23 Burst results for "Brandeis University"

Brandeis University Says 'Picnic' Is Oppressive Language

Mark Levin

01:49 min | 2 months ago

Brandeis University Says 'Picnic' Is Oppressive Language

"As I say the word BRANDEIS causes me really, to get pissed off. According to the oppressive language lists, the word picnic has been associated with lynchings of black people. In the United States. Did you know that anybody Picnic. During which white Spectators were said to have watched while eating. What does that have to do a picnic? Oh, my Lord. What else? Every day brings a new form of insanity. Another institution bites the dust. Suggested alternative to picnic is outdoor eating. Well, that's clever. So when people were watching lynchings, Mr Producer weren't they outdoor eating? If they were picnicking, I mean, Rule of thumb can be replaced with general rule because the former allegedly comes from an old British law allowing men to beat their wives with sticks no wider than their thumb. Okay? Rule of thumb and when it comes to trigger warning. An alert that spoken, written or recorded material may be alarming to certain people based on their experiences. Possible alternatives include content note. Content note. Where trigger has connections to guns for many people. Can't have that now. At least a phonic, the number three Republican In the House who is co sponsoring a bill called the Campus Free Speech and Restoration Act. All out assault on our first Amendment. An example of the far left cancel culture happening in our school boy, is she right?

Mr Producer United States House
"brandeis university" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:47 min | 2 months ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"You should not use Trigger warning the actual word that the PC crowd created. To signify something here. You know, a trigger warning. You give that before, you're going to discuss something that may upset people. It started with with, um Victims of sexual assault if a college Uh if there was like, say, uh, required reading? The professor would put out, uh, trigger warning. There's a sexual assault in this story just to trigger warning for those of you who may have been victims of sexual assault. Okay. That was a PC term. Danny, now trigger warning. Is a word that BRANDEIS University doesn't want students and staff to use. Do you know why Danny While triggers usually have a correlation when it comes to guns, Yeah. Guns. So, yeah, Guns are bad triggers a part of a gun, so hence triggers about how about this one picnic? You can't say picnic. Do you know why Because these pseudo intellectuals claimed that picnics were held at lynchings. So because people would pack a picnic for lynching. Don't say picnic. Alright. People wore bow ties and hats it at picnics should we never wear a bow Italian a hat again. At lynchings. You know, that was what happened. So anything that happened to the lynching. Which was a terrible thing, and, uh, just a sick and twisted part of our history. But no social. Finally, rule of thumb. This reminds me of the shark thing, Danny Rule of thumb. What is rule of thumb mean Danny? Rule of thumb has to do with your wife and not leaving more than a thumb wide bruise on them or something like that. Or, you know an old English law. You can beat your wife, but only with a stick No wider than your thumb. Do you know that that's not true? Nobody knows the origin of rule of thumb. Everybody knows what it means. But rule of thumb It has nothing to do with domestic violence. And yet the pseudo intellectuals at BRANDEIS University say, Don't say rule of thumb. Even though it's got nothing to do with it. Hey, before we get to Mike Armstrong, Doug wants to talk about amorous. Good morning dog. They thank you for this week because you've been giving us like history lessons seriously, And I think it's good for people. But do you notice like these policies and the becoming more divisive, like right? That's Seemed discriminatory in and of itself. Right. So I did a little of my own history. If you look being of Irish descent, I think in 16 18 16 19, the first slaves brought to Virginia. We're Irish. Yeah, there was. Yeah, there was you could construct. No slavery is yes. What was happening to Irish? And and so if you think the 16 hundreds 1600 half a million between the Virgin Islands, Antigua of Irish people, So everybody, let's everybody keep tracing your roots because we're all going to pile in on this, and I can't wait because someone going through a lawsuit at this for discriminatory so might cost the town of amorous taxpayers even more money when it's over, brings at the court. It's crazy, Doug. Thank you for the good weekend. You too. Let's go to Jack quickly on amorous Jackie of the last word until we get to Mike Armstrong. Yes. Three things on Juneteenth. It was Republican army that went down to Texas to inform Democrat Army. Yeah, that was over were freed. Yeah, Yeah. Okay. Yeah, And the other thing is is A dining jack. Curly piece of Professor I think at Princeton He has an essay on slavery. That is the best thing I've ever read. He's a scholar. He's not You know, can you? Can you send that to us on the name doesn't ring a bell. Can you send that? Can you email that to us a link. If you just do it if you just do it because this stuff is all over the place, But it's k e r y C k. Jack Curley. Thanks and slavery. Alright. And you see that, And the other thing is on, Um Lyndon Johnson. Remember what he said about the great society. Well, yeah, don't repeat that. We know all I won't use that word. But he said, you know, you know, we'll have them blew this out to them. Yeah. Right? Well by them that will will buy them back. Yep, it was a great society. Exactly. And I grew up in Wister. I saw those families come apart when that happens. It did. And a lot of other families, So it's said, you know, parts are parks on him, You know. Thank God. I gotta let you run. I gotta let you run him up against an excellent points, Excellent points..

Lyndon Johnson Mike Armstrong Virgin Islands Doug Virginia Jack BRANDEIS University Texas Danny 16 Jack Curley 16 hundreds Jackie Juneteenth Republican Antigua first English this week Three things
"brandeis university" Discussed on Skimm This

Skimm This

04:25 min | 8 months ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on Skimm This

"Would be political. Protest would turn into an actual attack on the capital and once things turn dangerous. Capitol police officers one of whom died after sustaining injuries. The riot were clearly overwhelmed. A few hundred national guard troops were also posted nearby to the capital at the time of the attack. Though they didn't have the authority to be anywhere on capitol grounds suit even if dc mayor one them to lend a hand by the time. The national guard finally showed up. It was hours after the capital break in started crazy right. These security failings are even harder to explain since it's not like what unfolded was exactly a secret in fact. It was predictable very predictable. That's yuda claus in. She's a professor in politics at brandeis university an expert in domestic and international terrorism ever since more than a dozen members michigan militia. Group were arrested last year for planning to kidnap. Michigan governor gretchen whitmer and conduct televised executions of lawmakers professor klaus and said she's been expecting more political violence the mid i was watching footage from the Storming of the capitol building in washington. Dc and notice people carrying on these ties. That was what i thought about. And it's not just professor klaus in that had a suspicion. Something bad might happen last week. For weeks there'd been online posts in which people openly discussed gathering in washington to try to interrupt is certification of the election results. So law enforcement had all the intelligence they needed to prepare but the lack of information sharing on the usual threat assessment mechanisms thought were not engaged. They were not advance on meeting in the context of the joint terrorism task forces pitcher regional coordination efforts between the different law enforcement agencies. That didn't happen. I think he'd be needs to say that This was a situation. Where.

last year last week klaus washington brandeis university more than a dozen members one Michigan michigan hundred
The future of work  as determined by Uber?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:06 min | 10 months ago

The future of work as determined by Uber?

"As the pandemic recession drags on people are turning to gig. Work to fill the gaps and the nature of that work is evolving proposition. Twenty two in california which passed this month. Let's companies classified delivery and ride hail drivers as independent contractors but with some requirements. Such as a wade's floor. And some health benefit options some describe it as a third way between benefit free part-time work and traditional full-time employment. If the idea catches on more. Broadly what could it mean for how we work. David-weill is dean at the school for social policy and management at brandeis university. He told me about the origin of this idea. A third way comes in fact from canada where there is a concept of. What's called the dependent contractor where you have a set of protections that are designed for independent contractors that really rely on a single or a small number of major employers who who are contracting their business to protect independent contractors. Who really have this level of dependency. But i think the problem of the third way is the fact that canada's starts in a very different place than workers in this country. Start well so now. We have prop twenty two new york city and seattle have their own laws providing for workers with prop twenty two. These companies have said that they'll start to provide some basic protections. That don't go. as far as you know. Full employer sponsored health insurance are we creeping toward new mindset around how we deal with labor in the us. I think we are. Creeping is the right word. I think what we have done is. Unfortunately we've allowed some very powerful platform companies to dictate the terms of our public policies. I mean remember that in many markets hooper and lift basically their business model was to come in in advance of regulations. Just set the terms on their own before there had been measured public policy discussion. About who are these workers in. Is this an appropriate way to classify them. And what concerns me about the efforts of those platform companies in lots of different places before we even got to prop twenty two was they were trying to in in in many ways dictate the terms about who is protected under different laws. And who isn't and that to me is an appropriate thing for public policies and and people we elect to think about not for people in Any any industry your powerful company to determine for us. I think prop twenty two and a lot of other things that have happened At the state level have pushed us unfortunately towards a defining that based on the interests of You know the small number of businesses rather than on what the what we as a public thinker appropriate protections.

School For Social Policy And M Brandeis University Weill Canada California David New York City Seattle United States
"brandeis university" Discussed on Jeff Goodman Basketball Podcast

Jeff Goodman Basketball Podcast

04:23 min | 11 months ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on Jeff Goodman Basketball Podcast

"List. It's a good show a little bit off topic. Sorry, Jeff rap. Go ahead. There's a little bit off the wall, but I think that it should be asked for anybody who is in the NBA or has been in the ass. What is your best NBA story? Oh, I can't I can't go there. There's everybody has like a great great one spot. I've got some yeah. I mean I was I was young man. I mean, I I was twenty-two twenty-six and the NBA is awesome. I mean it is awesome. It's like fantasy life is awesome. It's fantasy. People just don't understand and I love the MBA. I mean, I I was roommates with Frank Volvo. We just wanted to championships. I'm so pumped birth Vogel store. Give us give us your best food will start so so Frank and I Frank was the video guy and I was kind of like the head manager. I always say my first year and we we used to practice at Brandeis University. They didn't have didn't have a practice facility. And you know, we're we were just getting ready to start the preseason and like this dog. The old days where you had to load the game up put in a drive, then you had to go through code it and then you have to go break it back down and it took an enormous amount of time guys teams now have like eight volts guys. We had Frank and so Frank and I I never I never drank coffee Frank never drank coffee. And so Frank and I would actually take turns sleeping on Brandeis has trained cable beds uploading and coding games so that when Jim O'Brien came in Co Cho biet come in at like six 6:15 that everything was set and I just remember right after the preseason. I was ready to quit and I think Frank was ready to quit and I just I I broke down in tears. So they're like I'm making like $4,000 and I'm working twenty two hours a day and Frankie's working twenty-three hours a day and we did that all season long. And so we got to the all-star break..

Frank Volvo NBA Frank Brandeis University Jeff rap Brandeis Co Cho Vogel Frankie Jim O'Brien
"brandeis university" Discussed on Jeff Goodman Basketball Podcast

Jeff Goodman Basketball Podcast

04:23 min | 11 months ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on Jeff Goodman Basketball Podcast

"List. It's a good show a little bit off topic. Sorry, Jeff rap. Go ahead. There's a little bit off the wall, but I think that it should be asked for anybody who is in the NBA or has been in the ass. What is your best NBA story? Oh, I can't I can't go there. There's everybody has like a great great one spot. I've got some yeah. I mean I was I was young man. I mean, I I was twenty-two twenty-six and the NBA is awesome. I mean it is awesome. It's like fantasy life is awesome. It's fantasy. People just don't understand and I love the MBA. I mean, I I was roommates with Frank Volvo. We just wanted to championships. I'm so pumped birth Vogel store. Give us give us your best food will start so so Frank and I Frank was the video guy and I was kind of like the head manager. I always say my first year and we we used to practice at Brandeis University. They didn't have didn't have a practice facility. And you know, we're we were just getting ready to start the preseason and like this dog. The old days where you had to load the game up put in a drive, then you had to go through code it and then you have to go break it back down and it took an enormous amount of time guys teams now have like eight volts guys. We had Frank and so Frank and I I never I never drank coffee Frank never drank coffee. And so Frank and I would actually take turns sleeping on Brandeis has trained cable beds uploading and coding games so that when Jim O'Brien came in Co Cho biet come in at like six 6:15 that everything was set and I just remember right after the preseason. I was ready to quit and I think Frank was ready to quit and I just I I broke down in tears. So they're like I'm making like $4,000 and I'm working twenty two hours a day and Frankie's working twenty-three hours a day and we did that all season long. And so we got to the all-star break..

Frank Volvo NBA Frank Brandeis University Jeff rap Brandeis Co Cho Vogel Frankie Jim O'Brien
A Rosenberg by Any Other Name?

Jewish History Matters

11:11 min | 1 year ago

A Rosenberg by Any Other Name?

"I'm Jason La Steak and I'm really excited to welcome Geraldine. Good a fan and Kirsten from left to the podcast today. To talk about Kirsten's book a Rosenberg by any other name. A history of Jewish name changing America Josie could offend. It's a scholar of modern your studies currently teaching at American University. She received her. Phd In history from Brandeis University in two thousand eighteen and her research is focused on migration gender and the intersection of law and religion in French. American Jewish history. And we're also joined of course by Kirstin from Agla who's an associate professor at Michigan State University's Department of History her book Rosenberg by any other name. Which we're GonNa talk about today explores the history of name changing in the US in the twentieth century and her first book American Dreams and not nightmares looked at secular Jewish intellectuals. Use of the Holocaust in the early nineteen sixties. Thanks Jason I'm Geraldine. I'm very excited to talk with Kirsten today about her book on Jewish name changing in the United States. I was really fascinated to read Christian books because he deals with so many different things. And one thing that really stood out is the question of the types of economic and social anti-semitism that juice faced in the twentieth century. And this is a story that has been obscured both in how American Jews tell their own story and how they really name changing itself. But it's also a topic that has been obscured largely in the history of American Jews. And so a lot of the discussion with Kirsten really centered on the question of how everyday life of Jews in America were is shaped by anti-semitism and how American Jews del their own story in their recounting of how juice change their names in the twentieth century. I hope you'll enjoy this conversation. Kirsten hiding for joining the Jewish history matters podcast. Thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited so I actually wanted to start with a joke. That's awesome so it's actually a French. Joke offense Jewish joke as I understand it. So it's a story of Mister Meshu Shoe Katzman. We'll goes to the French authorities in the early twentieth century because he wants to change his name. A finds that cats minis for to foreign sounding Fort Jewish sounding so he asked no. Would it be possible to change the name and the French official tells him yes? Sure Okay so what's your name Katzman. So he breaks cats on into to any asked him. So what does that mean in German and the Jewish men says it means Shah Cat in English Okay what does men mean and the men answers it means lum the men so essential official says okay. Katzman you are no no longer cats men but shallow brilliant. It is marvelous because it's really about how your revealing I see in the process of trying to conceal it as you say in the book. Jewish name changing is no laughing matter. We have a lot of jokes involving name changing but it is in fact a very serious topic and so I wanted to start the conversation by asking you why it is such a serious topic and also what do you mean by name changing because I think the readers need to understand what that meant in the American context so the first thing that's really important to say is I only looked at one archive when space for name changing which was official name changing in civil court. It wound up being incredibly rich space. But there's lots of other places in lots of other ways that people could change their names for example. When I started talking about my work I had immigration. Historians say but this is not the only kind of name changing that happens if immigration memoirs you can see and I teach for my students memoirs where people decide to change their name on the shop floor. You know all the people they work with at the sweatshop. I'll sit around and spend the day talking about what your new American names should be. There's definitely kind of informal name changing people sort of take on names and the US among if not the than among the most flexible places in name changing you can really informally. Change Your name to anything. You want without any kind of permission or official status whatsoever. And it's legal this Anglo American law that the US actually took it even to a greater extent in England in some ways on sort of informal name changing people's selecting names because they like them because it sounds good. Those actually are are themselves legal so people can really change their names to anything so because I was using official name changes in city in civil court. I was looking at people who chose to do so officially who chose to be having the state know about their name changing and so- choosing to look at official name. Tinging meant that I was also looking not just at the state it wound up meaning also that I was looking at other kinds of people who might be interested in your name private employers or universities or other kinds of places and spaces where they might these surveillance you. I think maybe watching you questioning. Why your name looks different from one place from the other? What I saw gave us a real insight into the impact of the anti-ageing and the importance of it which is actually kind of your second question right. Why is this important? Why is it serious? A lot of what I've found in the archives. I mean I think a lot of people would have found it boring people's reasons for changing their names if you didn't spend a lot of time looking at them. They were very boring. I want to change my name because it's hard to spell because it's hard to pronounce equal can't remember it. It's hard to say on the telephone. You know a lot of sort of things like that so you had to kind of read through the lines but also some sad stories people who would talk about being excluded in the military people who talked about their employer telling them they had to change their name when they got promoted people who wanted to erase memories of having escaped Germany during World War Two. There are a lot of those sad stories and in other kinds of readings. I did oral history is that I did. It's not always you know. Sort of a tragedy. But there's a lot of lingering sadnesses there's a lot of lingering ambivalence and I think the larger part of the story is people feeling like they had to do this. Some of the interesting part of looking at the state and the government's interest in doing this right and sort of making name changing available to people so easily right so readily you can change your name. Go ahead and change. Her name is volunteerism. The circumstances under which they're changing their names are not free and open they are constrained. They are significantly constrained not forcibly coerced. But they are constrained and sometimes they are being asked to or told to change their names by employers by military officers by defense industry contractors by people who kind of represent some kind of power and have interactions with Stay or certainly with their possibilities of getting a job and living in America. I think it's interesting that everybody's treated this so much as a joke that no scholar studied it. You know which I find really interesting right. That people have so far. Brush this and treated it as something that was not serious that was insignificant or Hurace. Something that was not really important so you actually mentioned the state a few times so I wanted to ask you about the state. What's at stake in controlling names and name changes from a state perspective so the federal government begins asking about name tinges voluntarily on Naturalization Petitions in nineteen of Sex. It is voluntary. It's just a line on your naturalization petition so I only did a very limited look at naturalization petitions but I found at least a few where somebody clearly had changed their name so that it looked very different but clearly the people setting this out that they didn't fill out a name change like the government didn't see this change in spelling as actually being a change in name. So there's a certain amount of laxity that European grants are being treated with in their ability to change their names so my story more begins with really World War One and then especially the Inter war period and World War Two and it spirals as the welfare state as the government begins to be concerned with issues of security and be concerned that the people standing in front of whatever federal worker may not be who they size so one of the most important things I think that leads to the nineteen forties in particular being. Sort of the place. Where you see. More of these official petitions being submitted than any other time in the twentieth century is that the government decides that during World War Two. It actually happened in nineteen ninety eight. They begin having defense. Contractors require birth certificates on so they can ensure the safety of their defense plates. So you see beginning in the nineteen thirties forties this kind of spiraling new. People start to have to produce their birth certificates in order to get jobs to become a part of the war effort which is where the jobs are happening and then as people begin to register for the draft or as they begin to be officers they are getting inconsistent right. It's not I don't think this is every single person who goes to apply to become an officer or to register for the draft or even to try to work for the defense industry but what you get is just more and more people who are getting defense contractors or officers or rotc people or whoever saying. Oh your name doesn't match you know you're going to have troubles you know you need to come back. And produce a birth certificate that matches so some of this is about security right security as the country is going to war and I think some of it is just about the government beginning to look to documents. They are trying more during the welfare state especially during the war to keep track of. Who's who I didn't see a lie. That was necessarily pushed by the Alien Registration. Act But that is something that is starting to begin to question people who have not become citizens yet so my gases that is playing a sub textual role in some people's decisions to do this. The state is beginning to keep track of people and so this kind of very open ended name policy which was working really to sort of bring white immigrants into the country and enfold them seamlessly as the US goes to war as it begins to offer benefits like welfare benefits but also especially as it begins to go to a second war it begins to want to keep track of people and it's using names as part of that way of kind of keeping track of

Official Kirsten United States Mister Meshu Shoe Katzman American University America Brandeis University Jason La Steak Josie Officer Rosenberg Michigan State University Jason I Kirstin Associate Professor Germany England Tinging
"brandeis university" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Of Boston College Brandeis University. Okay in the In the course of your college education at Brandeis there might be a semester abroad somewhere during that time. Yeah I hope to study abroad for sure I hoping to study international relations or public health so I think it's important to definitely get the abroad. Experience involves travel. I WOULD GUESS. How do you feel about that? I really try to limit my air travel. I only I mean it's expensive to fly as it is so I don't fly very often but I think the general idea is if you're gonna fly then stay where you're going for a really long time. Because then not will mitigate the effects of The carbon that was emitted by your airplane and fly commercial and While you're off the place that you're going may be used public transportation or do some other environmentally friendly activities where you can eat limit even less the impact of the place. You're going to so. It was all about carbon offset. Yeah talking me a little bit about Just a few minutes ago here. Evelyn side near From Burn Academy Academy. Your your classmates back at school. Are they all all on board as much as you are with this or do you feel.

Boston College Brandeis Univer From Burn Academy Academy Brandeis
"brandeis university" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Job and I'm wondering at your own sense of you. Obviously you have an understanding for kind of your daily works now and how your parents daily is working and how much what your family does in terms of travelling and commuting and and all these different kind of carbon intensive activities that most Americans participate in. And I'm wondering fast forward for me thirty years to twenty fifty you will be Forty seven years old or something like that right and and and and tell me how your life is going to be different in in this carbon neutral world than the lives of your parents right now. Yeah I think that's a good question If if we can get to net zero In time in time we need to Than hopefully the world isn't on fire and parts of the world aren't underwater. I think that my life will certainly be a lot different than my parents life right now because maybe air travel won't be a realistic thing that we can do because currently there is not electric airplanes. And maybe we can't drive for as long without charging our vehicle but I think that ultimately those are changes that we have to make and we have to make them right now. Not In thirty years so Move I'm prepared to have a very different world and I see that you are a senior at burn burn academy right now. You have plans for next year yet. Yeah I I will be attending college in Outside of Boston College Brandeis University. Okay in the In the course of.

Boston College Brandeis Univer
"brandeis university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

12:43 min | 1 year ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"You get a confirmation Texan info standard data miss rates apply in this case what contest that's changed to to order to order last night went for a walk did it was beautiful the dogs over there was barking tear time for your dogs were really barking if you don't talk about the dogs yeah and the actual dogs the actual dogs seven thirty again with one dog what's going on it's not going to argue but to join poodles yeah it's always that the little one I want to be the toughest what book lady just relaxing walk mum Ginny's the arts boards bark supports Hey misty aims of ninety two sons beau stimulating talk three things I think you need to know number one Brandeis University comes out with a study showing the top this places for kids to grow up in Tucson is the nine th office to place in the country based on yes so you're ready for it education environmental health and economic opportunities but it's run by such great lefties that know everything you know sure sure sure sure second thing that I think you would need to know China is now trying to quarantine the eleven million people that live in Wuhan that's the city where apparently this strand of the corona virus came from they think it actually came from bats and apparently like one of the most popular it things to eat there in the restaurant you want his bat soup disgusting third thing I think you would need to know president trump will be the first American president to ever speak at the right to life March which takes place tomorrow first one ever for a guy these it is really conservative about that three things I think you need to know so why have you just twenty we've been talking about this morning I mean some of the normalization is stop now in Canada if you want to coach your kids' hockey team assisting whatever you have to go through a mandatory a mandatory course about gender identity one of the dad said not not doing this is ridiculous not based in science course it was it was produced by the hot hockey federation of they're not Terry again went to a radical LGBTQ activist group that actually put out information claiming eighteen to thirty month old children actually know their gender identity they do they don't realize the she'd vegetables but they know their gender identity and I said this is all about the normalization of things and on a different level or we're just it was the same level in a different thing they're they're trying to do the normalization of everything now they just try to creep in on in this is the problem of public schools and things like that so we have friends that that to have their child at innovation academy in oral valley okay and I'm our friend the mother of this child first grader because my wife she's like man I just got something nice can email from the school and I I just I just don't know when my website what's going on turns out they have but they they sent him I guess they're going to do two books there's this ramming if there was reading but these are these these two new books that they're gonna read with the kids in the class and one of them is called a family is a family is a family and these are first graders but six and seven year olds a family is a family is a family here's the review here's the description when a teacher asked the children in our class to think about what makes their family special the answers are all different many ways but the same in the one way matters the most of all one child is worried that her family just two different to explain but listeners are classmates talk about what makes their family specially ready for this one is raised by a grandmother and another has two dads one as many step siblings and another has a new baby in the family okay that that's all you need to know well as your claim as our classmates describe they live with you love some have families of every shape size and every kind of relation the child realizes that as long as her family is full of caring people it's special you think this is appropriate for first graders two dads this that bubble up I'm I know I'm not a teacher but I don't trust these educators that do these retreats and come up with what's appropriate right what should be the curriculum which we teach these first graders they could read books they could do things this is flat out indoctrination that's all this is your friend is worried and why would you be and by the way if you think this is an appropriate it has nothing to do with someone having two dads it doesn't matter I don't care if you're gay you're straight you this I don't even care for trans gender and you think you're a girl choose your pronoun what you it is what it is you might think I'm weird your what whatever I don't care about that is long as you don't affect my life right long as you don't affect my life but there is literally no reason unless you think there is one I'd love to hear from you there is no reason why a first grader needs to be read a book in his or her school about a family where there are two dads there are so many books that can be read there are so many things that can be taught me what you learn my son's in first grade what did you learn you learn math he learns of social studies you learned history he learns yeah I mean I would have if this is my kids school my kids I would I would be right up there and they would man they would they would be scared they would be very they would be if they would have no idea what hit them there is no reason this needs to be taught and you know what the haters gonna say again what you're just against gay marriage no I don't give a crap your do do I could do go do your thing I don't care but you know what I don't want my kids exposed to this at age six or seven okay it's not right they don't understand this stuff and they don't have to but what they're doing is they're trying to get it in the kids mind that this is normal well you're you're against things I don't know I just they just don't understand this and it's pure propaganda would you think it's okay if they just read a book where it's just explain it is only a mom and a dad and that's the way it is I wouldn't want that either I don't send my kid to school to be told what's normal and what's not normal I'd send to school because I wanted to learn things okay I wanted to learn I want to learn how to subtract we're gonna add learn how to spell yeah that that's what I want learn motor function skills that's what I want this this is sneaky propaganda sneak indoctrination and they'll be parents are afraid to say something because they you know they don't cause waves they don't get a teacher's bad side did want to be accused of being someone that a hater guest in a few kids at this point in Austin a few kids now you want and they'll be some wacky parents I think this is totally okay but you know what read that book to your kid in your own time that's it eight eight zero okay Annecy eight eight zero five six seven eight Dave welcome the canister hello good morning Garrett what's happened I thought it died I want to chime in on this topic so my opinion for a first grader totally unacceptable at that age to have this subject it to them yep I've got a a fifth grader who went through sex ed in the public schools in oral valley this year I was taught that by the teachers we were on board with it and then at you know that was enough if you will for I think a fifth grader to to digest and ask all the other questions that come with it yeah I I was okay with that and then the next thing you know there's questions about everything aside from heterosexual relationships and for me a nonstick they're gone all right it's it's it's a not for permission for them in their small brains to process everything on a heterosexual side let's let that digests let's let them grasp that as they appropriate questions and then I would like to see it where they they learn the other stuff later on I don't know when but when it's appropriate but at first all at once I'm not for that and so for a first grader they have this you know all right basically for some great yeah so wait a second so so your fifth grader was taught that there is gay marriage yeah and I know you're okay with that I just I I look at this and I just say why do they even bother teaching at a school like that don't that's not to me that's not science dot math I mean I know we gotta learn life really did you learn about trump and you learn about what great things capitalism is there even teach that stuff to me again that that that that that that I think is propaganda ID I think if you I mean if you want to teach your kid that Hey there's there's guys they get married there's we're gonna get married to each other I think that's for you to do when your own time I just don't know why well I know why I know why they want to teach this at school because they want to push it the people in charge want to normalize that's just all it is yeah yeah it in again if if if my fifth graders asking questions and you know basically scratching their heads saying this is that this is different I'm not used to this one moment this happens this work a first grader yeah it's it's too much I can't yeah I can't even fathom having to be the parent of a first grader and then make him come home as those questions yeah you're right and and listen in thank you for the call and thank you for telling us what happened at that to your child's school I appreciate it I'll squeeze in and real quick and walking mechanised he hello hi there I will be honest when Garrett I'm I'm a Christian I've got some really strong believe but at the same time first graders are dumb the kids notice that they're saying that they're out there picking up there's no mommy they noticed the Klamath picking up that there's not a you know a traditional nuclear family I think it's okay for them to say it's okay to be in a family that loves you regardless of whatever their choices are in line and I think first graders do understand it and they just want to fit in and and feel like they're okay and not be singled out for something that's just someone that loves them that their family look full different so I I understand where you're coming from and if that child needs that's fine but then why should my child be subjected to something like that it is the one that can notice that your child is the one that will say well my family looks different I have been listening to each other about yeah well then I'm I have a first grader and he's never asked me about any of this stuff because he doesn't they don't notice it I don't know if you have a first grader or not but I I've well you know I know a whole bunch of first graders because my kids in first grade and not one of the parents ever told me and the friends we have my kid noticed that two dads or no mom picked up the noticed that stuff they notice I wanted one plane they notice I put a first grader and she come home at all kinds of questions okay I noticed and I think here's a thing I think they just want to know that there okay that they're in a family that loves them and you know it's taking one last thing about kids that want to pick on each other off the table but should not be a question that the your your street your kid brings home to you and you explain it because that's a personal issue right there that's not teaching science and start teaching history this on teaching math that's not teaching anything like that I just I just don't think that that's what's needed at school they need to teach things about education not about all those things but they also teach your kid how to wash their hands after the use the bathroom they help your kids learn.

Ginny Brandeis University
"brandeis university" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"I wanna start off with something that's really pertinent to a place like this comic blues, and that's inspiration. A lot of people, one of the great things if you work at NASA, or, you know, somebody who does they're extremely passionate about what they do. And the same is true for actors and artists, they're extremely passionate, and they're always driven. So I want to know what kind of took each of you down that road. What was the guitar in the in the pawn shop window moment? And starting off with gates. What really kind of drew you to be actor-director choreographer, and kind of more importantly, what drew you to something like Star Trek? Well to be honest I was pushed when I was young to be a performer. I always personally would play in the dirt pile making cities. I was like, really into the relationship of peop-. And space, not necessarily the final frontier, but just kind of a dirt pile frontier, but as I got older I was performing more and more. And I was learning about theater, and I majored in, in at the university, I graduated from Brandeis university, and then I met a man, I took a workshop at Harvard, and he changed my life. So I would say he was the catalyst, he was someone who actually came to NASA. He was invited to NASA, and he was unknown pretty much in the United States, but he was very into analysis of movement. He had started in sports medicine, and then he went into theater, and he was friends with some of the most famous French artists of that period. But he believed that artists had a responsibility to help change the world for the better and we actually studied things like architecture, we had to understand music, and how to compose music. It was sort of, like, really? He synthesized a lot of ideas that I had had because I liked more than one thing I liked the whole process of creating something. And so when I came back to the United States, I was much all my, all my friends had gone to New York to try to get an agent in and make it and I was less thinking about my career, but they can about how could I change in the world? Or how could I be part of participate in it? And so, I started doing, you know, literally started doing some street theater doing different things, and then I started getting teaching positions because I knew how to teach his techniques, which were very much in demand and. So I would say that was the catalyst that got me thinking about the world and it was complete chance that Star Trek happened..

NASA United States Brandeis university Harvard peop New York
"brandeis university" Discussed on More to Life with Faith and Lois

More to Life with Faith and Lois

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on More to Life with Faith and Lois

"When this kind of accident happens, or if there is certain evil, we don't like to see the reality of what happens in our world. And in your position, your up close and personal to the very reality of what was happening in life. And we human race would rather candy coda gloss over, and I think that when you're looking on the other side, you were actually there. But when the other person is watching it on the TV there's that barrier between you and the. Reality of it. So we can become immune to numb to it. And the reality is death is a part of life. It is part of it. And it comes in so many different forms and your experience. You know, you were able to handle it and to deal with it into step into it. And you know, how did it change you? Well, it also came from my faith background from my family from the love that I had. But it changed me in that. I could express and talk about those moments and accept that. This is what happens even in horrible situations. I covered a war in the nineties in Bosnia. And I came back, and there were people who were offering to give me PTSD counseling because it was so difficult there. But because I went through it, and expressed my emotion it helped me in the next level of life to say, this is what happens when this gets out of control. It's kind of like a if then, and so I would piece all of that together and be very very conscious about these actions do result in that. And this. Is all for just sudden death in my view of death that as we look at all of ourselves as aging and with our parents or with siblings. I have a very different view of that also more as a continuum of life, which some people don't feel comfortable, right? They don't they. They would rather avoid it and stop it. And all the energy is put into not having happen. And that's a choice, and if you're yourself or facing death. It's your right to choose. However, you want to face that and one how you want to go into it. We want to just sanitize it. And the reality is that it is very real. It is very painful. It does hurt. I think some of that is we don't wanna feel the pain and the sting of death. But it's a reality death hurts there's a sting in it. There's a loss. There's an emptiness Royd that happens when someone that we love is no longer there. But there's a beauty in being. Being with have person in that transition, and I of attended the bedside of several of my family members and friends, and I would not trade the sacredness of those moments and those experience for anything in the world because there's been it's just a beautiful experience as painful, and as ugliest death is there's a beauty in it of seen. What happens to that person as they move through the transition, and that is what we're going to be talking about today, even more in depth the impact of facing death. And we want to share with you something that many of you may not even want to say, but that there is something beautiful about planning for death dying. Well, and that the art of dying is actually a possibility, and this is separate from sudden death. And yet we're going to go through how even in sudden death the process, and how you can grieve is very much the same. Even though it happens when you're not expecting it Anita Hannigan a professor at Brandeis university. And she wrote this brilliant essay talking about death in America, and anthropologists view, and one of the things she actually says in the US the end of life has become so medicalising. The death is often viewed as a failure rather than as an expected stage of life. So good. And so sadly, it is true. Is it is so true in other cultures in the world do not view at this way? There's a part.

Anita Hannigan PTSD Bosnia Brandeis university US America professor
"brandeis university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Us free with the tagline their democracy dies and darkness. They paid five point two million dollars for that could have hired a lot of journalists. Tim young line. That's a good line that got a lot of journalists for that for that five point two million dollars. The Washington Post along with CNN. Listen, it's not that you shouldn't report. It right. You should absolutely report. I would never ever say now, and there are good reporters at CNN. And there are good reporters at the Washington Post, but don't deny your complicity in the problem with news media today that you hate Donald Trump more than anything and therefore everything is fair game. The whole idea of if true. If you're doing historian saying, well, this is true. It means this that and yeah, that's insane. That you allowed people to come onto your airwaves or your report stories. That talk about doctors diagnosing, President Trump from afar, which is against every medical standard that there is. But people you got engaged in that way. Stop telling us that somehow we don't understand the valuable job you're doing and how we should just accept it. It's not the way it works, and it's insulting. And that's I I'm convinced as their purpose. They're trying to sell us that they bring us a value. But they won't take personal responsibility for what it is that that they've wrought. So the best was that ad from there from the NFL. The worst was I think that Washington Post add another good ad the Audi ad for the electric their future electric vehicles. That was a pretty good ad everything else is just a just a man, right? It's an ad. You can see anywhere. There was nothing Super Bowl ish. About it. Let's go to Brandeis university Brandeis university. Is having a week long series of social Justice events. Including ones led by advocates for sex workers. At Brandeis sorts the dice impact of festival of social Justice. Good lord. It. Just sounds just exhausting. As can be..

Washington Post President Trump Brandeis university Brandeis u CNN Brandeis Tim young NFL Audi two million dollars
You Believe Your Own Lies Very Quickly, How Dogs Understand Human Speech

Curiosity Daily

06:45 min | 2 years ago

You Believe Your Own Lies Very Quickly, How Dogs Understand Human Speech

"Today. You'll learn how to see the earth DHS the last meteor shower of the year. How researchers figured out dogs can understand what you tell them. And how long it takes before you believe your own lies? Spoiler alert hits not very long with satisfy some curiosity. You don't need to tell us go to see cool things in the sky. If you don't believe me, then let me tell you about the meteor shower is the last meteor shower of the year. And if you're listening to this in December, then you might want to Mark your calendar. I know I'm going to because I have not actually watched a single meteor shower this year to be fair. Neither have I. But we live in Chicago where there is a ton of light pollution. And so to see anything in the sky you need to drive a good long distance. Yes. Or shuttled to our listeners that don't live in a major city because you can see stars. Let us come. Visit. You can see the earth anywhere in the northern hemisphere. And that's because they emanate more or less from the north star or Polaris which sits right in line with the North Pole veers are visible for about a week. Once a year around the winter solstice when earth passes through the space to be left behind by comet eight p Tuttle in two thousand eighteen it's peak will be the night of Friday, December twenty first and into the wee hours of Saturday, December twenty second and those we hours are actually the best time to see it this year because the moon won't be up beer since peaks right around December's, full moon, and all that moonlight can interfere with its visibility. You definitely don't want to much light from the moon since you can expect to see five to ten meteors per hour around that time to finally Meteo shower look for the little Dipper. It should be pretty easy to find near the big Dipper. And the northstar is right at the end of its handle. Once you find that constellation look for co cab, the brightest star in the little dippers bowl. If it helps co. Has an orange hue? This is the rough origin points for the media shower, and you can see it with the naked eye. In fact, Benach healers made actually make it worse to see because they'll narrow your field division quite a bit. Probably not worth it. Now, try to keep realistic expectations says the aren't quite as spectacular as save perseus. But on two different occasions. The shower has had bursts of one hundred meteors in an hour, keep your fingers crossed and your I in the sky. And who knows what you'll see new research has looked into whether dogs can really understand what you're telling them. It's obvious that people can communicate with dogs. Sure. But if you tell a dog to go, fetch something, then is it the word their understanding or just the fact that you threw a ball and made a sound science may have the answer. So a recent study in frontiers in neuro science wanted to find out if dogs can understand words, the word understand can mean a lot of things. But in this context, the researchers decided that one fundamental cross species element of understanding was the discrimination of words from non words in. In other words, Doug should be able to differentiate familiar commands from nonsense. Sounds and for this study researchers used FM awry, brain scans, not just actions like fetching a ball. That's because if a dog understands the term, fetch they'll fetch a ball, but that makes us up understanding with obedience. This study on the other hand had dogs spend between two and six months learning. The names of two different toys. I the dog's owners just repeatedly named the toys they'd play fetch or tug of war with their dogs using say a toy called monkey and they'd say monkey multiple times while they were playing to reinforce the objects name in the dog's brain, then the dogs transitioned into actually denting. The objects owners would place monkey and say piggy several feet away from the dog and several feet apart. The owners would give commands like get monkey or where's piggy? And only give out treats if their dogs picked up the correct toy the FM are I scan was the final stage, and while dogs held still in the tubular machines. Their owners said familiar in gibberish words to the dogs. They used to. Mix of known words like monkey and piggy. And mechanically generated non words like strew in various combinations. It turned out that the dogs did reach the base criteria for understanding their brains reacted differently. To familiar words than they did two unknown words, interestingly, the dogs brains reacted differently than human brains, their brain activity spiked when they heard unfamiliar words, whereas human brain activity spikes, when we hear familiar words, we're not sure why dogs react differently to the unfamiliar or how deep their understanding of our words goes, but this study at least suggests that our speech is more than background chatter. Two dogs. They can distinguish one word from another before we get to our last story want to give a special shout out to some of her patrons. Thank you. Anthony, Highland Mark McCullough, many blaze Paulison brianna Webster and Kyle Hewitt for supporting our show on patriot. You will rock if you love our show and you want to help us out then visit patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com. All spelled out any amount helps and we try to give back by offering cool incentives. Like bonus episodes uncut interview. And fun conversations on discord one more time. That's patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com. According to a new study, it doesn't take long to believe you own lies. In fact, as reported by Futurity, we can start to believe the lies. We tell our actually the truth in his little as forty five minutes. It's makes me kind of paranoia not gonna lie where am I lying? You might be. No, you're definitely not. I am also paranoid about this. Are you? Yes. Well, Cody, this this banter is really engaging or is it it's definitely not. Or is it for this study out of Brandeis university? Researchers used electro encephalopathy or EEG to monitor the brain activity of younger and older adults while they answered questionnaires now in this study, the older participants was -nificant we more likely than the younger ones to accept the lie. They had told less than an hour earlier as the truth and by older group. I mean, the group was aged sixty to ninety two and the. A younger group was aged eighteen to twenty four according to the researchers the findings suggest that telling a falsehood scrambles older people's memory, so they have a harder time remembering what really happened in effect giving greater credence to the lie. This is a relatively small study with forty two participants on half of the questions on the questionnaire. They were given they were told by the researchers to lie and forty five minutes later, the respondents answered the same questionnaire. But we're told the answer all the questions. Truthfully. The central research question was did the lice stick and the data revealed that lying engaged the brain processes responsible for working memory, this finding suggests ally can embed itself in memory and come to feel Israel as the truth lying creates a new memory for something that didn't happen. So if you catch somebody in ally than remember, the person may actually think the lie happened, if it's not the first time, they've told it, I think the main takeaway from today's episode is that researchers need to study whether dogs can tell whether you're lying while watching a meteor shower, right?

DHS Chicago Northstar Tuttle Brandeis University Israel Doug Futurity Cody Mark Mccullough Brianna Webster Anthony Kyle Hewitt Forty Five Minutes Twenty Second Six Months
You Believe Your Own Lies Very Quickly, How Dogs Understand Human Speech

Curiosity Daily

06:45 min | 2 years ago

You Believe Your Own Lies Very Quickly, How Dogs Understand Human Speech

"Today. You'll learn how to see the earth DHS the last meteor shower of the year. How researchers figured out dogs can understand what you tell them. And how long it takes before you believe your own lies? Spoiler alert hits not very long with satisfy some curiosity. You don't need to tell us go to see cool things in the sky. If you don't believe me, then let me tell you about the meteor shower is the last meteor shower of the year. And if you're listening to this in December, then you might want to Mark your calendar. I know I'm going to because I have not actually watched a single meteor shower this year to be fair. Neither have I. But we live in Chicago where there is a ton of light pollution. And so to see anything in the sky you need to drive a good long distance. Yes. Or shuttled to our listeners that don't live in a major city because you can see stars. Let us come. Visit. You can see the earth anywhere in the northern hemisphere. And that's because they emanate more or less from the north star or Polaris which sits right in line with the North Pole veers are visible for about a week. Once a year around the winter solstice when earth passes through the space to be left behind by comet eight p Tuttle in two thousand eighteen it's peak will be the night of Friday, December twenty first and into the wee hours of Saturday, December twenty second and those we hours are actually the best time to see it this year because the moon won't be up beer since peaks right around December's, full moon, and all that moonlight can interfere with its visibility. You definitely don't want to much light from the moon since you can expect to see five to ten meteors per hour around that time to finally Meteo shower look for the little Dipper. It should be pretty easy to find near the big Dipper. And the northstar is right at the end of its handle. Once you find that constellation look for co cab, the brightest star in the little dippers bowl. If it helps co. Has an orange hue? This is the rough origin points for the media shower, and you can see it with the naked eye. In fact, Benach healers made actually make it worse to see because they'll narrow your field division quite a bit. Probably not worth it. Now, try to keep realistic expectations says the aren't quite as spectacular as save perseus. But on two different occasions. The shower has had bursts of one hundred meteors in an hour, keep your fingers crossed and your I in the sky. And who knows what you'll see new research has looked into whether dogs can really understand what you're telling them. It's obvious that people can communicate with dogs. Sure. But if you tell a dog to go, fetch something, then is it the word their understanding or just the fact that you threw a ball and made a sound science may have the answer. So a recent study in frontiers in neuro science wanted to find out if dogs can understand words, the word understand can mean a lot of things. But in this context, the researchers decided that one fundamental cross species element of understanding was the discrimination of words from non words in. In other words, Doug should be able to differentiate familiar commands from nonsense. Sounds and for this study researchers used FM awry, brain scans, not just actions like fetching a ball. That's because if a dog understands the term, fetch they'll fetch a ball, but that makes us up understanding with obedience. This study on the other hand had dogs spend between two and six months learning. The names of two different toys. I the dog's owners just repeatedly named the toys they'd play fetch or tug of war with their dogs using say a toy called monkey and they'd say monkey multiple times while they were playing to reinforce the objects name in the dog's brain, then the dogs transitioned into actually denting. The objects owners would place monkey and say piggy several feet away from the dog and several feet apart. The owners would give commands like get monkey or where's piggy? And only give out treats if their dogs picked up the correct toy the FM are I scan was the final stage, and while dogs held still in the tubular machines. Their owners said familiar in gibberish words to the dogs. They used to. Mix of known words like monkey and piggy. And mechanically generated non words like strew in various combinations. It turned out that the dogs did reach the base criteria for understanding their brains reacted differently. To familiar words than they did two unknown words, interestingly, the dogs brains reacted differently than human brains, their brain activity spiked when they heard unfamiliar words, whereas human brain activity spikes, when we hear familiar words, we're not sure why dogs react differently to the unfamiliar or how deep their understanding of our words goes, but this study at least suggests that our speech is more than background chatter. Two dogs. They can distinguish one word from another before we get to our last story want to give a special shout out to some of her patrons. Thank you. Anthony, Highland Mark McCullough, many blaze Paulison brianna Webster and Kyle Hewitt for supporting our show on patriot. You will rock if you love our show and you want to help us out then visit patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com. All spelled out any amount helps and we try to give back by offering cool incentives. Like bonus episodes uncut interview. And fun conversations on discord one more time. That's patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com. According to a new study, it doesn't take long to believe you own lies. In fact, as reported by Futurity, we can start to believe the lies. We tell our actually the truth in his little as forty five minutes. It's makes me kind of paranoia not gonna lie where am I lying? You might be. No, you're definitely not. I am also paranoid about this. Are you? Yes. Well, Cody, this this banter is really engaging or is it it's definitely not. Or is it for this study out of Brandeis university? Researchers used electro encephalopathy or EEG to monitor the brain activity of younger and older adults while they answered questionnaires now in this study, the older participants was -nificant we more likely than the younger ones to accept the lie. They had told less than an hour earlier as the truth and by older group. I mean, the group was aged sixty to ninety two and the. A younger group was aged eighteen to twenty four according to the researchers the findings suggest that telling a falsehood scrambles older people's memory, so they have a harder time remembering what really happened in effect giving greater credence to the lie. This is a relatively small study with forty two participants on half of the questions on the questionnaire. They were given they were told by the researchers to lie and forty five minutes later, the respondents answered the same questionnaire. But we're told the answer all the questions. Truthfully. The central research question was did the lice stick and the data revealed that lying engaged the brain processes responsible for working memory, this finding suggests ally can embed itself in memory and come to feel Israel as the truth lying creates a new memory for something that didn't happen. So if you catch somebody in ally than remember, the person may actually think the lie happened, if it's not the first time, they've told it, I think the main takeaway from today's episode is that researchers need to study whether dogs can tell whether you're lying while watching a meteor shower, right?

DHS Chicago Northstar Tuttle Brandeis University Israel Doug Futurity Cody Mark Mccullough Brianna Webster Anthony Kyle Hewitt Forty Five Minutes Twenty Second Six Months
"brandeis university" Discussed on Pod Save the People

Pod Save the People

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on Pod Save the People

"And they're not in the reasons for that are multitude first of all black houses don't appreciate at the same rate that white houses do second of all the return on investment for people investing in their own lives which is to say putting money into education reducing their student debt things of that nature that doesn't generate the same return to a black family that it does to a white family and folks like tom shapiro at brandeis university have studied this in depth showing that if you compare black and white families over a long period of time having more income does not mean more wealth and a lot of that comes back to what chuck's previously which is that basically intergenerational transfers of wealth show up in a lot of different ways and they're not often talked about and i experienced this all the time where people are really hiding how much intergenerational privilege they have and that privilege in this country is most often skewed along racial lines that's interesting when you say they're hiding it what does that look like like what does that mean right so this is the most common way i hear this is folks usually when people transfer wealth that happened in a few different times it happens when they graduate high school or when they graduate college or when they go to get married or when they have a kid like major life events and what i see is a stories that replicate themselves and i i heard about it from from professors shapiro at brandeis and i've since watched it play out over and over and over again here's how it goes and i'm suspect you and a lot of people listening to her the same story you know people say oh you know i saved i bought a house where we had to save up we were.

tom shapiro brandeis university chuck brandeis
Trump to roll out plan to combat opioids with no clear funding plan

Seattle Kitchen

01:52 min | 3 years ago

Trump to roll out plan to combat opioids with no clear funding plan

"Wild wings i'm pam coulter president trump plans to unveil his plan to curb the nation's opioid epidemic tomorrow it includes the death penalty for drug dealers and a goal of cutting opioid prescriptions by a third in three years brandeis university dr andrew kalani says any plan needs funding what we didn't hear from the administration and perhaps we'll hear tomorrow is some specifics on how they intend to achieve these goals and what we still haven't had from the administration is a request for real funding to tackle this problem there's renewed concern that mr trump plans to get rid of russia's special counsel robert muller i'm tom foty the latest presidential tweets renewed speculation and apprehension about what mr trump might have in mind for an investigator investigating him retiring republican senator jeff flake don't go there we have confidence in muller i certainly do and and i think my colleagues do as well so i hope that the pushback is now to keep the president from going there and what if he does once he goes after muller then we'll take action i think that people see that as a massive red line senator flake was on cnn state of the union tom foty cbs news washington after winning another term as russia's president president vladimir putin told reporters he'd cooperate with britain's investigation into the poisoning of a former russian spy but denied any russian involvement russia does not have those weapons russia's most all its chemical weapons some believe president trump will pull out of the iran nuclear deal in may ploughshares fund president joseph kony says it would have to be salvaged by european nations in western europeans can find some way to mollify the president i think the president will leave the deal and this will be a disaster for american national security the family of a dog that died on.

Joseph Kony CNN Senator Tom Foty Robert Muller Dr Andrew Kalani Pam Coulter Russia Britain Vladimir Putin Washington President Trump Jeff Flake Investigator Mr Trump Special Counsel
"brandeis university" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Support for ted radio hour in the following message comes from rocket mortgage by quicken loans when it comes to refinancing your existing mortgage or buying a home rocket mortgage lets you understand all the details so you can be confident that you're getting the right mortgage for you goats a rocket mortgage dot com slash ideas hey it's guy here and this episode is all about abraham as lows hierarchy of human needs did you know that up until the 1950s psychologists mostly focused on what was wrong with people and then came as low join us as we go up measures lows pyramid from food and sleep all the way to self actualization this episode originally aired in april of 2015 enjoy this is the ted radio our each week groundbreaking ted talks attacked technology entertainment design design is that really would stand from him never known livered and and ted conferences around the world gift of the human imagination we've had to believe in impossible thing the true nature of reality beckons from just beyond those talks those ideas drafted for radio from npr and guy rise you'd never know it from just walking around but in a simple midcentury building on the campus of brandeis university near boston there's an office where some of the most revolutionary ideas in psychology were first developed an office is just a real yet no clack outside yeah we really should have a plaque outside that office simply margie lochman professor of psychology at brandeis university gave a tour of lee office the same halls that he would walk down that once belonged to an he was here abraham maslo.

npr brandeis university boston abraham maslo ted margie lochman professor of psychology lee
"brandeis university" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"But what can the white house steal how much of a role can administration play in how we fight drug epidemics in this country that was answered he policy specifics of that question we talked a doctor andrew collide me he's the codirector of the opioid policy research collaborative at brandeis university is hell arsenal here's the ngo so for decades perhaps longer presidents have been fighting against drug epidemics of various kinds in this country and they're stand varied and and controversial levels of success in fighting in fighting drag academics our country now facing opioid epidemic what sets of this crisis apart as a unique challenge for an administration today too good question i would describe our opioid crisis as the most urgent public health problem facing define trade and it's an extremely complex problem there are no simple solution for bringing it under control because this is a multi faceted probably there no hate no levers that any particular stake holder can pull you address the problem many wondering if if if there's a difficult problem for the federal government hackel is that it requires a coordinated response from the many our friend federal agencies that have a piece of this problem and it was going to make real progress all of these different agencies have to work together and we haven't really seen that happen at you we looked at the way the federal government responded to this problem during the obama administration what a star on several occasions before federal agency working at odds from turns delivering contradictory public statement on the crisis so what we really is far federal agency to work together with very clear direction you haven't finger happy yet.

codirector brandeis university federal government obama administration federal agency andrew
"brandeis university" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

PBS NewsHour

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on PBS NewsHour

"Uh and some time we just don't have a long enough the louisville jail doesn't collect followed date on participants in its drug treatment program once they leave the jail but the kentucky department of corrections reports that statewide half the people who went through a substance abuse program in jailed say they stayed off illegal drugs for at least a year following the release three quarters say they regularly attended alcoholics and our colleagues anonymous meetings since bridge wilder galata lieu of will jail a year ago she stayed clean anna tens eight meetings every week she has a steady john to support herself and her two kids and is also pursuing an associate's degree you know i can't wait to wake up in the morning because i'm this ready to live you know like it's never been like that where do you think you'd be today if you had any had treatment in jail i probably be dead wilder says medication was a crucial part of her recovery before leaving jail she received two injections of vivid trawl than outside the jail wilder had seven more monthly injections at a free community health clinic ashore in lieu of all jail officials educate the inmates about vivid trial with videos and reading materials but some experts worry about the growing use of the the troll in jails we're seeing a treatment that doesn't have strong evidence supporting its use being over promoted dr andrew qalad need directs the opioid policy research collaborative at brandeis university he'd rather see doctors prescribe two other drugs that have been around longer buprenorphine and methadone they have much more data supporting their effectiveness for treating opioid addiction we have affected medicines that could be saving lives and not enough people are accessing them we should be giving them the treatment that we know we'll give them the best shot at at survival at a good quality of life we know what works and we shall be gambling with with vitrolles on that population.

wilder dr andrew qalad brandeis university buprenorphine louisville kentucky department of correct methadone three quarters
"brandeis university" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on Here & Now

"That's russ simon's who is managing partner at venue solutions group rush thanks for joining us thank you will in other news three researchers whose work illuminates the biological rhythm of living cells have won this year's nobel prize in medicine jeffrey hall and michael ross bash of brandeis university and michael young of rockefeller university in new york one for discoveries that peak under the hood of our biological clock the circadian rhythms that control how our bodies know when it's day and night that work could have huge implications for our health let's bring in dr david clapham he's a professor of neurobiology and pediatrics at harvard medical school and chief scientific officer at the howard hughes medical institute dr clock up clapham welcome thank you and we know that your colleague at the howard hughes medical institute michael ross basch was among the winners of the nobel prize today what do you think of the committee's choice i think it's a great choice a mcgraw's bash will occur in investigator in also michael young a former investigator were both recipients of the nobel prize and we also congratulate jeff hall who is uh a brand ice and let's get to what exactly they discovered here what is a circadian rhythm and do all living things have them yes sir we're all familiar with circadian rhythms because we all sleep at night and we are awake during the day we all know that plants leaves open and close the sign a bacteria produce oxygen and the daylight so anything from bacteria to plans to humans all have daily cycles uh for example in humans a body temperatures by boasts in the middle of the night cortisol levels are lowest in the predawn hours and then melatonin good secreted at night so circadian rhythms have a big impact on our health.

harvard medical school melatonin cortisol michael ross basch howard hughes medical institut michael ross managing partner jeff hall investigator chief scientific officer russ simon dr david clapham circadian rhythms new york rockefeller university michael young brandeis university jeffrey hall nobel prize
"brandeis university" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"We're thrilled now let's say so i don't have to say that a whole thing can i call yandi going forward prefer it only my mom calls me injury let's when she wavier which is mad at me when i was a kid tale of the interviews going well and i say andrew and then you nominate up okay i'll start to get a stomach ache and all i kinda crawl on the corner tasca don't do that honesty got at on the line no all right i'm going to say his name again but just to make sure i'm clear that who we have on we do have dr andrew slashing handy molinski he is an awardwinning author and professor of psychology an organisational behavior at brandeis university's international business school we're he specializes in behavior change and cross contr cultural interaction in business settings now trying to relate to the business builder jumped he writes regularly four of the harvard business review in his work has been featured in the new york times the economist fast company fortune financial times the boston globe as well as on in pr in andy you finally reached the big time you're on the business builders show i'm very honored they are a hey i really have a looking forward to it i i read your book and i will tell everybody the title of the book so they can google it while they're listening the title lose reach a new strategy to help you step outside your comfort zone rise to the challenge and build confidence.

brandeis university harvard business review new york times dr andrew professor of psychology boston google
"brandeis university" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"brandeis university" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I'm tom asked roof this is on point we're talking with the senate republican health care bill the gop push to pass it and the reality of what it would me you can join us this hour is this going to be our health care future who's got your back here on healthcare are you ready to ditch obamacare and trumpcare mcconnell care whatever you want to call it and go for single payer in the midst of all this debate over roy is with us from the foundation for research on equal opportunity conservative thinktank opinion entered forbes magazine stood altman is with us he worked on the affordable care act advised president obama on that professor of national health policy of brandeis university rebecca given joins us in a moment to look at single pero some americans missing it's time for that republicans having some trouble pulling their ranks together this was senator dean heller of nevada seeing the medicaid cuts a are just too much for him opposed it doesn't predict events on medicaid and the most vulnerable events the elderly struggling with mental health issues substanceabuse people with disabilities medicaid expansion probably have have the elicit were spin was on their will and opioid abuse governor test on that and the fact that we think we can pull the rug out from under that expansion those doors for that insurance is is the concern of mine republican us senator from nevada in a very tough spot they're in a situation where mitch mcconnell needs every boat he can get his hands on ron johnson republican of wisconsin saying why so fast we can't get this done this week carry was yesterday on nbc's meet the press.

wisconsin opioid abuse brandeis president forbes magazine trumpcare mcconnell obamacare gop senate nbc roy ron johnson mitch mcconnell nevada senator medicaid senator dean heller professor obama altman