33 Burst results for "Brandeis"

Learn the History of Jacobson v. Massachusetts

Mark Levin

01:47 min | Last week

Learn the History of Jacobson v. Massachusetts

"Case in the case, known as Jacobson vs Massachusetts. Jacobson. His lawyers argued that the Cambridge vaccination order was a violation of the 14th amendment rights. Which forbade the state from depriving any person of life, liberty or property without due process of law. Question then was whether the right to refuse vaccination was among those protected. Of the personal liberties, the Supreme Court rejected Jacobs argument and doubt the anti vaccination movement is stinging loss. Writing for the majority Justice John Marshall Harlan acknowledge the fundamental importance of personal freedom. But also recognize that rights of the individual in respect of his liberty may at times under the pressure of great dangers. Be subjected to such restraint to be enforced by reasonable regulation, says the safety of the general public main demand. This decision established what became known as the reasonableness test. The government had the authority to pass laws that restricted individual liberty if those restrictions, including the punishment for violating them were found by the court to be reasonable means for achieving a public good. Bottom line. There had to be some kind of real and substantial connection between the law itself and legitimate purposes. The Jacobson decision provided a powerful controversial president. To the extent of government authority in the early 20th century. In 1922, the Supreme Court heard another vaccination case, this time concerning a Texas student named Rosalind sucked, who was barred from attending public school because her parents refused to have her vaccinating. Zach's lawyers argue the school district ordinance requiring proof of vaccination denied her equal protection of laws. Under the 14th amendment. The court disagreed. Justice BRANDEIS wrote in the unanimous decision long before the suit was instituted, and they cite Jacobson vs

Jacobson Justice John Marshall Harlan Supreme Court Cambridge Massachusetts Jacobs Government Rosalind Zach Texas Justice Brandeis
German Philosopher Herbert Marcuse Was the Architect of the New Left

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | Last month

German Philosopher Herbert Marcuse Was the Architect of the New Left

"The author of the new left. Who's behind all of this so really important question now. There isn't a single person. go to karl marx. You can go to hey goal and the haley dialectic and the long march institutions and a german historisches view of our experience in our existence but there is one person that every conservative should become familiar with now. I want to give a hat tip to the great newt. Gingrich newt gingrich did something back in two thousand twelve where he insistently introduced the author and the activist saul alinsky into the mainstream of the conservative movement. When i go to republican lincoln. Reagan dinners when. I go to tea party. Meetings truly don't exist anymore. When i go to any sort of function and i say saul alinsky. I'd say seventy or eighty percent of the room knows who i'm talking about now. Actually i've been going across the country. Speaking at churches you'd be amazed at how few churches know who saul. Alinsky is a man who wrote rules for radicals thirteen. We've covered them extensively on the show and the dedication. That book was to lucifer. Who he said was the first ever rebel trying to tell me. We're not spiritual war. Oh charlie it's just a bunch of matter versus matter notes not to spiritual work. They admit it's a spiritual war now. The man who is the architect of a lot of chaos. You're living through the man who is largely responsible for a lot of the academic backing of is a man by the name of herbert markova using the frankfurt school. He was a communist. That was kicked out of the frankfurt. School in germany found a safe space and the united states of america taught at harvard. Columbia brandeis and eventually settled the university of san diego. He was the architect of what is now known as the new left.

Saul Alinsky Karl Marx Gingrich Reagan Alinsky Lincoln Saul Herbert Markova Charlie Frankfurt School Columbia Brandeis Frankfurt United States Of America Germany Harvard University Of San Diego
Brandeis University Says 'Picnic' Is Oppressive Language

Mark Levin

01:49 min | 2 months ago

Brandeis University Says 'Picnic' Is Oppressive Language

"As I say the word BRANDEIS causes me really, to get pissed off. According to the oppressive language lists, the word picnic has been associated with lynchings of black people. In the United States. Did you know that anybody Picnic. During which white Spectators were said to have watched while eating. What does that have to do a picnic? Oh, my Lord. What else? Every day brings a new form of insanity. Another institution bites the dust. Suggested alternative to picnic is outdoor eating. Well, that's clever. So when people were watching lynchings, Mr Producer weren't they outdoor eating? If they were picnicking, I mean, Rule of thumb can be replaced with general rule because the former allegedly comes from an old British law allowing men to beat their wives with sticks no wider than their thumb. Okay? Rule of thumb and when it comes to trigger warning. An alert that spoken, written or recorded material may be alarming to certain people based on their experiences. Possible alternatives include content note. Content note. Where trigger has connections to guns for many people. Can't have that now. At least a phonic, the number three Republican In the House who is co sponsoring a bill called the Campus Free Speech and Restoration Act. All out assault on our first Amendment. An example of the far left cancel culture happening in our school boy, is she right?

Mr Producer United States House
Women & Gender in the Qur'an, with Dr. Celene Ibrahim

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

02:44 min | 3 months ago

Women & Gender in the Qur'an, with Dr. Celene Ibrahim

"Honored to have dr. Selene ibrahim For the show today in dr selena brahima. She's the author of women and gender in the crown a published from oxford university. Press last year. She's also the editor of one nation. Indivisible seeking liberty and justice from the pulpit to the streets Probably the previous year and her comeback project is on the concept of monotheism in the crown in intellectual history so dr ibrahim Deaf has a lot of a lot to say about some very interesting topics in on gender in the koran. She is very qualified. Masha llah she has a A masters degree in women's and gender studies near eastern judaic studies from brandeis. She has a masters of divinity from harvard in a bachelor's degree with highest honors from princeton Dr ibrahim is a trusted public voice on issues of religion and civic engagement. She's deeply committed to countering counteracting bigotry and fostering varies pluralism integrity and civic responsibility. And we are absolutely honored to have dr ibrahim on the show today. So thank you dr ibrahim or do you prefer to go by selene. How do you want us to call. Let's go with selene. selene okay. Well we'll welcome selene. Dr ibrahim professor ibrahim to the show. We are so delighted to have you. I read your book in In earnest and I got a chance to also up. See some of your more recent obser- podcast media appearances. But it's funny. Actually the first time you ever kind of came across my radar even before you reached out via email was. I saw a lecture. And i don't know if it was livestreamed or a saw recording of it you gave For z to college Was that was that recorded on the west coast. Did you visit the bay area. Or was it one of those in communion out in the communities a tuna now. I had the good fortune of of coming to zeh tuna and it's a such a blessed place in the spirit. There is just incredible. So i it wasn't my first time visiting and hopefully it won't be my last either in shala in shalva that's rain out and we missed you so it was like a public lecture that you gave at. That event has a series where. I'm sure it's on pause during these times. It's probably been taken more online where there is a community outreach program and so there's i think it's a wonderful asset to the community. They really do bring in a number of speakers and not just on islamic topics but really a range of themes in the humanities

Dr Ibrahim Selene Ibrahim Dr Selena Brahima Dr Ibrahim Deaf Masha Llah Dr Ibrahim Professor Ibrahim Oxford University Brandeis Princeton Harvard Shalva West Coast Bay Area Shala
"brandeis" Discussed on No Jumper

No Jumper

02:05 min | 9 months ago

"brandeis" Discussed on No Jumper

"Know it was whoever it was. I hope she good. I mean i hope they exit. Good tuta not as. I'm pretty sure you didn't make up about them. That's a month from now. We'll come back around don't you worry. That's that's what he was doing. This weekend was getting her image together. We're going to a whole roll out for her. When she reemerges freeway. Brandeis you some twenty one gonna make merchant everything shit so we we do this called mad lately so like what has let me see me mad. Set a whole lot in irritated still by champion. Let's just after the access. What camera opposed to be looking at that josh. Look right at you motherfucker set. Set the record straight talk. Just because i say some shit don't mean i'm the fashion police get out my mother fucking dam. Can you wear champion. You wear whatever the fuck you wanna wear. I just don't like it. And if i see you might get irritated. Swear to god. I didn't even realize song. I were frosty. Like we've been did probably like a couple of months ago. And i said some like shit about nigger steel by champion annoying. I didn't even realize that like so. I guess i really just better cool. If doesn't look. I say be yourself if you like it. I don't not like don't go shit away because you heard the disown or somebody set it on fire and their video every day south sponsorship if they call you. What for shore champion toast. Maybe like a sweater back. In the day i might gone.

Brandeis josh
The future of work  as determined by Uber?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:06 min | 10 months ago

The future of work as determined by Uber?

"As the pandemic recession drags on people are turning to gig. Work to fill the gaps and the nature of that work is evolving proposition. Twenty two in california which passed this month. Let's companies classified delivery and ride hail drivers as independent contractors but with some requirements. Such as a wade's floor. And some health benefit options some describe it as a third way between benefit free part-time work and traditional full-time employment. If the idea catches on more. Broadly what could it mean for how we work. David-weill is dean at the school for social policy and management at brandeis university. He told me about the origin of this idea. A third way comes in fact from canada where there is a concept of. What's called the dependent contractor where you have a set of protections that are designed for independent contractors that really rely on a single or a small number of major employers who who are contracting their business to protect independent contractors. Who really have this level of dependency. But i think the problem of the third way is the fact that canada's starts in a very different place than workers in this country. Start well so now. We have prop twenty two new york city and seattle have their own laws providing for workers with prop twenty two. These companies have said that they'll start to provide some basic protections. That don't go. as far as you know. Full employer sponsored health insurance are we creeping toward new mindset around how we deal with labor in the us. I think we are. Creeping is the right word. I think what we have done is. Unfortunately we've allowed some very powerful platform companies to dictate the terms of our public policies. I mean remember that in many markets hooper and lift basically their business model was to come in in advance of regulations. Just set the terms on their own before there had been measured public policy discussion. About who are these workers in. Is this an appropriate way to classify them. And what concerns me about the efforts of those platform companies in lots of different places before we even got to prop twenty two was they were trying to in in in many ways dictate the terms about who is protected under different laws. And who isn't and that to me is an appropriate thing for public policies and and people we elect to think about not for people in Any any industry your powerful company to determine for us. I think prop twenty two and a lot of other things that have happened At the state level have pushed us unfortunately towards a defining that based on the interests of You know the small number of businesses rather than on what the what we as a public thinker appropriate protections.

School For Social Policy And M Brandeis University Weill Canada California David New York City Seattle United States
Boston college students create mask kits for city's homeless

WBZ Morning News

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Boston college students create mask kits for city's homeless

"A group of local college students has pulled their efforts and resource is to provide masks and information to Boston's homeless population. Here's W. B C's Carl Stevens. Locally, they come from Harvard BU BRANDEIS College students who are part of the national group Mass Transit. They delivered 6000 masks and Mohr to the Boston health care for the Homeless program cannot. Manav Gupta student from Harvard, told me they delivered what they call mask kits with education materials so that people who are invulnerable populations, no. Precisely how to use them how to take care of them out. He said. That knowledge is particularly important for the homeless because when others with covert 19 or told to shelter in place at home, the homeless often have Nowhere to

Harvard Bu Brandeis College Boston Manav Gupta Carl Stevens Harvard Mohr
A Rosenberg by Any Other Name?

Jewish History Matters

11:11 min | 1 year ago

A Rosenberg by Any Other Name?

"I'm Jason La Steak and I'm really excited to welcome Geraldine. Good a fan and Kirsten from left to the podcast today. To talk about Kirsten's book a Rosenberg by any other name. A history of Jewish name changing America Josie could offend. It's a scholar of modern your studies currently teaching at American University. She received her. Phd In history from Brandeis University in two thousand eighteen and her research is focused on migration gender and the intersection of law and religion in French. American Jewish history. And we're also joined of course by Kirstin from Agla who's an associate professor at Michigan State University's Department of History her book Rosenberg by any other name. Which we're GonNa talk about today explores the history of name changing in the US in the twentieth century and her first book American Dreams and not nightmares looked at secular Jewish intellectuals. Use of the Holocaust in the early nineteen sixties. Thanks Jason I'm Geraldine. I'm very excited to talk with Kirsten today about her book on Jewish name changing in the United States. I was really fascinated to read Christian books because he deals with so many different things. And one thing that really stood out is the question of the types of economic and social anti-semitism that juice faced in the twentieth century. And this is a story that has been obscured both in how American Jews tell their own story and how they really name changing itself. But it's also a topic that has been obscured largely in the history of American Jews. And so a lot of the discussion with Kirsten really centered on the question of how everyday life of Jews in America were is shaped by anti-semitism and how American Jews del their own story in their recounting of how juice change their names in the twentieth century. I hope you'll enjoy this conversation. Kirsten hiding for joining the Jewish history matters podcast. Thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited so I actually wanted to start with a joke. That's awesome so it's actually a French. Joke offense Jewish joke as I understand it. So it's a story of Mister Meshu Shoe Katzman. We'll goes to the French authorities in the early twentieth century because he wants to change his name. A finds that cats minis for to foreign sounding Fort Jewish sounding so he asked no. Would it be possible to change the name and the French official tells him yes? Sure Okay so what's your name Katzman. So he breaks cats on into to any asked him. So what does that mean in German and the Jewish men says it means Shah Cat in English Okay what does men mean and the men answers it means lum the men so essential official says okay. Katzman you are no no longer cats men but shallow brilliant. It is marvelous because it's really about how your revealing I see in the process of trying to conceal it as you say in the book. Jewish name changing is no laughing matter. We have a lot of jokes involving name changing but it is in fact a very serious topic and so I wanted to start the conversation by asking you why it is such a serious topic and also what do you mean by name changing because I think the readers need to understand what that meant in the American context so the first thing that's really important to say is I only looked at one archive when space for name changing which was official name changing in civil court. It wound up being incredibly rich space. But there's lots of other places in lots of other ways that people could change their names for example. When I started talking about my work I had immigration. Historians say but this is not the only kind of name changing that happens if immigration memoirs you can see and I teach for my students memoirs where people decide to change their name on the shop floor. You know all the people they work with at the sweatshop. I'll sit around and spend the day talking about what your new American names should be. There's definitely kind of informal name changing people sort of take on names and the US among if not the than among the most flexible places in name changing you can really informally. Change Your name to anything. You want without any kind of permission or official status whatsoever. And it's legal this Anglo American law that the US actually took it even to a greater extent in England in some ways on sort of informal name changing people's selecting names because they like them because it sounds good. Those actually are are themselves legal so people can really change their names to anything so because I was using official name changes in city in civil court. I was looking at people who chose to do so officially who chose to be having the state know about their name changing and so- choosing to look at official name. Tinging meant that I was also looking not just at the state it wound up meaning also that I was looking at other kinds of people who might be interested in your name private employers or universities or other kinds of places and spaces where they might these surveillance you. I think maybe watching you questioning. Why your name looks different from one place from the other? What I saw gave us a real insight into the impact of the anti-ageing and the importance of it which is actually kind of your second question right. Why is this important? Why is it serious? A lot of what I've found in the archives. I mean I think a lot of people would have found it boring people's reasons for changing their names if you didn't spend a lot of time looking at them. They were very boring. I want to change my name because it's hard to spell because it's hard to pronounce equal can't remember it. It's hard to say on the telephone. You know a lot of sort of things like that so you had to kind of read through the lines but also some sad stories people who would talk about being excluded in the military people who talked about their employer telling them they had to change their name when they got promoted people who wanted to erase memories of having escaped Germany during World War Two. There are a lot of those sad stories and in other kinds of readings. I did oral history is that I did. It's not always you know. Sort of a tragedy. But there's a lot of lingering sadnesses there's a lot of lingering ambivalence and I think the larger part of the story is people feeling like they had to do this. Some of the interesting part of looking at the state and the government's interest in doing this right and sort of making name changing available to people so easily right so readily you can change your name. Go ahead and change. Her name is volunteerism. The circumstances under which they're changing their names are not free and open they are constrained. They are significantly constrained not forcibly coerced. But they are constrained and sometimes they are being asked to or told to change their names by employers by military officers by defense industry contractors by people who kind of represent some kind of power and have interactions with Stay or certainly with their possibilities of getting a job and living in America. I think it's interesting that everybody's treated this so much as a joke that no scholar studied it. You know which I find really interesting right. That people have so far. Brush this and treated it as something that was not serious that was insignificant or Hurace. Something that was not really important so you actually mentioned the state a few times so I wanted to ask you about the state. What's at stake in controlling names and name changes from a state perspective so the federal government begins asking about name tinges voluntarily on Naturalization Petitions in nineteen of Sex. It is voluntary. It's just a line on your naturalization petition so I only did a very limited look at naturalization petitions but I found at least a few where somebody clearly had changed their name so that it looked very different but clearly the people setting this out that they didn't fill out a name change like the government didn't see this change in spelling as actually being a change in name. So there's a certain amount of laxity that European grants are being treated with in their ability to change their names so my story more begins with really World War One and then especially the Inter war period and World War Two and it spirals as the welfare state as the government begins to be concerned with issues of security and be concerned that the people standing in front of whatever federal worker may not be who they size so one of the most important things I think that leads to the nineteen forties in particular being. Sort of the place. Where you see. More of these official petitions being submitted than any other time in the twentieth century is that the government decides that during World War Two. It actually happened in nineteen ninety eight. They begin having defense. Contractors require birth certificates on so they can ensure the safety of their defense plates. So you see beginning in the nineteen thirties forties this kind of spiraling new. People start to have to produce their birth certificates in order to get jobs to become a part of the war effort which is where the jobs are happening and then as people begin to register for the draft or as they begin to be officers they are getting inconsistent right. It's not I don't think this is every single person who goes to apply to become an officer or to register for the draft or even to try to work for the defense industry but what you get is just more and more people who are getting defense contractors or officers or rotc people or whoever saying. Oh your name doesn't match you know you're going to have troubles you know you need to come back. And produce a birth certificate that matches so some of this is about security right security as the country is going to war and I think some of it is just about the government beginning to look to documents. They are trying more during the welfare state especially during the war to keep track of. Who's who I didn't see a lie. That was necessarily pushed by the Alien Registration. Act But that is something that is starting to begin to question people who have not become citizens yet so my gases that is playing a sub textual role in some people's decisions to do this. The state is beginning to keep track of people and so this kind of very open ended name policy which was working really to sort of bring white immigrants into the country and enfold them seamlessly as the US goes to war as it begins to offer benefits like welfare benefits but also especially as it begins to go to a second war it begins to want to keep track of people and it's using names as part of that way of kind of keeping track of

Official Kirsten United States Mister Meshu Shoe Katzman American University America Brandeis University Jason La Steak Josie Officer Rosenberg Michigan State University Jason I Kirstin Associate Professor Germany England Tinging
Elisha Goldstein :: A Course in Mindful Living

Present Moment: Mindfulness Practice and Science

09:02 min | 1 year ago

Elisha Goldstein :: A Course in Mindful Living

"Urge. Yesterday is Alicia Goldstein. Welcome to the PODCAST. Good to see you. Oh so so great to be here. Thanks for having me and I wanted to speak with you for quite some time because you've written many books and have a couple with Different Bob Stall in your your name has been married for quite some time in the we had a very Unplanned in for to its meeting at Mindful Leader Conference that a year or so ago I was just such a nice surprise when so glad to finally be able to bring you on the podcast. Glad you're here so what I'd like to do is My audience may not know about you and so many you can spend a little bit of time and also about your background. Okay you know. I think I came to to mindfulness much. Like I'm guessing you did or a lot of people did and you know that was at a time when say I keep with this story? It keeps the the year's getting longer and longer but this was This was a little over. Twenty years ago Maybe twenty five years and a little bit something like that where I was working in San Francisco during the dotcom. Boom and and Early on and that was I was working hard and I was actually really successful or that was doing managing sales teams. I was up in San Francisco and and And I was working hard but I was also playing a whole lot harder and that was the reality. And I think I was lost and I was confused and You know in in my success at the time was kind of clouding over over all of that making it so I couldn't really see that I was actually had a problem at that time and And I went away I was. I was urged to go with my family kind of an intervention And I went away to a kind of a Jewish retreat center in southern California and called Brandeis Bardin Institute and They told me they said Hey. Go go over there. And I'm like how could I do something like that? I got all this appear. They said you know if it doesn't doesn't work out for you in a day. Just don't worry about it you can leave. I'm like okay so I go there when the first day. I'm I'm there I Within a short period of time I run into this guy who introduces himself and You know because I'm challenging. Everything there the prayers versus like that introduces himself. And he says Oh. I seem kind of a stressed out and I don't chew Do something for marriage. You try doing something for me like when I just expect something. I'm like okay. Whatever and so we hands this orange and and he says don't you just soften your body for a minute and I want you to kind of bring your senses to this orange for a second. This is crazy. What the heck is this guy? What does he asked me to do? And so and I hold the orange and he has the feel it kind of just just kind of humor. Mace as an sensing into the touch of the orange smoothness of it the Opening my eyes to the colors of it and saying that it's kind of bright and it wasn't until I started to actually peel back and I saw the zest pop out of it. Something I haven't noticed before really an orange at that at that time as kind of taken aback surprised by it and and as I was late opening it up I saw the veins of the orange and I was really kind of starting to get into it and and And then finally put this into my mouth and it just exploded in my mouth exploded and I had this big smile. My Face Kinda laughed at that time and And as I was doing that it was the best tasting orange at ever taste in my mouth. So how do you feel and I said well? I forgot feel good. I feel relaxed and he said well. What would the days weeks and months ahead be like? If you had more of this in your life and I'm like sign me up. Sounds great and and so that was my introduction. Really into the experience of mindfulness was with through this tasting an orange and it wasn't and it wasn't that that was actually my first introduction to somebody because I've been reading about it for a long time. I think there's a lot of listeners here. There's a lot of people who start off by reading and there's certainly like a lot of books out there that are really popular that don't wreck actually suggest any experience it's more conceptual and there's a lot of reading but you know that's like car our introduction to a sense of feeling more president intentional in our lives in the world and it could be also inspirational and so the interesting thing about this story is You know go on this place to To really get into it and I think I was voted most likely to be a rabbi. You know while I was there and And Go home. I go back to my I go back to my my workplace thirty days later and and I'm and I'm wearing just as a side note that a lot of people don't know is I go back and I'm wearing these things. Called seats seats seats. Seats are like this. This cloth you wherever your body that has these fringes on there and you see a Lotta Orthodox Jews where this type of stuff and that the the fringes are meant to remind you to do good deeds in the world. And I'm like that's fantastic. Why wouldn't I wear something that reminds me to do? Good deeds in the world because I was like in that place generosity and art and so I go to my corporate work environment with button-down shirt and suit with these seats. Seat hanging aside my pants and everyone thinks I'm crazy and And then you know it took me about one week to fall back into my old habits real power I later learned behind our environments and and the influence the people we hang around with have on us and the influence our environment has on us And how we're like ultimately really interdependent with the environment and the people that we're we're around so but that was a very interesting thing took me about a week however a deep seed was planted within me and And I start had a thirst to kind of learn more and I decided to go back to school. Eventually for my to leave the corporal. Go back for a doctor program and in psychology in Palo Alto and And that's where I met my wife on the very first day that I was there so I know that was the right decision and and And and it was there that I I got. I got introduced to the sky. named window resear-. Obama was an eastern teacher at the time. And and one of the things we were doing in this class was reading really Khan and a contemplative way and which meant like you read really slowly which is something was a great gift to me to learn how to read that way because a lot of us right now and this is incredible tip for everyone who's listening right now and you just see that if you see this in yourself that when there's really great books out there because there's there's a lot of great books out there and And we read them where we're reading them and then after we're done reading them we just put them back on the shelf. Read it through. Put back on the shelf. What's the next great book out there? And and the reality is to learn how to read slightly slower and take in the pages even pas re less read slower and contemplate. While you're reading is going to be so much more powerful you'll squeeze so much more juice out of the book if you do that and so that was a great gift me but one of the things that I came across as I was doing that was that for him. One of the highest there was this Experience you know that he kept coming back to call the sacred experience and you know it was. It was real high form of living and and I started resonating with that and I said wow I wanna I wanNA learn to have more sacred moments in my life because thousands of many years from now on my deathbed hopefully looking back. I'll have you know to be able to live a sacred life will will feel so good. And so Be feels a meaningful and so I decided I wanted to study how you create sacred moments and can people actually have more cultivate more of these in their lives and they realized in order to do that You needed to be present and intentional and I was a doctoral student and for doctoral students You need to create unique research and so I was like well. What's out there? That will teach us how to be present. That's actually been studied by science right now so I can like drawn it for this doctoral research paper which was later by the way that that whole study that I was that that I did there was later published in the Journal Clinical Psychology. But what I found was it was mindfulness based stress reduction. Ted You're very familiar with and so and this wonderful program sure all your listeners know about it and And is used that. And that's where I met Bob Stall and He was he was the leading teacher in. Bs are at the time outside of Umass and you know I went through his program and then became really close to him. And then we really we connected and I started getting teacher trained by and and And that was really the birth of my more formal experience. You know into mindfulness and the training of it and the practice of it in everyday life

San Francisco Alicia Goldstein California Bob Stall Brandeis Bardin Institute Barack Obama Mace President Trump Journal Clinical Psychology Umass TED Palo Alto Khan
"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"The third thing is you get proliferation of cells grow in and the forcing is remodeling so that you don't whole bunch of scars so that whole process is basically mediated by platelets. We used to think well platelets just come and cause the clock but over the past ten or fifteen years what we found is that a hundred and forty one different growth factors have been identified within platelets and so what happens is is when you create micro trauma using shockwave therapy and then inject these platelets into the penis the penis the the platelets honed to the areas of injury and they stick to the area of injury and they get activated when they get activated they release these growth factors need these growth factors include vascular growth with factors platelet growth factors epidermal growth factors then why this is the people uses on their face and neck they call the vampire facial exactly yeah and i didn't believe it so i start injecting it into my scalp and all this hair in the front part of my scalp was all new hair wow yeah it's really thing you know i'm too far and i have a wife and i have four kids and i hopefully they loved me whether i have no p._r. Pierce stem cells europe. Crazy yeah and so after that i became a true i'd read the the literature rasa yeah yeah sure i mean. I'm sure you've done that before. You read stuff and you believe it no. I i keep thinking of it to it my shoulder because and i i don't know the stem cells are usually a lot more evolved inexpensive very close in terms of efficacy as far as i know literature yeah and the orthopedic literature p._r._p.'s really taken enough. I know yeah so. Let's see i really appreciate you coming down here and explain this all just a pleasure to meet you. It's my pleasure. I grew up with you so it's like <hes>. It's a it's such such an honor to be here. He taught me the birds and the bees guy. I thought you crazy crazy but the practical stuff now look at you right right the the.

fifteen years
"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Thanks for explaining all this to us. I appreciate it. I was really interested in this device. I've read some literature on it. Look really good thing. That's why sort sort of agreed to get behind it but i was like to get more into the specifics for people who are actually using it so i appreciate you often and i just talking topics. We should get into the men are always oh gosh giving one. I mean i do tons of sect amies in yeah. They've got mad. I'm sure lengthening <hes> premature ejaculation value the sticker cancer prostate cancer prostate diseases. You can think of things that the young males are the ones that get very preoccupied about s._t._d.'s you in that area much much were you when you were trained as you focus on prostate prostate function where you're doing kidney transplants and you know i started with doing kidney transplant and so i did a lot of research harvard you are at harvard medical school through the howard hughes medical constitute and then <hes> kidney transplants a tough way to make a living you know you're up all night flying from place to place to place to do kidney transplants and so actually discovered <hes> general urology i really love general urology and i loved my career as a general urologist for seventeen or eighteen years but gains wave really it it changed the whole calculus for me became really interesting. Oh you know so we can talk about if you want the everyone's into what's called the p shot. What's that and in stem cells. Ok p shot is an injection of platelets so it's like player platelet rich plasma right and so i can in in <hes> i can do a five minute lecture on stem cells and p._r._p. Four would you use it for so you can use it for everything so they use it orthopedics. The pedic's kobe bryant was famous. I what what do you guys. Use it for for improving erectile function and growing penises. Oh interesting. Where do you inject it into the penis or you can use it for preowneds disease so for intractable peroni patients. You can inject a little bit of p._r._p. And there's a little but evidence that it helps basically what p._r._p. Is is so when you get an injury. The first thing that happens is you get a clot right. He must stay. This is the second thing you do. Is you get an inflammation. Inflammatory response white blood cells come in the bacteria and take away dead tissue..

kobe bryant harvard medical school howard hughes medical s._t._d. eighteen years five minute
"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"B. L. u. c. h._e._w. Blue dot com promo code drew and other side effects of the potential adverse. That's the absolutely amazing thing you know knock on wood. I've done hundreds and hundreds of patients and not one single side effect. He let's talk a little bit about <hes> homeboy replacement therapy. I'm assuming you're getting all that too in your male sexual absolutely as part of your job where you know i've always been a little confused by you know where the i don't know how to describe and the professional standards are right so what people don't understand which is really critical critical to understand is once you start. You can't stop because because your body stops making testosterone so i had a patient who i did a sesame on who is a los angeles raiders or oakland raiders defensive lineman like three hundred fifty pound monster of a human being and so we went to the sesame his testicles were the size of small peas because he had been on huge doses of destruction for longtime you yeah and your body stops making testosterone so think about it this way like say you have central heating air and you set the central heating air for seventy two degrees then you bring a space as heater in you. Turn the space heater on all of a sudden. The central heating air goes off because the space heaters there yeah five years later the space heater breaks. Does the central heat nair go back on. It's been off for five years. Maybe it doesn't work anymore and so basically you're committing yourself to a life of being onto storrow now if you're sixty five or seventy seventy or even fifty five in your levels are low and they're going to remain low for the rest of your life. It's a great idea. It makes guys feel so much better yeah but if you're you're thirty five and you're down in the dumps there are so many better ways to boost testosterone then the author replacement exactly. Is there any on off therapies. There's intermittent but that's just the way it works. The more you take the lesser body makes but but that's why i was asking about the on off one month-on-month on one month off does that give you a chance to sort of well that just makes it bounce up and down but in terms of keeping production by the testes and losing it for good good no one's do you can do that or you can take like h g so if you wanna keep your fertility. That's the other issue. Is that if you're taking it when you're younger like if you're on the high school football team the college football team you're going to prevent are not prevent but you're gonna basically affect your fertility your ability to procreate creating the future so it's really it's it's not trivial stuff. So what do you do if a guy comes in with re relative to stop strong and some lack of the talent catalyse the kind of stuff yeah. I mean if there are fifty five or sixty years old. It's great and you put them onto. Saas thrown can either give him shots or pellet or creams. If they're forty i talked to them about cleaning up our lifestyle exercising eating better and getting better sleep nitric oxide helping you.

testosterone oakland raiders B. L. u. Saas los angeles football five years one month three hundred fifty pound seventy two degrees sixty years
"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Activate stem cells you activate nitric oxide synthase which produces nitric oxide which causes vasil daily shannon also most important you secrete vascular endothelial growth factor <hes> so it's a growth factor that causes you to grow new blood vessels and so it usually he takes about four weeks but by the fourth week these guys come in and they have that you know that little giddy grand that you get the time you kissed to grow in your sixteen sure these these settlers shit eating exactly my my wife told me you better not use profanity. It's okay it's all good depart guest the so these guys come in like this one guy who he had been my patient for like fifteen years and his wife had alzheimer's and he was such such a wonderful guy. He took such good care of his wife for ten years. I could see him just suffering he coming in every six months and after ten years as white finally passed away and a couple of years later or he got a girlfriend and this was just about the time we were introducing gains wave and said peter lump. Let's try it and he hadn't been physically intimate with a woman for fifteen years. It was seventy six seventy seven years old and this is not just for old folks no not just for awful but the example that you just an example and you know four or five weeks later he came in and he had that kind of shit eating grin and i mean he was crying. He really was it was the first time he'd been physically intimate with a woman in fifteen years and it just it meant so much to horse and that really so i practiced general urology for for almost twenty years and did all sorts of cool stuff like started robotic arctic surgery programs and that's what sold me on going into male sexual medicine and now my practices entirely male sexual medicine and it's just we're like seriously we work miracles everyday. It's just amazing so tell us how this thing works. Who should be getting it right. So if if you're in your forties or fifties and you're beginning to start to use viagra you feel like things aren't working at the way that they used to and that you know that's something that guys can notice throughout the lifespan right absolutely so. How do you know something needs addressing if it's important to you so it doesn't matter if even if it happens occasionally occasionally if it's important you get checked out right well. I mean the thing is. Are you going to wait around until you're you can't walk. Ah i guess with behind my question is there seems like there's a lot of sort of recreational use of p._d. Five inhibitors and and i'm not quite sure what to do with that. <hes> you know a lot of young guys rang like i shouldn't really be using it and and i how do i know probably people getting an online and stuff sort of inefficiency. I get it <hes> but but i'm not really sure intermediate zone right getting there so there are side effects of those medications and so taking it and putting a foreign substance in your body. His sometimes can be dangerous. Sometimes it's totally fine yeah <hes> but you're exactly zeroing in on my concern which is whenever there's not a medically compelling reason to take that risk. Even though the risk is tiny. You're still taking that exactly. It'd be like taking a weight loss pill as opposed to going to the gym. Gains waves going to the gym jim. Sometimes you need them sometime but again. That should be you know who needs it all right so keep going so gained weight is like going to the gym. It's like getting your penis back can shape. It's growing new blood vessels. It's turning the clock back five or ten years on your own personal physiology people find someone that's doing. This treatment gains wave dot com g..

peter lump alzheimer viagra fifteen years ten years seventy six seventy seven year twenty years five weeks four weeks six months
"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"To geico progressive progression of central cardiovascular designed. The coronary arteries right well. It's actually smaller than the coronary artery so it's kind of the canary in the coalmine sir what happened so because a law smaller means way less love squared yeah so it's it's pyre. Four is the fourth power while it's eh inverse talking about the the the dialysis served here but the flow is actually a four pound phenomenon. I didn't get that far into <hes> and so you know very tiny degrees of individual damage or you know any kind of exact cholesterol deposition that sort of thing and if you're a smoker smoker. You're really lucky to get that stuff. Oh yeah i mean that diabetics three to four times. <hes> smokers people on beta blockers people on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors habita- anyone with cardiovascular disease hypertension. I mean just across the board. It's part of normal aging process now. The amazing thing is up until a couple of years ago. If if you look at any men's health magazine what are they going to tell you about improving erectile function you exercise eat better. <hes> don't eat foods high in cholesterol etcetera etcetera it or don't smoke don't drink but i came up with this concept of biohacking the aging peanut. I love the name of that the talk because there's this whole i i hate the term biohacking but you've you've packed biohacking semi because you're not really biohacking. You're just you're addressing the physiology. That's all right so the biohacking but go ahead go ahead. I know people love that right and so there i i came up with five things that you can do that are shortcuts instead of spending six hours in the gym which you know most people with normal jobs and family senator he can't do that so first of all nitric oxide. Ed replacement is essential so i'm fifty two on average. My nitric oxide levels will be fifty percent of what they should be by the time you had seventy wendy. You're nitric. Oxide levels will be about twenty to twenty five percent. Do we know what that's due to. It's just part of the normal aging process and if you're on a p._d. Five inhibitors habit or is that a plus p five is almost like a reuptake inhibitor. No i know but if you say let's say somebody's on day-lewis can't should they also be taking a supplement absolutely okay. You're absolutely because what this what a nitric oxide booster does increases the amount of nitric oxide. What appea- five inhibitor basically does us innocent in a simple fashion it stops the reuptake of the nitric oxide products yeah and so it's essential and the amazing thing about nitric oxide boosters is is it <hes> improve cognition. It reduces your risk of dementia alzheimer's. That's it you have it there i do. I need to take this. You've just brought it for you. Thank you so called a firm which is funny. You should just call it firm af <music> bureau night <hes> citrulline with going on with that why don't these are <hes> <hes> either all nitric oxide booster so centrally is from watermelon actually and it's <hes> basically fermented watermelon citrulline turns into arginine in in the body and argentina's the nitric oxide donor also has beat it has a brazilian route called mira paloma and it has ginseng those are all potent nitric oxide boosters so arginine is the nitric oxide donor but you can't take nitric that you.

geico alzheimer senator argentina day-lewis mira paloma wendy twenty five percent fifty percent four pound six hours
"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Everybody. Welcome dr podcast <hes> again just the win in the sale of the corolla pirate ship check out the various pods dr dot com. We appreciate you checking. They're not gonna look after dark. Show people are finding that to be very interesting and i have in the past brought people in here that representatives of some of the phenomenon of some of the products that we've advertised on the website or on the on the shows like to nigeria talked to the scientists behind the cd therapy and <hes> we are <hes> allowing allowing gains wave to be represented in our shows and i thought let's bring in somebody who really knows something about this. We can talk about it as physicians and scientists and really talk about what this thing is so here we are about to the jets brand is welcome. Thank you very much. It's great to be here at brandeis is a urologist and it said here you're one of the first to perform robotic prostatectomy looked way too young for that <hes> fifty two do those been around for thirty five years is that turn seventeen years seventeen years ago it was started by a company called intuitive surgical trickle and i used to go down to intuitive which is in northern california at that time it was in mountain view and practice on the cadaverous with train their reps crazy so i had a radical robotic prostatectomy yeah but it was served seven years ago so i felt when i was getting done that <hes> it was something brown forever because there were some people that were so good at the guy the guy i had matt buoy during junior an interesting and he said he'd done eleven hundred under at that point and i said fine. Let's go do this amazing. When i started doing it. I would come down to u._c._l._a. And try to convince them like this is great. You know watch my videos radio's. It's amazing. They didn't want to do it and they were like nano..

nigeria brandeis matt california seventeen years thirty five years seven years
"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"You just gotta take a picture of your gas has receipt and bam up to twenty five cents a gallon cash back. You don't have to tell me twice. I'm downloading the free. Get upside gas app. Now download the free. Get upside right app now in the app store or google play to save up to twenty five cents a gallon when you buy gas use promo code next for a twenty cent gala botas on your first i tank. That's up to forty five cents a gallon on your next tank. Just download the free get upside app at the app store or google play and use promo code next save save money on gas on every fill up just download the free get upside app and use promo code next. That's n e x t. It's time to turn it up up with your new favorite podcasts expeditiously with t._i. Here on podcast one during the rapper entertainer family man and activist as he bridges the gap and sheds light unimportant social topics and much more in an authentic eyebrow raising dialogue that might make you wanna pull out your dictionary download new episodes of expeditiously with t._i. Every week on apple podcast outcast and podcast one. You've heard a blue blue dot com. They offer men's performance enhancement. You wouldn't like to last longer. Go extra rounds will boots you dot com you can find the first sewell's with the same active ingredients with pharmaceutical agents like viagra dribbles can work faster sometimes twice as fast and blue can be taken of course on a full or or empty stomach unlike the pharmaceutical agents takes only a few minutes to connect with a blue shoe dot com affiliated physician and if you qualify you'll be prescribed by that dr online quickly. No in person visit no awkwardness waiting in line at the pharmacy. It's ships directly to your door in discreet packaging. The chew blue dot com prescribed online by the physician in and made in the u._s._a. If it's appropriate for you to be using them they can give your level of confidence you might want to have you and your partner will love it. Here's a great deal for you. Guys visit blue chubias a bill you e. c. h. e. w. here's a great deal for you. Guys visit blue dot com and get your first order free when you use promo code drew deary w just pay the five dollars shipping. That's a hell of a deal that it's blue b. L. u. c. h. e. w. blue-chip dot com promo code drew well. You've heard me talk about how fast it is to to get a true car certified dealer to send you a true cash offer. It's exquisitely fast. You can do it from your smartphone home. Just go to truecar and your license plate it number watch the cars information pop-up answer questions and that's it you get an acura true cash offer for a local truecar certified dealer. It is that easy. Bring your car ins- they can check it out. Check it out with you last questions no surprises then you just the overhaul of your check. If that's what you wanna do or you can trade in your car for a new ride and of course i used truecar to lock in price for a new or used vehicles. They have both available and it's it's you know it's a good price because you see what people are paying your area and you know it's the true price because it includes these accessories so it's.

google apple viagra sewell partner e. c. h. e. w. L. u. c. five dollars
The Fed chairman says the relationship between inflation and unemployment is gone

Marketplace

02:48 min | 2 years ago

The Fed chairman says the relationship between inflation and unemployment is gone

"With the power of the other we try real hard on this program not to get all Giardini there are days when you got to do what you gotta do and today is one of them jargon in question is something called the Phillips curve which says that the lower the unemployment rate gets like it is right now inflation should start getting higher and higher like it is right well now that's the point unemployment is really low but inflation is basically flat here's why I mention it this week during his testimony on Capitol Hill that to deepen Catherine and I were talking about Fincher J. pal said basically the Phillips curve once again the relationship between unemployment and inflation that has been part of the standard framework for decades also that doesn't really work anymore market place's replenish your explains what broke it the unemployment rate in the U. S. is three point seven percent that's pretty good people having jobs is it's great and actually it's part of the federal reserve's job to keep unemployment down but the fed has a fear a fear that if the unemployment rate gets too low prices could rise too much in the economy is also the fed's job to keep prices stable demand is very far your to see prices raw Steven K. teaches at Brandeis international business school is as the labor market gets tighter wages to tenderize it been rising a little and the idea is that with those bigger paychecks demand goes up prices go up faster that has happened before but it is not happening now the link between domestic wagers the crisis is much weaker because of globalization the economy is not a cute little self contained box we buy stuff from all around the world so prices are affected by things all around the world so it's harder to say gosh wages are going up so prices must too also another reason it's gotten harder to tell when inflation is going to get out of control is is actually been for ever since inflation was out of control Ellen that Meister is an economist at UBS the fed has been very good at keeping inflation relatively constant then the late nineties so that I am placing doesn't get into individuals expectation we saying is inflation doesn't get into people's heads they don't worry about IT companies are paranoid about it they don't change their prices that often so inflation doesn't really moved much or very quickly on the one hand all of this is to say that it's gotten harder for the fed to tell whether the unemployment rate is too low whether high inflation is just around the corner but the flip side is maybe it's not all that urgent they can focus much more on the real side of economy the fed probably doesn't have to worry too much than anything crazy is going to happen with inflation all the sudden anytime soon in New York I'm sorry been ashore for market place where's Jay bell about inflation in that unemployment link when we talked to him last summer he basically shrugged you can hear the interview that market place dot

Seven Percent One Hand
San Francisco's E-Cigarette Ban Aims to Goose the FDA

Morning Edition

05:26 min | 2 years ago

San Francisco's E-Cigarette Ban Aims to Goose the FDA

"Tuesday. San Francisco became the first major city in the nation to approve a blanket ban on the sale and manufacture of e cigarettes, the city supervisors passed the ban unanimously like many cities across the country. San Francisco says it's trying to stem vaping epidemic among school aged kids and teens. Join us to talk about the ban in San Francisco and what it could mean for the rest of California is attorney Andrew tournament Seco with the public health Law Center, which monitors tobacco laws across the country. Thanks for being with us. Thank you for having me. We'll supporters of the band say that it can help rein in vaping, kids and teens. But some who oppose it Sates going to remove viable smoking, turn it, that can help people quit supervisors at all weigh in on vaping as a path toward quitting. That's valid point on, I think manufacturing, especially to have been making this Wayne. And this claim is not actually founded in science. Oh. In fact. And we know that those pass wait for them to gain that status to if the approval to, to be a cessation product from combustible products. The report says that e cigarettes where the most commonly used products high school students in two thousand seventeen the surgeon general has mentioned how the use of cigarettes has explicitly increase in middle and high school students of the rate of nine hundred percent between two thousand two thousand fifteen and the pattern of use of cigarettes, higher within teenagers and young adults spending adult so idea that they products or e cigarettes are a cessation tool. He's. Listen. Do BS those numbers those numbers about growth in, in student populations of there staggering, but did San Francisco at all ever? Consider a sort of a more tailored approach in terms of banning them in schools, and or exploring options like vape monitors that, I know some schools across the nation have those restrooms and other parts of schools. The best way to stay me that we're facing right now. We do this is an pedantic but synthesis believes it's facing and the best way to do. It took the approach that they felt appropriate to spend that they make San Francisco really just the first city sort of actively take on FDA, that's maybe dragging its heels on weighing in on vaping. San Francisco as I just the forefront. And, and like you mentioned, you know, the FDA has this pathway through, which is cigarettes can be on the market, and they're not doing that. They've been pushing back to dead line products. I've been on the market for many, many years. Now. And dictate adults has the numbers show, and this is presenting a public health catastrophe and, yeah, San Francisco's want as on the forefront of doing this having difficulty reconciling, the fact that jewel, one of the largest makers of, of e cigarette products is headquartered there and is a large player in the market, and a resident of the city, that's actually great point. And they'll initiatives now in San Francisco to try to change that, so that the CD sense right message, when he'd enacts laws that protect the public health about having the industry that is responsible for this being housed in its own property. What we should inside that this band is Cisco did just pass is temporary can only last up to six months. That said, do you anticipate this catching with other large cities states? I mean there's, there's things making their way through the California legislature. Right now about vaping and prohibiting it in some places the beauty about. Public health initiatives, that developing the local level. It's that incremental in a sense that Justice Brandeis said you know, there's a laboratories of democracy. This is this is a politics being tested on the on the local level. And if it gains public public health goals, we hope to see it working its way to localities. Also, diffusing ports to the state, and another high level, so that, you know, we as a society, take steps to address on pedantic and midst. What would you tell somebody? That is an adult choosing to, to use an EC Greg product in the bay area. And now knowing they are going to be banned from using it is that is that, right? Is that fair? Do they have the right to smoke? What they want. Well, I hate to recognize you, but there's no right to smoke or those right to access this product. I mean I I'm really I'm pathetic to people find themselves addicted to these. Product. Some good diction probably has been going on for many years and interventions available to people who would like to transition from those combustible products, the FDA approved cessation products. And for example, you'll probably have a great important of nicotine even combustible cigarettes. That's does lawsuits going on right now where those claims have been made that jill's Jews make an for. Delivering nicotine is more potent combustible cigarette. So what's on fair is the business practices of, of the cigarette industry, trying to continue to push his products in the public that have delicious public health effects on the population Andrew twin about Seco is a staff attorney with public health Law Center. Thanks so much for being with us today. Welcome, thank you for having me.

San Francisco FDA Public Health Law Center California Andrew Tournament Seco Nicotine Justice Brandeis Seco Attorney Cisco Jill Andrew Twin Staff Attorney Nine Hundred Percent Six Months
Why Should We Care About Privacy?

Crazy/Genius

08:12 min | 2 years ago

Why Should We Care About Privacy?

"Internet is broken. And nowhere is it's broken. This more obvious than in the endless series of scandals in one particularly sensitive subjects, but there's another privacy crisis brewing. And Facebook is reportedly bugs Aqaba says he's sorry about the privacy, data breach. Constitutional amendment to protect our privacy. Cyber security experts are calling a popular app on Facebook privacy nightmare more than seventeen million. Everybody's talking about privacy. These days who has it who doesn't which companies are taking it away and how to get it back. But I have a confession. And I'm a little nervous to say this out loud because I don't want to sound like a fool in the first episode of this season. But I have no idea what privacy even means anymore. And I sort of get the feeling a lot of you don't either we complain about. Alexa, listening to our orders about Instagram targeting us with ads about smart devices tracking our behavior, but every year, we buy more, Alexa products post more on Instagram by more smart devices. If you ask Americans have online privacy is in a state of crisis. They say, yes. But if you ask them, would you actually pay for devices and apps that would guard your identity, two thirds of them say, no. So we value privacy. We just value it it, exactly. Zero dollars zero cents. This divergence between are complaining and our behavior. Drives me a little nuts. Like come on people. We can't buy rooms at the panopticon hotel. And then complain about the surveillance this discrepancy between attitude and behavior is not a paradox. I can explain it to you ho. Thank god. And. Welcome back to crazy genius season. Three our theme for the next date episodes on break the internet. I up the privacy wars when people think about what's wrong with the internet. They think about privacy, but before we can figure out how to fix it. We need to agree on what it is. And what if anything is at stake when it comes to protecting our private data is everybody a bunch of paranoid hypocrites or am. I the crazy one. For the Atlantic. I'm Derek Thompson. This is crazy. Why are you interested in privacy? Isn't everybody? Interested in privacy that Sarah, I go she's a history. Professor at Vanderbilt University. She literally wrote the book on the history of privacy in America the known citizen. I wanted to know what is privacy. What does it mean? And have we always been as worried about it as we are? Now privacy is one of those interesting values that really doesn't surface until it's violated. So people don't enunciate it until they think they don't have it. I go told me privacy isn't a stable concept. And it hasn't always been that controversial, what's really striking. When you look at the period before say, the late nineteenth century, really before the civil war. You don't actually find a lot of public debates around privacy. You don't even find the word privacy in these debates. Pull up a copy of the US constitution on your computer, control. F search for the word privacy zero results. The closest you'll get is something like the third amendment. No. Soldier Shelby quartered in any house without the consent of the owner. But in the seventeen hundreds most Americans didn't even own a house. Most Americans in fact, were not particularly entitled to privacy, unless they were propertied unless they were men and heads of households lots of people didn't even own their own labor, for instance, if you think about enslaved people in the United States, and so, you know, we're talking about a pretty small sector of the population that thought of itself as entitled to privacy. Wh what do you think changed in the late nineteenth century such that Americans relationship to privacy really had a turning point in that period, but comes to the fore in the late nineteenth century is that all these new technologies kind of make privacy precarious in a way that it hadn't been before photography is one example, instantaneous photography amateurs, taking photographs being able to publish and trade images of people that were in a real sense kind of private images. But also telephone lines. Telegraph. Cables that made communications faster and more convenient and less expensive in certain ways, but also much more porous. So that you get worries about wiretapping and listening in and so forth. So whole bunch of technologies are one 'cause telegraphs and photographs brought tech into our personal space. But something else was getting into our personal space. Other people in the eighteen hundreds Americans moved from sparse farms into dense cities, people didn't realize they valued privacy until it disappeared. And they were forced to sleep eat work and live all on top of other people those things kind of collide in a in a pretty serious fashion in the late nineteenth century, and we'll give rise to the first modern calls for a right to privacy. So where does this term right to privacy come from pretty late? It's in eighteen ninety and it comes from a Harvard law review essay written by Louis Brandeis and Samuel Warren. Louis Brandeis would eventually moved to the supreme court, and they call for what they called a. Right to be let alone they believe that this is a right that people have against various kinds of invaders of their private affairs and private lives. And what were they responding to? They were talking about a right to privacy from an aggressive press from journalists who were scouring especially the lives of the elite for scandalous stories about divorce, and it's amazing. So the original right to privacy was a right to privacy from journalists. Yes. So from private actors, but also from what Warren and Brandeis called the new devices that allowed things that were meant to be expressed in private to be shouted from the rooftops snooping. Journalists and newfangled telephones weren't the only things freaking out Americans. There was also the mail when postcards were authorized and then went on sale. They were immensely popular. But they will immediately. Also cause a backlash by editorialists and moralists etiquette writers who believe there was something fundamentally problematic. About people sending private matter through the mails without an envelope. Right. That couldn't be sealed Americans are often charged with disclosing too much with being to free and loose with their information. And some of the critiques of the postcard read as if they were talking about in the late nineteenth, century social media. I mean, the terms are exactly the same the right to privacy is has essentially shifted in these one hundred years from a right to privacy of property to privacy of communications where the bad actor isn't so much the government anymore. It's private actors. It's muckraking journalists, and it's who else advertisers. There's this wonderful case one of the early right to privacy suits from nineteen zero to New York state, which is about a woman who discovers much to her. Shame and humiliation that her face appears on advertisements for Franklin mills. Flour? And she sues because this seems like a kind of a violation of her privacy rights, not a tangible property right again, but a right to control her own image. She does not win hirsute. But it does cause an uproar in the press is a nationally followed case, and in fact is responsible for the first New York state laws regulating the right to

Louis Brandeis Facebook United States Alexa Instagram Samuel Warren New York Panopticon Hotel Aqaba Government Vanderbilt University Harvard Law Review Derek Thompson America Professor Soldier Shelby Franklin Mills Sarah
"brandeis" Discussed on Sex With Emily

Sex With Emily

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on Sex With Emily

"I can't get erection. Peter. Let's try this new thing called gains wave not heard it works really well in have the machine. And so we started doing gains wave after the fourth or fifth treatment. He came entity had that at red blush that you get when you're out to tender sixty year old boy, and you kissed her first girl and an Esa meal. What's going on Peter? He came into the office. In was hugging me and hugging my medical assistant? And he said, you know. My my girlfriend, and I went out and took a of the vitro tablet, and he goes I was able to have sex with her. And that was the first time I've had sex in fifteen years, and it was such a special moment for him, and for me, and you know, I've cured people have cancer so many times taking kidney stones and help people in so many different ways. But that was such a special moment to be able to help someone in that way. I'll always remember it. And that was really sort of one of the first impetus is for me to move away from doing general urology and move into the sexual medicines pace. And I have so many stories now like that where you know families are about to break up or marriages are about break up and were able to help men through gains wave kid their erections back get their sexual spontaneity back and get their physical intimacy back and get their relationship back on track. And we prevented families from breaking out. We've prevented divorces and gains wave really has been the key for a lot of men because it's a curative situation because women sometimes feel really bad that they feel like it's their fault that their husband or spouse. Can't get erection that they're not attractive or they're not attractive as may. And and it plays into the relationship. I mean, you obviously know this not more than I do please into the relationship. Annex absolutely is a lot of friends encountered this verse time. From one time. Like all of a sudden, the unlike it's not really really, it's not you automatic. But we can't work as we also ourselves. So anyways obey we've already caretakers. It's not fair. But I love it. You are manner confidence that em. Yep. Films together, though. The sexy. Zurve forget, I guess you waiting were talk about this about the solutions for men angelman know, better than anyone that this is just one small component of physical intimacy. So it might clinic I try to avoid where it's like sex for me and for us in our clinic, and I have a psychologist works with us. And on my staff is really well trained in highly educated to talk about this in terms of physical intimacy. You know in my office, we're not looking to like help guys go out and score chicks at bar. Now, we're trying to do is to help men who've head of a, you know, a good healthy life maintain physical intimacy, which is an important part of enjoyment arrives. Thank you so much Dr Brandeis where he will find you with the best. Lisa find you right now. So Brandeis MD dot com and also I.

Peter Dr Brandeis Brandeis MD Esa cancer Lisa fifteen years sixty year
"brandeis" Discussed on Sex With Emily

Sex With Emily

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on Sex With Emily

"Go into the peace one of the reasons my show, he will feel comfortable calling his kids and Nana Mus. But there's a lot of men who call in. And they I might be the first person they've ever talked about their penis challenges. They don't wanna talk to the doctors. They don't talk to the partners, and what is kit is after all your years work. You've been why is there so much? Shame about talking about what's going on. There's a lot of ego involved. There's a lot of macho manliness and so in my in my practice Brandeis MD in San Ramon, California. What we do is we really try to disarm that. We try to explain to men that this is part of life. This happens to almost everyone at some point in their life. And there's no shame. There's no. It's not a problem. Right. For example. People don't feel embarrassed going with cardiologists, right, right? You know, you don't take my dad at the cardiologists today. But but people are for some reason embarrassed her shamed of going to the urologist for rectal this function. But you know, it's the same disease process. Actually, right. It's just blood vessels getting blocked, delivering less blood to an end, Oregon. And in one case, it's the heart in another case. It's pains. Dakhli? I I mean, that's my planet. Let's just talk about all of it. Let's just talk about, you know, our challenges sexually otherwise you have patience partner's coming to you. Because it's hard for them to talk about like their spouses come in. And actually about a third of the time. They come with their spouses. Okay. That's good. I think it's important. I really like it when they bring their spouses because you know, it's a team effort is a team effort sex is a team effort. You know, a home will Colleen and like have you ever talked your partner about this, whatever it is giving penis orgasms with men and went anything, and they were not comfortable with it. So you heard about gains wave shock therapy for e d and Peroni disease. It also helps tackle parents for a second. And then you brought it to San Francisco essentially knew about eight years ago, and your business has been taken off. 'cause you're helping men in ways that are I'm assuming it is. I always when I first heard about for years. I was like, holy there's I still Lucien ver- men in e d that is not a pill that could change your life. This is going to be the biggest thing. Ever. So let's talk about the specific. I six pair Onis that's really common to people are as for millions with the term. Sure, so parentheses is scar tissue on the inside of the peace and about eighty percent of the time. People don't even realize when it occurs. But basically the lining of the inside of the penis. I know we talked just a minute ago about the high pressures on the inside of the penis. And the lining of the inside of the penises unique in that it can withstand those really high blood pressures, but it can stretch. But if you get a small crack in that tissue it produces scar tissue scar tissue in the body, his strong, but it doesn't stretch. And so you get one side of the penis that stretches on one side of the penis. It doesn't stretch and say end up with a curvature. And so what gains wave is actually able to do is break up that scar tissue. So if you look at the collagen, which is what makes up the inside of the peanuts. Collagen an Alaskan under the microscope you'll see that in normal tissue. It's kind of more parallel fibers, but in scarred tissue, the fibers are all over the place scrambled. And so when you pull on those fibers that are all scrambled..

partner Nana Mus San Ramon Brandeis MD California Onis San Francisco Colleen Oregon eighty percent eight years
"brandeis" Discussed on Sex With Emily

Sex With Emily

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on Sex With Emily

"Thanks for listening to sex with Emily today show, I'm joined by board certified urologist, Dr Judd Brandeis to talk about how science is making strides for your penis, and I'm answering your emails topics include no, more blue pills. Innovative new tech that helps your member work harder longer and stronger, the two people you need to be talking about sex, your partner and your doctor and how they can help you get your love life back on track. What to do if you're skeptical of your partners fantasy and whether or not veer porn is considered cheating, all this and more. Thanks for listening. Here's a listener Email I recently received and let me tell you. It's not the only one of its kind. Hi, emily. I'm thirty eight year old single mom who wants to get back on the dating scene, but I'm terrified I've been dealing with bladder leakage and actually started wearing pads everyday just to be safe between the leaking and the pads. I'm totally insecure about spontaneous intimacy with a new partner. How can I move past this? Well, I let me tell you that she's not alone. It's actually estimated that forty million women use pads everyday for bladder leaks young old with without kids. But let me tell you. There's nothing to be ashamed of there are solutions though. And it's not just pads the apex by poor. Ma is an affordable device that uses gentle electrostimulation to create an extremely effective cagle workout automatically not only does a strong public floor. Help prevent the old sneeze in peace situation. It can increase the strength and frequency of your orgasms which also helped make you want to get intimate again. Similar to the intensity that I've spoken about for years. The apex delivers the same results without the rabbit vibrator functions. Making it the perfect option for women who are sensitive to stimulation to start using an apex and stop relying on pads. Visit porn wa dot com slash Emily. That's peo-. You are MO dot com slash Emily. The eyes of. Is that our secret? Crew is they call them in a bygone only. You gotta boyfriend because many here he just got his heart broke, anything kind of cute standards. The women know about shrinkage isn't a common knowledge what you mean like laundry shrinks about sexual much me. Oh, my welfare so won't be in bed. His pretty good. But you know, Emily's not the kind of drill. You just play. You're listening.

Emily partner Dr Judd Brandeis Ma thirty eight year
A high-ranking pharmaceutical executive blames the FDA for the opioid epidemic

60 Minutes

03:59 min | 2 years ago

A high-ranking pharmaceutical executive blames the FDA for the opioid epidemic

"And Americans who've grown dependent on the powerful pain pills. We have not had a high ranking executive from the pharmaceutical industry sip before our cameras until now tonight. Ed Thompson, a drug manufacturer who spent decades managing and producing opioids for big pharma breaks ranks to denounce his industry, and it's federal regulator the food and Drug administration, which he says opened the floodgates on the crisis with a few little changes to a label the root cause of this epidemic is the FDA's illegal approval of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain. The FDA ignited opioid crisis without question. They start the fire. Ed Thompson told us when the top selling. Opioid Oxycontin was first approved in nineteen ninety five. It was based on science that only showed it safe and effective when used short term, but in two thousand one pressured by big pharma and pain sufferers the FDA made a fateful decision. And with no new science to back. It up expanded the use of Oxycontin to just about anyone with chronic ailments, like arthritis and back pain. This is what a package in the FDA did it by simply changing. A few words on the label that lengthy insert no one ever reads today. The label says the powerful pain pills are affective for daily around the clock long-term treatment and that small label change made a big change in the way, drug companies would Mark it all opioids allowing them to sell more and more pills at higher and higher doses. A drugs label is the single most important documents for that product it determines whether somebody can be ten million dollars or billion dollars. Also because it allows you to them promote the drug based on the labelling. Ed Thompson owns P M R S, a successful, Pennsylvania form, suitable company that manufacturers drugs for big pharma. It's made him a rich, man. But now he's putting his livelihood at risk. He's doing what no other drug maker has ever done. He suing the FDA in federal court to force it to follow the science and limit the opioid label to short term use. Thompson is challenging the FDA to start with his newest opioid. It's Thompsons creative way to sabotage the system. He may lose money rolling out his new drug. But if he is successful, it would set a precedent. Other manufacturers would be forced to change their labels and limit their marketing decision going in your direction could pull down a multi billion dollar industry. Correct. Probably somewhere between seven and ten billion dollars. A year would come off the market. We made a decision to stop selling snake oil to US citizens in nineteen sixty two snake oil. Yes, you're using high dose long-duration opioids when they've never been designed to do that. There's no evidence that their affective. There's extreme evidence of harms and deaths when he was them Brandeis professor, Dr Andrew Kalat knee is one of the country's most recognized addiction specialist and has been an expert witness in litigation against big pharma, including Purdue the maker of Oxycontin. He has been trying to get the FDA label change since two thousand eleven to make clear opioids are not for everyone. These are essential medicines for easing suffering at the end of life, and when used for a couple of days after major

Ed Thompson Food And Drug Administration Executive Dr Andrew Kalat Purdue Pennsylvania Brandeis P M R S Professor Ten Billion Dollars Ten Million Dollars Billion Dollars Billion Dollar
"brandeis" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Sunday survivors placed flowers at an execution wall at the former Nazi German death camp. They also wore striped, scarves, that recalled their uniforms. Some with a red letter p that letter was the symbol the Germans used to Mark the prisoners as polls earlier in World War Two most prisoners were polish rounded up by the occupying German forces later, Nazis transformed Auschwitz into a mass killing cypher Jews and others. Correspondent Andrew Stewart reports that Soviet forces liberated Auschwitz on January twenty seventh nineteen forty five. It was January twenty eighth nineteen sixteen that Louis Brandeis was nominated by president Woodrow Wilson to the supreme court Brandeis became the court's first Jewish member. Breaking news and analysis at townhall dot com. A new book on NFL innovations is written by football writer. Doug, Farrar, the old adage necessity is the mother of invention is alive and well in the NFL. It's also the subject of the genius of desperation a book by football writer dot for our that serves as an encyclopedia of coaches and their innovations. I was always interested in football theory, and the way things were put together for our premises. How coaches were able to adapt to their own personnel while coming up with schemes that were strokes of genius until someone else built a better mousetrap the book gives you a true appreciation of the NFL's, best coaches and their ability to adapt. Create and revolutionized the league. I'm Dave berry in rainy Orlando Florida Sunday, the AFC the NFC for the.

NFL writer Louis Brandeis Brandeis Woodrow Wilson Andrew Stewart Orlando Florida Dave berry football Doug president Farrar
"brandeis" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Former prisoners marked the seventy four th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz on the international hol cost remembrance day Sunday survivors, placed flowers at an execution wall at the former Nazi German death camp. They also wore striped, scarves, that recalled their uniforms. Some with the red letter p that letter was the symbol the Germans used. Mark the prisoners as polls earlier in World War Two most prisoners were polish rounded up by the occupying German forces later, Nazis transformed Auschwitz into a mass killing cypher Jews and others. Correspondent Andrew Stewart or reports that Soviet forces liberated Auschwitz on January twenty seventh nineteen forty five. It was January twenty eighth nineteen sixteen that Louis Brandeis was nominated by president Woodrow Wilson to the supreme court Brandeis became the court's first Jewish member. Breaking news and analysis at townhall dot com. A new book on NFL innovations is written by football writer. Doug, Farrar, the old adage necessity is the mother of invention is alive and well in the NFL. It's also the subject of the genius of desperation a book by football writer. Doug for our that serves as an encyclopedia of coaches and their innovations. I was always interested in football theory, and the way things were put together for our premises. How coaches were able to adapt to their own personnel while coming up with schemes that were strokes of genius until someone else built a better now strap the book gives you a true appreciation of the NFL's best coaches and their ability to adapt. Create and revolutionized the league I'm Dave berry in rainy Orlando Florida Sunday, the AFC the NFC for the third straight year. Twenty six seven the final score was the annual Pro Bowl checkout. More of these stories by logging onto townhall dot com. I'm Rhonda rockstar. The nine.

NFL Doug football writer Louis Brandeis Brandeis Rhonda rockstar Woodrow Wilson Andrew Stewart Orlando Florida Dave berry president Farrar
You Believe Your Own Lies Very Quickly, How Dogs Understand Human Speech

Curiosity Daily

06:45 min | 2 years ago

You Believe Your Own Lies Very Quickly, How Dogs Understand Human Speech

"Today. You'll learn how to see the earth DHS the last meteor shower of the year. How researchers figured out dogs can understand what you tell them. And how long it takes before you believe your own lies? Spoiler alert hits not very long with satisfy some curiosity. You don't need to tell us go to see cool things in the sky. If you don't believe me, then let me tell you about the meteor shower is the last meteor shower of the year. And if you're listening to this in December, then you might want to Mark your calendar. I know I'm going to because I have not actually watched a single meteor shower this year to be fair. Neither have I. But we live in Chicago where there is a ton of light pollution. And so to see anything in the sky you need to drive a good long distance. Yes. Or shuttled to our listeners that don't live in a major city because you can see stars. Let us come. Visit. You can see the earth anywhere in the northern hemisphere. And that's because they emanate more or less from the north star or Polaris which sits right in line with the North Pole veers are visible for about a week. Once a year around the winter solstice when earth passes through the space to be left behind by comet eight p Tuttle in two thousand eighteen it's peak will be the night of Friday, December twenty first and into the wee hours of Saturday, December twenty second and those we hours are actually the best time to see it this year because the moon won't be up beer since peaks right around December's, full moon, and all that moonlight can interfere with its visibility. You definitely don't want to much light from the moon since you can expect to see five to ten meteors per hour around that time to finally Meteo shower look for the little Dipper. It should be pretty easy to find near the big Dipper. And the northstar is right at the end of its handle. Once you find that constellation look for co cab, the brightest star in the little dippers bowl. If it helps co. Has an orange hue? This is the rough origin points for the media shower, and you can see it with the naked eye. In fact, Benach healers made actually make it worse to see because they'll narrow your field division quite a bit. Probably not worth it. Now, try to keep realistic expectations says the aren't quite as spectacular as save perseus. But on two different occasions. The shower has had bursts of one hundred meteors in an hour, keep your fingers crossed and your I in the sky. And who knows what you'll see new research has looked into whether dogs can really understand what you're telling them. It's obvious that people can communicate with dogs. Sure. But if you tell a dog to go, fetch something, then is it the word their understanding or just the fact that you threw a ball and made a sound science may have the answer. So a recent study in frontiers in neuro science wanted to find out if dogs can understand words, the word understand can mean a lot of things. But in this context, the researchers decided that one fundamental cross species element of understanding was the discrimination of words from non words in. In other words, Doug should be able to differentiate familiar commands from nonsense. Sounds and for this study researchers used FM awry, brain scans, not just actions like fetching a ball. That's because if a dog understands the term, fetch they'll fetch a ball, but that makes us up understanding with obedience. This study on the other hand had dogs spend between two and six months learning. The names of two different toys. I the dog's owners just repeatedly named the toys they'd play fetch or tug of war with their dogs using say a toy called monkey and they'd say monkey multiple times while they were playing to reinforce the objects name in the dog's brain, then the dogs transitioned into actually denting. The objects owners would place monkey and say piggy several feet away from the dog and several feet apart. The owners would give commands like get monkey or where's piggy? And only give out treats if their dogs picked up the correct toy the FM are I scan was the final stage, and while dogs held still in the tubular machines. Their owners said familiar in gibberish words to the dogs. They used to. Mix of known words like monkey and piggy. And mechanically generated non words like strew in various combinations. It turned out that the dogs did reach the base criteria for understanding their brains reacted differently. To familiar words than they did two unknown words, interestingly, the dogs brains reacted differently than human brains, their brain activity spiked when they heard unfamiliar words, whereas human brain activity spikes, when we hear familiar words, we're not sure why dogs react differently to the unfamiliar or how deep their understanding of our words goes, but this study at least suggests that our speech is more than background chatter. Two dogs. They can distinguish one word from another before we get to our last story want to give a special shout out to some of her patrons. Thank you. Anthony, Highland Mark McCullough, many blaze Paulison brianna Webster and Kyle Hewitt for supporting our show on patriot. You will rock if you love our show and you want to help us out then visit patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com. All spelled out any amount helps and we try to give back by offering cool incentives. Like bonus episodes uncut interview. And fun conversations on discord one more time. That's patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com. According to a new study, it doesn't take long to believe you own lies. In fact, as reported by Futurity, we can start to believe the lies. We tell our actually the truth in his little as forty five minutes. It's makes me kind of paranoia not gonna lie where am I lying? You might be. No, you're definitely not. I am also paranoid about this. Are you? Yes. Well, Cody, this this banter is really engaging or is it it's definitely not. Or is it for this study out of Brandeis university? Researchers used electro encephalopathy or EEG to monitor the brain activity of younger and older adults while they answered questionnaires now in this study, the older participants was -nificant we more likely than the younger ones to accept the lie. They had told less than an hour earlier as the truth and by older group. I mean, the group was aged sixty to ninety two and the. A younger group was aged eighteen to twenty four according to the researchers the findings suggest that telling a falsehood scrambles older people's memory, so they have a harder time remembering what really happened in effect giving greater credence to the lie. This is a relatively small study with forty two participants on half of the questions on the questionnaire. They were given they were told by the researchers to lie and forty five minutes later, the respondents answered the same questionnaire. But we're told the answer all the questions. Truthfully. The central research question was did the lice stick and the data revealed that lying engaged the brain processes responsible for working memory, this finding suggests ally can embed itself in memory and come to feel Israel as the truth lying creates a new memory for something that didn't happen. So if you catch somebody in ally than remember, the person may actually think the lie happened, if it's not the first time, they've told it, I think the main takeaway from today's episode is that researchers need to study whether dogs can tell whether you're lying while watching a meteor shower, right?

DHS Chicago Northstar Tuttle Brandeis University Israel Doug Futurity Cody Mark Mccullough Brianna Webster Anthony Kyle Hewitt Forty Five Minutes Twenty Second Six Months
You Believe Your Own Lies Very Quickly, How Dogs Understand Human Speech

Curiosity Daily

06:45 min | 2 years ago

You Believe Your Own Lies Very Quickly, How Dogs Understand Human Speech

"Today. You'll learn how to see the earth DHS the last meteor shower of the year. How researchers figured out dogs can understand what you tell them. And how long it takes before you believe your own lies? Spoiler alert hits not very long with satisfy some curiosity. You don't need to tell us go to see cool things in the sky. If you don't believe me, then let me tell you about the meteor shower is the last meteor shower of the year. And if you're listening to this in December, then you might want to Mark your calendar. I know I'm going to because I have not actually watched a single meteor shower this year to be fair. Neither have I. But we live in Chicago where there is a ton of light pollution. And so to see anything in the sky you need to drive a good long distance. Yes. Or shuttled to our listeners that don't live in a major city because you can see stars. Let us come. Visit. You can see the earth anywhere in the northern hemisphere. And that's because they emanate more or less from the north star or Polaris which sits right in line with the North Pole veers are visible for about a week. Once a year around the winter solstice when earth passes through the space to be left behind by comet eight p Tuttle in two thousand eighteen it's peak will be the night of Friday, December twenty first and into the wee hours of Saturday, December twenty second and those we hours are actually the best time to see it this year because the moon won't be up beer since peaks right around December's, full moon, and all that moonlight can interfere with its visibility. You definitely don't want to much light from the moon since you can expect to see five to ten meteors per hour around that time to finally Meteo shower look for the little Dipper. It should be pretty easy to find near the big Dipper. And the northstar is right at the end of its handle. Once you find that constellation look for co cab, the brightest star in the little dippers bowl. If it helps co. Has an orange hue? This is the rough origin points for the media shower, and you can see it with the naked eye. In fact, Benach healers made actually make it worse to see because they'll narrow your field division quite a bit. Probably not worth it. Now, try to keep realistic expectations says the aren't quite as spectacular as save perseus. But on two different occasions. The shower has had bursts of one hundred meteors in an hour, keep your fingers crossed and your I in the sky. And who knows what you'll see new research has looked into whether dogs can really understand what you're telling them. It's obvious that people can communicate with dogs. Sure. But if you tell a dog to go, fetch something, then is it the word their understanding or just the fact that you threw a ball and made a sound science may have the answer. So a recent study in frontiers in neuro science wanted to find out if dogs can understand words, the word understand can mean a lot of things. But in this context, the researchers decided that one fundamental cross species element of understanding was the discrimination of words from non words in. In other words, Doug should be able to differentiate familiar commands from nonsense. Sounds and for this study researchers used FM awry, brain scans, not just actions like fetching a ball. That's because if a dog understands the term, fetch they'll fetch a ball, but that makes us up understanding with obedience. This study on the other hand had dogs spend between two and six months learning. The names of two different toys. I the dog's owners just repeatedly named the toys they'd play fetch or tug of war with their dogs using say a toy called monkey and they'd say monkey multiple times while they were playing to reinforce the objects name in the dog's brain, then the dogs transitioned into actually denting. The objects owners would place monkey and say piggy several feet away from the dog and several feet apart. The owners would give commands like get monkey or where's piggy? And only give out treats if their dogs picked up the correct toy the FM are I scan was the final stage, and while dogs held still in the tubular machines. Their owners said familiar in gibberish words to the dogs. They used to. Mix of known words like monkey and piggy. And mechanically generated non words like strew in various combinations. It turned out that the dogs did reach the base criteria for understanding their brains reacted differently. To familiar words than they did two unknown words, interestingly, the dogs brains reacted differently than human brains, their brain activity spiked when they heard unfamiliar words, whereas human brain activity spikes, when we hear familiar words, we're not sure why dogs react differently to the unfamiliar or how deep their understanding of our words goes, but this study at least suggests that our speech is more than background chatter. Two dogs. They can distinguish one word from another before we get to our last story want to give a special shout out to some of her patrons. Thank you. Anthony, Highland Mark McCullough, many blaze Paulison brianna Webster and Kyle Hewitt for supporting our show on patriot. You will rock if you love our show and you want to help us out then visit patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com. All spelled out any amount helps and we try to give back by offering cool incentives. Like bonus episodes uncut interview. And fun conversations on discord one more time. That's patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com. According to a new study, it doesn't take long to believe you own lies. In fact, as reported by Futurity, we can start to believe the lies. We tell our actually the truth in his little as forty five minutes. It's makes me kind of paranoia not gonna lie where am I lying? You might be. No, you're definitely not. I am also paranoid about this. Are you? Yes. Well, Cody, this this banter is really engaging or is it it's definitely not. Or is it for this study out of Brandeis university? Researchers used electro encephalopathy or EEG to monitor the brain activity of younger and older adults while they answered questionnaires now in this study, the older participants was -nificant we more likely than the younger ones to accept the lie. They had told less than an hour earlier as the truth and by older group. I mean, the group was aged sixty to ninety two and the. A younger group was aged eighteen to twenty four according to the researchers the findings suggest that telling a falsehood scrambles older people's memory, so they have a harder time remembering what really happened in effect giving greater credence to the lie. This is a relatively small study with forty two participants on half of the questions on the questionnaire. They were given they were told by the researchers to lie and forty five minutes later, the respondents answered the same questionnaire. But we're told the answer all the questions. Truthfully. The central research question was did the lice stick and the data revealed that lying engaged the brain processes responsible for working memory, this finding suggests ally can embed itself in memory and come to feel Israel as the truth lying creates a new memory for something that didn't happen. So if you catch somebody in ally than remember, the person may actually think the lie happened, if it's not the first time, they've told it, I think the main takeaway from today's episode is that researchers need to study whether dogs can tell whether you're lying while watching a meteor shower, right?

DHS Chicago Northstar Tuttle Brandeis University Israel Doug Futurity Cody Mark Mccullough Brianna Webster Anthony Kyle Hewitt Forty Five Minutes Twenty Second Six Months
Brett Cavanaugh, Supreme Court and Bloomberg discussed on

02:58 min | 3 years ago

Brett Cavanaugh, Supreme Court and Bloomberg discussed on

"Confirmation of Trump supreme court nominee Brett Cavanaugh could create the most conservative supreme court in generations with the court shifting to the right on abortion gay rights. Affirmative action federal regulatory, power and gun restrictions. But during his confirmation hearings Cavanaugh dodge question after question from democratic senators, even coining a term for his refusal to answer calling it nominee precedent. Here's an exchange between Democratic Senator Patrick layhee and Cavanaugh on presidential powers. Trump claims is an absolute right to pardon south. The question of self pardons is something I've never analyzed. It's a question. I have not written about it's a question. Therefore, that's a hypothetical question that I can't begin in. This context is a sitting judge and is a nominee. My guest is Neil Kinnock off a professor at Georgia State University college of law meal, what struck you about Kavanagh's answers. Well, he's being very careful. So the process proceeds with senators coming at him with sharp implements and him trying to apply anesthesia, and I'm afraid the result for for those of us watching feels like we've been lobotomize supreme court nominee seem to be getting more and more adept at not answering the top questions. So what's the point of four days of hearings kind of kabuki? Right. So the hope is among senators is the they will catch him and trip him up, and he'll say. Something substantive and his job is to try to run out the clock and not say anything that gives anybody reason to object to him. So he'll say precedents can't be overruled or much more importantly precedents. Cannot be revised revisited and rendered meaningless. Even though they're not formally overruled, and that's much more. The supreme court's usual way of doing business. I think precedent may have been the word most used by Cavanaugh and supreme court nominees use that all the time yet we saw judge Neil Gorsuch in its first year on the court provide the fifth vote to overturn a forty year old precedent and throw out mandatory union fees in public sector unions. So can we take a nominees saying he's going to follow precedent with more than a grain of salt? Of course, not when they say, they will follow precedent. They don't really mean they will follow it. They mean, they will respect it as precedent and Brown versus board of education. Overruled plus versus Ferguson a precedent and properly. So so not every president has to be adhered to. I can think of several that I would like to see overruled, but never should have been decided in the first place. They are still precedence. They entitled to some degree of respect. And that's all the more that cavenaugh means to indicate which is indicated

Brett Cavanaugh Supreme Court Bloomberg Professor University Of Louisville Brand Neil Kinnock Justin Reid Walker Brad Kavanagh Donald Trump President Trump Georgia State University Colle June Grosso Justice Kennedy Susanna Palmer Anthony Kennedy Justice Department Exxon Justice Breyer Neil Gorsuch
"brandeis" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Was wrong about that i mean baby steps i mean i didn't realize that jordan peterson was so influenced by louis brandeis in his thinking oh wait i'm sorry obviously he doesn't know who is brandeis i mean being able to admit you're wrong is a good quality yes that's true that is a very clean your room quality i appreciated that exchange i appreciated that he was able to follow logic there i don't appreciate that this guy has been given a mass platform and built a sort of content of a western civilizational expanding colt based all in no small part off of his history on nonsense conspiracy theories about politics and he can't even ground himself in the basic enough understanding to disaggregated things within constitutional law in the history of civil rights protections i'm not thrilled about that but i am glad that when it was laid out in front of him he was able to follow the logic i have no doubt that a similar experience will never be experienced with sam harris ever so credit where credit's due and maybe we all should host jordan peterson and just take him through some like very basic deductive reasoning on everything like i was real might be jordan my be peterson maybe so really if you mess if you don't say if you say somebody's pronoun wrong you realize you're not going to go to prison forever well i realized he put the law in front of me and i read it literally out loud yes i was wrong my b i'll just terrific selfhelp books now the you know what there will be no beef is that guy just wrote some like like in cleaner room follow your goals nothing wrong with that although people should read james hillman instead of him james hillman was great union psychotherapist and james hillman the nineteen ninety s wrote a book called we've had one hundred years of therapy in the world is getting worse and the argument was that therapy had become an agent of internalizing problems that were societally created and therefore even though he and he.

jordan peterson louis brandeis brandeis sam harris james hillman one hundred years
Trump to roll out plan to combat opioids with no clear funding plan

Seattle Kitchen

01:52 min | 3 years ago

Trump to roll out plan to combat opioids with no clear funding plan

"Wild wings i'm pam coulter president trump plans to unveil his plan to curb the nation's opioid epidemic tomorrow it includes the death penalty for drug dealers and a goal of cutting opioid prescriptions by a third in three years brandeis university dr andrew kalani says any plan needs funding what we didn't hear from the administration and perhaps we'll hear tomorrow is some specifics on how they intend to achieve these goals and what we still haven't had from the administration is a request for real funding to tackle this problem there's renewed concern that mr trump plans to get rid of russia's special counsel robert muller i'm tom foty the latest presidential tweets renewed speculation and apprehension about what mr trump might have in mind for an investigator investigating him retiring republican senator jeff flake don't go there we have confidence in muller i certainly do and and i think my colleagues do as well so i hope that the pushback is now to keep the president from going there and what if he does once he goes after muller then we'll take action i think that people see that as a massive red line senator flake was on cnn state of the union tom foty cbs news washington after winning another term as russia's president president vladimir putin told reporters he'd cooperate with britain's investigation into the poisoning of a former russian spy but denied any russian involvement russia does not have those weapons russia's most all its chemical weapons some believe president trump will pull out of the iran nuclear deal in may ploughshares fund president joseph kony says it would have to be salvaged by european nations in western europeans can find some way to mollify the president i think the president will leave the deal and this will be a disaster for american national security the family of a dog that died on.

Joseph Kony CNN Senator Tom Foty Robert Muller Dr Andrew Kalani Pam Coulter Russia Britain Vladimir Putin Washington President Trump Jeff Flake Investigator Mr Trump Special Counsel
"brandeis" Discussed on We The People

We The People

02:22 min | 4 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on We The People

"It was so meaningful to be able to share with you here in this space and if you're listening closely as i know you work as i could see your eyes and watch you hear you know what brandeis would say about whether the first amendment protects hate speech brandeis concluded in that beautiful opinion that the first amendment does protect the expression of the speech we hate and that the only speech that can be banned according to the first amendment is speech intended to unlikely to cause imminent violence only an emergency can justify repression said justice brandeis only when there is not time enough to deliberate when the threat is imminent and the violence is serious and the need is urgent and now that's when you can suppress speech but as long as there's time enough to liberate as long as there's time for people to develop their faculties a reason and for reason to prevail than the best response to evil councils is good ones to hate speech is counter speech and that's why the greatest threat to freedom isn't inert people and public discussion is a political duty so i am the privilege to leave this wonderful nonpartisan national constitutions center i have to give you the best arguments on all sides of any contested constitutional question but i sit here with confident serenity and tell you in terms of the text and history and original understanding and supreme court caselaw the answer to the question i posed to you is clear yes the first amendment does protect hate speech it forbids the suppression of the hateful councils and the speech we a bore unless that speech is intended to and likely to cause imminent violence and as long as there's time enough for deliberation the best response to evil councils good ones and that's why well i'm now i i think i have lead you up to the edge of the conclusion but now i'm going to ask for your vote and talking about leading the witness but i don't this is not a close questions so we'll see if you're persuaded by my riveting and entirely than persuasive presentation based on what you've heard so far are chittag ones.

brandeis first amendment
"brandeis" Discussed on We The People

We The People

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on We The People

"A friendship they were not they were things to be resisted unlimited and that's why brandeis insisted that the warrantless wiretapping not only would have been impermissible with a war without a warrant but it might even have been impermissible with a warrant unless the crime to be discovered was very serious and the intrusion on privacy was not severe and brand i said since wiretaps could reveal the privacy of people on both ends of the wires it was presumptively impermissible possibly even with a warrant so the supreme court in subsequent cases eventually embrace brandeis has insight but in a way that it undermined his central inside and way that will squarely confront the supreme court next term the corded in nineteen sixty seven said that although the fourth amendment protects people not places and forbids tr of searches committed without physical trespass in some circumstances the tests should be whether people have a subjective expectation of privacy that society is prepared to accept is reasonable the problem with that test is that as technologies become more ubiquitous our expectations of privacy or diminished in a way that correspondingly diminishes constitutional protections and then as series of subsequent cases in the 1970s the cord expounded on this metaphor by saying that when i surrendered data to a third party abandon all expectations of privacy in it so the court said in a case called miller that when i saw render my bank records to the bank lose privacy expectations in the bank is free to turn my records over to the government and in a central case called smith versus maryland the court said that when i used the telephone to call someone the a pen register which was the 1970s way that telephone numbers were recorded could be used to figure out which phone numbers i called and i are banned in expectations on the phone numbers i called because i surrendered them to the third party my phone company and therefore no warrant was required to seize the records of my phone calls.

brandeis miller smith maryland
"brandeis" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"brandeis" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I'm tom asked roof this is on point we're talking with the senate republican health care bill the gop push to pass it and the reality of what it would me you can join us this hour is this going to be our health care future who's got your back here on healthcare are you ready to ditch obamacare and trumpcare mcconnell care whatever you want to call it and go for single payer in the midst of all this debate over roy is with us from the foundation for research on equal opportunity conservative thinktank opinion entered forbes magazine stood altman is with us he worked on the affordable care act advised president obama on that professor of national health policy of brandeis university rebecca given joins us in a moment to look at single pero some americans missing it's time for that republicans having some trouble pulling their ranks together this was senator dean heller of nevada seeing the medicaid cuts a are just too much for him opposed it doesn't predict events on medicaid and the most vulnerable events the elderly struggling with mental health issues substanceabuse people with disabilities medicaid expansion probably have have the elicit were spin was on their will and opioid abuse governor test on that and the fact that we think we can pull the rug out from under that expansion those doors for that insurance is is the concern of mine republican us senator from nevada in a very tough spot they're in a situation where mitch mcconnell needs every boat he can get his hands on ron johnson republican of wisconsin saying why so fast we can't get this done this week carry was yesterday on nbc's meet the press.

wisconsin opioid abuse brandeis president forbes magazine trumpcare mcconnell obamacare gop senate nbc roy ron johnson mitch mcconnell nevada senator medicaid senator dean heller professor obama altman