17 Burst results for "Brandenburg Concerto Number"

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

06:26 min | 4 months ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on TechStuff

"Here's how you would construct something that would be able to play these things right now. They were there twelve inches in diameter. And they are designed to be played back at Sixteen and two-thirds revolutions per minute so actually fairly slowly. I mean you know. We're thinking about the The forty five or thirty three revolutions per minute for For your average albums and this is a sixteen in two thirds so On these golden records are lots and lots of stuff actually. It's including things like greetings from five different languages including some that aren't being used anymore did not been used in a very long time. Which is a Sumerian language. Which was last used around? Four thousand selection of nature. Sounds Yup so if you ever wanted to hear what frogs burping sounded like and you are from some distant planet. Here's an opportunity to share your Ford Prefect and you're on your way to Earth. This is a good way to do some homework before you get there. A lot of traditional music some Some native American chance and Scottish Bagpipes talk about some of the music was on here for African ritual music There's a bunch of classical music and so I wrote down some of my favorites. This is this is obviously. There are lots and lots of musical tracks on the records. These are just the ones that I personally wrote down because I I they resonate with me. it's not to say that the other ones are not anti sense familiar with some of them but there's the Brandenburg Concerto number two F. Actually it's just the first movement That's by a guy named Bob Batch. Johan batch wrote that if I'd he's just some dude really yeah obviously Bach's Brandenburg Concerto number two enough then there's a melancholy blues which was performed by Louis Armstrong Stravinsky's the rite of spring was included Bach actually was pretty well represented on this record. He also had the well tempered. Clavier down there There was the first moon. Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. You know the There was another tribes chant and then of course the most important I think Musical work that was included out of all the pieces were on there as we as we all know from the documentary back to the future I save Martin Mc fly. It'll save the human race. We're talking about Chuck Berry's Johnny B. Good there's actually a book all about the process that they used to select which sounds went on the golden record. It finally came out with a CD companion at some point. I'm sure it's on digital. Yes the book itself is out of print but you can sometimes find copies is called murmurs from Earth So if you want to learn more about how they came about choosing which sounds go in there That's that's a really well done piece. It's it's something that I've heard nothing but good things about it. I personally have not had chance to read it By the time I learned about it it was wearing print. But there's also a bunch of images on the desks including a star map clearly showing the location of earth new saying here's what humans tastes like maps of earth images. I'm just I'm just ignoring that. Entirely there are people who have said what a huge mistake it was to essentially include directions directly. I I think it's pretty ridiculous. Because the odds one anyone finding voyager sweating big as it turns out really big. No-no HAD NOT. You might think it's a long walk to the chemist on the corner but that's just nuts compared to space it's going to be tens of thousands of years before either. Voyager craft encounter anything near another star. Yeah exactly so really by the time. I'm betting we will have either kill ourselves off or hit and plus on top of that you know it would all depend on from what direction the other creatures were approaching earth because there are a lot of different vectors you could take and only a couple of them would intersect with the pathway of either voyagers waste way more than most science fiction. Movies are willing to acknowledge. There's building just ship space battle than just the single plane So there was also an hour. Long recording the brainwaves of a woman named Ann Druyan. Who would become crossings wife. Yep She's an author she concentrates mainly on cosmology and science and She she signed up for this. She volunteered to have her. Brainwaves recorded in Carl Sagan talked about it and she thought it was a really interesting idea and so she went in for the process where her brain waves in her heartbeat. Were were red and then transferred to data analog that we have to say because it's an analog desk and She says that what she did was she. She thought about big historical moments. That were very important in the development of human history and then she spent some time thinking about the current situation on earth. How what that's like and not sugar coating at things like Violence BETWEEN PEOPLE. And the the yeah. Yeah so she really spent some time thinking about things that she felt needed to be addressed and then she said that she took the liberty toward the end of the session to take a little bit of time and think about what it's like to fall in love. Which I think is amazing. Wonderful Sweet. Yeah so now we. Those aliens can't tell us they don't know how to love because she thought about it for for a while. Darn it So yeah those radio signals do take a long time to get to. Us So But and and the record. That's on there if you want to hear some of the stuff There are there are a lot of different sites out there that that keep all the things that tells you. What's there and most of? That's pretty easy to get access to and listened to find one in Lincoln up on social. Yeah we'll see if we can find something in the you know. Maybe I'll see if I can make it a spotify playlist or something and I'll get a Ukulele and play. Johnny be good on the Ukulele Johnny. Please stop that would be the name of that song all right so anyway. That's that's kind of the the the wrap up of the spacecraft in the stuff that was aborted but we still haven't talked about the actual science return so we're going to do that in just a moment but before we do. Let's take.

Johnny B. Bach Scottish Bagpipes Ford Prefect Bob Batch The forty Carl Sagan spotify Ann Druyan Chuck Berry Johan batch Lincoln Beethoven Louis Armstrong Stravinsky
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

07:43 min | 4 months ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on TechStuff

"Is pointed in the right direction to get the data the needs. And the. It's yeah. It's a three axis stabilization system and use the celestial, or Giro referenced attitude control to make the high gain antenna point back to Earth now we talked about the fact that there is an interesting gold plated copper disc on board each of the two voyager spacecraft. The golden records there for. So this This was a really cool idea you know. Who of course was the chairman for this Carl? Sagan yes, he he had billions and billions of suggestions, but not all of them can make it onto the desk, obvious right, and and these are these are these these goldplated copies engraved like vinyl records? Yeah, yeah, and kids. Ask Your parents. Oh dear, no, no kids are hipsters. These days. We know things final. It's cool kids, 'til your older siblings because they they've missed out on the HIPSTER generation right? I'm not all right, so so yeah, you're talking about a desk. Vast physical grooves that are in it that can be read using a stylus and country, which which were included the they included the cartridge and stylus did not include a turntable. So aliens aliens work it out. They have to build it, but they did leave instructions written in a symbolic language to say here's how you would construct something that would be able to play these things right now. They were there twelve inches in diameter, and they are designed to be played back at sixteen and two-thirds revolutions per minute. So actually fairly slowly i. mean you re thinking about the? The, Forty five or thirty three revolutions per minute for for your average albums, and this is a six hundred two thirds so. on these golden records are lots and lots of stuff actually. It's including things like greetings from five different languages, including some that aren't being used anymore did not been used in a very long time. which is a Sumerian language which was last used around four thousand. Selection of nature sounds Yup, so if you ever wanted to hear what frogs burping sounded like, and you are from some distant planet. Here's an opportunity to. Share. Your for Ford Prefect and you're on your way to Earth. This is a good way to do some homework before you get there. A lot of traditional music, some native American chance and Scottish Bagpipes talk about some of the music was on here. For African ritual music there's a bunch of classical music and so. I wrote down some of my favorites. This is this is obviously. There are lots and lots of musical tracks on the records. These are just the ones that I personally wrote down because I I they resonate with me, It's not to say that the other ones are not anti sense. Familiar with some of them but there's the Brandenburg Concerto number two F. actually it's just the first movement that's by a guy named Bob Batch. Johan batch wrote that. If I'd he's just some dude really. Yeah obviously Bach's Brandenburg Concerto number two enough Then there's a melancholy blues which was performed by Louis Armstrong Stravinsky's. The rite of spring was included Bach actually was pretty well represented on this record. He also had the well tempered clavier on there there was the first Moon Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. You know the There was another tribes chant, and then of course, the most important I think musical work that was included out of all the pieces were on there as we as we all know from the documentary back to the future I. Save Marnie MC fly. It'll save the human race. We're talking about chuck. Berry's Johnny B good. There's actually a book all about the process that they used to select which sounds went on the golden record. It finally came out with a CD companion at some point. I'm sure it's on digital. Yes, the book itself is out of print, but you can sometimes find copies is called murmurs from Earth so if you want to learn more about how they came about choosing, which sounds, go in there That's that's a really well done piece it's. It's something that I've heard nothing but good things about it. I personally have not had a chance to read it. by the time I learned about it. It was wearing print. But. There's also a bunch of images on the desks including a star map, clearly showing the location of earth. NEW SAYING Here's what humans tastes like maps of earth images. I'm just I'm just ignoring that entirely. There are people who have said what a huge mistake! It was to essentially include directions directly. I, I think it's pretty ridiculous because the odds one. Anyone finding voyager sweating. Big as it turns out really big no-no. Head, not you might think it's a long walk to the chemist on the corner, but that's just nuts compared to space. It's going to be tens of thousands of years before. Either Voyager craft encounter anything near another star. Yeah, exactly so really by the time I'm betting. We will have either kill ourselves off or hit. And plus on top of that. You know it would all depend on from what direction the other creatures were approaching. Earth because. There are a lot of different vectors. You could take, and only a couple of them would. Intersect with the pathway of either voyagers waste. Than most science fiction movies are willing to acknowledge, there's just ship space battle than just the single plane. so there was also an hour long recording the brainwaves of a woman named Ann Druyan, who would become crossings wife Yep. She's an author. She concentrates mainly on cosmology and science and she. She signed up for this. She volunteered to have her brainwaves recorded in Carl. Sagan talked about it, and she thought it was a really interesting idea, and so she went in for. The process where her brain. Heartbeat were were red, and then transferred to data analog that we have to say because it's an analog desk. And She says that what she did, was she? She thought about big historical moments that were very important in the development of human history, and then she spent some time. About the the current situation on earth how what that's like thing and not sugar coating at things like violence between people and the the. Yeah yeah, so she really spent some time thinking about things that she felt needed to be addressed. And then she said that she took the liberty toward the end of the session to take a little bit of time and think about what it's like to fall in love, which I think is amazing, wonderful sweet! Yeah, so now we those aliens can't tell us. They don't know how to love because she thought about it for for a while. Darn, it so yeah. Those radio signals do take a long time to get to US so but. And and the record that's on there. If you want to hear some of the stuff there are, there are a lot of different sites out there that that keep all the things that. Tells you? What's there and most of that's pretty easy to get access to and listened to. Find one in Lincoln up on social. Yeah, we'll see if we can find something in the know. Maybe I'll see if I can make it a spotify playlist or something. I'll get a Ukulele and play Johnny be good on the Ukulele. Johnny please stop. That would be the name of that song all right so. Anyway that's that's kind of the the the wrap up of the spacecraft in the stuff that was aborted, but we still haven't talked about the actual science return, so we're going to do that in just a moment, but.

Johnny B Sagan Bach chairman Carl Scottish Bagpipes spotify Johan batch Ann Druyan Ford Prefect US Bob Batch Marnie MC Lincoln Louis Armstrong Stravinsky Berry
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

07:43 min | 4 months ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on TechStuff

"Is pointed in the right direction to get the data the needs. And the. It's yeah. It's a three axis stabilization system and use the celestial, or Giro referenced attitude control to make the high gain antenna point back to Earth now we talked about the fact that there is an interesting gold plated copper disc on board each of the two voyager spacecraft. The golden records there for. So this This was a really cool idea you know. Who of course was the chairman for this Carl? Sagan yes, he he had billions and billions of suggestions, but not all of them can make it onto the desk, obvious right, and and these are these are these these goldplated copies engraved like vinyl records? Yeah, yeah, and kids. Ask Your parents. Oh dear, no, no kids are hipsters. These days. We know things final. It's cool kids, 'til your older siblings because they they've missed out on the HIPSTER generation right? I'm not all right, so so yeah, you're talking about a desk. Vast physical grooves that are in it that can be read using a stylus and country, which which were included the they included the cartridge and stylus did not include a turntable. So aliens aliens work it out. They have to build it, but they did leave instructions written in a symbolic language to say here's how you would construct something that would be able to play these things right now. They were there twelve inches in diameter, and they are designed to be played back at sixteen and two-thirds revolutions per minute. So actually fairly slowly i. mean you re thinking about the? The, Forty five or thirty three revolutions per minute for for your average albums, and this is a six hundred two thirds so. on these golden records are lots and lots of stuff actually. It's including things like greetings from five different languages, including some that aren't being used anymore did not been used in a very long time. which is a Sumerian language which was last used around four thousand. Selection of nature sounds Yup, so if you ever wanted to hear what frogs burping sounded like, and you are from some distant planet. Here's an opportunity to. Share. Your for Ford Prefect and you're on your way to Earth. This is a good way to do some homework before you get there. A lot of traditional music, some native American chance and Scottish Bagpipes talk about some of the music was on here. For African ritual music there's a bunch of classical music and so. I wrote down some of my favorites. This is this is obviously. There are lots and lots of musical tracks on the records. These are just the ones that I personally wrote down because I I they resonate with me, It's not to say that the other ones are not anti sense. Familiar with some of them but there's the Brandenburg Concerto number two F. actually it's just the first movement that's by a guy named Bob Batch. Johan batch wrote that. If I'd he's just some dude really. Yeah obviously Bach's Brandenburg Concerto number two enough Then there's a melancholy blues which was performed by Louis Armstrong Stravinsky's. The rite of spring was included Bach actually was pretty well represented on this record. He also had the well tempered clavier on there there was the first Moon Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. You know the There was another tribes chant, and then of course, the most important I think musical work that was included out of all the pieces were on there as we as we all know from the documentary back to the future I. Save Marnie MC fly. It'll save the human race. We're talking about chuck. Berry's Johnny B good. There's actually a book all about the process that they used to select which sounds went on the golden record. It finally came out with a CD companion at some point. I'm sure it's on digital. Yes, the book itself is out of print, but you can sometimes find copies is called murmurs from Earth so if you want to learn more about how they came about choosing, which sounds, go in there That's that's a really well done piece it's. It's something that I've heard nothing but good things about it. I personally have not had a chance to read it. by the time I learned about it. It was wearing print. But. There's also a bunch of images on the desks including a star map, clearly showing the location of earth. NEW SAYING Here's what humans tastes like maps of earth images. I'm just I'm just ignoring that entirely. There are people who have said what a huge mistake! It was to essentially include directions directly. I, I think it's pretty ridiculous because the odds one. Anyone finding voyager sweating. Big as it turns out really big no-no. Head, not you might think it's a long walk to the chemist on the corner, but that's just nuts compared to space. It's going to be tens of thousands of years before. Either Voyager craft encounter anything near another star. Yeah, exactly so really by the time I'm betting. We will have either kill ourselves off or hit. And plus on top of that. You know it would all depend on from what direction the other creatures were approaching. Earth because. There are a lot of different vectors. You could take, and only a couple of them would. Intersect with the pathway of either voyagers waste. Than most science fiction movies are willing to acknowledge, there's just ship space battle than just the single plane. so there was also an hour long recording the brainwaves of a woman named Ann Druyan, who would become crossings wife Yep. She's an author. She concentrates mainly on cosmology and science and she. She signed up for this. She volunteered to have her brainwaves recorded in Carl. Sagan talked about it, and she thought it was a really interesting idea, and so she went in for. The process where her brain. Heartbeat were were red, and then transferred to data analog that we have to say because it's an analog desk. And She says that what she did, was she? She thought about big historical moments that were very important in the development of human history, and then she spent some time. About the the current situation on earth how what that's like thing and not sugar coating at things like violence between people and the the. Yeah yeah, so she really spent some time thinking about things that she felt needed to be addressed. And then she said that she took the liberty toward the end of the session to take a little bit of time and think about what it's like to fall in love, which I think is amazing, wonderful sweet! Yeah, so now we those aliens can't tell us. They don't know how to love because she thought about it for for a while. Darn, it so yeah. Those radio signals do take a long time to get to US so but. And and the record that's on there. If you want to hear some of the stuff there are, there are a lot of different sites out there that that keep all the things that. Tells you? What's there and most of that's pretty easy to get access to and listened to. Find one in Lincoln up on social. Yeah, we'll see if we can find something in the know. Maybe I'll see if I can make it a spotify playlist or something. I'll get a Ukulele and play Johnny be good on the Ukulele. Johnny please stop. That would be the name of that song all right so. Anyway that's that's kind of the the the wrap up of the spacecraft in the stuff that was aborted, but we still haven't talked about the actual science return, so we're going to do that in just a moment, but.

Johnny B Sagan Bach chairman Carl Scottish Bagpipes spotify Johan batch Ann Druyan Ford Prefect US Bob Batch Marnie MC Lincoln Louis Armstrong Stravinsky Berry
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

09:46 min | 4 months ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on TechStuff

"Never actually look more into it. Because I was lucky that I could say it. There's an infrared interferometer spectrometer. And Optical calibration targeting system, a planetary radio astronomy and plasma wave antenna, each spacecraft's two of those and also as the planetary radio astronomy instrument or Has the a plasma instrument. Voyager one's plasma instrument is nonfunctional, but all other instruments are in working order and boys. You're too is still collecting data through its plasma instruments It's got. It also gets power from three Isotope Thermo Electric Generators, and currently it gets about three hundred and fifteen watts of power now the spacecraft designed so that all of their systems can operate at four hundred watts of power. Okay, so it's able to It's still getting power, but it's not enough power to operate everything, and in fact they designed the voyager spacecraft with this in mind, the idea being that as the power as the power supply begins to decrease, it begins to shutdown unnecessary, says instruments. So originally. There were eleven different. Projects that were involved in gathering data from the Voyager's systems and processing that data here on earth. There were eleven of them currently, only five of them are still in operation because the other systems have been progressively shut down to make sure that the voyager spacecraft can still send us information, and like you said by twenty, twenty or twenty five or so. That's when we expect. Expect the power to have run down enough where we're not going to be able to get any more information from them, because it's just not going to have the power necessary to broadcast right right well, because the way that this engine of sorts works, is that appellative plutonium dioxide released heat through their own natural decay processes, and so once they have finished a king. That's it. Yeah. That's true and then I'll I forgot. Magnetometer boom which designed tests to measure magnetic fields, so that was one of those things we didn't really know a lot about the magnetic field to the outer planets before we sent these these spacecraft up. That's one of the really huge as sources of information that it is. Yeah and so then it has a flight data subsystem, which handles all the information, and it has an eight track digital tape recorder. So you've got an eight track up there. It's a it to the FTSE configures controls collects data from the various instruments and the tape recorder handles the data from the plasma wave subsystem, because that's the one that gets the highest density of data and the shortest amount of time, so the data tape recorder was the cutting edge technology to handle that that information and according to NASA. The tape in the digital recorder won't wear out until the tape has moved back and forth through a distance that is equivalent to the width of the United. States that is not. Not Terribly, precise because the United States is not a perfect rectangle, but in general I would say that's probably about three thousand miles, which is around four thousand eight hundred kilometers I assume they mean is that it's doing fine. Yeah, so what they're saying is that that tape is capable of traveling that collective amount of distance about breaking right, so you got to remember the tape. itself is not that long. It's just saying that they would you'll by the time you would go through all this tape and his worn out. You could have gone all the way across. The United States using that same distance of taping played through. Just kind of that's impressive that has a command computer subsystem which provides sequencing and control functions, which includes fault detection, corrective routines, antenna, pointing data and spacecrafts sequencing data. The detection involves seven top level fault, protection routines, and each one is able to detect and correct for several possible failures. Oh, basically it just means that there's the computer has multiple modules, and they compare data back and forth between each other, and it will decide if one module is different from the others that that one's faulty and to cut it out system. And it also means that the space craft capable of shutting down systems if it needs to automatically autonomously, because which is important, because we can't broadcast to these things they broadcast to us. They don't have receivers though their antenna could receive information, thank yeah, but it means that it would take seventeen hours for the information to get to us in seventeen hours for the freshly of back, and by then whatever the problem was is probably not the biggest issue at that point right, so yeah. It's important to have something to connect autonomously. If if you if the communication is a barrier, same sort of thing with the the curiosity rover when it was landing on the surface of Mars, you know a lot of that landing. In fact, all of the landing was autonomous because there was no time for us to send any adjustments to the system. It's like you're on your own. Yeah, by the time we. We would be able to send adjustment. It would have already either crashed or landed safely, so you had to design a spacecraft that could do this or else. It wouldn't work pretty impressive in the nineteen seventies for for the amount of computing power that what's going Oh. Yeah, definitely, and it also had an attitude, art or still hassle I. Don't know why I'm using the past tense still up dead to you. The attitude and articulation control subsystem, which is also known acs it's in charge of maintaining the spacecraft orientation in positions the scan platform. This is what we're talking about. The system that's that's in charge of making sure that data antennas pointed back at Earth, and also that the scan platform, which is really you know the instrumentation panel? Is pointed in the right direction to get the data the needs. And the. It's yeah. It's a three axis stabilization system and use the celestial, or Giro referenced attitude control to make the high gain antenna point back to Earth now we talked about the fact that there is an interesting gold plated copper disc on board each of the two voyager spacecraft. The golden records there for. So this This was a really cool idea you know. Who of course was the chairman for this Carl? Sagan yes, he he had billions and billions of suggestions, but not all of them can make it onto the desk, obvious right, and and these are these are these these goldplated copies engraved like vinyl records? Yeah, yeah, and kids. Ask Your parents. Oh dear, no, no kids are hipsters. These days. We know things final. It's cool kids, 'til your older siblings because they they've missed out on the HIPSTER generation right? I'm not all right, so so yeah, you're talking about a desk. Vast physical grooves that are in it that can be read using a stylus and country, which which were included the they included the cartridge and stylus did not include a turntable. So aliens aliens work it out. They have to build it, but they did leave instructions written in a symbolic language to say here's how you would construct something that would be able to play these things right now. They were there twelve inches in diameter, and they are designed to be played back at sixteen and two-thirds revolutions per minute. So actually fairly slowly i. mean you re thinking about the? The, Forty five or thirty three revolutions per minute for for your average albums, and this is a six hundred two thirds so. on these golden records are lots and lots of stuff actually. It's including things like greetings from five different languages, including some that aren't being used anymore did not been used in a very long time. which is a Sumerian language which was last used around four thousand. Selection of nature sounds Yup, so if you ever wanted to hear what frogs burping sounded like, and you are from some distant planet. Here's an opportunity to. Share. Your for Ford Prefect and you're on your way to Earth. This is a good way to do some homework before you get there. A lot of traditional music, some native American chance and Scottish Bagpipes talk about some of the music was on here. For African ritual music there's a bunch of classical music and so. I wrote down some of my favorites. This is this is obviously. There are lots and lots of musical tracks on the records. These are just the ones that I personally wrote down because I I they resonate with me, It's not to say that the other ones are not anti sense. Familiar with some of them but there's the Brandenburg Concerto number two F. actually it's just the first movement that's by a guy named Bob Batch. Johan batch wrote that. If I'd he's just some dude really. Yeah obviously Bach's Brandenburg Concerto number two enough Then there's a melancholy blues which was performed by Louis Armstrong Stravinsky's. The rite of spring was included Bach actually was pretty well represented on this record. He also had the well tempered clavier on there there was the first Moon Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. You know the There was another tribes chant, and then of course, the most important I think musical work that was included out of all the pieces were on there as we as we all know from the documentary back to the future I. Save Marnie MC fly. It'll save the human race. We're talking about chuck. Berry's Johnny B good. There's actually a book all about the process that they used to select which sounds went on the golden record. It finally came out with a CD companion at some point. I'm sure it's on digital. Yes, the book itself is out of print, but you can sometimes find copies is called murmurs from Earth so if you want to learn more about how they came about choosing, which sounds, go in there That's that's a really well done piece it's..

United States Bach Isotope Thermo Electric Genera FTSE NASA Marnie MC chairman Scottish Bagpipes Louis Armstrong Stravinsky Sagan Johan batch Ford Prefect Bob Batch Berry Carl Johnny B
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

04:38 min | 4 months ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"That's the opening to the fifth of six Brandenburg Concertos by Johann Sebastian Bach. Why start with number five well first of all the concerto numbers don't really have anything to do with the order in which. Bach wrote them. The Fifth Brandenburg Concerto features a Harpsichord and the story of the Brandenburg concertos begins with a trip. That Johann Sebastian Bach took to pick out a new HARPSICHORD for the prince whose court orchestra he conducted. There are actually three solo instruments in the Brandenburg Concerto number five Harpsichord violin and flute. The harpsichord is an ancestor of the piano. But as you can hear it doesn't sound the same. That's because Harpsichord strings are plucked by teeny tiny. Quills in a piano. The sound is made by hitting the strings with small felt covered hammers. Here's a spot where the harpsichord plays alone. So you can hear it while he was on his trip looking at Harpsichord he met Chris. Jon Ludvig the Margrave of the province. That's like a state of Brandenburg. Margrave is a fancy title. They used to give to military governors of German provinces. The margrave of Brandenburg had his own orchestra and when he found out. Bach was a composer. He said he wouldn't mind hearing some of his work. Only own okay. There's the Brandenburg Concerto number one. It has a really huge group of Solo instruments. Seven in all Bach was thrilled that the Margrave was interested in his music. He thought there might be a good job prospect for him in Brandenburg so he pulled together a set of concertos mostly stuff he'd already written for the orchestra he conducted and sent them off with a very flowery letter to the Margrave the Brandenburg Concerto Number. Three IS FOR THREE SETS OF STRING. Instruments Violins violas and cellos. It's a good thing. Bach didn't hold his breath waiting for an answer from the margrave because he never got one in fact the margrave probably never even looked at these beautiful concertos. What A DOOFUS. Part of the problem may have been that his orchestra wasn't as big as the one baulk road them for so the Margaret didn't have the musicians to play them but he could have at least sent a thank you note. That's the six Brandenburg Concerto. It's also just for strings given the Margrave of Brandenburg's rudeness. You can bet that. Bach didn't name his concertos Brandenburg years. After he died one of Bach's biographers attached the name to them and obviously it stuck Bach called his pieces concertos for a variety of instruments which is a pretty good description since each one is written a different instrumental combination. The Brandenburg Concerto Number. Four has a small group of soloists two flutes or recorders and a violin. It's the violin that really gets to show off especially towards the end of the peace..

Johann Sebastian Bach Brandenburg Concerto Number Brandenburg Brandenburg Concerto Margrave Fifth Brandenburg Concerto Jon Ludvig Chris Margaret
Johann Sebastian Bach 4: The Story of the Brandenburg Concertos

Classics for Kids

04:32 min | 4 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 4: The Story of the Brandenburg Concertos

"That's the opening to the fifth of six Brandenburg Concertos by Johann Sebastian Bach. Why start with number five well first of all the concerto numbers don't really have anything to do with the order in which. Bach wrote them. The Fifth Brandenburg Concerto features a Harpsichord and the story of the Brandenburg concertos begins with a trip. That Johann Sebastian Bach took to pick out a new HARPSICHORD for the prince whose court orchestra he conducted. There are actually three solo instruments in the Brandenburg Concerto number five Harpsichord violin and flute. The harpsichord is an ancestor of the piano. But as you can hear it doesn't sound the same. That's because Harpsichord strings are plucked by teeny tiny. Quills in a piano. The sound is made by hitting the strings with small felt covered hammers. Here's a spot where the harpsichord plays alone. So you can hear it while he was on his trip looking at Harpsichord he met Chris. Jon Ludvig the Margrave of the province. That's like a state of Brandenburg. Margrave is a fancy title. They used to give to military governors of German provinces. The margrave of Brandenburg had his own orchestra and when he found out. Bach was a composer. He said he wouldn't mind hearing some of his work. Only own okay. There's the Brandenburg Concerto number one. It has a really huge group of Solo instruments. Seven in all Bach was thrilled that the Margrave was interested in his music. He thought there might be a good job prospect for him in Brandenburg so he pulled together a set of concertos mostly stuff he'd already written for the orchestra he conducted and sent them off with a very flowery letter to the Margrave the Brandenburg Concerto Number. Three IS FOR THREE SETS OF STRING. Instruments Violins violas and cellos. It's a good thing. Bach didn't hold his breath waiting for an answer from the margrave because he never got one in fact the margrave probably never even looked at these beautiful concertos. What A DOOFUS. Part of the problem may have been that his orchestra wasn't as big as the one baulk road them for so the Margaret didn't have the musicians to play them but he could have at least sent a thank you note. That's the six Brandenburg Concerto. It's also just for strings given the Margrave of Brandenburg's rudeness. You can bet that. Bach didn't name his concertos Brandenburg years. After he died one of Bach's biographers attached the name to them and obviously it stuck Bach called his pieces concertos for a variety of instruments which is a pretty good description since each one is written a

Johann Sebastian Bach Brandenburg Brandenburg Concerto Margrave Brandenburg Concerto Number Fifth Brandenburg Concerto Jon Ludvig Chris Margaret
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:36 min | 4 months ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Concerto comes from two Italian words with sort of meanings first concerto means in agreement or together like the word concert. You go to a concert to hear people playing together but the Italian word contract. Tari has to do with struggling. And a concerto also has to do with one or more solo instruments doing friendly battle in concert with a larger group. Italian COMPOSER GIUSEPPE. Torelli gets most of the credit for developing the instrumental concerto. In the late sixteen hundreds an Italian who lived a bit later on Tonio Vivaldi wrote Zillions of Concerto will actually only five hundred or so. But it seems like Zillions Vivaldi's most famous set of concertos named for the four seasons the earliest concertos were written for violins. But you can have a concerto for any instrument. Here's one that you'll have nipple Makoma road for trumpet. One for cello by front-seat high one for Tuba by Refund Williams who in the late twentieth century Scottish composer James Macmillan wrote a concerto called vinnie Emmanuel for percussionist. Evelyn Glenn you can also have a concerto with more than one Solo Instrument Wolfgang Gone Medina's Mozart wrote this one for flute and Harp Dmitri Shostakovich wrote a wonderful concerto for piano and trumpet the end of the peace sense just like music for a silent movie. Let's because when he was young Shostakovich had a job playing piano for silent movies in box day composers also wrote something called the Concerto Grosso which does not mean. A concerto with slimy stuff. Losing out of it grow is Italian for great. Instead of just one or two soloists. A Concerto Grosso has a whole group of soloists. A smaller group pitted against a larger group. George Frederic Handel. Who lived at the same time as Bach wrote quite a few Concerto Grossi? That's the official plural of Concerto Grosso. a lot of Bach's Brandenburg concertos fall into the Concerto Grosso category in the Brandenburg Concerto. Number two the small group consists of Trumpet Flute Oboe Violin and the big group is made up of string instruments. You've heard music from Johann Sebastian faulks Brandenburg Concerto number. Two so by now you might be wondering how many Brandenburg concertos there are and how they got a name like Brandenburg. I'll tell you that next week. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for Kids and produce it with Pimm Lander at wgn Cincinnati. Please join me next. Time for the story of the Brandon. Birds on classics for kids..

Concerto Grosso Brandenburg Concerto Dmitri Shostakovich Johann Sebastian faulks Brande Zillions Vivaldi Brandenburg Pimm Lander Tonio Vivaldi George Frederic Handel Bach Tari Torelli Evelyn Glenn James Macmillan Naomi Lewin vinnie Emmanuel Cincinnati Refund Williams
Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

Classics for Kids

05:25 min | 4 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

"Kids. Concerto comes from two Italian words with sort of meanings first concerto means in agreement or together like the word concert. You go to a concert to hear people playing together but the Italian word contract. Tari has to do with struggling. And a concerto also has to do with one or more solo instruments doing friendly battle in concert with a larger group. Italian COMPOSER GIUSEPPE. Torelli gets most of the credit for developing the instrumental concerto. In the late sixteen hundreds an Italian who lived a bit later on Tonio Vivaldi wrote Zillions of Concerto will actually only five hundred or so. But it seems like Zillions Vivaldi's most famous set of concertos named for the four seasons the earliest concertos were written for violins. But you can have a concerto for any instrument. Here's one that you'll have nipple Makoma road for trumpet. One for cello by front-seat high one for Tuba by Refund Williams who in the late twentieth century Scottish composer James Macmillan wrote a concerto called vinnie Emmanuel for percussionist. Evelyn Glenn you can also have a concerto with more than one Solo Instrument Wolfgang Gone Medina's Mozart wrote this one for flute and Harp Dmitri Shostakovich wrote a wonderful concerto for piano and trumpet the end of the peace sense just like music for a silent movie. Let's because when he was young Shostakovich had a job playing piano for silent movies in box day composers also wrote something called the Concerto Grosso which does not mean. A concerto with slimy stuff. Losing out of it grow is Italian for great. Instead of just one or two soloists. A Concerto Grosso has a whole group of soloists. A smaller group pitted against a larger group. George Frederic Handel. Who lived at the same time as Bach wrote quite a few Concerto Grossi? That's the official plural of Concerto Grosso. a lot of Bach's Brandenburg concertos fall into the Concerto Grosso category in the Brandenburg Concerto. Number two the small group consists of Trumpet Flute Oboe Violin and the big group is made up of string instruments.

Concerto Grosso Brandenburg Concerto Dmitri Shostakovich Zillions Vivaldi Tonio Vivaldi George Frederic Handel Bach Tari Torelli Evelyn Glenn James Macmillan Vinnie Emmanuel Refund Williams Tuba Wolfgang Official
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:40 min | 5 months ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Johann. Sebastian Bach was the greatest member of a musical dynasty beginning in sixteenth century Germany. Three Hundred Years. Worth of box held jobs as town. Musicians organist and choir directors Johann Sebastian's. Father was a musician. His grandfather was a musician and his great grandfather was a musician. All the male members of the family were trained by their fathers uncles and older brothers to carry on the tradition. That's by no handsome. Asean box Uncle Johann Michio or John. Michael Bah his daughter. Maria Barbara Married Johann Sebastian. Who was her second cousin? I guess that made her Maria. Barbara Bach. Pa IN GERMAN WORD MEANS STREAM BUT JOHANN. Sebastian produced a whole ocean of box. He and Maria Barbara had seven kids when Maria Barbara Died Balk married. A singer named Anna Magdalena and had thirteen more children twenty in all J S. That's short for Johann. Sebastian Bach expected his sons to follow in his footsteps and several of them became well known composers. Box oldest son bill him. Freedom on or W. F. Baugh worked mostly as an organist. He never quite lived up to everybody's great expectations even though he wrote some Nice music the fifth child the third son of J S Baugh was Carl Philipp Emanuel Norse EP. Aw He was very successful. Cpi box spent years working for the flute. Playing King of Prussia. Frederick Great Frederick. The great never went anywhere without his flute. Not even into battle so. Cpa Bach wrote a lot of music both CPI and W. F. were sons of J s Bach's first wife Maria Barbara Anna Magdalena Baw. Second wife was the mother of his youngest son. Johann Christian J C Bach was the most radical member of the clan for starters. He left Germany and went to study and work in Italy in order to get a job at the cathedral in Milan Italy. This Bach did something. Nobody had done before he changed. Religion converting from Lutheran Catholic and J C Bach. Did something else. His father had never done. He wrote operas after Italy. He moved to one of the hottest cities in Europe for Italian opera and became known as the London Bach. That's right people in London. England were crazy about Italian opera even or especially if it was written by Germans. There's a man named Peter Shakily who claims to know about yet another box son P Q. According to Peter Shakily until he discovered P Q. No one wanted to admit that he existed. Peterson says that's because PD Q. Box Stole Music from other composers and came up with things so outrageous that they make people laugh because it makes people laugh. Peter Shakily keeps right on composing. I mean discovering music Cuba that's from PD Q. Bach piece called Kanaya in Brooklyn. That's written for Double Reeds. When a COMPOSER SAYS MUSIC IS FOR DOUBLE REEDS? He means oboe. Zampa Soons instruments that have double reeds sticking out of the top of them. Blowing into the reads is what makes the instruments sound but PD. Cuba wrote for double reeds without Hobos and bassoon. Attached the words pretty funny to watch it to us to be home you know moves run grounding knows PD. Cuba may be big. Newton of someone's imagination but Johann Sebastian. Bach certainly wasn't at the beginning of this show. You heard a bit of his Brandenburg Concerto number. Two next time on classics for kids find out what a concerto is. I May Omi Lewin. I write classics for Kids. And produce with Tim. Lander at WG UC Cincinnati. Please join me again.

Johann Christian J C Bach Johann Sebastian Double Reeds Maria Barbara Uncle Johann Michio Maria Barbara Died Balk Germany Peter Shakily Maria Barbara Anna Magdalena B Cuba Anna Magdalena Italy Frederick Great Frederick J S Baugh Asean W. F. Baugh Prussia Michael Bah Omi Lewin
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:05 min | 5 months ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Hello I'm Mayo Lewin. Welcome to classics for. Kids is one of your parents doctor or lawyer and maybe as far back as they can remember everyone in their family has gone into the same profession while that's how it was with the Bach family all of them were musicians Johann. That's German for John. Sebastian Bach was born in sixteen eighty. Five in the German town of is enough. His father was the official town musician. There by the time was ten. Both his parents had died so he went to live with his older brother. Who was also a musician? Of course Johann Sebastian. Bach turned out to have very fleet fingers. He played a mean violin and by the time he was eighteen. He had a job as an organist. Bach held three main jobs over the course of his life. You can tell where he was working by. What kind of music? He wrote the first box. Big Jobs was official. Court organist for the Duke of Weimar so a lot of box great organ. Music comes from early on in his career. That Weimar job also had box serving as concert master. The head Honcho violinist of the Duke's orchestra when the Duke of Weimar decided not to make him conductor of the Orchestra. Bach was pretty unhappy. Then a visiting prince offered a job directing his orchestra but when Bach tried to quit his job in Weimar. The dukes said no way he even threw in jail for a month to try and make its point but it didn't work when Bach got out of jail. He headed straight to the town of curtain to work for the prince the prince had a wonderful orchestra so Bach wrote lots of instrumental music. While he was in curtain eventually balk moved onto his last job at the Saint. Thomas Lutheran Church. In the city of Leipzig. His title was cantor. That's what they called the choir and music director and it was a huge job box trained singers organized music for several churches in town and for the University of Leipzig and he composed new music every week for services at the Saint Thomas Church most of Bach's great choral music was written in Leipzig the choir at the Saint Thomas. Church still performs box music every week. One of the coolest things I ever got to do was sit in the church where Bach worked and listen to the choir sing. His music while Bach was alive. No one outside the towns in Germany where he worked had heard of him and people thought of him as just another working musician after he died people pretty much forgot about him until a century later when another composer Felix Mendelssohn dug out some of Bach's music and performed it after that the whole world recognized what a genius had been and Faulk may even be recognized beyond this world in nineteen seventy seven scientists sent the unmanned voyager spacecraft off to explore the galaxy. They put examples of the best that planet Earth had to offer on board and one of those examples was a recording of Johann Sebastian box. Brandenburg Concerto number. Two.

Sebastian Bach Weimar Johann Sebastian Mayo Lewin University of Leipzig Leipzig Saint Thomas Church official Thomas Lutheran Church Felix Mendelssohn Germany head Honcho Saint Thomas cantor Faulk director
Johann Sebastian Bach 1: About Johann Sebastian Bach

Classics for Kids

04:53 min | 5 months ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 1: About Johann Sebastian Bach

"One of your parents doctor or lawyer and maybe as far back as they can remember everyone in their family has gone into the same profession while that's how it was with the Bach family all of them were musicians Johann. That's German for John. Sebastian Bach was born in sixteen eighty. Five in the German town of is enough. His father was the official town musician. There by the time was ten. Both his parents had died so he went to live with his older brother. Who was also a musician? Of course Johann Sebastian. Bach turned out to have very fleet fingers. He played a mean violin and by the time he was eighteen. He had a job as an organist. Bach held three main jobs over the course of his life. You can tell where he was working by. What kind of music? He wrote the first box. Big Jobs was official. Court organist for the Duke of Weimar so a lot of box great organ. Music comes from early on in his career. That Weimar job also had box serving as concert master. The head Honcho violinist of the Duke's orchestra when the Duke of Weimar decided not to make him conductor of the Orchestra. Bach was pretty unhappy. Then a visiting prince offered a job directing his orchestra but when Bach tried to quit his job in Weimar. The dukes said no way he even threw in jail for a month to try and make its point but it didn't work when Bach got out of jail. He headed straight to the town of curtain to work for the prince the prince had a wonderful orchestra so Bach wrote lots of instrumental music. While he was in curtain eventually balk moved onto his last job at the Saint. Thomas Lutheran Church. In the city of Leipzig. His title was cantor. That's what they called the choir and music director and it was a huge job box trained singers organized music for several churches in town and for the University of Leipzig and he composed new music every week for services at the Saint Thomas Church most of Bach's great choral music was written in Leipzig the choir at the Saint Thomas. Church still performs box music every week. One of the coolest things I ever got to do was sit in the church where Bach worked and listen to the choir sing. His music while Bach was alive. No one outside the towns in Germany where he worked had heard of him and people thought of him as just another working musician after he died people pretty much forgot about him until a century later when another composer Felix Mendelssohn dug out some of Bach's music and performed it after that the whole world recognized what a genius had been and Faulk may even be recognized beyond this world in nineteen seventy seven scientists sent the unmanned voyager spacecraft off to explore the galaxy. They put examples of the best that planet Earth had to offer on board and one of those examples was a recording of Johann Sebastian box. Brandenburg Concerto number.

Sebastian Bach Weimar Johann Sebastian Saint Thomas Church University Of Leipzig Leipzig Official Thomas Lutheran Church Felix Mendelssohn Germany Head Honcho Saint Thomas Cantor Faulk Director
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Switched On Pop

Switched On Pop

06:37 min | 1 year ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Switched On Pop

"Feel that right? And I'm not gonna get too deep into the theory here. We're just going to say that, when you hear this, I think you hear musical logic. Well, yeah, this is like when I studied classical music with you in school. One of the very first things you learn about is the fundamental sort of structure of harmony, and the way in which cords want to move into each other. Exactly. And this is the sort of, like underlying. All of classical harmony is this meta superstructure. Yeah. So fifths are distance between two notes. So we move from our I note g and the cord based around that note to our second note, and our second chord, c. Away from a fifth below g exactly. So that is like a really important relationship in classical music, moving from a note that a fifth below and what we do after that is we take that new note. See go to remove a fifth below that to happens after that Charlie fifth below that to be flat v below that. And that's where in the morning edition deemed the progression stops, but we could keep going right? Yeah. We could go on where it's to a flat. And now I feel like I'm actually quizzing. Back in your music, fifty five final shouts out to professor Arleen coal. We love you sorry, a flat goes down to deflate and fifth below. Deflate is g flat and then a fifth below that is c flat, but will rename it as be major because that's a little nicer. And if it below that is easier that a D, And now where we truly after d major right back to where you were right back to Jean. It's a very complicated way of spelling music, you, like basically go through seven different letters, and you just do so obnoxious, permutations until you eventually get back to where you started. Yeah. I don't know why you have to say, call it obnoxious that seems comedic using when you first learned it, and then you learn to spell in funny ways. But the point being that there's this sort of wild underlying mathematics, where if you start one place you keep going down five. Eventually you end up back where you started totally. This is one of the fundamental properties of western tonal harmony is that this this circle of unlike undergirds so much. And whether we're aware of that or not, whether we have taken music, fifty five that is like present somewhere in our collective consciousness. Certainly. If we've heard classical music after morning edition, listen to Bach or Mozart, specially earlier classical music. And baroque music you're going to hear these things. It's embedded in this stuff. And so you just associated to classical music. Right. There's like callous examples, but I'm just going to pull out one of my favorites. Here's a nice circle of v progression. From Bach's Brandenburg concerto, number five, I movement in d major, what's have listened jam? So every time it switches between the flute and the violin. You can hear. It's moving from one fifth chord to another fifth cart. An ember learning the going through the cycles of fifth was away of drawing composition. So he'll longer and longer and longer. It's absolutely. It's a way of like moving from one harm onic place to another. Yeah. You can also serve as a bridge or a harmonic highway if you. So, yeah, has this feeling of movement, and which kind of makes sense if we're I think about how that applies in the morning edition theme song. I am sort of waking up and slowly rising. And so this thing is kind of, like moving me along. Yeah. Okay. I love that. So it's giving you this energy and momentum and it's also reaching back. I mean, literally when you hear circle Fiszman, especially in this context, a generation later Beethoven, Mozart would look back to that sound, and they would call it this delay onto go like the old old school. That's an old like literally even in, you know, the, the eighteenth century that was being called old school. Yeah. So now it's like firmly got that association like this is old. This is venerated. This is serious. So it's like you know, I think it's a good thing for news program to say, like, hey, we're going to be we're going to be like. Reliable. We've been around since the fifteen hundred essentially, and you can trust us, we know what we're doing okay. Now at the same time, let's move to the complete opposite end of the equation. Because there's things that at least nineteen Seventy-nine would sound very modern, and that gets us back to smooth Jess. Okay. So we're going from era dish in into contemporary newsworthy. Yes. But newsworthy nineteen seventy I didn't. Okay. But I do have an ulterior motive here because I want to understand the influence of smooth jazz here, and maybe in doing so give some credit to smooth jazz, exonerate expiate bring smooth jazz back into the light even putting off this discussion for a long time because I keep hearing like inclinations of smooth jazz coming back, especially into some like LA. Hip hop stuff, one hundred percent and you've been, like, whole lot. Yes, it's time, you know, and the derision in your voice, when you first said two words, smooth and jazz. It was palpable, right? NPR public radio news, smooth jazz guitar. Smooth jazz guitar spruce, droves guitar I think it's it is a cultural trope, smooth jazz bad. Yeah. So we're going to you're going to start going to be our Guinea pig for hopefully, a culture wide movement of re reclaiming Jess. Barbecue me? Okay. So when you think, you know this theme, let's play it one more time. I

Jess Bach Mozart NPR circle Fiszman professor Charlie Jean Guinea LA Brandenburg Beethoven one hundred percent one fifth
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

12:47 min | 1 year ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"I am not the conductor that our next guest is frontier vote i pointed at the court appointed the court and they just stand there finally brandenburg johann sebastian during his now usually in studio but they're both a little bit under the weather are linda mary nello and franz vote the conductor franz what did i do wrong i'm pointing at these guys and pointing and they just stand there with their mouths agape what do i need to do stamp my foot or what richard it must be something about your personality what can i say i have an electrifying personality but it didn't work on these guys both on i wish you both feeling better yeah we wish that too yeah thanks so much well we're just happy to be with you always enjoy visiting all right tell us about this upcoming shoe because it is this sunday and saturday saturday in albuquerque and sunday in that's the one we're worried that's the one we're focused on the one on sunday at immaculate heart of mary chapel wonderful facility up near santa fe prep tell us about that one well that's going to be with orchestra and we're going to start off with box brandenburg concerto number five and then do a series of selections my absolute pick heaven over this because there's so much glorious music to choose from but selections from the saint john passion the saint matthew from the mass in d minor and then we'll take a limiter mission and finish up with a cantata number seventy eight by baa and it should be feast for anybody who likes this kind of music for those that are educated what is the proper way to say bach good and by the way i wanted to share some information that one of our singers esther moses berg she was a featured soloist on this program posted on our facebook page because one of the things that's exciting about bah is that he is his music is timeless he's the most popular composer to this very day some three hundred years after his life ended where i should say began because actually he died in seventeen fifty so we're not quite to twenty-fifty yet but in any case she posted this really fun quote that i wanted to share by a guy named james roads and it's just about how we can all relate to who this man was here's a man who was orphaned by the age of ten who lost eleven of his twenty kids in infancy or childbirth whose first wife and love of his life died suddenly so there's spa drenched in grief sleeping with groupies in the oregon law a duly fighting hard-drinking rockstar with a work ethic that makes obama look like a bum and producing music that's still three hundred years later inspire stuns and rockets us into a fourth dimension of existence it's quite a statement twenty children he produced as well in his spare time yes exactly frans worry operating director you directed an opera houses is anywhere near as popular in this country as he is in europe yes equally popular it's an amazing story of all of the composers of all time he has he takes place no matter where he occurs on the globe being the most sought after and the most appreciated of all composers of all time why what is it well genius and inspiration he was a channel directly from whatever your view of the cosmos and the spirit is and every single piece that he wrote to varying degrees is a source of inspiration and fascination for for audiences and for musicians for performers of the were just thinking last night we were doing one of the rest achieves from the cantata and everybody kind of looked at one another after the arrest was finished because it sounded like like schurenberg burglar or some modern composer indeed buck did everything that all of the composer's who followed him century as later did and did it better so when you when we hear the brandenburg's we were listening to concerto number five coming in it's so popular sounds like masterpiece theatre merchant ivory movie beginning of know of the costume drama some kind the brandenburg's are his most popular work most accessible work certainly orchestral of all of the orchestral music that he wrote it rank day rank right up there at the very top and they're performed very often makes a great box set it does indeed and they remain as challenging today as they were when they were first performed they are technically not easy whatsoever and they require a great deal of musicianship and technical ability and musicality so it really stretches the entire musical sphere now i know you you required you being the new mexico performing arts society did acquire a harpsichord correct well we have an electronic instrument that mimics the harpsichord with real sound samples so in your in your instance up at the immaculate heart of mary chapel on mount carmel road on sunday at six pm get your tickets now because they always sell out it will be a group made up of what kind of instruments strings flutes hobos and keyboard piano in this case because we don't have a concert style harpsichord okay so our pianists jacquelyn helene graciously has accepted the challenge of performing this music on the piano and she's doing an absolutely fabulous job of it because the day was written for harpsichord correct well that's what was this was pre piano do you have to transcribe it when you have to change what's the challenge the challenges with the harpsichord no matter what sort of pressure you use on the keyboard it doesn't get louder or excuse one dynamic and so bought compensated by writing more notes and quicker notes in order to make more sound you don't have that challenge on the data in fact you have the opposite challenge to not make too much sound because of the enormous number of notes and the quickness of some can sometimes be overwhelming to the year so that's the challenge for the piano player right sounds like one our guests are frond vote and linda marina new mexico performing arts society and linda franz said flute your flouted you're going to be performing yes i am the brandenburg five is for what's called it's a concerto grosso which means that there's a group or a a general orchestral group and then there are three soloists violin flute and keyboard in this case piano we're joined by david felber are violin soloist and i'll be our flute soloist for that first piece is flutist or flout is correct well i'll answer to both but i personally prefer fluted oh you do okay yes i do this loudest is more tied at the british term of floss death it's pronounced all hoity toity yeah and we're pretty you know we've talked about this a little on your show before we're pretty low brow in the sense that we like to try to lower all barriers between the performers and the audience so that there's a real collaborative experience there for people who were listening and people who are performing i like the way you equate lowbrow with my show thank you glad you got that i picked up on the run i'm not the one that's a little bit under the weather here i got a loud and clear thank you very much people can acquire tickets how yes well now i have to say that as of today wednesday april third of we're getting very close to being sold out for the santa fe performance we're not completely sold out but we're really on the border here i'm so we recommend that people go to the website the tickets page of our website immediately that's an m. p. a. s. dot org or they call hold my ticket right away at eight seven seven four six six three four zero four it is possible that the program will be sold out in that there may not be tickets available at the door for particular performance so underlay get on the stick go to the website yes hold my ticket your tickets now usually have some rosa tickets in the front of people want to spend a little bit more for reserved seating yeah that's sold out completely all right if they would like or they're going to be in albuquerque if they're listening online the show on saturday win where same same same program it's almost the same program except that the very first piece is going to be two preludes and fuchs from box well tempered clavier book one also featuring jacqueline helene as piano soloist and then the rest of the program will be identical to the sunday evening program the only difference really is that we're not we're not having the orchestra for the saturday evening performance it is at st michael and all angels episcopal church on montano at seven p._m. on saturday april six and we do have tickets available for that performance we think it's going to be equally beautiful and we encourage people to come to the albuquerque performance if they find that the santa fe performances sold out this is spring show are you going to be doing anything special for the for around easter well this is pretty much our program yeah we usually do it a bit on the early side to avoid conflicting of their major on sombo center performing around then for example you know pro musica hester series and the loretto chapel always at easter time and so forth so what the groups try to do is schedule around each other so that people don't have to choose which programme they want to experience this is some of the some of the best most beautiful historic appreciated music and rural of this especially for me the brandenburg's i mean really stand out because they're just gorgeous.

johann sebastian franz linda mary nello three hundred years
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Seventy WFL. A weather is next. It's the biggest music festival of the year. And it's coming to the CW radio music festival. Don't miss the iconic performances. Back here. Powerful moments. We're all proud to be Vegas. The city of everything you stand for. Want to watch. You miss watch. Our must see iheartradio music festival. This Sunday and Monday night at eight PM on CW, forty four a Florida orchestra goes baroque for an intimate evening at box coffeehouse, go back to a simpler time with a virtuoso strings of the Florida orchestra performing baroque greatest hits that have been popular for more than two hundred years featuring Bach's Brandenburg concerto number three along with familiar music from Telemann and Vivaldi all led by world renowned conductor and harpsichord soloist Jeannette Sorrell free performances October twenty six th through the twenty eight in Tampa. Saint Pete Clearwater tickets start at just eighteen dollars plus kids and teams get in free to this and all Tampa Bay times masterworks concerts, whether it's date night or family time. Nothing beats the Florida orchestra live. Don't miss an intimate evening at box coffeehouse, featuring the virtuoso string players of. The Florida orchestra believe me. They are incredible. That's October twenty six th through the twenty eighth tickets at Florida orchestra dot ORG. Most big box store customers have to replace their patio furniture. After just a few years. But you don't have to because.

pm florida tampa bay clearwater saint pete vegas wfl
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Dissect - A Serialized Music Podcast

Dissect - A Serialized Music Podcast

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Dissect - A Serialized Music Podcast

"Important as multiple musicians needed to stay together in order to keep the peace from falling apart. By the mid thirteenth century. The first western rhythmic notation system was developed called rhythmic modes, laying the foundation of what would become our modern notation system. Rhythmic modes USA physical space between notes to indicate how long or short note was to be played. By the fourteenth century. This volved into a much more accurate and dependable system called Missouri notation here, the notes themselves were expressed with different symbols that indicated the duration of that note, this system eventually birth. The measure separated by vertical bar lines on a musical staff. A measure organizes a piece of music and small sections with each measure containing a certain number of beats a time signature expressed at the beginning of piece of music tells us how many beats are contained in one measure of particular piece of music today. The most common time signature in western popular music is written what's called four, four time, meaning their four quarter. Note beats per measure. So when you hear musicians counting one, two, three, four, and then starting over one, two, three, four. They're counting the beats of one measure in four, four time. Then moving onto the next measure. Starting the one, two, three, four count over a piece of music is organized measures, and these measures are performed literally to create a composition or song. Now I know this is a lot to throw you at one time, but the cool thing about all this is that you actually know these things quite well to prove this. Let's your few examples. I will listen to Brandenburg concerto number three and g major written by Johann Sebastian Bach in seventeen twenty one as the peace plays count along for four measures, and I want you to join in as counting, then I'm going to stop for two measures, but I want you to continue counting, then I'll come back in and if you and I are sinked you'll know that you can't to correctly in my absence. Okay. Ready count along with me one, two, three, four, one, two. Two, three, four, one, two, three, four, one, two, three, four, one, two, three, four. One, two, three, four, one, two, three, four. Okay. So where we in sync when I came back in, I'm guessing for most of you, the answer is yes, let's try another, but this time I'm only going to count to measures with you. You keep counting when I stop and I'll join back in after a while again, if we're sinked when I come back in, you know, you counted correctly. My absence one, two, three, four, one, two, three, four. One, two, three, four, one, two, three, four, one, two, three, four. So how'd you do again for most of you? I'm going to soom you did it correctly. These rhythms and patterns are so culturally ingrained in all of us that even those with Nobis training or able to do this exercise somewhat easily while this might seem second nature to you. This is actually an incredibly complex rhythmic system that took hundreds of years to develop and mature. It's the reason I took the time to outline it's lengthy development at the beginning of the sidebar. There's incredible history behind what we take for granted every day. Okay. So now that you're feeling like the second coming of Mozart, let's make it a little more challenging. Like I said earlier, most of the popular western music you listen to every day is written in four, four time for quarter note beats per measure, but that's just one way.

Johann Sebastian Bach Missouri four quarter
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Rotunda something like that just little you know look quick lunchtime it actually astor piazolla yeah exactly in the end it you know the show p people in santa fe the you know there some really good stuff you know down in the southern part of the state while richard you've been talking to a lot of politicians slide may will i'll tell you if i can work units at the thought that lay are fed up we'll talk to the quartet may be us inner worth in and speaker e gough could could help us out with we'd be very open to that you'll just a little lunchtime thing you know the for the legislators in ah and for the public yeah all right and this is going to be really cool because the eu symphony and the school for the art they also get to partake right yes they do they get to attend the dress rehearsal which is a great learning experience for young players because you know they you symphony people they have fast students from elementary school through high school and one of the things we found out about the our program is that approximately somewhere between thirty and forty percent of the petition participants in their program actually go on to steady music at a post postsecondary level and we're talking school for the urge no we're talking though santa hanifi you simply association i don't actually know what the percentages are at the school for the arts at roland ewere 100 percent while that's probably true incurred isaac very motivated gives over yeah oh they are an and you know their new chair of the music department kurt isaac stern has been really fantastic to work with two of we've enjoyed that collaboration and his background as classical yes it is okay all right so along with the professors added in mexico came up the program so fill a thin on the program why will people wanna go see your show well it has three big hitters on it buck beethoven and schubert the buck brandenburg concerto number five which we came in with which we came in with and that's heavy on the strings tonight plus flute and uh keyboard plus very popular plus it's very well no i asked you know franz before we started what's your favorite favorite brandenburg and he said all of them you have to go what one through six he can just you know pick out number three other six yes but.

santa fe richard e gough dress rehearsal isaac kurt isaac stern mexico franz brandenburg eu roland ewere beethoven schubert forty percent 100 percent
"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on The Personal Computer Radio Show

The Personal Computer Radio Show

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"brandenburg concerto number" Discussed on The Personal Computer Radio Show

"They are widely regarded as some of the bus while castro compositions of the baroque era my preference however had been pitches at an exhibition by ms leslie or the moldau by smut now well we settled on the buck brandenburg concerto number three in g major as boc was the most recognizable name so what do they have to do with personal computing absolutely nothing shortly after we feature recording of computer music of the first philadelphia computer music festival held august the 25th 1978 as part of the personal computing 78 show in philadelphia the concert featured more than thirty musical compositions performed on ten computers synthesizers the op record made of the concert include seventeen musical pieces performed on seven different computers synthesizes representing programming by eleven people the lp album is free to download and is available from vintage computer music dot com john dilkes organiz the computing 78 show in philadelphia that year many of the computer musicians were reluctant or too shy to perform at a computer music concert something that never heard of before but word of the concert at spread and a steady stream of calls from all over the country began to come in how chamberlain one of the early computer music pioneers agreed to come as the call hellmers who is the editor of bite magazine a very popular magazine at that time and david all publisher of creative computing and malcolm right engineer of solidstate music in california dorothy siegel poured in from new york to say she was arranging a peace for computer and clarinet especially for the concert.

boc personal computing philadelphia editor bite magazine publisher malcolm engineer dorothy siegel new york castro ms leslie chamberlain david