6 Episode results for "Brandenburg Concerto Number"

Johann Sebastian Bach 4: The Story of the Brandenburg Concertos

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 4 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 4: The Story of the Brandenburg Concertos

"Hello I'm Naomi. Lewin welcomed the classics for kids. That's the opening to the fifth of six Brandenburg Concertos by Johann Sebastian Bach. Why start with number five well first of all the concerto numbers don't really have anything to do with the order in which. Bach wrote them. The Fifth Brandenburg Concerto features a Harpsichord and the story of the Brandenburg concertos begins with a trip. That Johann Sebastian Bach took to pick out a new HARPSICHORD for the prince whose court orchestra he conducted. There are actually three solo instruments in the Brandenburg Concerto number five Harpsichord violin and flute. The harpsichord is an ancestor of the piano. But as you can hear it doesn't sound the same. That's because Harpsichord strings are plucked by teeny tiny. Quills in a piano. The sound is made by hitting the strings with small felt covered hammers. Here's a spot where the harpsichord plays alone. So you can hear it while he was on his trip looking at Harpsichord he met Chris. Jon Ludvig the Margrave of the province. That's like a state of Brandenburg. Margrave is a fancy title. They used to give to military governors of German provinces. The margrave of Brandenburg had his own orchestra and when he found out. Bach was a composer. He said he wouldn't mind hearing some of his work. Only own okay. There's the Brandenburg Concerto number one. It has a really huge group of Solo instruments. Seven in all Bach was thrilled that the Margrave was interested in his music. He thought there might be a good job prospect for him in Brandenburg so he pulled together a set of concertos mostly stuff he'd already written for the orchestra he conducted and sent them off with a very flowery letter to the Margrave the Brandenburg Concerto Number. Three IS FOR THREE SETS OF STRING. Instruments Violins violas and cellos. It's a good thing. Bach didn't hold his breath waiting for an answer from the margrave because he never got one in fact the margrave probably never even looked at these beautiful concertos. What A DOOFUS. Part of the problem may have been that his orchestra wasn't as big as the one baulk road them for so the Margaret didn't have the musicians to play them but he could have at least sent a thank you note. That's the six Brandenburg Concerto. It's also just for strings given the Margrave of Brandenburg's rudeness. You can bet that. Bach didn't name his concertos Brandenburg years. After he died one of Bach's biographers attached the name to them and obviously it stuck Bach called his pieces concertos for a variety of instruments which is a pretty good description since each one is written a different instrumental combination. The Brandenburg Concerto Number. Four has a small group of soloists two flutes or recorders and a violin. It's the violin that really gets to show off especially towards the end of the peace. The Selo Group in Bach's Brandenburg Concerto number two consists of four very different instruments trumpet Flute Oboe and Violin. See if you can pick them out. I'm ruin I write classics for Kids and produce it at W. G. UC Cincinnati with. Tim Lender and Bruce Ellis. Please join me again for more classics for kids.

Johann Sebastian Bach Brandenburg Concerto Number Brandenburg Brandenburg Concerto Margrave Fifth Brandenburg Concerto Jon Ludvig Lewin Selo Group Bruce Ellis Cincinnati Chris W. G. UC Tim Lender Margaret
Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 4 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

"I'm Naomi Lewin. Welcome to classics for kids. Concerto comes from two Italian words with sort of meanings first concerto means in agreement or together like the word concert. You go to a concert to hear people playing together but the Italian word contract. Tari has to do with struggling. And a concerto also has to do with one or more solo instruments doing friendly battle in concert with a larger group. Italian COMPOSER GIUSEPPE. Torelli gets most of the credit for developing the instrumental concerto. In the late sixteen hundreds an Italian who lived a bit later on Tonio Vivaldi wrote Zillions of Concerto will actually only five hundred or so. But it seems like Zillions Vivaldi's most famous set of concertos named for the four seasons the earliest concertos were written for violins. But you can have a concerto for any instrument. Here's one that you'll have nipple Makoma road for trumpet. One for cello by front-seat high one for Tuba by Refund Williams who in the late twentieth century Scottish composer James Macmillan wrote a concerto called vinnie Emmanuel for percussionist. Evelyn Glenn you can also have a concerto with more than one Solo Instrument Wolfgang Gone Medina's Mozart wrote this one for flute and Harp Dmitri Shostakovich wrote a wonderful concerto for piano and trumpet the end of the peace sense just like music for a silent movie. Let's because when he was young Shostakovich had a job playing piano for silent movies in box day composers also wrote something called the Concerto Grosso which does not mean. A concerto with slimy stuff. Losing out of it grow is Italian for great. Instead of just one or two soloists. A Concerto Grosso has a whole group of soloists. A smaller group pitted against a larger group. George Frederic Handel. Who lived at the same time as Bach wrote quite a few Concerto Grossi? That's the official plural of Concerto Grosso. a lot of Bach's Brandenburg concertos fall into the Concerto Grosso category in the Brandenburg Concerto. Number two the small group consists of Trumpet Flute Oboe Violin and the big group is made up of string instruments. You've heard music from Johann Sebastian faulks Brandenburg Concerto number. Two so by now you might be wondering how many Brandenburg concertos there are and how they got a name like Brandenburg. I'll tell you that next week. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for Kids and produce it with Pimm Lander at wgn Cincinnati. Please join me next. Time for the story of the Brandon. Birds on classics for kids.

Concerto Grosso Brandenburg Concerto Concerto Grosso Naomi Lewin Johann Sebastian faulks Brande Dmitri Shostakovich Zillions Vivaldi Brandenburg Brandenburg Pimm Lander Tonio Vivaldi George Frederic Handel Bach Tari Torelli Evelyn Glenn James Macmillan vinnie Emmanuel Cincinnati Refund Williams
Johann Sebastian Bach 2: The Sons of Johann Sebastian Bach

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 5 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 2: The Sons of Johann Sebastian Bach

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin Johann. Sebastian Bach was the greatest member of a musical dynasty beginning in sixteenth century Germany. Three Hundred Years. Worth of box held jobs as town. Musicians organist and choir directors Johann Sebastian's. Father was a musician. His grandfather was a musician and his great grandfather was a musician. All the male members of the family were trained by their fathers uncles and older brothers to carry on the tradition. That's by no handsome. Asean box Uncle Johann Michio or John. Michael Bah his daughter. Maria Barbara Married Johann Sebastian. Who was her second cousin? I guess that made her Maria. Barbara Bach. Pa IN GERMAN WORD MEANS STREAM BUT JOHANN. Sebastian produced a whole ocean of box. He and Maria Barbara had seven kids when Maria Barbara Died Balk married. A singer named Anna Magdalena and had thirteen more children twenty in all J S. That's short for Johann. Sebastian Bach expected his sons to follow in his footsteps and several of them became well known composers. Box oldest son bill him. Freedom on or W. F. Baugh worked mostly as an organist. He never quite lived up to everybody's great expectations even though he wrote some Nice music the fifth child the third son of J S Baugh was Carl Philipp Emanuel Norse EP. Aw He was very successful. Cpi box spent years working for the flute. Playing King of Prussia. Frederick Great Frederick. The great never went anywhere without his flute. Not even into battle so. Cpa Bach wrote a lot of music both CPI and W. F. were sons of J s Bach's first wife Maria Barbara Anna Magdalena Baw. Second wife was the mother of his youngest son. Johann Christian J C Bach was the most radical member of the clan for starters. He left Germany and went to study and work in Italy in order to get a job at the cathedral in Milan Italy. This Bach did something. Nobody had done before he changed. Religion converting from Lutheran Catholic and J C Bach. Did something else. His father had never done. He wrote operas after Italy. He moved to one of the hottest cities in Europe for Italian opera and became known as the London Bach. That's right people in London. England were crazy about Italian opera even or especially if it was written by Germans. There's a man named Peter Shakily who claims to know about yet another box son P Q. According to Peter Shakily until he discovered P Q. No one wanted to admit that he existed. Peterson says that's because PD Q. Box Stole Music from other composers and came up with things so outrageous that they make people laugh because it makes people laugh. Peter Shakily keeps right on composing. I mean discovering music Cuba that's from PD Q. Bach piece called Kanaya in Brooklyn. That's written for Double Reeds. When a COMPOSER SAYS MUSIC IS FOR DOUBLE REEDS? He means oboe. Zampa Soons instruments that have double reeds sticking out of the top of them. Blowing into the reads is what makes the instruments sound but PD. Cuba wrote for double reeds without Hobos and bassoon. Attached the words pretty funny to watch it to us to be home you know moves run grounding knows PD. Cuba may be big. Newton of someone's imagination but Johann Sebastian. Bach certainly wasn't at the beginning of this show. You heard a bit of his Brandenburg Concerto number. Two next time on classics for kids find out what a concerto is. I May Omi Lewin. I write classics for Kids. And produce with Tim. Lander at WG UC Cincinnati. Please join me again for more classics for kids.

Johann Christian J C Bach Johann Sebastian Naomi Lewin Johann Double Reeds Maria Barbara Uncle Johann Michio Cuba Germany Maria Barbara Died Balk Maria Barbara Anna Magdalena B J S Baugh Italy Anna Magdalena Peter Shakily Frederick Great Frederick Omi Lewin Asean W. F. Baugh Prussia
Johann Sebastian Bach 1: About Johann Sebastian Bach

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 5 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 1: About Johann Sebastian Bach

"Hello I'm Mayo Lewin. Welcome to classics for. Kids is one of your parents doctor or lawyer and maybe as far back as they can remember everyone in their family has gone into the same profession while that's how it was with the Bach family all of them were musicians Johann. That's German for John. Sebastian Bach was born in sixteen eighty. Five in the German town of is enough. His father was the official town musician. There by the time was ten. Both his parents had died so he went to live with his older brother. Who was also a musician? Of course Johann Sebastian. Bach turned out to have very fleet fingers. He played a mean violin and by the time he was eighteen. He had a job as an organist. Bach held three main jobs over the course of his life. You can tell where he was working by. What kind of music? He wrote the first box. Big Jobs was official. Court organist for the Duke of Weimar so a lot of box great organ. Music comes from early on in his career. That Weimar job also had box serving as concert master. The head Honcho violinist of the Duke's orchestra when the Duke of Weimar decided not to make him conductor of the Orchestra. Bach was pretty unhappy. Then a visiting prince offered a job directing his orchestra but when Bach tried to quit his job in Weimar. The dukes said no way he even threw in jail for a month to try and make its point but it didn't work when Bach got out of jail. He headed straight to the town of curtain to work for the prince the prince had a wonderful orchestra so Bach wrote lots of instrumental music. While he was in curtain eventually balk moved onto his last job at the Saint. Thomas Lutheran Church. In the city of Leipzig. His title was cantor. That's what they called the choir and music director and it was a huge job box trained singers organized music for several churches in town and for the University of Leipzig and he composed new music every week for services at the Saint Thomas Church most of Bach's great choral music was written in Leipzig the choir at the Saint Thomas. Church still performs box music every week. One of the coolest things I ever got to do was sit in the church where Bach worked and listen to the choir sing. His music while Bach was alive. No one outside the towns in Germany where he worked had heard of him and people thought of him as just another working musician after he died people pretty much forgot about him until a century later when another composer Felix Mendelssohn dug out some of Bach's music and performed it after that the whole world recognized what a genius had been and Faulk may even be recognized beyond this world in nineteen seventy seven scientists sent the unmanned voyager spacecraft off to explore the galaxy. They put examples of the best that planet Earth had to offer on board and one of those examples was a recording of Johann Sebastian box. Brandenburg Concerto number. Two Johann Sebastian Bach came from a long line of Musicians and he had twenty kids himself so he added even more musicians to the line next week on classics for kids. Some of Johann Sebastian Bach Sons Naomi. Lewin I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim. Lantern at WG UC Cincinnati. Please join me again next. Time for classics for kids.

Sebastian Bach Johann Sebastian Bach Sons Nao Johann Sebastian Bach Bach Weimar Johann Sebastian Mayo Lewin Saint Thomas Church University of Leipzig Leipzig official Thomas Lutheran Church Cincinnati head Honcho Felix Mendelssohn Saint Thomas Germany cantor Tim director
TechStuff Classic: TechStuff Goes on a Voyage

TechStuff

1:01:15 hr | 4 months ago

TechStuff Classic: TechStuff Goes on a Voyage

"Here's the thing. Saving money with Geico is almost better than playing pickup basketball. Because there's always that guy who joins your game. He never passes the rock. He constantly bricks threes, and who completely hack you, and then put his hands up and say no foul, no foul with GEICO. It's easy to switch and save on car insurance, no need to fake an ankle sprain because you're absolutely exhausted so switching, save with Gyco. It's almost better than sports. One night in nineteen, sixty, one on the side of a dark highway. Betty and Barney Hill. Kat Lights in the sky two years later, the underwent hypnosis to try and recall what happened. Some took it as fact. Others thought it was a fantasy, but what really happened that September night in rural New Hampshire join me toby ball for the inaugural season of stranger rivals a CO production of iheartradio in grim, mild from Aaron Monkey. Listen to strange arrivals on the iheartradio. APP ON APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to textile production from iheartradio. Hey there in welcome to tech stuff I'm your host Jonathan? Strickland executive producer with iheartradio and a love, all things, tech and today we're going to listen to a classic episode titled Tech Stuff Goes on a voyage it's about the voyager program and this episode originally published on April Twenty Fourth, two, thousand thirteen. The Voyager program is one of those really fascinating space programs that I absolutely loved learning about so I hope you guys enjoy this classic episode. The first thing we wanted to talk about was. I've kind of what was the purpose. Of the voyager missions, which by the way are still going? On right now, but we wanted to talk about the time line of the missions, and then we'll get into more details about the spacecraft itself, and then follow that up with a discussion about the science that has been discovered by these amazing spacecraft so going back to May nineteen seventy-two. That's when NASA begins to fund emission, though involve designing building and launching spacecraft. Spacecraft, that are meant to explore the outer planets of our solar system, and even before this back in nineteen, sixty five and engineer named Gary Flanders noticed that sometime in the nineteen seventies, the outer planets would be aligned planetary alignment in such a way as to make this very possible, and this was you know the space program was going and booming and it was. Kind of an incredible. Alignment of the stars that allowed us to right when we had money to do this stuff. Right so so I mean that planetary alignment is really what makes the voyager missions possible because you know if the if the plants were in such an alignment so that let's say the. Missile. They're still aligned properly. They're just not. Viable for us to explore share. Let's say let's say like Jupiter's on one side of the sun, and Saturn's on the other side of the sun than it would be really tricky to design a spacecraft. Could explore both. And this particular alignment isn't going to occur again for another one hundred seventy six years, so you had to jump on the opportunity, and so in one thousand, nine, hundred eighty two, even though it was still years away from when this alignment would occur, NASA gets on the ball and starts to design this and in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, seven, they are finished with design and the spacecraft they had been designing was. was under the working name the Mariner Jupiter Slash Saturn nineteen seventy seven, but they decided to rename it little bit mouthful. Yeah, they called it later and on August twentieth, Nineteen, seventy seven Titan Centaur. Rocket carried one of the two voyager spacecraft from Cape Canaveral Florida into the atmosphere, and ultimately into space, which one was it that will announce I. It was voyager to that launched I which one launched second voyager one. Okay so. So this this was basically for PR purposes because the the way that they were designed voyager, one was going to do to stricter. It was going to reach Jupiter I. So start sending back images of Jupiter. You know fingers crossed if all goes well I and NASA about that the public would be incredibly confused if if. Voyager one launched first, but got to the planet's second, whereas some for some reason lodge second Gig to the planet, I is less confusing. No one was paying attention to the launch. Goodness knows no one pays attention to to salon. Yeah, but one thing. You're actually able to watch while you're still on earth. It still makes me tear up every single time. Anything gets launching. Only just. Humidity's so beautiful. That's pretty awesome when you think about what it takes to get something into space, it is phenomenal, the amount of engineering and ingenuity that went into that but yesterday so the Voyager two launches I. The voyager wine launches about sixteen days later, in fact, not about six days later it launched on September fifth, Yep, nineteen, seventy seven and it's using the same sort of rocket Titan Centaur rocket, which by the way love it. Anyway. The initial purpose was for these to explore the giant planets in the outer solar system. Those giant planets are Jupiter. And Neptune. Pluto of course Nada giant planet it does not get the treatment. For these missions forget you Pluto, and there were two separate trajectories that were being used voyager. One of course was designed so that the trajectory was chosen so that it would reach Jupiter I. Then move onto Saturn. And then get flew off to head toward interstellar space. Joop Voyager two. Would do a visit to all four of the giant planet right, so that's why the you have the different timelines, because even though voyager launched I for it to be able to hit this trajectory where it was going to pass by each of the four giants. It had to do that at a different angle. So, that's the and if you were to look at a model of the solar system and just spend the plants around at the different rates you would see. Oh, yeah, now. I understand. You would have to be really particular about when you would launch and how you would launch for it to be able to hit all of these points properly amazing engineering that's required and just math. This required to make sure that you've got the right the right timing. Yeah, and it was. It was kind of shady, you know. Know basically until it happens, no one was sure that it was going to happen right, and and it's interesting. Because the voyager spacecraft used the plants themselves to help. Make sure they got to where they needed to go, but we'll get into that. It's pretty awesome, though so moving down the time line, they've launched in one thousand, nine, hundred seventy seven almost two years later on March Fifth Nineteen, seventy nine voyager one has its closest approach to Jupiter and it captures a lot of images of Jupiter and Jupiter's moons. And then July ninth, nineteen, seventy nine, so same year. That's when voyager two passes closest to Jupiter Then we go to the next year on November, twelve, thousand, nine hundred eighty voyager one has close to Saturn, and then it begins its trip out of the solar system, saying so long suckers and starts heading off into the. Sunset accept it can't be at opposite of the ten set right. The sunrise either normally be the opposite of a sunset. Son diminishing into a Tinier Ball I guess. Not Nearly as poetic, but August twenty, fifth, nine, hundred, eighty, one, that's when voyager to gets its close approach, the standard, but of course to is not flung off into interstellar space right away instead it is then headache toward urine s, which it passes closest to on January twenty, fourth nineteen eighty-six, so it took five years for voyager to go from Saturn to urine tests. And it would take. It would take a few more years before like five well three more years I'm sorry three more years before. I would get close to Neptune but before we get to that point. Nine hundred eighty seven voyager to observes these. Supernova nineteen eighty-seven eight. One thousand nine hundred eight voyager, returns the first color images of Neptune so that voyager to that is, so it's getting closer to Neptune in one, thousand, nine, hundred eighty. It's still not the closest it will be, but that's when we first start getting color images of Neptune back from voyager. And, on August, twenty, fifth nineteen, eighty nine voyager two has its closest approach to Neptune and that concludes the primary mission of the of both voyager spacecraft that primary mission, being the exploration of those outer planets so the cost of the missions. From nineteen seventy-two to the time when they finish their mission, their primary mission was eight hundred sixty five million dollars. Now NASA points out that if you break this down by the population of the United States and year over year, that's about eight cents per person per year so. Too Shabby essentially saying look really in the grand scheme and it sounds like a lot of money, but in the grand scheme of things. This is just a tiny investment, so look at these pictures to center. Keep. Calm and keep exploring is what they said hate that name. Anyway so the that that entered sixty five million dollars included everything include the expense of the launch vehicle's the radioactive power source which will get to talk about a little bit and and just the maintaining of the missions. By nineteen, eighty nine voyager one was heading toward interstellar space. And on Valentine's Day in nineteen ninety, we get the final images from voyager, which is portrait of the solar system. Happy Valentine's Day. I gave you the filler system sweet, not shabby. Three days later, February. Three days in eight years later. On I should read the year before we. You said there were seventeenth nineteen ninety eight. I have all my notes in front of me. It's just you know. My typing and viewing skills are apparently. There's something to be desired. Diminished today, nineteen, ninety eighth every seventeenth, the voyager one passes the pioneer ten, which had obviously been launched previously, and so that makes voyager one the most distant human made object in space. It is still to this day. The most distant human made object in space. It's actually most distant stir. was because it keeps going those good grammar. Well I figured I might as well measure up to my reading and comprehension skills. December fifteenth, two thousand four voyager one crosses the termination shock manasian shock. This is this is a pretty cool guys today. He'll you chief? Yes, here's some things that you need to know about our wacky little solar system here you might ask what's the solar system. Is it. Pluto Oh. No, it's not Pluto. Again it all depends on how you're defining the edge of the solar system, but the way NASA defines it no not blue well especially since it's still on the planet rain. It's a dwarf planet. There's that never mind, yeah. It's Pluto is right there with happy sleepy, Doby Doc, bashful so termination shock. That's that's the point where the solar wind particles start to slow down. They were traveling essentially at. kind of the speed of sound would be, but anyway traveling really fast. They start slowing down because you can think of the solar wind as this this force that pushes out from the Sun all right now, think of the interstellar space kind of having its own pressure. It's sort of like air pressure is pushing in on the solar. Magnetic fields air pressure. They're exactly they're not air particles. It's all we're talking. There are particles on space, but that's that's a different thing. Anyway, so the solar wind is pressing against these these other pressures. To the point where the solar wind is slowing down, that's the termination shock, right? Boundary with with shockwave and also still not the edge of the solar system now. You've also have the Helius fear now. This is where we still have. We still have evidence of the solar wind within the heels year. Then you have the he'll pause. which is the very boundary of where the solar windows, and that still is not the edge of the solar, system. Now according to NASA. Really we need to think of the edge of the solar system as being a an area where the sun's gravitational pull has no greater effect on you than any other particular celestial body out there so in other words you aren't being pulled toward the solar system at that point any more than you're being pulled toward other point right? Yeah, so that that areas ill defined by the very nature of gravity. That would take a very long time to get there and we'll talk about that. When we get into the science section so anyway. Termination shock has all these fluctuating magnetic fields due to the change in the speed of the solar wind, and that's kind of why it's called what it's called and voyager one like I said crossed on December fifteenth, two thousand four, and begins to encounter the interstellar medium that doesn't mean that it's an interstellar space yet, but starting to encounter the particles that would be an interstellar space. September fifth two thousand seven three years later, that's when voyager two catches up and crosses the termination shock at a totally different point by the way, these two spacecraft are in two totally different sections of. Nowhere near each other, and you're not at all and in July and two thousand twelve wager one enters a new region of space, which is still inside the solar system. The Hilo Helius fear here. She called a magnetic highway Yup and the directions of particles that it's encountering are beginning to change which suggests that the spacecraft is at the very edge of the Helius. Fear then. Engineers didn't expect the data that they got back. They thought that it would have passed beyond this point earlier. Which just tells us that? Our solar system is actually larger. We thought. Is more powerful than we previously expected. Never underestimate the power of the sun. It can turn me read in a matter of minutes. Very susceptible to that sort of thing, so yeah, that's we've already talked about how they have they. They left at different times in their pathways meant that they are traveling in different directions different at different speeds. And they visited different. Voice your to visit to more planets than voyager one dead. We talked about how the planets helped. Move the spacecraft and direct the spacecraft. So if you guys have seen science fiction films like a star Trek for the voyage home where they slingshot around the sun, they're actually using the sun's gravity to kind of accelerate a ship to the point where it can travel back in time. I don't understand that by the way. If you've got warp speed you technically anyway, that's another. We did that episode. Went. They use it to slingshot around the sun, which magically lets them travel back in time? There's some truth to that in the sense that we have used that same kind of principle with designing the voyager spacecraft a right. What we what we realized is bet. If. You okay, you're moving towards the planet. You're PROB- okay. Okay? And as you move towards the planet, you're going to start accelerating as the planet's gravitational pulse. That's pulling you in. If you only kind of by then hypothetically you'll decelerate on the way out, because you're losing energy to that gravitational pull right, and by the way because of the conservation of energy, technically the planets orbit actually slows sure I'd infinitesimally. Yeah, it's Let's see I've got I haven't written down. I know I've got it written down. It's something like a one foot in a trillion years. Well, but hey, that is an impact you are. You are making a difference, but Jupiter is going to be a little late to its to its appointment and trillion years right, however, because planets are moving in their orbits. If you are going on the same trajectory as a planets orbit, you can pick up that orbital speed right as he slingshot around the planet, and so that that has allowed voyager spacecraft to. Get propulsion from one plant to the next without having to have massive thrusters onboard in fact when we get to the actual description of the spacecraft. You'll find out that they're. Thrusters are not incredibly powerful at all at all. But they were able to use the power of gravity direct and propel themselves. As large as Jupiter it's moving through space at something like thirty thousand miles per hour, forty eight thousand kilometers and Yeah! And, that's yeah, it's completely free energy boost about that much speed now, according to NASA because of the use of planetary gravity voyager to ended up having a fuel economy. Of about thirteen thousand kilometers per liter or thirty thousand miles per gallon. That's efficient. It's my car. That's highway. Miles city miles. They did not give me so I. DON'T I. Don't know how it would do in the city They're the voyager. Two's flightpath got a look like we said at all four of the giant planets and and it's a couple of billion miles further inside the solar system than the voyager one, so the voyager one got a kind of head start into interstellar space. and is more than eleven, billion or seventeen point, seven eleven, billion miles or seventeen point seven billion kilometers away from the Sun at this point Alabama more than eighteen. As of as of today there's there's a tracker on NASA nice can check this out. And and. At that distance it takes hours for a for data Toco from the spacecraft to be picked up here on earth about seventeen hours. Well. Yeah, so that's a long time so. The the way that let me let me find my note on it. It's not really interesting the way that they receive radio signals because they're. They're pretty far away. They're getting increasingly difficult to the technology that they have a whole series of two hundred and thirty foot radio dishes specifically to poll voyager data, the these are the deep space antenna that they have to pick up this information. And and they actually. Those over the course of the life of the Voyager Program when they first started, they were significantly smaller, and they didn't have to be as big because the voyager spacecraft were relatively closer to the earth. And now now we got to a point where we keep upgrading the antennas so that we can continue to pick up these increasingly weak signals so pretty amazing according to NASA the missions from Earth to Neptune, required the equivalent of eleven thousand working hours of human work while eleven thousand work years. which they said, there's only a third of what it took to build the Great Pyramid. So Hey. We're slacking. Really, they're just saying look. How much more efficient we are. They were piling up rocks. We were sending a spacecraft into space. And and again we've learned that the solar system is actually larger than what we previously anticipated, and so by the time the voyager two flew by Neptune the two spacecraft together had transmitted about five trillion bits of scientific data back at Earth, and it was someone's job to look at all that. But yeah, the deep space tracking antennas are the ones we were talking about earlier that have been upgraded several times, and that that kind of that's the brief view of the mission, and next we're going to take a look at the space craft itself and also some kind of cool. Records that are above the the two spacecraft, but before we do that, let's take a quick pause to thank our sponsor. With the capital, one quicksilver card, you earn unlimited one point five percent cashback on every purchase everywhere. That's unlimited one point five percent cashback on everything you buy and unlimited really means unlimited with quicksilver. There's no limit to how much cash back you can earn capital one. What's in your Wallet Credit Approval? REQUIRED CAPITAL ONE BANK USA IN A. Technology is becoming more open data, more accessible and the world more innovative IBM is combining their industry expertise with the open source leadership of red hat to bring you more freedom, more security more flexibility. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work. Learn more at IBM dot. com slash red hat. Okay, let's talk about the actual spacecraft and and we know what they were supposed to do, and what they have done so Oh, in one thing I did not mention I guess. Is that the whole enter interstellar travel stuff that's totally planned as well in fact has been added on as a secondary mission, primary mission was the outer planets secondary is what's up with this interstellar stuff? We don't know anything about well. They realized that are power sources would. Would work until about twenty twenty and so figured well. Hey, let's just kind of roll with it. Yeah Yeah, so. That's twenty, twenty, two, twenty, twenty five. That's about when we expect the power resources to be to the point where they can no longer power the transmitter to send us back data, and we'll talk about that. That's one of the things that That's interesting about this space craft. There are a lot of interesting. Thank so both of them Denko. Yes, they are identical so each one of the ways just under a ton. And now when they were on top of the the launch vehicle, they weighed a lot more than that, but the space craft themselves are just under a ton each on earth, obviously because weight is all relative to where you are. And they are each made up of about sixty five thousand individual parts, but these parts are often made up of Tinier. So. They have a term they use which is equivalent parts and equivalent parts means like. If you were to look at for example, if I were to stay, my computer is part of is one part of the equipment that I use. Someone else could point out well. That computer has multiple chips in it, and those chips have transistors, and so really that one part is a representation of lots and lots lots of parts, so NASA was like well. If you want to know how many. Parts there are about five million of them. compare that to your old standard definition color television. There'd be about two thousand five hundred equivalent parts. So lots more than a color. TV which is kind of what you want in your. Space, you need a little bit more than your average standard definition color television I agree. I would hope so yeah also. Larger than, your standard. Yes. Unless you're? A crazy rich person, the the main body is a is a ten sided box. That's about six feet or one point eight meters across, and that's where the fuel tank the and some of the electronic instruments. And we'll talk about those instruments. There are a lot of them. Lunch. They're. They're they both have areas that are hardened against radiation and shielded, and the reason for that is obviously that when you go into space, you're going to encounter things that you would not encounter here on the surface of the planet, and the reason for that is that the earth atmosphere and magnetosphere? Magnetosphere sphere still makes me think that we're watching X. men I I would say I would say magnetosphere I know you would, but but I. Fear. Is the fear in which magneto travels, and it's also a magnetic field that surrounds the earth penetrates and binds us together. like the force now what it does actually repels certain types of waves and particles, which allows us to relive. Yeah, we to being bombarded by cosmic radiation or gamma, rays, or things like that because. Much worse sunburns than than others, we're talking so the the combination of the atmosphere and the magnetosphere or magnetosphere. Protects US and so the thing is that when you're on space, you don't have the benefit of that protection, so that's why both of them have these these shielding areas in casings that are hardened against radiation to protect them if they were to encounter any of these waves or particles. Clearly very important, interesting, little side fact, so earth has a magnetosphere. Mars doesn't. So if we were to make a colony on Mars we would not have that protection that we would need to compensate for it in some way right, so you wouldn't want to go on any long strolls on the Martian soil radio, some serious protections. That's all of those all of those fashionable space bikinis that were that were really popular back in the nineteen fifties would not probably be good. The interesting thing I heard was I was listening although I. It was a skeptics guide to the universe. Great podcast has no affiliation with us, but they are fantastic very. Interesting Educational podcast. They had a recent episode where. They had an astronomer on talking about things like Mars and they were even talking about all right. Let's look into a science fiction future where we can tear a form Mars, so we're able to transform Mars so that the actual services habitable livable, and even then because of the lack of the magnetosphere you would still be prone to things like cosmic radiation gamma radiation you would, you would still be vulnerable that so you would not be able to tear form it for any extended length of time eventually that stuff would kill the life on that planet right because things like gamma, radiation for example aren't as cool as for example, teenage mutant Ninja Turtles make it sound or Mostly you just die. Yeah, it's not. It's not attractive. NASA said that because of the distance from the the the voyager spacecraft passed close enough to Jupiter that. It received more than a thousand times the radiation that would be a lethal level of radiation very. For Human Person. Yes. So moving onto more things that are on board this these spacecraft. It has a it has a twelve foot or a three point. Seven meter high gain antenna looks like a satellite dish. Yeah, this is what allows it to transmit and receive data to and from Earth, and no matter where it goes. The Internet is programmed to always point towards earth. Yes, that's it's actually got a gyroscopic. System so that no matter how it's oriented, it can, it can readjust its attitude so that the the antennas twenty toward us, so we can have the best possible hike up those radio transmissions It has a lot of different instruments aboard including. Besides the high gain antenna it's got a low energy charged Particle Instrument and ultra-violet Spectrometer, which currently only the voyager one is using to collect data. has both narrow and wide angle imaging instruments also known as cameras. Got A. Fancy eight hundred eight hundred cameras, because this was launched in the nineteen seventies. Yes, seemed pretty cool at the time. Yeah, as a cosmic ray instruments that can detect and measure cosmic rays a photo polar remedy. which I have no idea what it does I I was I? I ran into and thought that's really cool and I. Never actually look more into it. Because I was lucky that I could say it. There's an infrared interferometer spectrometer. And Optical calibration targeting system, a planetary radio astronomy and plasma wave antenna, each spacecraft's two of those and also as the planetary radio astronomy instrument or Has the a plasma instrument. Voyager one's plasma instrument is nonfunctional, but all other instruments are in working order and boys. You're too is still collecting data through its plasma instruments It's got. It also gets power from three Isotope Thermo Electric Generators, and currently it gets about three hundred and fifteen watts of power now the spacecraft designed so that all of their systems can operate at four hundred watts of power. Okay, so it's able to It's still getting power, but it's not enough power to operate everything, and in fact they designed the voyager spacecraft with this in mind, the idea being that as the power as the power supply begins to decrease, it begins to shutdown unnecessary, says instruments. So originally. There were eleven different. Projects that were involved in gathering data from the Voyager's systems and processing that data here on earth. There were eleven of them currently, only five of them are still in operation because the other systems have been progressively shut down to make sure that the voyager spacecraft can still send us information, and like you said by twenty, twenty or twenty five or so. That's when we expect. Expect the power to have run down enough where we're not going to be able to get any more information from them, because it's just not going to have the power necessary to broadcast right right well, because the way that this engine of sorts works, is that appellative plutonium dioxide released heat through their own natural decay processes, and so once they have finished a king. That's it. Yeah. That's true and then I'll I forgot. Magnetometer boom which designed tests to measure magnetic fields, so that was one of those things we didn't really know a lot about the magnetic field to the outer planets before we sent these these spacecraft up. That's one of the really huge as sources of information that it is. Yeah and so then it has a flight data subsystem, which handles all the information, and it has an eight track digital tape recorder. So you've got an eight track up there. It's a it to the FTSE configures controls collects data from the various instruments and the tape recorder handles the data from the plasma wave subsystem, because that's the one that gets the highest density of data and the shortest amount of time, so the data tape recorder was the cutting edge technology to handle that that information and according to NASA. The tape in the digital recorder won't wear out until the tape has moved back and forth through a distance that is equivalent to the width of the United. States that is not. Not Terribly, precise because the United States is not a perfect rectangle, but in general I would say that's probably about three thousand miles, which is around four thousand eight hundred kilometers I assume they mean is that it's doing fine. Yeah, so what they're saying is that that tape is capable of traveling that collective amount of distance about breaking right, so you got to remember the tape. itself is not that long. It's just saying that they would you'll by the time you would go through all this tape and his worn out. You could have gone all the way across. The United States using that same distance of taping played through. Just kind of that's impressive that has a command computer subsystem which provides sequencing and control functions, which includes fault detection, corrective routines, antenna, pointing data and spacecrafts sequencing data. The detection involves seven top level fault, protection routines, and each one is able to detect and correct for several possible failures. Oh, basically it just means that there's the computer has multiple modules, and they compare data back and forth between each other, and it will decide if one module is different from the others that that one's faulty and to cut it out system. And it also means that the space craft capable of shutting down systems if it needs to automatically autonomously, because which is important, because we can't broadcast to these things they broadcast to us. They don't have receivers though their antenna could receive information, thank yeah, but it means that it would take seventeen hours for the information to get to us in seventeen hours for the freshly of back, and by then whatever the problem was is probably not the biggest issue at that point right, so yeah. It's important to have something to connect autonomously. If if you if the communication is a barrier, same sort of thing with the the curiosity rover when it was landing on the surface of Mars, you know a lot of that landing. In fact, all of the landing was autonomous because there was no time for us to send any adjustments to the system. It's like you're on your own. Yeah, by the time we. We would be able to send adjustment. It would have already either crashed or landed safely, so you had to design a spacecraft that could do this or else. It wouldn't work pretty impressive in the nineteen seventies for for the amount of computing power that what's going Oh. Yeah, definitely, and it also had an attitude, art or still hassle I. Don't know why I'm using the past tense still up dead to you. The attitude and articulation control subsystem, which is also known acs it's in charge of maintaining the spacecraft orientation in positions the scan platform. This is what we're talking about. The system that's that's in charge of making sure that data antennas pointed back at Earth, and also that the scan platform, which is really you know the instrumentation panel? Is pointed in the right direction to get the data the needs. And the. It's yeah. It's a three axis stabilization system and use the celestial, or Giro referenced attitude control to make the high gain antenna point back to Earth now we talked about the fact that there is an interesting gold plated copper disc on board each of the two voyager spacecraft. The golden records there for. So this This was a really cool idea you know. Who of course was the chairman for this Carl? Sagan yes, he he had billions and billions of suggestions, but not all of them can make it onto the desk, obvious right, and and these are these are these these goldplated copies engraved like vinyl records? Yeah, yeah, and kids. Ask Your parents. Oh dear, no, no kids are hipsters. These days. We know things final. It's cool kids, 'til your older siblings because they they've missed out on the HIPSTER generation right? I'm not all right, so so yeah, you're talking about a desk. Vast physical grooves that are in it that can be read using a stylus and country, which which were included the they included the cartridge and stylus did not include a turntable. So aliens aliens work it out. They have to build it, but they did leave instructions written in a symbolic language to say here's how you would construct something that would be able to play these things right now. They were there twelve inches in diameter, and they are designed to be played back at sixteen and two-thirds revolutions per minute. So actually fairly slowly i. mean you re thinking about the? The, Forty five or thirty three revolutions per minute for for your average albums, and this is a six hundred two thirds so. on these golden records are lots and lots of stuff actually. It's including things like greetings from five different languages, including some that aren't being used anymore did not been used in a very long time. which is a Sumerian language which was last used around four thousand. Selection of nature sounds Yup, so if you ever wanted to hear what frogs burping sounded like, and you are from some distant planet. Here's an opportunity to. Share. Your for Ford Prefect and you're on your way to Earth. This is a good way to do some homework before you get there. A lot of traditional music, some native American chance and Scottish Bagpipes talk about some of the music was on here. For African ritual music there's a bunch of classical music and so. I wrote down some of my favorites. This is this is obviously. There are lots and lots of musical tracks on the records. These are just the ones that I personally wrote down because I I they resonate with me, It's not to say that the other ones are not anti sense. Familiar with some of them but there's the Brandenburg Concerto number two F. actually it's just the first movement that's by a guy named Bob Batch. Johan batch wrote that. If I'd he's just some dude really. Yeah obviously Bach's Brandenburg Concerto number two enough Then there's a melancholy blues which was performed by Louis Armstrong Stravinsky's. The rite of spring was included Bach actually was pretty well represented on this record. He also had the well tempered clavier on there there was the first Moon Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. You know the There was another tribes chant, and then of course, the most important I think musical work that was included out of all the pieces were on there as we as we all know from the documentary back to the future I. Save Marnie MC fly. It'll save the human race. We're talking about chuck. Berry's Johnny B good. There's actually a book all about the process that they used to select which sounds went on the golden record. It finally came out with a CD companion at some point. I'm sure it's on digital. Yes, the book itself is out of print, but you can sometimes find copies is called murmurs from Earth so if you want to learn more about how they came about choosing, which sounds, go in there That's that's a really well done piece it's. It's something that I've heard nothing but good things about it. I personally have not had a chance to read it. by the time I learned about it. It was wearing print. But. There's also a bunch of images on the desks including a star map, clearly showing the location of earth. NEW SAYING Here's what humans tastes like maps of earth images. I'm just I'm just ignoring that entirely. There are people who have said what a huge mistake! It was to essentially include directions directly. I, I think it's pretty ridiculous because the odds one. Anyone finding voyager sweating. Big as it turns out really big no-no. Head, not you might think it's a long walk to the chemist on the corner, but that's just nuts compared to space. It's going to be tens of thousands of years before. Either Voyager craft encounter anything near another star. Yeah, exactly so really by the time I'm betting. We will have either kill ourselves off or hit. And plus on top of that. You know it would all depend on from what direction the other creatures were approaching. Earth because. There are a lot of different vectors. You could take, and only a couple of them would. Intersect with the pathway of either voyagers waste. Than most science fiction movies are willing to acknowledge, there's just ship space battle than just the single plane. so there was also an hour long recording the brainwaves of a woman named Ann Druyan, who would become crossings wife Yep. She's an author. She concentrates mainly on cosmology and science and she. She signed up for this. She volunteered to have her brainwaves recorded in Carl. Sagan talked about it, and she thought it was a really interesting idea, and so she went in for. The process where her brain. Heartbeat were were red, and then transferred to data analog that we have to say because it's an analog desk. And She says that what she did, was she? She thought about big historical moments that were very important in the development of human history, and then she spent some time. About the the current situation on earth how what that's like thing and not sugar coating at things like violence between people and the the. Yeah yeah, so she really spent some time thinking about things that she felt needed to be addressed. And then she said that she took the liberty toward the end of the session to take a little bit of time and think about what it's like to fall in love, which I think is amazing, wonderful sweet! Yeah, so now we those aliens can't tell us. They don't know how to love because she thought about it for for a while. Darn, it so yeah. Those radio signals do take a long time to get to US so but. And and the record that's on there. If you want to hear some of the stuff there are, there are a lot of different sites out there that that keep all the things that. Tells you? What's there and most of that's pretty easy to get access to and listened to. Find one in Lincoln up on social. Yeah, we'll see if we can find something in the know. Maybe I'll see if I can make it a spotify playlist or something. I'll get a Ukulele and play Johnny be good on the Ukulele. Johnny please stop. That would be the name of that song all right so. Anyway that's that's kind of the the the wrap up of the spacecraft in the stuff that was aborted, but we still haven't talked about the actual science return, so we're going to do that in just a moment, but before we do, let's take a quick moment to thank our other sponsor. Here's the thing. Saving money with Geico is almost than playing pickup. Because there's always that guy who joins your game. He never passes the rock. He constantly brings threes, and who completely hack you and then put his hands up and say no foul, no FAO. With Geico it's easy to switch and save on car insurance, no need to fake an ankle sprain because you're absolutely exhausted so switch and save. Gyco it's almost better than sports. All My name. Santa host of to Miami Morning Show and all the move. I want to personally invite you to my new podcast. Allah my name is a new show we're all talk to. Community leaders and people like you. Together we'll learn more about the triumphs and failures that empower my weekly guest. My show kicks off with the Awesome J. Balloting from Columbia that's revolutionized Latin music and continues to break records worldwide K. bothering opens up and talks about his humble beginnings, the secret to the success, and how he managed to remain authentic to style. You'll be able to go a few layers deeper into the lives of my special guest. You can find my new show all off. My name is on the free iheartradio APP or wherever you prefer to listen to your podcast. A new episode every Tuesday if combined. Yes, I hope you'll join me all are my name is the podcast. If talked about what the mission was, we talked about the spacecraft. Let's talk about what the spacecraft found. So of the eleven investigation teams that were originally involved in the voyager mission like I said earlier. Only five of them are still supported, and those five are magnetic field investigation. Low Energy Charged Particle investigation, COSMIC RAY investigation plasma investigation, which is only active on the boy or to the. Doesn't work anywhere and PLASMA WAVE INVESTIGATION SAY PLASMA, investigation plasma wave, two different things, and these are clearly the more important ones because there's not all that much to for example, take pictures of. Once you're done Dante the photo of the the the solar system from way the heck out there. There's really no purpose to. Going to that, so yeah, that's been shut down and the five instruments that support these five missions. The medic field instrument or MAG. Low Energy charged particle instrument the ACP. COSMIC ARRANGEMENT SIERRA THE PLASMA instrument that's, p., L. S. and the plasma wave instrument. That's PWS. Really at this point now that we've finished taking photos and measurements of all the planets, which was the main science, before was really getting good images, and getting some good scientific data about the actual plants, and their movements was the origin of the program. Yeah, before they kind of realize. Oh, Hey, we can do more stuff out there. Yes, go now now we're. We've switched over to interstellar, but some of the stuff they've found because of these, and then later on have have expounded upon by sending other orbiters like Cassini for example but some of the stuff they discovered were like they. They took a closer look at Europa which is one of Jupiter's moons. And saw that it had a a water ice surface and originally thought maybe Europa could have an ocean underneath that ice, but some scientists now say they think that it's probably more like a slush or maybe even solid solid ice but that was a possibility they The voyager spacecraft also observed Palay. which is the largest volcanoes on ECHO? Which is the another moon of? And they observed that pay was erupting, sulfur and sulfur dioxide and. These eruptions were going up to heights that are equivalent to about. Thirty Times, the elevations of Mount Everest. Hollis mountain on Earth multiply that by well mountain on the surface like a not underwater. Look at underwater and there's an argument these area. But, over above water. It's tall mountain unnerved. By thirty times, that's how high up these eruptions going not necessarily a good vacation spot now scientists point out that gravity is about six times weaker than that of earth, so it's closer to what our moon has but the fallout zone for the the the sulfur dioxide that was being. Thrust into the atmosphere of i. o was about the size of France. Well yeah, so. That was. When I read the while a huge huge volcano Now the. We also had some information about Saturn's largest moon which is called tighten. discovered the oceans of pain and methane aboard aboard on Titan, not aboard time it is technically a space. Scuttling. Satellite. Natural satellite, not a man-made one. And it has a also discovered that has the Titan, the largest moon of Saturn has a dense atmosphere lots of hydrocarbons, and maybe it could possibly at some point in the past have supported life. The methane is a possible indication that living things once lived there. Now. It does not necessarily hydrocarbons as well, but that does not necessarily mean that life. On Titan, but it's a possibility of voyager also took images of urinalysis rings, which are very difficult to see. Right. And but they did that. They also observed Saturn's rings and saw that they were made of about ten thousand strands of ice, particles and car sized icebergs and that if you at the proportionally, their thickness is much much much much much smaller than the width of the rain, so if you think of it as like A. One of those things called. They're not the FRISBEES, but you know the rings the Dickie. Hollow in the middle there, so it's just a it's a desk. That doesn't have a center to it. the width of the band is much wider than the thickness of the band is what they discovered those kind of interesting. Now. We're talking more about the interstellar work. They're still inside the Helius. Fear right and I did want to mention at some point here on March twentieth, and we mentioned this in another podcast that we were recording right around March twenty eight. There were there were false reports that it had left. The healers fear entered interstellar space, and those were those were false reports NASA came out and said No. We've not seen the changes in the magnetic radiation that we are expecting because they did say that they had seen some changes in particle movement, which at I would have indicated that the spacecraft had moved out of the Helius here. From the magnetic movement, that's not the case right, so it's one of those things where again we keep finding out. The solar system is larger as we learn more about how behaving so now the next step in this you can think of the interstellar exploration and being in three phases, the first was crossing the termination shock, which both of the spacecraft already done. The next is exploration of the hero Sheath. Opening right now, and then the third is interstellar exploration, which is when the spacecraft have passed beyond the helium pause boundary. Now he'll. Boundary you can think this is kind of like a bubble around the sun that co completely encompasses the the the entire solar system. It's not a perfectly round bubble, so. But it's it's Whibley wobbly area. And beyond this boundary there's no solar wind or magnetic field from the Sun. However, they're still the gravitational influence of the sun at that point, but particles in waves in this area of space are unaffected by our son, and we don't really know a whole lot about them because we haven't been able to observe them directly through any kind of spacecraft. and. This is a hypothetical Heliopolis. We have not encountered it yet, so, but it's still not technically the edge of the solar system. If you if you ask NASA, the edge of the solar system would be that area where there's no longer that gravitational factor from the Sun which would require us to travel about two light years away from the sun, so they'll take us about forty thousand years for those spacecraft to get there which is. You know set your alarms because it's GonNa take a while so in other words. If someone tells you that the voyager has passed outside the solar system, your response should be wow. Which Alien Warp did away from there? Because there's no way that it's done that at least not by the definition that NASA makes now. They're talking about the Halio pause. That's a different story and it's different. That's a different story and they are anticipating that within our lifetimes. They said they expected it to happen. Within ten to twenty years of passing the termination shock. So now it's just a real be probably hopefully. Fingers crossed before before that plutonium dioxide runs out right before twenty, twenty or twenty twenty around that area so. Learn, you have an interesting idea. An experimental idea that we thought we would try. which is that you sent out a tweet saying? Hey, guys! If you have any anything interesting that you want to ask or goofy that you want to ask about our podcast about the voyager spacecraft and the time to do it and people did a of people did anyway so hopefully we'll be able to do this in the future and get me even more discussion, but this was a fun. First Attempt, so here's some of the questions we receive in on twitter asked a whole bunch of questions that I'm going to tackle one at a time. I was how fast are the voyager spacecraft traveling? Good question so voyager wants traveling at about three point six astronomical units per year and wedge to his poking along at three point three astronomical units per year now. That might not tell you very much unless you know how long an astronomical unit is, it's measurement of distance based upon the mean distance between Earth and the sun, and that's equivalent to about one, hundred, forty, nine, million, five, hundred, Ninety, seven, thousand, eight, hundred, seventy, one kilometers, or ninety, two million. Million Nine, hundred, fifty, five thousand seven miles, and because Jonathan loves you. He did the Math Yep, so let's talk about how the sucker breaks down, so remember voyager. One's going at three point six astronomical units year that means traveling about five hundred, thirty nine million kilometers per year or three, hundred, thirty five million miles per year, and that breaks down to sixty, one, thousand, four, hundred, thirty eight kilometers per hour or thirty, eight, thousand, one, hundred seventy six miles per hour either way. It's going wicked fast. Voyager two three point three astronomical yet for year that breaks down to four, hundred, ninety, four million kilometers per year or fifty, six, thousand, three hundred eighteen kilometers per hour and miles. It's three hundred seventy million miles per year or thirty five thousand miles per hour. Slightly less wicked fast, but still we could fix so, but still faster than than me. For example his next question next question was. Are they accelerating no. Next question was how long will remain in contact well like we said, we're not really sure it's all going to depend upon the power supply, and also whether or not our antenna here on earth can continue. But we expect around twenty, twenty, twenty, twenty five will be the last we hear of them. And then Ian and also a listener named Jonathan also a date. They both that we somehow reference a film star. Trek the motion picture okay. What does have to do with Star Trek the motion picture well in a way, voyager is the bad guy in star trek the motion picture. In another way, the whole film is the bad guy because it's slow as heck. I watched it I watched it not for an anticipation of this podcast I watched it just. And I had not seen it since I was a kid. Not Don't think I ever sat through it all the way through when I was a kid. I don't think I got through it. All the way throws an adult again. I can't say that I've seen since I was about A. Laundry. Search to amazing movie star Trek. The motion picture not so much, but in that story, and this is gonNA sound really familiar to anyone who watched star trek four, because it's very similar story. A probe that has this weird energy field around it enters our solar system actually I. It's just moving through space, but everything encounters. It's starting to deactivate and everyone's kind of upset because that's terrible. We stop this. And, of course, the only person who can stop it is Kirk who come and deers star starship enterprise. He is no longer the captain of the Enterprise. At that point, he's teaching it Starfleet, but the enterprise is docked in a space station around Earth, and so he after a very long tour of the ship the outside of the ship that Scotty takes on eventually onboard. This movie moves slowly is what I'm saying and they they go and investigate this this probe that's called V., Jer vitre and. And Vija is this artificially intelligent. Vehicle and actually the vehicle contains a smaller probe leg vehicle inside of it ultimately. They discovered that what Vija. Really is is voyager six, which doesn't exist yet. No, there's only. Two, but in this in the movie it was voyager six that was supposedly lodge toward the end of the twentieth century, which I don't know if you noticed, we're not in that anymore. So you know same thing like I think the eugenics wars and star trek to that. are that ever mentioned that Khan was part of that was supposed to take place in one, thousand, nine, hundred six, so we have a lot of catching up to do not that I want those to happen anytime soon, but the the Vija was called villager because it could no longer see the letters that were missing. So. The missing letters were gone so all that was left. Was the VGA since feature? And and in the story, what you find is that aliens had encountered the voyager six probe, and had enhanced it so that it could learn everything that is learnable, and then return the information to so it was trying to do a originally, it was supposed to be a benevolent thing, but because feature had gained since it no longer completely understood the parameters of its mission, and so it started to go a little bunkers and then of course, the some crew members aboard the enterprise end up essentially reasoning with the artificially intelligent probe so like I said it's kind of the bad guy in Star Trek the motion picture. If you feel like spoiled that movie, I didn't. Really I mean. You bear skipping our star Trek. Takes. Say, this is someone who loves star Trek. Okay I don't don't get me wrong I. Just I feel like that movie, was it? A lot of the movies played for Grandeur and problem is that we've all gotten used to seeing these amazing of visuals. They're even more amazing than what was available back then so to kind of have this big reveal moment and you look at the picture and you're like you. Happens on TV every week. So that's the problem all right so Then we also had a listener who has the handle retina made it his name who asked what about future missions with better equipment. Well we had the Cassini orbiter, but we also NASA had proposed a couple of joint missions with the European Union. But they haven't really worked out. One of them was the Jupiter Europa orbiter, but that was essentially scrapped because of budget problems, and the other was the titan. Saturn system mission, which was shelved in order for NASA to concentrate on the Jupiter Europa or So but originally those were supposed to launch in twenty twenty now because of the budget cutbacks and everything, and you know the fact that they're just hasn't been time to develop. That launch window is kind of closed at this point so. As far as I, know right now, there are no definitive. Space or Outer Planet Missions Plant I think right now. People are really concentrating on on Mars Mars and the moon. Earth orbit those are those are the things that are. I hesitate to say easier. Remaining more achievable. I have heard that that future moon landing have been scrapped in favor of future Mars. Yes. And this changes from one administration to another, because because a lot of these considerations are not just technological or scientific. They're also political. The whole space race was political the fact that the if there had not been that rivalry between the United States. Show of muscle. We can send. We can send this rocket not only to your face, but all the way to the moon. So that was that was you know without that kind of pressure? Then it makes it harder for scientists to get the money. They need to be able to do the science they do. That's a sad fact of the world. Is that money away? Does make the world go round. And that wraps up another classic episode of Tech Stuff Hope. You. Guys enjoyed it. This was a lot of fun for us to do. I really had a great time with it. I want to do more episodes that are space-related about specific projects. I've done everything from like the Jimmy Program or German I. Program to You know like the Apollo missions the space shuttle missions, but I want to look at more of the satellite type stuff, too. I I think that those are really fascinating and only done a few of them, so if there any specific topics whether they are space related or otherwise. Let me know you know ones that you want to hear anyway. Let me know about it. reach out on twitter or on facebook. The handover both texts stuff H. S. W. and I'll talk to you again really soon. Is, an iheartradio production for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio, APP, apple, podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. My name is empty. xanthos host of a morning show and on the move. I want to personally invite you to my new podcast. All My name is Ado show where all talk to artist community leaders and people like you. Together, we'll learn more about the triumphs and failures that empower my weekly guest. You can find my new show on the free iheartradio APP or wherever you listen to your podcast. I'm Oscar Ramirez, and I host the daily Corona Virus Update a daily podcast bringing you the latest on what to know about the global pandemic. We're facing. There's a lot of information going around about the viruses spreading hot spots around the world and the United States, possible treatments and Best Practices to keep you and your family healthy. It's more important than ever to follow this fast moving story and avoid misinformation, so you can keep up to date and make informed decisions. Listen to the daily Corona virus update on the iheartradio. APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your podcast.

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The Smooth Sound of Morning News

Switched On Pop

43:02 min | 1 year ago

The Smooth Sound of Morning News

"Earn? Support for this episode comes from Dell taking binge-watching to the next level with their new totally remastered. X P S thirteen laptop with smoother streaming. You'll never have to wait to find out who breaks up makes up or takes the throne, stay tuned. Because later on in the show, I'll tell you what gone. Learn more about the X P S thirteen with Intel core processors and get ready to give your next binge session a refresh. Call eight hundred buy Dell. Welcome to switch on pop music, Nate Sloan songwriter, Charlie Harding, Charlie today. We are here to talk about one of the most popular songs in the western world. Ooh. It's not Taylor swift. No. And it's not little MAs X. No. And it's not the Jonas brothers. Okay. Let's just spin it. All right. What are we listening to hear Charlie? This is the morning edition theme song by NPR. Ding, ding. And while this song is not at the top of the charts. This is absolutely part of the world of popular music. I mean as, as popular as music gets this is heard by millions and millions of people every single day morning edition being the most popular program on the entire radio. Dial I had no idea. Oh, wow. So this is like this is big. Every if you're like like you've heard this is so familiar to you. Yes, Whitney says, when she hears this, she smells toast. It's like this, since the kind of interaction you hear the morning edition. Joe's mean this is like built into our DNA for a lot of us who've been listening to the song was first composed in nineteen seventy nine to company. The daily NPR morning edition news broadcasts. But for the first time since then there's a new morning edition theme song that's been release. I've heard it. I like it. Okay, so but we're going to get there. But I, I wanna talk about, like, why are you BIC witness incredibly familiar piece of music it works on a so affectively? So what I want to do is I want to break down this theme song in the first half, and then the second half we're going to dissect the news theme song. And then I want to hear your take compare contrast. Yeah, but let's just start like why again, this is for a lot of us. This is just like you know as familiar as twinkle twinkle little star or something. So what is it about this song? That's so effective in that screams, like NPR public radio news, smooth jazz. Guitar. Okay. We're going to get there. But first before this move jazz, guitar. I wanna talk about the, the harmonic motion in the sun. First of all, like, what do you? When you think NPR, like what, what do you think of what comes to mind? Drive time news. Okay. Wonky, yeah. Balanced. Yeah. Balanced. Okay. Very, very generous newsworthy. Yeah. Good. Okay. Let's go with that so far. We've got news. You said one key. Let's let's stick with those two. All right. So it's like what current and sort of area diet or something. Yeah. Okay. So I think there's a way that the music to this song composed by BJ Liederman way. Back in nineteen seventy nine gives us that feeling of like area dish in intelligence seriousness even and that has to do something called the circle of fifths. Yes, I remember the circle of fifths from college harmony classes in order to talk about this. We're just going to zoom in on part of the theme. We're just going to zoom in on that, like distinctive guitar part don't dump down to let's play that. Jazzy Bill stop. You're, you're, you're dropping the jazz bomb too soon. We're here. We're hearing classical harm. Yeah. We're talking about the circle of fit. So get so race from your mind the associations of that sound of that smooth sexy. You know, vaguely familiar of hold music electric guitar. I want to focus on the underlying harmony in order to abstract it a little bit. I'll just playing on the piano. First second. Now, I'm going to argue that the reason that we get the sense of like okay this is serious. This isn't hedge is going to tell me important things about my world is because it's using this ancient musical property called the circle of fifths. Yes, let's take that line. And obstructed, even further just into a series of harmonies. Feel that right? And I'm not gonna get too deep into the theory here. We're just going to say that, when you hear this, I think you hear musical logic. Well, yeah, this is like when I studied classical music with you in school. One of the very first things you learn about is the fundamental sort of structure of harmony, and the way in which cords want to move into each other. Exactly. And this is the sort of, like underlying. All of classical harmony is this meta superstructure. Yeah. So fifths are distance between two notes. So we move from our I note g and the cord based around that note to our second note, and our second chord, c. Away from a fifth below g exactly. So that is like a really important relationship in classical music, moving from a note that a fifth below and what we do after that is we take that new note. See go to remove a fifth below that to happens after that Charlie fifth below that to be flat v below that. And that's where in the morning edition deemed the progression stops, but we could keep going right? Yeah. We could go on where it's to a flat. And now I feel like I'm actually quizzing. Back in your music, fifty five final shouts out to professor Arleen coal. We love you sorry, a flat goes down to deflate and fifth below. Deflate is g flat and then a fifth below that is c flat, but will rename it as be major because that's a little nicer. And if it below that is easier that a D, And now where we truly after d major right back to where you were right back to Jean. It's a very complicated way of spelling music, you, like basically go through seven different letters, and you just do so obnoxious, permutations until you eventually get back to where you started. Yeah. I don't know why you have to say, call it obnoxious that seems comedic using when you first learned it, and then you learn to spell in funny ways. But the point being that there's this sort of wild underlying mathematics, where if you start one place you keep going down five. Eventually you end up back where you started totally. This is one of the fundamental properties of western tonal harmony is that this this circle of unlike undergirds so much. And whether we're aware of that or not, whether we have taken music, fifty five that is like present somewhere in our collective consciousness. Certainly. If we've heard classical music after morning edition, listen to Bach or Mozart, specially earlier classical music. And baroque music you're going to hear these things. It's embedded in this stuff. And so you just associated to classical music. Right. There's like callous examples, but I'm just going to pull out one of my favorites. Here's a nice circle of v progression. From Bach's Brandenburg concerto, number five, I movement in d major, what's have listened jam? So every time it switches between the flute and the violin. You can hear. It's moving from one fifth chord to another fifth cart. An ember learning the going through the cycles of fifth was away of drawing composition. So he'll longer and longer and longer. It's absolutely. It's a way of like moving from one harm onic place to another. Yeah. You can also serve as a bridge or a harmonic highway if you. So, yeah, has this feeling of movement, and which kind of makes sense if we're I think about how that applies in the morning edition theme song. I am sort of waking up and slowly rising. And so this thing is kind of, like moving me along. Yeah. Okay. I love that. So it's giving you this energy and momentum and it's also reaching back. I mean, literally when you hear circle Fiszman, especially in this context, a generation later Beethoven, Mozart would look back to that sound, and they would call it this delay onto go like the old old school. That's an old like literally even in, you know, the, the eighteenth century that was being called old school. Yeah. So now it's like firmly got that association like this is old. This is venerated. This is serious. So it's like you know, I think it's a good thing for news program to say, like, hey, we're going to be we're going to be like. Reliable. We've been around since the fifteen hundred essentially, and you can trust us, we know what we're doing okay. Now at the same time, let's move to the complete opposite end of the equation. Because there's things that at least nineteen Seventy-nine would sound very modern, and that gets us back to smooth Jess. Okay. So we're going from era dish in into contemporary newsworthy. Yes. But newsworthy nineteen seventy I didn't. Okay. But I do have an ulterior motive here because I want to understand the influence of smooth jazz here, and maybe in doing so give some credit to smooth jazz, exonerate expiate bring smooth jazz back into the light even putting off this discussion for a long time because I keep hearing like inclinations of smooth jazz coming back, especially into some like LA. Hip hop stuff, one hundred percent and you've been, like, whole lot. Yes, it's time, you know, and the derision in your voice, when you first said two words, smooth and jazz. It was palpable, right? NPR public radio news, smooth jazz guitar. Smooth jazz guitar spruce, droves guitar I think it's it is a cultural trope, smooth jazz bad. Yeah. So we're going to you're going to start going to be our Guinea pig for hopefully, a culture wide movement of re reclaiming Jess. Barbecue me? Okay. So when you think, you know this theme, let's play it one more time. I think one musical antecedent, we can here for this is a song that had come out the year before, or actually, it was released in nineteen seventy seven but in nineteen seventy eight it hit the charts and became super popular and that was feels so good by Chuck Mangione. Maybe the only top forty hit ever to feature the Flugel heart. Okay. There's like letting thing going on. There's some really spunky base half inning. And a really. Lagarto soft tone to the horn. It's smooth. It's, it's butter. It's great. Yeah. No, I think these are definitely occupying very similar sound worlds. They make sense. This was a big kit, but it's an instrumental hit instrumental hip. Wow. Yeah. So it's, but it's interesting because it's not just I wanna talk not just about this sort of sonic similarities and the sonic world of smooth jazz. But also kind of what it meant and what it signified in where it came from and where it came from. So we're at the end of the seventies, let's go back to the beginning of the decade because smooth jazz arises from another jest. I'll called fusion which starting with miles Davis, late sixties was really about bringing the sounds of rock and funk, and Arn be into the world of jazz. And I think like you know, there's many beautiful damsels of this, but a crystalline one would be Herbie Hancock's headhunters. Let's take the first track. Off of that. Chameleon. A a a. The. A I. Functions base. A. Drumming that Harvey Mason senior. Oh, and it is like words fail. It's just pure funk, can't sequence that. A I. The tar line. Okay. So I don't know about you, but me there's not much smooth about this. No. Because this is what's the opposite. This is rough, scratchy funk. Yeah, yeah, yeah. This is rough. And and you know this was like this was a hit unto itself as well. This is actually played on the popular television program. Soul train like this. This is a legit hit in its own right? But it's different. It's like this is like a dance get down, like sweat flying off your face kind of kind of jazz fusion. So how does this transform overtime? I have no idea. Okay. Over the course of the seventies, a new market starts to merge for a longtime jazz had been the dominant music for African American audiences. That starts to change in the seventies fusion starts to take some of that audience that audience starts to move to, to other genres that are popping up, and especially the adult audience that the adult African American audience that listened to jazz is looking for something that they can grab onto maybe something that isn't quite so intense and funky and youthful sure maybe, but that has some of those elements, some of the jazz elements, some of the rock, it's funk. Elements of and the answer to that lies in what would become known as smooth jazz. And we can hear very like early interational of that in a George Benson song from nineteen seventy six we're in the middle of the decade left or Cranston called breezing. Still funky, but I feel like lounge at home. Yeah. Days where it's got that rhythm. It's got that drive, but it's also like a little chiller. It's a little. It's like this grownups music, this is like, you know. Yeah. Put a little George Benson. I'm for yourself. Glasses chardonnay. Let a fire, you know, this is like, this is music for, I love, George Benson. And I love smooth jazz. But we haven't really gone into the, the beating heart of smooth jazz. Yeah. We haven't gone to the eighties when this genre really takes off and transforms from this more sort of Nishi adult African American audience to something that's very mainstream. And that's where it becomes a little more controversial. We start to get this negativity surrounding it. And I think if there's one figure that encapsulates all of that, who would it be Charlie? Kenny G. How there's an essential difference, there's many differences here, but one of the things that I'm hearing when you get the eighties is the introduction of all of these digital sounds. Digital keyboards right shaney as well as digital river, which sort of impossible spaces that you can hear on the drum hits that big. And part of my associated with smooth jazz is the actual production space that the thing is made in what it sounds like more so than even necessarily the notes in all of those digital textures sound bright. They are actually having a resurgence right now in popular music the artifice she -ality of the actual way, the music is made, I think imposed upon my year an idea of what's real, and not real where when we're listening to the Benson. You have some of those big wide spacious sounds made by an orchestra and an actual reverberate space rather than with a digital effect. Yeah. No. And I think you're, you're hitting the nail on the head of what people react so intensely to in the music of Kenny G is this sense of artificiality, not only in the sound of the recording as you're describing, but also in his personality. He's not a real jazz musician. He's like he's a sellout. He's a he's a phony. And I think this view is encapsulated by jazz musician like patent Athenee who described Kenny G as lame ass. Jive Suto bluesy out of tune noodling wimped out fucked up playing. Yeah. Inspires, a lot of animosity the whole back, and you can read into this language. Okay. So now it's time to get myself bucks and say, like, hey Leif, Kenny G loan paraphrase, Chris Tucker, like, and it's interesting to hear Mathie here. It's like a lot of this language to is very masculine very macho like he's serious. He's, he's like this is Wimpy this is this is not like, you know, supercharged macho jazz. I don't mean to go ahead of you. Okay. But I always feel like when I have some sort of subjective relationship to why something aesthetically bad. It's actually something else, not the. Object self? Right. It's like some other kind of cultural identity marker that is unsaid. And so in this case, pointing to masculinity authenticity serenely as well. I mean, all these things are brewed together and come out like Kenny, g you know, jazz monster. Right. So we have to get back to the morning, but I do I would I would feel remiss if we didn't take this digression to say, hey, everyone. Let's get check yourself. Kenny G unmistakable remarkable saxophone tone here that in an instant, you know who it is. And it's not something that just comes naturally. That's that's hard work. That's dedication to your craft, would you call him, the Jimi Hendrix of soprano saxophone. I don't. Okay. Morning edition. So let's bring it back now. Okay. So what we have here. We have I the stealing onto co the circle of fist, this ancient harmonic progression. That says, hey, we are smart untrustworthy and be we have something that in nineteen seventy nine was not only contemporary and cool, but literally, like the paragon of adult African Americans Fistican, which says a lot about a, the kind of audience, they were reaching to, which is maybe a more diverse audience than we might expect and be like, how are understanding of those sounds have changed in the intervening erasing because underlying, this is like the age old criticism that NPR doesn't reach its intended public community that it's too white. It's too old of certain demographic, it serves on urban population, and I'm totally blown away because when you first played the classical thing I was like, yeah. Everyone knows NPR's Eric. I didn't know the history of the jazz sound I was. I went right to Kenny G. So keeping that in mind. Let's take a quick break. And come back and listen to this new theme song and think about what kind of audiences that might be engaging with call. Okay, it's time to talk binge-watch brought to you by the del X, P S thirteen laptop. And today, we're talking about our top three vengeful shows of all time. Okay. Number one Benjamin show of all time. Tremaine. Yeah. I mean you know, I have to be completely honest, I've never seen it. But it's like pretty much at the top of my list. I can't believe we've hung out going to jazz shows Norrland's, and you have never watched tra- may is the best. It is beautiful into Rovan narrative of post, Katrina New Orleans on HBO with all of the best characters music stories. It's beautiful. It's a black Mark. I'm resume. I can't. I can't tonight this is a little unorthodox. It's not it's not a TV show, but I think I'd argue you could been getting of jazz, the fantastic documentary, Shirley, Jackson Conan's, America. I mean, this is like, if you wanna learn about jazz, the world we live in this beautiful film to start with I can't recommend it enough. Okay. Our third top binge Ables show. I would say is explained on Netflix. This is vox explainer show. They're like, super concise, little mini documentary, like fifteen minutes beautifully done animated story. Telling it's awesome, there episode on music and on K pop or phenomenal essential watching totally the cave of one. So as you can see, these are all music related binging, but you can you can get ready for your own binge session. Experienced del cinema technology on the remastered. X P S thirteen laptop with the latest Intel core processors for incredible streaming color, and sound. Call eight hundred buy Dell that's eight hundred be you why del. I'm Todd Vander the host of prime time a new show from box dot com this season we're tackling the American presidency on TV stories that capture the way television effects, and reflects politics and culture. We'll take a look at fictional presidents who've changed the way we think about the real Oval Office, that isn't gentlemen. The president of the United States. The morning everyone. Please take your seats and how real presidents US TV to further their own goals. What'd you come here to plug? Have you heard of the verbal correct from the first TV president people have gotta know whether or not their president's? Well, I'm not a crook to arguably the last, we have fighting the fake news. It's fake phony fake primetime. From the vox media podcast network, and vox dot com. Listen and subscribe, wherever you get your podcasts. Okay. So as we mentioned morning edition has a brand new theme song. And if you thought something as anodyne as a public radio show, slightly altering its the music could not be controversial. You would be completely wrong because this has generated so much attention. And to quote, the NPR buds Mun. She describes the in very characteristic, NPR fashioned. She says the vast majority of the reaction has been negative. So let's spend this new controversial morning edition, the inside. K look funky. Are you hearing the original theme in here at all? And I think it becomes a little more explicit here. Lot of different. Sounds in here. Lots. Claps. Prizing melody. Jail. Immediate reactions here. I really liked the opening. It's really long. There's a few sounds that I almost didn't want in there. It definitely is the old theme song, kind of just reimagined. Yes. Yeah. That's what comes to mind except. It doesn't have that circle of fist progression from the original, which kind of bums me out a little bit. Yeah. But, you know, like, as I said, like, if we're trying to escape the overly one-sided Yar, maybe dropping the classical reference works. Okay. This think what I'm hearing and I agree that they're clearly trying to capture the diversity of like American public radio listeners, I think. Right. And in doing so, like, have all these different sounds, it's kind of like as you go through. You hear one thing and then another and then another it's kind of like the Epcot center of musical styles. And I did read a few things about this. When it when it came out which was like the thing was actually made by a committee. Yes. Has to there's no way like just one artists gets to compose this, and it was made by a music agency that composes things for HBO and other places like that. So why do you think it's generated so many negative reactions? We'll link to a great piece by head reduce the in the end where he goes through basically everything that this fees, but we don't need to do that. Other people. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. Big fans of Adam's work. But like, why like why is this generating so much negative feedback thing aid definitely change? Just ever. It's the thing like if they hadn't even announced it, and it had just like boop played it in people probably be on their drive forgetting to now eventually get used to it. Yeah. But like we've been we've been primed to have an opinion. So that's I think that's the first thing that's going to happen. Interesting. And we also have a decades old relationship. It's not just change. This is something which is the smell of toast. Right. So what are we going? What are you going to smell out so we have these deep deep deep personal cessations thing? Okay. So Charlie this point. Let's spin the new theme one more time. And see if we can't pick out what they might be trying to reference through some of these musical decisions. I'm hearing a mixture of acoustic instruments, and then sample based instruments. So the most predominant change. Here's a Ford of the floor kicked her. Them. And then there's some sweeping sh- kinda sound here, which are sort of like EDM ish. At the end of weird clap sample, which I think, is actually far too high in the mix. It's actually only thing I really don't like about this song is just the mix of that clap is. Okay. This is cool. So maybe it's not that they're actually saying, like, oh, we're gonna reference these specific genre. 's these specific, you know world musical styles. But more, we're going to incorporate these general sounds from the twenty first century into this theme. Yeah. Risers for in the floor bass drum. I mean that could be in the back of a house track for sure. And then these claps which you would find I don't know anything from like a big Sean track to, you know, the new Jonas brothers song. Yeah. Okay. So it's, it's more about the arrangement choice in there was no point where where they're like. Oh here, here's a here's a trap song, right? There's not one point where I was like, I knew the song they were deriving from the particular styles just the instruments. Yes. Yeah. So you think that serves the purpose does that meet the requirements of sounding more contemporary to you? Yeah. I think it's perfectly effective part of me just wants to not even judge the sung until another three decades. Have latte. Holy it sort of like sat with us end becomes like part of our new new cultural touchdown and that, you know, might be a cool way to pivot to another discussion. I wanna have regardless of how you feel about this new theme. You know, there's another NPR theme that has everything you want, and that's all things considered. My favorite theme. Is that a different rhythm the one before we'll talk, let's dig into the details of it in a second. But what I wanna I start with yet. I mean, we're on the same page, Chuck, like I love the sign, and I'm just gonna lay all my cards on the table. I even prefer this to the morning edition in the first place served, if a purpose, though, yes, I actually acoustically what it's doing is actually try one is waking you up at one is sort of, like taking you home, how interesting. Oh, yeah. Because all things considered comes on in the afternoon. Yeah. Drive time show. Yeah. Through traffic. It's evening music of fast. Okay. So what's what's wild about this? When those unlike morning edition, this theme song what we're listening to is already the end result of a number of changes to, to the theme. So let's go back to the first all things considered them by done vogue. Alley in nineteen seventy six. This is switched on Bach. Yeah. Drops. Collars, try the best part is coming up in the next variation here. Rising peggie. It'd. Wow. Okay. So almost entirely synthesized in sequence, but also very classical reference switched on Bach who inspired games. Hopefully, the popular at the time using this the size or on old music. Okay. That's for two nineteen Eighty-three. We'll hear the development of this all things considered theme. Which position here we started to get the rhythm, which makes it sound, it's like more code is that we going for. Yeah. Like telegram. Yeah. Like telegram service, everything whenever you see, like a movie has something news like. Use that kind of telegram sound is used in all kinds of veto. Exactly. Totally. Yeah. And. You hear that the other one get there? Get there. Slow your roll. We're gonna get there. But yeah, this is definitely more classical more developed, you know, interestingly still hearing the circle of fifths motion that actually is something that connects us from all things considered to morning edition. You wake up and you go to bed both with the circle of fifths. Now, fast forward to nineteen ninety five and we get the current interruption of the all things considered theme, sung recompose by the great jazz, trombone, est Wycliffe, Gordon. This is the section. It's really knew. Yeah. And it's not smooth jazz. This is Bob. Yeah. That's I love. Yeah. Okay, let's just hang out here in this kind of vamp tail fade out section of the nineteen ninety-five Wycliffe, Gordon, all things, considered beam. Okay. I think what's happening here. Why this is so compelling. And like you I'm the same way. I'm like, well, I listen to this day, I think what's happening here is we've got to rhythms going on at once poly rhythm. Yes, we have one rhythm. That's in three two one two three one two three one two, three one two three. And we've got another rhythm kind of drawn from the original bomb. Boom, boom. That's in four one two three food to two three four. Yeah. And now what Wycliffe Gordon is doing is like he's putting them on top of each other at same time. So once we hearing one two, three one, two, three one two, three four, if you put those together, it's like. One two three two, three one two three four. The one two three four I was that party trick over for you. I've worked on that a long time. And I'm glad to finally share it on the show, and that's like super exciting to listen to because your mind is Louie being torn in two directions. Oh my gosh. Division division, three four. Make it my mind can't stop listening. Yeah. So this is I mean, let's just like I of want to step back now and say, like, regardless of whether you love or hate the new morning edition themes, on, like trust that all things considered. We'll always be there for you. The other thing I love about this theme is that it's been recompose and so many beautiful ways. This is my favorite thing about it, too. Yeah. Every single time you here on the show. They play in different context, depending upon this sort of emotion of the story will it's also gone this one, especially as gone beyond the world of NPR into the world of popular music, at large, like check this out. This is incredible. Arrangement of this. Tune by easily my all time favorite Capella group, take six. Yeah. She. Yes. Oh my God, I heart is racing. So that it's just like a masterclass in vocal harmony, and I mean, I would just listen, I would listen to that on repeat. It's, it's so good. The timbre are so beautiful person's voice the way that they take on the instruments. It's amazing. Okay. Try and now I want to end our conversation with another pop version, another sort of recomposition of the all things considered the and this one's by one of your all time favorite bands. Very cylinder. Nope. Great guests, though, that's to be MC. Go reach deep reach deep. I know you've been talking about nine inch nails on the podcast and your youthful love of that ban. But go even deeper, it's fish. It's fish. You've you've exposed. Cowbell our. I mean, this is the fishies fish that was ever fished. So I love what they've done here. But I I'm being a little tongue in cheek like also, let's get to the end of the song because something really interesting happens brings this whole episode full circle, they turn the song into a few like we were talking about morning edition, and how it's using these old baroque Bach properties of music now fish takes all things, considered, and just makes that man can't just drop an f-bomb and not explain what you're talking about. I feel justified in wild fish growing up. They're the best. That's amazing. You dropped the f bomb, and I don't know if everybody's going to be familiar, I'm not gonna define few in the last two minutes of an episode. We'll cover that in a future. It's just it's a baroque technique. Yeah. We get a reference to what we were hearing in back in morning edition like this circle of fist stealing onto go this old school baroque approach. I mean you hear this, and it sounds like BOK BOK does. Okay. This point we've spent more time than anyone probably should dissecting various in VR themes. But my takeaway is that, like, regardless of whether we do or don't like this new theme, these themes, will continue to, like ramified through our world in ways that we can never expect and we'll roles in our life, that we can't expect so like I'm curious to sit with this for a while. And listen to it day in day out and see how my appreciation of changes over time. I'm getting the cultural historical associations to these sounds are constantly changing based off of the references that we come with. And I didn't know anything about, as we talk about in the first half, about smooth jazz, and how it had multiple racial vectors that I actually became associated to NPR, and I didn't even realize the importance of music made for adults and it's something I actually would like to explore further. The show at another time because there's a whole world of music that is geared towards young people, and another world that is geared towards adults and different audiences in different. Genres have tried to sort of seize an adult listening audience, another thing often much maligned and I didn't have probably something worth unpacking. More there. There's some sort of ageism going on. What's there? I think there's a lot of ripe discussion to be had could look forward to it. Switch on pop is produced by Nate Sloan, NB, Charlie Harding, or engineering, mixing mastering done by Brandon, McFarland or community manager is Sarah, Terry. The shot Kirwa and Allison rocky are executive producers are production, vox media. You can find more episodes of our show anywhere podcasts exists, and you can always reach out to us contact. It's which on pop dot com. Twitter switched on pop anywhere else, which pop out there. We'll be back again another week and we promise you more pop hits until then thanks for listening. Hi, I'm Ashleigh Carmen of the verge, and I'm Linda me of the goods by vox. And we are the hosts of wide, you push that button, a show where we can fronts, the decisions that technology forces us to make and good news. We're back and we've got new episodes out now. This season will be tackling topics like why people slide into DM's why people run anonymous accounts. Plus, we will also have special miniseries about death online. Eventually, we'll be more dead people on Facebook than living, people listen to push that, and every Wednesday on apple podcasts Spotify or your favorite podcast app. Ends of scribe for free to get our new episodes, automatically little seal later.

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