to do is be so precise about language when we were Michigan yesterday. I came out to talk to some of the protesters, and they had a sign that said trans women are women, and I said. Okay. I want. I'm not trying to set you up. You I want you to explain your point of view. We're talking about you use this phrase trans women, which is very ambiguous. We're talking about somebody born a man has all the male genitals as the male chromosomes at a short haircut when he was a kid now, he identifies as a woman should. And as I said the word is that I am not how dare you. I will not speak to you. If you use that pronoun, heat to refer to her which used to be him, and this person that I was just asking please give you a million people will see what you have to say, give your point of view. He walked away because he c- he refused to converse. You can't make somebody come to the table and converse with you the best way that you can try to make yourself understandable mic. Someone else's fuse. Understandable is to use really really clear language. But if they're willing to talk, you're not gonna make them do it. I'm offended. So. So what do you think you talked to a lot of people that disagree with you? I mean, I think the only way to have a conversation we need to things one a common understanding that a fact is a fact the fact that exist, and to you need to have a common understanding of the rules of the conversation because otherwise you end up falling apart because what you'll do is. You'll start a conversation about facts, somebody gets emotional, and then all of a sudden you're into character attacks, and that's not a conversation anymore. He's basically a conversation is sort of like, you're building a tower out of blocks with somebody. And if you put down to block and the person mmediately takes that block away the tower doesn't get Bill. There's no second level to the conversation. The best conversations are the ones that are happening. Once you get three or four levels up in the conversation, but you actually have to build the foundations together. So one of the mistakes. I see people make is they try to build on the third floor of the of the building when the first two floors don't exist. So there's no common agreement as to the rules of the conversation. What are the what are the limits of the conversation are which issue are we talking about is it insulting for me to use? Certain phraseology with you. As you said, if you don't agree on the on the fundamental framework of is the building today square, or is it going to be an octagon, then you and you mmediately started arguing about what sort of minaret half the building. There's there's no conversation to be had Alicia. All right. This is a pretty good question. One that I've wondered myself this comes from subscriber named Mike which don't forget that. If you subscribe right now during this barred cast, you too could be stuck here with me. So. Toby sign up for that. How do I unsubscribe? I have no idea I've been trying. Any time you like. He makes us. Hey, guys. Just the political right run the risk of giving eo see too much exposure. And thus giving her more credibility. It seems that Democrats did this with Trump in two thousand sixteen. No, no. I mean. Yes. Yes. In the sense that she's prominent because we give her attention important. That's important. I think that's total crap. I'm gonna stop you right there. That is garbage. And it is crap issues from is it no, it is not a reason she has really really think we contribute to it. No. I think that the left so what the left day is. They put her on the cover of every magazine, they elevated to national prominence they feature her at every conference. And then they say, oh, she pisses you off doesn't shake, right? She really annoys. She's inter inter like, no. I think ride users bad. It's exactly we're talking about before in. No, no. She really knows. We'll show you three times as much of her until you're like, no, I think it's a bad idea. Here's why thing it's about idea. Oh, you're obsessed with virtue because I didn't put her on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. If I'd never talked about her, you know, what she would be on the cover of Rolling, Stone magazine, and so tired of this. And by the way, I don't even agree with it about from. I don't. Think that people had ignored a Trump from just gone away. I think it's such wishful thinking that you're in control the universe that you're not in control him. Donald Trump was never going away. He was one of famous people in the United States. People knew who he was people thought, it was hilarious people wanted to hear it. He had to say. And you know, what every other candidate in the race tried to do with Donald Trump, ignore him. That's what they did. Go back to the primaries Republicans, ignore Donald Trump. And you know, what happened? He won the nomination. Really, we're talking I was talking to the Cruz campaign and the Rubio campaign, I was like that you can't ignore him. Stop ignoring him, you're attacking each other. And you think that he's just gonna go. Do you not you don't think billion two billion dollars worth of free media helped him out? I think that he was going to get that regardless. And I think that the media that was providing him that coverage were Plymouth wear. Left-wingers Android winners. Okay. Fox and friends built him. The guy was gonna get media coverage. She's a celebrity celebrities. Get media coverage ANC has star power. She's a celebrity. You wanna see how this works? Let's all pay attention to AB club, which are for we conceive. She suddenly immediate throw a desk. At the reason why I I give her a lot of coverage even things that aren't on the cover of Rolling Stone. I play her all the time. The reason I don't think it's a bad thing to give her a lot of coverage is because AFC takes leftist arguments to their logical conclusion and their wacky crazy conclusions than knocked down every building in some. If she's so much more honest than Bernie, totally honest. I love. Wasn't that important accused? She's inherently important you have to cover and she is the avatar of socialism yeses attractive? She self-confidence she's ignorant destructive. And that is central with socialism is socialism looks beautiful. You know, she's very attractive. It says I'm gonna solve all these problems for you. And she says that it knows nothing about human nature or economics. And ultimately destroys everything it touches. She is socialist. She said the great thing this week, which is so honest, which is that that if automation comes none of you will have jobs, and that'll be great. But the able to learn languages and art music. Bill whittle very famously talked about this almost a decade ago. Because this is a common socialist communist argument, we have that one day you won't have to work so hard, and then you'll be able to learn all these language you'll be able to do all the able to play the violin. And Bill said yet that happened though. It was called the iphone capitalism gave it to us. It gave us one hundred percent of all the accumulated knowledge of man that we carry around in our pocket, you wanna learn a language. There's an app you wanna learn music. There's an app you want to know about you know, the Peloponnesian war. There's an app and what do you do? Yeah. Look at foreign. Lisa. Really, I know. By the way, did any of you on your shows this week cover? Mommy, porn from the UK. The headline. And then I close, Mike. Actually read the story. These mothers in the United Kingdom saw online pornography for the first time that their that their teenage children were watching and they were moved two of them said that they vomited because it's so disgusting. What actually takes place in online pornography, which is anything the the the worst things that the mind can see about. And so they were trying to think what do we do about this that our children are being exposed to these horrible dehumanizing, objectify ING images of women and all of these exploited sexual positions. And their idea was let's make mommy approved pornography for our children to watch. So they contact a pornographic production company, and they hire them to make mom approved porn, which is pornography that sort of adheres to the normal customs of sex. You know, there's a little foibles and people's bodies aren't perfect. And it doesn't always work the way you think it's going to work, and it requires you know, requires conversation and looking at. Each other's eyes and a great story line. And then they premiered the movie and made their children's sit with them off with their mothers and watch. Mommy approve. You know, before I mean, obviously, it's like the worst thing. I've ever heard these women are clearly the shrewdest mothers is they know anything that. Mommy, does or mommy thinks is cool like instantly. You'll renew might be able to. There will be no grandchildren higher next. The story about this believe it or not it has nothing with my own mother. So when I was at UCLA studying things that really matter you had to take some some kind of generalized G courses one. Of course, I had to take was a course in Israeli film. So Isreaeli film in particularly it's gotten a lot better now. But in in the one thousand nine hundred and two thousand basically euro porn. So it was just like everything that was the the trashy est of European TV was what Israel has made this particularly for like nineteen sixty nine hundred seventy s when when Israel was getting on at speed is a country. So there's a famous rarely actress whose son was in the class, and they decided that they were going. She was gonna come in interesting to speak about this film, and they're gonna show this film, and in this film. She's completely nude. And she is having pretty graphic sacks. With a couple of different dudes on the screen and her son is in the classroom watching this. So this is already awkward enough. And she and during the Cuban a she she asked her said, how did you feel watching? It's like, what was pretty awkward mom? It was a couple of weeks later where we're back in the class. And you know, I'm an orthodox Jew. Right. And I'm sitting there most of the Israeli film class. Most of the kids are Jewish. So behind me there. I'm sitting with the sun and a couple of other kids, and they turned to me, and they're like us your orthodox right now. So you've never had sex. Right. Your virgin until marriage. Like, right. That's my religious principle. I've never had sex, and they're like well have you and they start getting mocking, and they go so have you ever seen a naked woman? And I was like, well, yeah, I lived in western culture. It's almost impossible not to see a naked woman at one point. And and one of them goes, well, who's last naked woman? You saw the geigo your mom. Restroom other jobs. Ranked he'll save us from ourselves. I don't know if I can I'm currently sadder than betas dog looked in that entire thread. Cain wants to know. Hey, guys. What are your thoughts on the spread of conservatism among millennials? It's lucrative. And for nine ninety nine. Daily wire subscriber you have just by the way, only a few minutes left to become a subscriber in annual subscription during this broadcast be entered into a chance to win a trip out to see us do this again in the future. Here's what I was about millennials and conservatism, it, it's it's a pretty amazing thing. The CEO of YouTube was interviewed by CARA. Swisher cara. Swisher code Swisher. Who is a fixture really in reporting on Silicon Valley, very famously dated our time. Yeah. Very famously interviewed Bill Gates, and Steve Jobs together was a huge thing that she made happen once and in the interview Switzer actually asks for YouTube to ban the Ben Shapiro show. And what I loved about it. If she said, she says, the Ben Shapiro's date way drug to the far worst things need to be. Not to the Andrew claybin show and the Mike. Actually says Nazis because she says they watch me and then they watch Jordan Peterson than they watch Nazis on. But the beautiful thing is the come back to you. The cycle of violence. Reason she knows about Ben Shapiro is because she walked in to her living room, and her son was watching something on YouTube, and she could hear the violent hate filled bigoted rhetoric coming from his screen and she while filter, and he was watching. Yeah. She says her son, son. Why are you watching this evil evil spirit? And they said, well, no that's been Shapiro. He's super smart. She says this in the interview just now that's been Shapiro. Super smart. I know he's not smart. He's clever, but he's an idiot. And he's immoral and he's terrible. And and and the CEO of YouTube says how you don't want us to you're not suggesting we've band, Ben Shapiro. And she says, I would I would. I can't. But then the best that she says is anyway, don't worry about my son. He's already lost. And I wouldn't have. We wouldn't amazing thing that we live in a generation where if you are a millennial American today and you want to rebel against your parents. Yes. What usually go over to the YouTube, and you look for most religious button down here. Here in America. And when he pops up, and he says things like, hey, kids, get a degree get a job, but don't have sex before marriage that you'll be successful. And it's like your parents are like oh. Our day. We're having this amazing. So I spoke at U of M last night. And there's a tweet last night from a person who's conservative said, they brought a liberal friend and after the lecturers over liberal turn to this conservativeness documents that he's not a racist. And it's like. Right. Of course. But this is this is why I think that there is hope still for the millennials is that at a certain point reality doesn't true. I mean, this fantasy world that we've been living in where you can rip on all of the evils of capitalism, well benefiting from every aspect of capitalism imaginable, where you can talk about how terrible personal responsibility is well living in the free country in the history of the world where you are told your victim every day while being the most privileged people who have ever lived. And where you are told the people who are racist were legitimately not racist. And are in fact anti-racist, and you are told that true racism is not acknowledging that grew by density should Trump. Individualized real racism at a certain point reality intrudes, and you just these people are are joyless theirselves. They're annoying in the it's it's really is that the left has gotten so irritating and annoying, and this is not a female term, Bossie, male and female Bossie. Yeah. It's just like I don't want. Bernie sanders. Running my life. I don't want ASU running my life. And when I say this, I think there are a lot of millennials were like, yeah. That's that's basically. Right. That's basically, right. And as they get older, and they realized just how bossy these the leftists have what they have in mind. It's gonna get worse. This is why ASEAN Bernie Sanders are wonderful because they're just stripping away. I'll Britain's it's like, yeah. No hamburgers. Number to the car is going to get rid of the airplanes. You're gonna watch all of our favorite entertainment. Brennan's are good bread lines. Red lines. Red. There is a little bit of a distinction to between the millennials who came of age with Barack Obama. They all fell in love with them. There's not a red America. There's not a blue America, and the gen Z the the group younger than millennials that we were talking to yesterday Michigan that we see on college campuses, those are different groups. And I think that group has come of age in the age of the woke skulls in the age of censorship in the age of inbred lines and the touting of socialism, the those are very different moments that happened very close to one another. And it gives me a lot of hope for those youth these days of gen Z, and hopefully, maybe the millennials can learn something from them. Yeah. Because if the left has taught us anything that you learn exclusively from the children. My friends. My friends our time together and didn't get in your subscription, your annual subscription over a daily, wire dot com slash subscribe. It's too late for you. If you're watching this later on demand, it's too late for you. It was only during the live broadcast. Still subscribe, we could really use the support. And we'll probably do this thing again in the future because we want to give opportunities to meet more of our subscribers take more questions from our subscribers. So for Ben for Andrew for Michael Ilia? I'm sorry for Ben for Michael for any the lovely and for myself and all of us at the day, the wire, thanks for giving us, you know, all of your time and life works this evening audience. Yes.

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