35 Burst results for "Brain Cancer"

The Wanted's Tom Parker diagnosed with 'terminal' brain cancer

Fred + Angi On Demand

00:24 sec | Last week

The Wanted's Tom Parker diagnosed with 'terminal' brain cancer

"Starting with some sad news wanted Tom Parker revealed he has terminal brain cancer the thirty two zero. Yeah. He's so sad the thirty two year old was diagnosed with stage for globalist Doma six weeks ago and is currently undergoing radiation and chemo he said he's going to fight the cancer all the way but it's looking like he has a long road and my heart breaks for he and his wife who is currently pregnant with the couple's second

Tom Parker Brain Cancer
The Wanted's Tom Parker diagnosed with brain tumor

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:38 sec | Last week

The Wanted's Tom Parker diagnosed with brain tumor

"Of a British boy band, revealing that he has terminal brain cancer. Me Tom Parker and wanted hit number three on the charts in 2012 with this song. He's now 32 when going public with his recent diagnosis of a grade for glioblastoma, which is an aggressive brain tumor. Parker says he knew something wasn't right. But he didn't expect it to be. This released a statement on Instagram saying he and his wife were absolutely devastated. But I'm going to fight this all the way markers now undergoing radiation and chemotherapy. His wife is due in about a month with a couple second child. Vicki, More K Next. 10 70 news radio.

Tom Parker Brain Cancer Glioblastoma Vicki Instagram
The Wanted's Tom Parker diagnosed with brain tumor

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:38 sec | Last week

The Wanted's Tom Parker diagnosed with brain tumor

"Singer of a British boy band revealing that he has terminal brain cancer. Tom Tom Parker Parker in in the the wanted wanted his his number number three three on on the the charts charts in in 2012 2012 with with this this song. song. He's He's now now 32 32 when when going going public public with with his his recent recent diagnosis diagnosis of of a a Grade Grade four four glioblastoma, glioblastoma, which which is is an aggressive brain tumor. Parker says he knew something wasn't right. But he didn't expect it to be. This released a statement on Instagram saying he and his wife were absolutely devastated. But I'm going to fight this all the way markers now undergoing radiation and chemotherapy. His wife is due in about a month with a couple second child. Vicki, More K Next. 10 70 news radio.

Tom Tom Parker Parker Brain Cancer Glioblastoma Vicki Instagram
The Wanted's Tom Parker diagnosed with brain tumor

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:38 sec | Last week

The Wanted's Tom Parker diagnosed with brain tumor

"Singer of a British boy band revealing that he has terminal brain cancer. Tom Tom Parker Parker in in the the wanted wanted his his number number three three on on the the charts charts in in 2012 2012 with with this this song. song. He's He's now now 32 32 when when going going public public with with his his recent recent diagnosis diagnosis of of a a Grade Grade four four glioblastoma, glioblastoma, which which is is an aggressive brain tumor. Parker says he knew something wasn't right. But he didn't expect it to be. This released a statement on Instagram saying he and his wife were absolutely devastated. But I'm going to fight this all the way markers now undergoing radiation and chemotherapy. His wife is due in about a month with a couple second child. Vicki, More K Next. 10 70 news radio.

Tom Tom Parker Parker Brain Cancer Glioblastoma Vicki Instagram
The Wanted singer Tom Parker reveals he has inoperable brain tumor

The KFBK Morning News

00:31 sec | Last week

The Wanted singer Tom Parker reveals he has inoperable brain tumor

"That's from the band called Wanted In their lead singer, A fellow named Tom Parker 32 years old has been diagnosed with inoperable brain tumor. This's very sad news. They posted this on instagram. The family said. They're going to fight this all the way. Parker and his wife are expecting their second child. He's just 32 that for brain cancer is a very young age very well Last certainly wish him well to treatment. No doubt is going to be undergoing that soon. All right, let's get outside and

Tom Parker Brain Cancer
Washington DC - CBS News transportation safety analyst Mark Rosenker dies at 73 in Alexandria

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

Washington DC - CBS News transportation safety analyst Mark Rosenker dies at 73 in Alexandria

"P. News, a former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, has died. Mark Rosenker, who chaired the country's accident investigation agency, from 2005, to 2009, under President George W. Bush, was 73 Rosenker had brain cancer and died yesterday in Alexandria. He also served as vice chairman of the Washington Metro Rail Safety Commission later is a transportation consultant and safety analyst, including regular contributions to CBS

Chairman Of The National Trans Washington Metro Rail Safety C Vice Chairman Mark Rosenker President George W. Bush Brain Cancer Alexandria CBS Analyst P. News Consultant
Joe Biden officially becomes the Democratic nominee for president

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Joe Biden officially becomes the Democratic nominee for president

"Joe Biden is the 2020 presidential nominee Tuesday during an aggressive night at the Democratic National Convention. Rupert aggressive and the criticism of President Trump with Tuesday's theme being leadership matters. Former President Bill Clinton and former secretaries of state Colin Powell and John Kerry, all delivering sharp accusations of a failed leadership of President Trump and especially foreign policy and the Koven 19 response, then emotion as the story of the tragic losses of Joe Biden's first wife and baby daughter in a car crash. And a son, Bo from brain cancer. Joe Biden, saying Like he was able to make a broken family whole. Joe Biden can't make a broken country hole at the Democratic National

Joe Biden Donald Trump President Trump Bill Clinton Colin Powell Rupert Brain Cancer John Kerry BO
Biden VP Pick: Kamala Harris to Join Biden in Delaware

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

02:10 min | 2 months ago

Biden VP Pick: Kamala Harris to Join Biden in Delaware

"The campaign trail today with his newly announced running mates. He in California Senator Kamala Harris, appearing together in Biden's home state of Delaware, ahead of Ah, virtual fundraiser tonight, The Biden campaign has released a video of what you might call their political proposal moment. First of all is the answer. Yes. The answer's work. I am ready to do this with you for you. I just I'm just deeply honored and very excited. Never, too were once rivals, of course, and Harris made headlines with some sharp criticism of Biden during the Democratic primaries. But she later became a vocal supporter of the former vice president correspondent are Let Sainz explains something else that apparently help bring the two together. Harris shared a special relationship with job Eden's son, Beau Biden. They both served alongside each other is as attorneys general in their home states and developed a close relationship from that. Biden, in making his announcement, actually noted the fact that he valued those opinions and that that was a factor that played into his decision making process. Beau Biden died of brain cancer five years ago at age 46. Ah Harris makes history is the first African American woman and the first American of Indian descent to be nominated on a major party's presidential ticket. Pundits say her mixed race heritage has allowed her to connect with multiple audiences. Harris was elected to the U. S Senate in 2016 after serving his California's attorney general, and Delaware Senator Chris Kun says he was impressed with her when first running for his Senate says she was compelling. She was engaging. She's funny, and she's warm. She is capable of being both a very tough questioner in the Judiciary Committee, going after Attorney general Bar or Attorney general sessions on then she's equally capable of being warm and engaging, an upbeat She's someone who will be terrific to campaign with and to govern with. Harris ran for the Democratic nomination herself but left the race before voting began as she struggled to raise money. Perhaps the most notable moment of her campaign was when she criticized Biden during a debate for his past opposition to school busing. Biden Harris expected to make remarks

Beau Biden Senator Kamala Harris Ah Harris Delaware Attorney California Senator Chris Kun Brain Cancer Judiciary Committee Senate General Bar Vice President U. S Senate Sainz Eden
Origin Stories: Joe Coulombes Quirky Legacy at Trader Joes

Business Wars Daily

03:18 min | 2 months ago

Origin Stories: Joe Coulombes Quirky Legacy at Trader Joes

"From wondering I'm David. Brown and this is business wars daily on this Monday August third. During the pandemic, the news has been rushing by faster than a bullet train. It's easy to get caught up in the daily news overlook the big picture. So this week we're taking a little step back in looking at the origin stories of some of America's most iconic companies I in our series trader. Joe's it's founder Joe Colom died in. March, at the age of eighty nine trader Joe's of course, is the neighborhood grocery chain that transformed millions of people, shoppers, and employees alike into cult-like fans. The impact of his markets has been so significant that the Washington Post called Coloma cultural icon there's no trader Joe's near You well, let me. Step back for just a second and tell you the story. It was nineteen, sixty, seven Joe Coolum. Thirty seven had built a chain of eighteen convenience stores in California when gigantic seven eleven came along and he realized he couldn't compete according to the New York Times. The had to find something else to do one day. Kulam read that sixty percent of young people who were qualified to go to college. We're going thank you GI bill. He also read that Boeing was building a plane, the seven, thirty seven that would give more people the opportunity to travel overseas the assumed more international travel would make Americans pallets more adventurous New York Times reported. The idea for trader Joe's a store with fresh produce, sophisticated flavors and good wine affordable prices was born he opened the first one in Pasadena California that year famously Kulon conceived of Trader Joe's is a store for the quote over educated and underpaid his stores would serve budding foodies who wanted something more than they could get it typical supermarkets but who couldn't pay a fortune for it and something? More was what he built quirky stores with. South. Seas flair shelves stocked with Exotic Cheeses and gourmet foods from other countries and eventually natural foods and organic produce. He also trained cashiers to be both friendly and authentic a tradition that continues. So strongly today that following colognes death one woman tweeted name one mental health professional that could teach me as much about emotional intimacy as a trader. Joe's cashier. The hawaiian-shirted workers often seem so unusually pleasant that people ask why they seem so happy. It isn't simply good customer service training that accounts for the smile. It's no Colom also believed in treating employees well, today according to the trader Joe's claims that its workers are among the industry's best compensated employees they receive annual raises ranging from seven to ten percent health insurance starts on. Day One more than one person tweeted that trader Joe's covered health crises that other companies would likely not such as the woman who claimed that her colleague faced a two million dollar bill for brain cancer treatments. But with trader, Joe's health insurance he paid nothing as the A. P. noted, many workers have stayed with trader Joe's for decades in an industry marked by high turnover. From colognes ethics good food at affordable prices came hundreds of store brand items like Granola in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two unheard of cookie butter and frozen Mac and cheese

Trader Joe Joe Colom Joe Coolum New York Times California Kulam Brown David Brain Cancer Washington Post America Founder Coloma MAC Pasadena Boeing A. P.
Becoming a home carer during a pandemic

VNN Focus

08:20 min | 3 months ago

Becoming a home carer during a pandemic

"3.3 million home health workers such as nurses, therapists and personal care AIDS provide a range of medical and daily living services to nearly 12 million people around the US, However, the covert pandemic is putting pressure on this workforce already in crisis due to shortages. Especially in some states that are experiencing an increase in covert cases. Alexandra Harrell is the founder of an organization called Patty and Ricky. And she offers tips on how family members can assist their loved ones during their new role as a caregiver during the pandemic really hard time for individuals with disabilities or chronic health conditions, illnesses they're scared that people home health care is coming to their homes. Because they're scared to Kobe and many family members have decided to have their family members were just abilities, chronic condition their elderly parents live with that. So there's a lot of new caregivers right now. And those, of course, are being experienced. You know the new caregivers that they're not used to this, I guess because they're they're usually out at work or wherever they go every day. And so now they're at home with the person who needs to care right? Because they're new to the caregiving, which is a new role for them can be really challenging at first. You know they used to having maybe they're assisted living facility, which many have been throughout the country, so it's just been a really hard time, but I do have some chips. Kind of support papers up. I was a kid, my mom Patty, Patty, Patty, with my mom. Okay? And he was really fashionable. Really Cool on me. What? Brain cancer. When I was 19 years old. It was just me and her and I came home from college and so caretaker. And it wasn't during a pandemic so he can be difficult. But it's not. You know, it was definitely a challenging time. But you know, I have some things that really supported me. You know terms of looking at our home environment, for instance, you know the home environment accessible of safe. Always you could. You know with that, with grant bars and anti slip mats in the shower, shower chairs, really thinking about how can you take her home and they get more accessible for your family members? So that was something that was really helpful to me. And I just made my mom being ableto navigate house in ways that She wouldn't have been able to otherwise so number one looking at your environment and you know, making a structure that had time and schedules for medication and Well in terms of medication. It's really important you set those alarms on the phones have printed a person's never lists. Doctor's phone numbers just like thinking ahead. A worst case scenario is I'm usually a really optimistic but I just believe that you prepare. It won't happen. Right way ready to go your cellphone Chargers medication extra set of clothes. You know, just so you know, I believe I have packed. We wouldn't have to go. Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, that was really helpful. That had to be you know, 19 years old. Two dozen have to do that alone. That had to be I don't know the word daunting does it justice and I'd just be incredible. No, I was, um You know, my mom is such an incredible mama raised me to be able to take care earn raised me to be okay. You don't know her since she passed away when I was 20 But it was it was really challenging. But I didn't know it was important to you that during that such a hard time that me and my mom Joy way, laughed. A lot had been so sure to watch television and crafts or whatever, you know, walk around the block. Get some fresh air. It was back, and it was definitely really challenging. Um and I wish my mom wasn't 50 years old when she was nine, but I had to do it way early. Um, I'm really happy that I could give her Looks like it was actually a really positive end of life. So it was. It was really hard, but I need my company Toddy and Ricky after her. She was such a cool woman when she was here. I just wanted to bring together adaptive clothing. Dot com. We have some really great adaptive clothing and accessories and adoptive shoes that make make dressing dressing dressing easier easier easier it it it having having having adaptive adaptive adaptive clothing clothing clothing can can can really really really support support support dressing dressing dressing and and and undressing undressing undressing in in in it. it. it. Can Can provide provide independence independence for for people people with with disabilities. disabilities. And those that are aging on a doctor's holding something I wish I had what I was cured giving for my mom. Yeah, Yeah. Now you also You also had a cousin who was unable to care for themselves. What was that experience like? Yes. So in the company that I have Patti and lucky he was my cousin. Okay? And he was born unable to walk or talk, and he really showed me. What is with you here? What's his vehicle to get what he needed to go but could also be a fashion accessory, and he really showed me that we can communicate so much. It doesn't have to necessarily Peter, our voice. It could be drugs, eyes compete your communication but but especially especially pressed pressed that that would would communicate communicate things things that that he he needed needed a a working working or or different different expression expression that that he he would would point point to to a a different different button button that that would would his his parents parents sent sent him him to to use use to to communicate communicate it. Just my my friendship with my cousin Ricky really formed. How see disability today just as humans. We all have different years and whether physical, emotional mental we all have different going on. You know, that was really important to me When I started. Patty and Ricky is really have products for everyone and So people that doesn't have to be a medical supply store. You know, it can really be a fashion store and our clothing accessories. We saw him Paddy rookie dotcom are really Universally designed so that it's just sharper designed with Velcro and Matt strategic zippers for women, men, kids, we just make clothing is your front and you would never know. It's been adoptive. Yeah. I really owe a lot of my work. I really have no idea what I'm just like You have any HD? Anxiety. You know my whole anxiety. But it's you know, it's really a part of many things of who I am. And you know I don't want you. I talk Teo, the Alzheimer's Foundation of America, and they were saying some of the same things you are, but especially with Alzheimer's. It is Wow, it is so different. It's such a con founding disease that those family members are really, really struggling right now. You know, too for that, Do you deal with that as well? Oh, yes, we have. We have don't clothing really easy. Holding a lot of customers during this time, a lot of care givers it No, I think it's really important to remember the Cherokee ever burn is a real thing and show your words have to be taking care of themselves, not guilty and having to order food. You're financially for shop for them a grocery store. Just different ways to utilize friend technology, Teo and for help if they need to make sure that you still care about taking care of themselves. Yeah, I think it's really huge. I back my mom definitely was ignored my own use. So I believe that you know, caregivers. Make sure to take that personal time. Careful, only is well taken care of herself. It's going to take care of someone else.

Patty Ricky United States Kobe TEO Alexandra Harrell Aids Brain Cancer Founder Patti Alzheimer Toddy Peter Alzheimer's Foundation Of Amer
Washington, DC - Former Arlington County board member dies after battle with brain cancer

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 6 months ago

Washington, DC - Former Arlington County board member dies after battle with brain cancer

"News former Arlington County Board member Erik Koch all has died after a battle with brain cancer Arlington now notes that got shots passing comes a month and a half after the initial word that he was hospitalized in ten days after his sudden resignation from the board gosh I was first elected to the board in November twenty seventeen after serving on the county's Planning Commission and transportation

Erik Koch Brain Cancer Planning Commission Arlington County Board
The Legacy of Joe Coulombe - The Founder of Trader Joe's

Business Wars Daily

04:01 min | 8 months ago

The Legacy of Joe Coulombe - The Founder of Trader Joe's

"You heard the sad news last week. The joke who had died at the age of eighty nine. Who that you say? We'll Cologne founded trader. Joe's The neighborhood. Grocery chain that Trans for millions of people shoppers and employees alike into cult-like fans the impact of his markets has been so significant that the Washington Post called Colom a cultural icon. There's no trader Joe's near you will let step back for just a second and I'll tell you the story. It was nineteen sixty seven joke loan than thirty seven years old had built a chain of eighteen convenience stores in California when gigantic seven eleven came along and he realized he couldn't compete according to the New York Times. He had to find something else to do or one day. Colom read that sixty percent of young people who qualified to go to college. Were going thank you? Gi Bill He also read that. Boeing was building a plane. The seven thirty seven. That would give more people the opportunity to travel overseas. He assumed more international travel would make Americans pallets more adventurous. The New York Times reported the idea for trader Joe's store with fresh produce sophisticated flavors and good wine at an affordable price was born. He opened the first one in Pasadena. California that year famously. Colom conceived of Trader Joe's store for the over educated and underpaid historic would serve budding foodies. Who wanted something more than they could get it a typical supermarket but who couldn't pay a fortune for it and something more was what he built. Quirky stores with a South Seas Flare shelves stocked with Exotic Cheeses and gourmet foods from other countries and eventually natural foods and organic produce. He also trained cashiers to be both friendly and authentic a tradition that continues so strongly today that following Coloma's death one woman tweeted name one mental health professional. That could teach me as much about emotional. Intimacy is a trader Joe's cashier the hawaiian-shirted workers often seem so unusually pleasant. That people ask. Why seem so happy? It isn't simply good. Customer Service training that accounts for the smile no Colom also believed in treating employees well today according to the trader. Joe's claims that its workers are among the industry's best compensated employees. They receive annual raises ranging from seven to ten percent. Health Insurance starts on day. One more than one person tweeted that trader. Joe's covered health crises that other companies would likely not such as the woman who claimed that her colleague faced a two million dollar bill for brain cancer treatments but with trader. Joe's health insurance. He paid nothing as the A. P. noted many workers have stayed with trader Joe's for decades in an industry marked by high turnover from Cologne Fox. Good food at affordable. Prices came hundreds of store brand items like Granola in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy two rather unheard of here in the states cookie butter frozen Mac and cheese also California wines unheard of prices such as the Charles Shaw wine still referred to as two buck chuck. Although today it costs a little more outside. California in Nineteen seventy-nine Colom Sole Trader Joe's to Aldi Nord German grocery chain. Not the same one that owns the Strip down. Budget PRICED AT SUPERMARKETS. Colom remained on a CEO Until Nineteen eighty-eight. The original of the company is still firmly intact today trader. Joe's boasts five hundred stores across the country in two thousand fourteen. The New York Times described the unique chain is equal parts gourmet shop discount warehouse and Tiki Trading Post. The company is hardly without its challenges. It faces a giant rival in whole foods owned by Amazon. All these which is owned by German firm. Audi sued a sort of second cousin to trader. Joe's owner Aldi. Nord is making a big push in America and reportedly beats trader. Joe's on price. Then there are complaints about the downsides of popularity especially given trader Joe's famously small stores in parking lots there are the long lines overcrowding running out a favorite items and too many choices

Trader Joe Colom California JOE The New York Times Washington Post Aldi South Seas Flare Audi Amazon Brain Cancer Boeing America Pasadena Aldi Nord German Coloma Cologne Fox CEO Charles Shaw
Watch the Democratic debate in South Carolina tonight, Democratic line up

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

07:13 min | 8 months ago

Watch the Democratic debate in South Carolina tonight, Democratic line up

"Again tonight the Democrats there in South Carolina South Carolina primaries coming up on Saturday then followed immediately by super Tuesday and so the candidates are all up there let me see who's going to be on stage tonight here's the full list we have Elizabeth Warren Joe Biden Bernie Sanders senator Amy Klobuchar from Minnesota Michael Bloomberg is going to be back let's see if he's prepared and all this time around Thomas Dyer whose another one that's kind of unprepared and getting really silly when his you too bad at all really sick of them yeah it's amazing he's he spent a lot of money as well not needs that spending Bloomberg money Bloomberg it's estimated has already spent a half a billion dollars in ads both prince both television radio and internets and mayor Pete's gonna be onstage as well so you have with a whole bunch of them out there we'll see see who the low the long knives obviously you're not gonna be out for Michael Bloomberg this time around he's proven that he's not going to be the candidate he's just an apt I think would be the way to put it to good for dead last debate was just terrible they'll be out for Bernie Sanders this time because Bernie is the front runner they're all gonna be going after Bernie watch that tonight problem is Bernie's not a fighter but Jesus ease a savvy politician I mean that's really all he's done all his life do you have a job until he was forty all these really done is yeah even from the public trough is now you don't congressman senator mayor so he's done he's just you know been a public servant his whole life didn't didn't Poland regular paycheck to lose forty years old unbelievable but he's going to be up there tonight nonetheless we've had to Bernie Sanders talking about who should be the candidate because member last time Bernie was making a good run of Hillary and it looked like at one point in fact he was going over taker and delegates and then the Democrats pulled this stuff with super delegates and all this stuff and all by the way well we found this these delegates over here they happen to be in the wrong room will bring them all they want to vote for Hillary okay and then wow we get found this carload of delegates over here and this busload here they were stuck up in Wisconsin you know they want to vote for Hillary that's right okay so here they pulled all this magic and basically stole the nomination away from Bernie well Bernie is just letting him know that he's paying attention this time around I guess and he feels that who's ever rides at the democratic convention with the most delegates should be the nominee this is Bernie Sanders Cardi one candidate comes out on top the state of the country you voted for that candidate all but by the way we don't think the candidate should be the nominee I think that would be a serious serious problem for the Democratic Party and I think it will wreck havoc all on that person's campaign what was your view Verney it'll ruin that Carson's campaign because they won't won't be the nominee anymore Pete mayor Pete from a south bend Indiana he's also up there running thirty seven years old I'd like to see he's out class but he is very very well first if you see every every word he said his B. is practiced every movement he makes has been run through focus groups he's very very I don't see a plastic up on stage but he certainly is smooth talker the whole bit but he's realizing as are the Democrats the Bernie Sanders is the candidate and if he comes out of super Tuesday with so many delegates he very well could be the candid unless of course the Democrats pull some crazy shenanigans but mayor Pete up there he realizes of Bernie Sanders is his nominee it's going to destroy the Democrats and so he sold up his hands and Hey guys over here you know I'm a viable candidate let's give a listen to cut after this is mayor Pete we have put together a campaign with has a different way of approaching politics that has drawn together people across ideological spectrum in in in different kinds of communities and stand the best chance not only defeating senator Sanders well if we can unify the party but of defeating president trump in the fall okay I don't think that last one's gonna happen but again he's kind of saying Hey if we put Bernie up there the boy we're all in trouble and then there's old Joe Katie green our ring in the inter webs I found a great piece of audio from Joe Biden told Joe Jo Jo Jo Jo Jo Jo is not sure what he's running for let's listen to Joe Biden South Carolina yesterday and I have a simple proposition here I'm here to ask you for your help right come from you don't get far less yes my name is Joe Biden I'm a democratic candidate for United States Senate look me over your legs he help out and now both of you have a bite give me a look though okay wait wait what what are you doing you run that bias against Jerry can I have a simple proposition here I'm here to ask you for your help right come from you don't get far less yes my name is Joe Biden I'm a democratic candidate for United States Senate look me over here like was he help out if not both together by give me a look though okay okay hold on he is a democratic candidate who's running for the United States Senate and if you don't like him that vote for the other Biden who put the replacement so did sound like he said you know sit down sit down Joe somebody get him some water let's maybe check as wires in the back to make sure that they're all firing properly argue I think he's lost a couple of cylinders there yeah I know he's not he's not firing fuller is easy it's not the no not the old politician used to be falling back on his lines who is running for the Senate folks Joe Biden's running for to be the democratic candidate for president okay now not finding sentenced in state Senate Joe you know used to be kind kind of funny that's actually kind of sad you know he's there so many times he'd be in Ohio we get confused call at Iowa and and I say it's sad because he was doing an interview a couple weeks ago and he mentioned how every morning he gets up and he says you know it should have been both it's running for president beau Biden was the son the son that tragically died of brain cancer he was the Attorney General of Delaware and Joe every morning thinks himself should have been a son running for president so maybe is doing in his honor but Joe I know you're probably gonna do well in South Carolina maybe up on the stage just clarify that you are running to be the Democrat candidate for president case people think you're still running for Senate I'm

South Carolina Amy Klobuchar Michael Bloomberg Thomas Dyer Elizabeth Warren Joe Biden Ber Senator Minnesota
"brain cancer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 8 months ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is sort of a or saying I can't imagine and the thing is we can all of us we can we can imagine all of these things it's just very uncomfortable to do it and it is also sort of a few tile exercise there's no amount of imagining that would prepare you in any way for it so I don't blame anyone for not wanting to imagine that because I wouldn't have either it started on a day in October yeah anyone who's been through something hard can recap all of their tragedies for you as if their listing their grocery list so here's mine October third I lost my second pregnancy it was eleven weeks and six days which is like you just feel as if there's a magical twelve week mark where you're past the first trimester and then nothing bad can happen and that's absolutely not true but I did have that feeling sitting there in the doctor's office thinking like if only had waited till tomorrow to come in then the baby would have been alive just this magical thinking and downstairs in the parking structure was my husband who was dying of brain cancer he and five days later my dad was dad and six weeks later my husband Aaron was dad and so it was this wave after wave after wave of loss and that marked the end of twenty fourteen for me I didn't know how to do you any of this I was completely new to all of it was the first time my dad had died the first time I lost a husband lost a pregnancy and I didn't know how to sit with my own discomfort and my own machine I wanted to be anywhere else norm agony shared her story on the Ted stage so since all of this last happened I've made it a career to talk about death and loss not just my own because it's pretty easy to recap but the losses.

brain cancer Aaron
Are Cell Phones the Cigarettes of the 21st Century?

The Ultimate Health Podcast

10:38 min | 8 months ago

Are Cell Phones the Cigarettes of the 21st Century?

"We go with Dr Joseph McCulloch Doctor mccalla. Welcome back to the podcast so great to chat with the again. Well it's great to be here Jesse. Yeah we got a lot to get into. I loved your New Book On. Ems and I love the title. Em assist perfect. My sister's responsible for that one love it. I'm sure people are gonNA love it as well as we jump in here. I think it's important to talk about how you first became aware of ems. I know for you. This has been something on your radar for about twenty years. Some curious how did you initially come in contact with them? And what was your initial reaction. Well because I've got a website that seeks to educate the public about health issues. I became aware of this a long time ago about two decades ago as you mentioned and it was pretty clear if you if you're serving the literature that this is an issue so I knew about it. I accepted that they were an issue but reluctantly chose to accept it. Fully embrace it and act upon it in a way that would protect me specifically largely because I fell prey to the deceptive campaigns by the wireless industry essentially replicated the patterns of the tobacco industry. They absolutely do work. They seek to create doubt and confusion. Which is a primary strategy and they certainly did my mind than they effectively by spinning off of many other ostensibly credible research studies. That suggested. There wasn't an issue. So pretty this doubt this lack of scientific certainty and unlike tobacco which has very clear and strong suggestions that. There's something going on here. I mean just common sense. Why would you inhale something? That's Y- smoke into your lungs. I mean it just doesn't make sense is not going to be an issue but wireless radiation. It doesn't have that at all in fact to other counters at our amazing Lee beneficial to us and that is incredibly inconvenient prize with all these tools easy access to the greatest innovation history of mankind. Which is the Internet. And it's invisible. You can't hear see it smell it so you're just never aware that you're being enveloped with these exposures with that. In the convenience aspect primarily I just shows to be remained ignorant and at ignorant but chose to embrace it in full and take measures to counteract it and I didn't really get motivated to get more serious about it until one of my mentors. Dr Klinghoffer confronted me with this. He's a clinician. For many years in sees a large number of people still in the trenches being patient some of the sickest patients in the world sees in Europe and in the US and one of his basic tenants as he refuses to see someone. Unless they're gonNA mitigate the M. F. Exposures because he knows that there's not going to get better so that to me was a giant clue and I got serious about in once I started studying it and it took me three years to compile information. This book became real obvious that this was indeed. A real threat in that the source of the confusion was the wireless industry and they're far more sophisticated than tobacco industry. Everyone knows how effective they were. I mean Jay's we had every federal regulatory agency telling us in warning of the dangers of cigarette smoking yet they still persisted for thirty years before we finally got the black box warnings and telling people very clearly authoritatively that these are dangerous and I think everyone listening most likely can remember when the four five. Ceo's of all the major tobacco industries testifying before Congress saying one that cigarettes were not addictive and to to the best of their knowledge did not cause cancer. They were lying through their teeth. It took that long and they still lied. But finally attorney generals were able to correct that in impose tens of billions of dollars in sanctions against them. And we're going to head towards a similar result with the wireless intrigued but it's going to probably take another twenty thirty forty years. I mean because the evidence is so clear and compelling once you objectively review it and before we get deep into the nitty gritty here. I think it's important. Were on the same page and to get there. Can you explain exactly what? Ems are sure mfs is an acronym is your electromagnetic fields and describes the entire range spectrum. Which can be anywhere from a fraction of a cycle per second which is called hurts too many billions of or even hundreds of thousands of billions of cycles. Per Second. Not all you must are dangerous. We've been exposed to EMS since air entire human biological history and example of those would be sunlight. Sunlight isn't enough broadly. They're broken down into two different categories. I O nizing radiation in which there is some from sunlight. Ultraviolet radiation was gives us our son Tannin. Vitamin D is actually ionizing radiation. That's when you get too much you'll get a thermal burn as dangerous. You don't WanNa get excessive something like that but obviously some as important to stay healthy. I don't think any rational human being other than a dermatologist. Which hard to classifies rational most of the time would disagree with that and we've had relatively low exposures. I mean they're earth actually emits certain very low level. Emf's Shuman Resin Sake. Seventy eight hurts or so but this is very low level but the exposures that we're most concerned about our manmade ones which didn't really exist before the late eighteen eighties or so electrical fields radiofrequency feels these were not around the planet but they started becoming more prominent even though they were around for four years at the end of World War. One they were still pretty low and if you compare the levels of a typical major exposure we're concerned with which radio frequencies which is about two to five Gigahertz Gigahertz as a billion cycles per second those are the frequency that your microwave oven runs on and your cellphone. They're almost identical frequencies. The industry uses heat thermal damage as a measure of the safety. Because it's the same for microwave. So their thought is that if it's not heating your tissue like a microwave than can't possibly cause biological damage will go back to that later. There's this broad spectrum of ems the end of world will want certain level even though ems. Were around be as we're ROTHROCK FORTY YEARS? It was still relatively low out century later. Nineteen or twenty twenty. We are literally at a billion billion times higher exposure than we were a hundred years ago. That's ten to the fifteenth. So it's hard to imagine that an increase in that type of magnitude of exposure wouldn't have some biological impact so today for example getting into the different man media mass. There's four different types. One being radio frequencies than we got magnetic fields electric fields and dirty electricity. Well Yeah. Those are the primary mimic exposures note. Nature does create radio frequencies to I mean they exist in stars amid him. I think you'll see there are out there but the really really low exposures if you were to measure them they be. I mean it almost immeasurable by most commercial equipment so the issue is not only the frequency but the amount of intensity of exposure them out of power. That's being broadcast into your tissue right. We're going to be looking at the Manmade Weinstein how we can lessen or totally eliminate the impact on the human body. You talked about the SARS and you talked about the effect of this radiation causing heat on the tissue so first of all I just want to get into the FCC here. 'cause they're the ones that are creating these guidelines and the guidelines they're creating have to do with heating tissue so let's go a bit deeper into this and talk about SARS and in the measurement that we're using here and how that works will SARS is another acronym again stands for a specific absorption. I forget the IRS Stanford but essentially it's a term used to describe how much heat is generated when you're exposed to electronic device and it's not unreasonable because it is. I says microwave transmitter. So it will vibrate your tissues as certain frequency and create. He'd and he'd can clearly 'cause biologic damage and it can be an indirect indicator of the amount of danger. That's there but by no means a direct because we know now very clearly and there's literally hundreds if not thousands of studies have proved conclusively that is not the heating damage is what we call the non thermal effects and for the longest time it. We really confused me. No one really knew or understood. What the biologic mechanism was for these. Non Thermal Effects. We just knew. That's what causes damage. We knew it was heating was very very clear was not heating the tissue and if you go abide by these standards FCC I think just adopted him from another professional agency is like International Electrical Standards Agency that they took that from and they've got these models based on but even using this flawed model they use this model that is called Sam which was patterned after a six foot. Two or four military guy was weighed about two hundred thirty pounds sale very large head and it totally different characteristics than a child. They're measuring SAR based on that model. So it's flawed and they're not measure for children also it's slugged begin with but even using that model. It's still an indirect indication because it will give you an indication of the amount of power that's being generated by that devise. But you cannot you simply cannot use. Sars is indication of the safety of your phone because it isn't other than you maybe can compare models and will lower star rating. Might be a little safer but you still need the shield yourself because exposure this will clearly increase your risk of biological damage in the most common would be cancer but you know what I call cell phones to cigarettes of the twentieth century for good reason because there's so many similarities. Not only did they wireless industry pattern their tactics after tobacco but they also in many ways are almost identical with the mechanism of the Holocaust. Har- They do not hurt you. After one exposure or exposure for a week a month or maybe even a decade it takes these is a long term chronic exposure. Where ultimately you'll succumb to the biologic damage. So this is a new experiment. Most people listening to this if not been exposed to their cell phone for more than two decades. I mean there are some but there's like no one more than three decades and debt still maybe under the window a word required exposures going to occur to encounter these side effects and you know people can smoke for four or five decades and still not have cancer now. They make succumb to other reasons. Like my mom who's longtime smoker and was confusing to see by the tobacco industry and she ultimately wound up dying from complications from COPD or emphysema. So you don't necessarily have to die directly from cancer but there's a lot of people coming down with brain cancer as and even prominent celebrities. We have two senators Ted Kennedy and John McCain who both died from brain cancer secondary to cell phone

Sars Cancer Brain Cancer Dr Joseph Mcculloch Jesse Europe United States Dr Klinghoffer Doctor Mccalla LEE Copd Congress Ted Kennedy International Electrical Stand FCC Attorney Shuman JAY
Hall of Fame DE Doleman dies at age 58

Sports To The Max with Mike Max

00:23 sec | 9 months ago

Hall of Fame DE Doleman dies at age 58

"But it looking back on a quarterback who played in the Superbowl but also Chriss excuse me riches thoughts on the passing of Chris Doleman a sad news today the Chris Doleman passing away at the age of fifty eight after a battle with brain cancer a tragic loss there and we mourn along with the Minnesota Vikings family of course rich playing with Chris dormant with the Vikings in the early

Chriss Chris Doleman Brain Cancer Vikings Minnesota Vikings
HOF defensive end Doleman dies at age 58

Steve Cochran

00:08 sec | 9 months ago

HOF defensive end Doleman dies at age 58

"All the defensive end Chris Doleman best known for his time with the Vikings has passed away Toma battling brain cancer passed away yesterday at the age of

Chris Doleman Vikings Toma Brain Cancer
Chris Doleman, NFL Hall of Famer, dies at 58

The WCCO Morning News with Dave Lee

00:41 sec | 9 months ago

Chris Doleman, NFL Hall of Famer, dies at 58

"The Minnesota Vikings are mourning the loss of hall of Famer Chris Doleman who died at the age of fifty eight following a battle with brain cancer first the woman spent fifteen seasons in the NFL included ten with the Minnesota Vikings he was elected to the pro football hall of fame in twenty twelve to my daughter and son Evan in Taylor Dorman I like to tell the love you very much and I did everything for you I worked as hard as I could to be your hero to be that person that you looked up to try to live my life in a way that you would think his arm dolman fifth all time on the NFL's career sacks with that miss just four games throughout his

Minnesota Vikings Chris Doleman Brain Cancer NFL Evan Taylor Dorman Football
"Mummy Bandit" who robbed Newport Beach bank sentenced to 19 years

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:47 sec | 9 months ago

"Mummy Bandit" who robbed Newport Beach bank sentenced to 19 years

"A man known as the mummy bandy gets nineteen years in prison almost a decade after being convicted of robbing a bank in Newport beach I'm a Taurus was convicted in twenty ten on five counts of second degree robbery the count of of possession possession of of a a firearm firearm by by a a felon felon all all which which are are felonies felonies jurors jurors also also found found true true sentencing sentencing enhancement enhancement for for the the personal personal use use of of a a firearm firearm Taurus Taurus faced faced a a life life sentence sentence in prison for previous conviction in a string of bank robberies in the early nineties but the judge struck the prior conviction so Taurus could avoid a life sentence he lost a bid to get the medical records of his trial attorney who died of brain cancer five months before his conviction he argued that those records would be needed to determine if it's attorneys disease affected her representation Taurus got the nickname Mumby banded due to the way he covered his face with a white cloth during his

Newport Beach Robbery Trial Attorney Brain Cancer
"brain cancer" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"I'm Nora mcenery. And this is terrible. Thanks for asking. Show of hands who has been to cognitive behavioral therapy. My hand just went up if you have not gone. I mean, I've really loved to have loved it. And one of the things there's also by the way, lots of different kinds of therapy. This is just one option, but one of the things your therapist may mention or may have mentioned is both and thinking that's both slash and thinking it's something that is kind of hard to practice because it does mean that two things can be true at once and that's hard. Because when you're mad at someone you want the whole world to agree that they are garbage. When the truth is that they are garbage to you. And also probably pretty decent to other people. That's just a casual example from my own life and therapy, not name names. Life is constant exercise in both and thinking, and if the concept had been introduced to me just a little earlier like a decade or two I would have been able to save a lot of heartache. I was in advertently practicing both and thinking for years starting with when my husband Aaron was diagnosed with brain cancer. Before that. I thought things were either good or bad that I was either good or bad that life was basically just a series of. Yes. Or no questions. No, multiple choice. No essays, which is a shame because I can tell you right now in five hundred to one thousand words, single-spaced normal margins with footnotes. I rock essay question when my husband Aaron got sick with brain cancer. Life was hard and beautiful cancer wasn't our entire life. It was just a part of our life and between the chemo and the brain surgeries and the radiation. We had a really fun life. Whole just mixed together. I really truly I looked forward to going to the hospital with Aaron when he would stay the night because consistently by the way, call at the hotel like, oh, God, we gotta get gotta get to the hotel tonight. I mean, not because it was like a very well appointed space blankets where the same same. You know, facial soap, quote, unquote that would strip your skin of all moisture seem awful lightning. But anywhere, I went with him was fun. Even if he was getting an IV of poison to kill his brain cancer. One night we were at home at our house, and we were in our room, and he hit me in the arm. Pretty like a wack like boop doodle? What that hurt and he looked at me, and then looked at his arm, and we both realized his arm was moving on its own. A seizure was coming. That's we knew and he showed it. I'm going down. And I wrestled him onto the bed except I didn't fully get him on there. And then he felt like we toppled onto the ground. But I got his head like a champ. And when the seizure was over he was delirious and exhausted in like came back into his body and his eyes opened and he looked at me. And he said you fucking we claim. So hard. I almost threw up. He described me as a giraffe on roller skates. He was like, I weigh less than you. And you couldn't get me onto a bed that was you just had to push me onto it like well. Yeah. But you were pretty slippery. Anyways. I laughed. It was one of the most horrifying things I'd ever seen. And he still made me laugh. And later that night and cried in the shower. So he wouldn't hear me. This entire podcast is an exercise in both and thinking, our guests stories like my story or your story is never just sad or just terrible just grueling. I mean, they often are saddened terrible in grueling. But never just that there are silver linings and moments of levity. There are little lights in the darkness. And your happy times your best stories..

brain cancer Aaron Nora mcenery advertently
"brain cancer" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

"As I told you earlier so wouldn't have noticed that being a symptom. And my mom eight months before was diagnosed with brain cancer. So she had a brain tumor as well. So now, I'm taking I'm quarterbacking her care. So I've been responsible for my parents for the last sixteen years financially medically everything so she gets brain cancer. So now I have to be your Tom Brady. She doesn't even know anything. Like, I've I was in charge of every decision period. She just was like, okay. Do whatever you want like it's in your hands. So it's a massive massive position to be in. It's scary because you have to make decisions and it's life or death. And so I was really stressed. And I thought what I was feeling was stress. So as the months progressed kind of stress we talking about so you get jittery like your arms your body. Feels like just I was having a lot of headaches. So I was on said, I was hosting a news, and I had my radio show on Sirius. And I'd started slurring my speech and reading prompt or all of a sudden became. Hard. Yeah. Like vision issues, and I mean, I was like one take Queen. And now all of a sudden was like oh gosh. Hold on Rupa. The like, I couldn't get the words out. Sometimes. No, no. No. No. No. No. So this is what I would do. I'd be like guy. Sorry. It's my stupid brain tumor. Let me do that again. So I'm on set having these issues headaches. I was so exhausted was getting this ear pain. So my mom got diagnosed in September by January. I'm having this awful ear pain. So I thought I had an ear infection. So busy with my mom just disregarded it by February. So went away and then February comes back, and I was like, oh, maybe my body healed itself. And now it's back. I'm finally going to go to the doctor, but wait a minute. Weren't you anytime going to a doctor for a checkup? Now, maybe blue work who has I'm I contract in a way. I want to go to the doctor. At least twice a year and give shed worked everybody should. And now, I'm getting a colonoscopy. They just lowered the age to forty five and I'm getting one I want go in my ass and see anything that doesn't look right. Rob go for all. I'm saying is like it's scary. And so okay. So I would have thought I wasn't doing physicals. Like not happening in just in time. But if something like major was wrong, I would go get a check like whatever. So is having headaches of slurring my speech. My vision was becoming problematic and then the year pain bothering my neck was going out all the time like what with your neck. It would just go out, and I'd have to get adjusted. It was crazy. So I finally scheduled an appointment to go get my ear infection an ear infection and thirty eight this is so weird. This makes no sense. Not a fear that occur in the world. You're like, okay. I want to go in. I went in had a new doctor, and it was my first time with him. And so I said I think I have an ear infection. He checks my areas like your ears are actually to clean, his Kenya layoff, and what else are you feeling? So as I started listening the symptoms like, well, I'm like getting headaches, and visions kind of going slurring my speech, and then I just want like the light. Went off in my head and go. Oh my God. I know you're gonna think I'm crazy. But I think I have a brain tumor like, my mom, and he's like, I don't think you're crazy. But I also don't like what you're saying. Let's get an MRI real the rule this out. So then in the meantime, my mom's tumor, they tell me is grow growing. So now, I was like, I must be crazy. I started hydrating onset..

brain cancer Tom Brady Kenya Rob sixteen years eight months
"brain cancer" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on WRVA

"Dot org where it's a quick little form send us their information. And we send cards on your behalf. And we are we love that. It's been very touching very special and things that people can do themselves. Of course, we urge to send cards yourself, and you know, give a reach out to military families in your community. You know, come by with a meal, even if you pick it up. You know, give a gift card or just a greeting card or a phone call. Let them know that you're thinking of them and appreciate what they're doing. Because it's it's hard. When a loved one is away. So. No, our point is to just do something, you know. Around and keep your eyes open to see where is a need finding out think of these wonderful people who are doing so much, you know, even during a Skype call for those that may not have a way to do that. Grandparent's servicemen and women. They may not do. This guy's thing. Or facetime. And you can step in there and say, hey streaming necessary. You know, cell phone, ipad, laptop, whatever, and we will schedule a calling and you can say Hello. And that's just a guest right there. And another thing there's a couple. Couple of personal stories would include Acton. Very stressful for. Adopted grandma's, sandy and her cancer battle. She has brain cancer right now. And we we're at the cancer center a.

facetime brain cancer Acton
"brain cancer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Brain cancer that usually affects children. Two year olds four year old six year olds. Who pass way too quickly? And their parents just watch. It is horrific. I'm happy to do my part. I'm happy to give what I can because cancer is evil cancer is horrific. And even a guy who I disagreed with an guy didn't like. No one deserves it. He leaves behind a family, it'd be head over to Indy star dot com. You can read a piece about him. I'm sure there's a place to leave. Your good words. The difference between disliking someone's work and the idea or the incivility of hoping something bad happens to them is the difference between where we can be. And where unfortunately, we are. Right. If I disagree was on, politically, I am not afraid to say. So I am not shy about it. If I see something that they have written her. They have said, and I can slowly dismantle it in the way that I do. I apologize to no one. Because I can live and die. If you will. My reputation could live and die my ethic. Limited by that. I've either done it. Right. I've done it wrong. And people can come back at me, and they have. I would wish nothing, but. His cancer cured..

Brain cancer four year Two year six year
"brain cancer" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Here what brings you to washington dc what is a famous cancer researcher doing in the studio right now well we're organizing an effort to make a decisive assault on brain cancer we brought together a diverse collection of stakeholders that can actually develop a strategic plan and implement such a plan and the nci has led this effort to convene this group so that we can make an impact on patients today with the great science that's emerging an nci being national cancer institute for listeners who might not know that's correct and the new nci director dr ned sharply was present the whole time this effort to combat brain cancer how how do these projects get targeted what is it about brain cancer right now that warrants a special effort well first and foremost it's been one of the most intractable cancers we see a lot of high profile individuals beau biden senator mccain ted kennedy and others that have been flicked by this disease it's universally fatal for forty plus years has been very little increase in the survival of patients afflicted with this disease what's the survival rate essentially fifteen to eighteen months and it extracts very significant toll because you know essentially at affects your brain and who you are and so there's a lot of neurological side effects that occur as a result of the tumor and in fact the treatment as well and so there's a lot of new science that's emerging the genes that are abnormal in the cancer how the immune system works and how it could be harnessed through drug manipulation to reawaken the immune system to attack the cancer certain viruses that are now engineered to be able to tack cancer cells but leaving tack normal cells so we wanted to try to harvard harvest some of these new scientific insights and apply them to inventive clinic trials testing these agents so that we can see who can make an impact on the streto disease looking across the specter of.

researcher assault brain cancer nci washington director dr ned beau biden senator mccain ted kennedy eighteen months
"brain cancer" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"Yes so with your diagnosis your brain cancer was that an advanced or aggressive form i mean were you terminal at one point like what what was the deal there i can't remember exactly but it was pretty inspiring what you did for yourself man i'll tell you man i got so lucky that it wasn't cancer as benign but it was brand around my left optic nerve has wrapped around the artery that goes into the brain started corroding the top of my spinal cord jeez and it was i mean they kind of operate on it and they have this medication that works for a lot of people and for me my body formed an immunity to the medication so they started increasing the doses so much that it started affecting my heart valves and my heart valve started making annoy so i've i truly felt screwed and that's when i kind of took things into my own hands and i wanted to get down to the root of what is a brain tumor it comes from some sort of imbalance i looked back house in my gut everything told me that this imbalance is coming from how i've eaten mine entire life and i've always always been on diets and i would even go years without eating fruit or vegetables because most of the diets i would do we're like kito genetic dinah shore schorr and and i'm talking about from a very young age up probably started dieting around age ten and i remember one of my first ones was atkins you know out either starve myself or i would only eat meat or out eat all this process stuff or then i would then i would get into binge eating and it would just be just nothing alive i wouldn't eat anything alive so i asked myself what do you mean by alive.

brain cancer heart valve
"brain cancer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"And then atheist later my sister had brain cancer she died he take no these both deaths called crushing bill so my parents and i want rich or you know working class people and comparing that to this i had one i've been fortunate i've been very lucky let a pretty healthy home we've done in the hospital for things like puzzle and removal i broke my ankle when i'm sixty playing football and i was in the hospital for months ironically fifty years later when i was in my sixty i going to get hit by a truck driving my bike shirley a big helpful let's say the same in the same hospital was when i was fifteen and broken ankle shifting to other things like a concussion and a couple of broken ribs but by contrast would that one month i was injured on a saturday evening at six o'clock i i was in chair for one year for one day the following monday i i was operated lot and i was home on tuesday i mean to me that's miraculous absolutely two months later found out i had the prostate cancer and to have an operation on i went into the hospital on friday and i was home saturday afternoon that's it apps of course we get caught up in talking about all the tremendous cost how much you know how much is worth going living well that's that's my point there's a disconnect between patients knowledge of what things cost and in talking to your doctor about that and there's also a completely you know this there's some hospitals are charging twenty thousand dollars for a procedure where another hospital ten miles away charging two thousand and so there's no there's no disclosure there's a truth in advertising as far as the cost of various procedures in that not even the sufficiency with use of the high cost technology mri is and that type of thing robot surge robotic surgery and that's of course we want we went to develop this but there are for the exact same procedure there's a very big gap between hospitals and so this is i.

brain cancer football twenty thousand dollars fifty years two months one month one year one day
"brain cancer" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"And i you you came to us indirectly on a roundabout way what happened was some or what a friend of yours called and told us they were raising money and gifts for a young woman a young girl uh she's fourteen is that right ellen record crane and she diagnosed with inoperable brain was a brain cancer or are recovering to murdering on wrapped around her bring its inoperable so weather cancerous or not doesn't matter it's inoperable and it's it's devastating news and so to make a long story short one cent an ipad to her and some gift cards that ended up in a woman at a woman's address the wrong address nicky and nicky this woman uh her boyfriend and she said tuck it and took the gift cards waste said we need to get a hold of this boyfriend this is unjust enrichment this is wrong this is just flat out wrong and we're going to pursue criminal charges people don't understand just because you have something doesn't mean it's yours just because something's delivered to you yet once you convert that you have committed a crime and and so she went out on our own mark didn't think it was so altruistic i thought it was magnanimous he did not heed he thought it was just a way to get out of trouble say what she did inland people make their own minds you went out and bought another ipad yes so she took numerous gift cards and she took the ipad and then it which by the way was in grave for this little girl that has his sin operable key brain tumor brain tumor so she went out in she did buy this nikki did by a ipad i guess for but big deal she didn't replace the i tuned cards she didn't get it and grave do you know what i said it to you yesterday if i rubbed the bank for a million bucks and i sent him a.

brain cancer nicky
"brain cancer" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on WGTK

"It can eventually you're not creating new neural synapses you're not having the oath it relates your memory is going to cause memory issues if it's related to your vision it could lead vision problems so many things are controlled by your brain there so stimulating your brain is a big part of that and it's not just stimulation meaning you know i need to work a math because i haven't done algebra since i was in ninth grade stimulating in the fact that the brain needs movement of what's called your cerebrospinal fluid right in that fluid is not only what brings it the nourishment which is what dr raja spray was talking about but it's also what stimulates the different areas of the brain and that brings up an example i've dr chart charles majors and he was in a house so his background story sorry if this is a laptop of that he was there is his background story was that he and his earlier younger years and life lived in a house that had black mold in it he later found out and black mold is something if you're exposed to it you have to detox from it because it can cause so many sosa so many different problems with in your body and for him and manifested itself has cancer and he had he had brain cancer and he was such thick are so such of a large tumor that it was actually blocking his brain stem where cerebal spinal fluid would flow from his fine into his brain and when he got to you know when he got to the doctors when this find the starting affecting his life the doctors will come into the room and they are expecting this like frail feeble week man but he was totally perfectly healthy looking although he had a stage four massive tumor within his brainstem and what was keeping the fluid flowing back and forth from his brain to to his final system to his final cord was the fact that he was a chiropractor and he was.

sosa cancer brain cancer dr raja
"brain cancer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He he oh now my full names adrian luke curve broke serve said there i have terminal of brain cancer i am he is i wanna do this work of singing at the bedside of people who were dying because i feel very strongly that death is of a very real part of life and we can't just ignore he is one i go to the bedside it is an opportunity to be in a very sacred space with some one because you are there with a person in their most intimate tongue men law you're going through their own questions about lanee am i gonna see tomorrow the reflecting in a way that is very heure i am kicked munger i'm the founder of the fish oil choir in 1990 i was asked to fill in a volunteer slot for a friend to his dying of hiv aids it was very distressing to see him comatose in agitative so i did what i did at the time when i was nervous or afraid and i started singing i watched him com saddle get positively serene and i calmed settled in got positively serena thought that i had discovered something our rediscovered something an ancient practice that tribal humans do for one another when someone struggling who is really means some of them live in some or pain in my hand news milo law good how can post death i had a brain tumor that was very large and it was a pretty scary time and i came out of that surgery blind and unable to walk and i had an opportunity to decide okay what am i gonna do now you know by give better i'm going to do something something important i always left to sing and i heard there were these people that saying to people who were donny and i thought that was the most incredible thing i've ever heard i got little little um shiver up my spine an island talk of do this c when they hear that sound especially when they hear the morning's sni of this rule experience it's so body absorption of brations gene looks similar sums you can see that they begin to breathe more easily and it's just a feeling that they are relaxed.

brain cancer munger founder donny
"brain cancer" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on The Adam and Dr. Drew Show

"I think that's life i what i do hit the wrong and other shas kelly line five yep by can you hear me yeah all right hey um i have a question about brain cancer uh my mom died of brain cancer a couple of months ago and with all the news about john mccain having lille last selma and then there's marie and the new those two husband brain tumor in her mom has uh i think she'd be into but i'm good wondering berea has you jorma which is totally unrelated totally right so that's the great yeah but go ahead so i might concern is you know how do i stop freaking myself out of every time i get a headache that doesn't go away understood what i i don't i can't think of a see lots of brain cancer my day and i can't think of in the situation where have seen it take more than one person in the family so it's only interesting unless cancer right those their babies some genetic reno sort of element there but i i wouldn't freak out about it rates an antius anything at all view v the kind of thing the risk that gets realized as you get much much older that's what i would say all right four we talked to michelle real quick let me tell you about lee ram many scientology aftermath so excited nato amy nominated groundbreaking dax series lee ram any scientology in the aftermath returns for season two on august 15th 10 all new episodes leah and high level former scientology executives and members delve into shocking stories of abuse harassment.

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"brain cancer" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on WDRC

"To come you know we we had a couple of people said well you know jimmy carter head the brain cancer and survived that has completely gone and we hope that for john mccain a different type he had melanoma right that spread to the the brain and the treatment for that is completely different type of cancer lately different cancer the way the glee 'oblast tomo works as it was explained to me by by a surgeon is um that while you can they and and they said they reported that with senator mccain they they were able to um you know a get the the tissue you know that they can remove that but in the recurrence would when it spreads through the branded it basically becomes and bettered and the brain um and it is at that point surgery is is not an option and the treatment is limited and so it's when it comes back um that it becomes a situation of that uh you know is is is just the frankly uh devastating to a lot of families that of that have had to deal with it is it's called a rare form of cancer a brain cancer uh and technically it is but there are many people that have you know that the may have had have dealt with his with a family member or somebody that they no fewer than two hundred thousand cases a year on the average a guido blessed obama um at but did it's in a way that's that's where we but when we have the whole discussion on on healthcare you know it's some there there are things right now the technology can't accomplish but we always want the best were looking for the best and and the cost of that healthcare you know is is always going to be great when we're looking for it to do great things and and hopefully will make a breakthrough for anyone in the future of you know that.

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"brain cancer" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"In the days weeks months and years to come we we had a couple of people said well jimmy carter had the brain cancer and survived that has completely gone and we hope that for john mccain a different type he had melanoma by that spread to the the brain and the treatment for that is completely different type of answer lately foreign cancer the way the glee 'oblast tomo works as it was explained to me by by a surgeon is that while you can they and they said they reported that with senator mccain they they were able to you know again the the tissue you know that they can remove that but in the recurrence would when it spreads through the brain it basically becomes and bettered in the brain um and it is at that point surgery is is not an option and the treatment is limited and so it's when it comes back um that it becomes a situation of that too you know as is is just the frankly mom devastating to a lot of families that have that have had to deal with that it is it's called a rare form of cancer a brain cancer and technically it is but there are many people that have you know that the may have had have dealt with his with a family member or somebody that they no fewer than two hundred thousand cases a year on the average a glee 'oblast oma at but did it's you know that's that's what we boom we have the whole discussion on on healthcare you know it's some there there are things right now the technology can't accomplish but we always want the best were looking for the best and and the cost of that healthcare you know is is always going to be great when we're looking for it to do great things and and and hopefully will make a breakthrough for anyone in the future uh in of that that might meet uh in a with meet up with this kind of fate that it's it's it's sad because you know going through what.

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"brain cancer" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on KELO

"And the fact that we need to make sure that we have stuff going out of this as fast as we have stuff coming into us and because you may be regular have regular bow habits you may have no problem urinating or things like this is easy to get complacent about the fact that go to the bathroom every day and i have at least one bowel movement in iranian only feeling pretty good but slowly insidious italy toxins are building up inside the system more today probably than ever because the what's out there in the air in the water in the food and the ground in our clothing and our carpets in our cars everything else constant petroleumbased toxins that are getting into the system not even not to mention glysophate and the kind of stuff that sprayed all over our foods that you and i have talked about so the body has to have an avenue to get rid of this stuff that's why we have a liver and we have a kidney and they work in union with one another to constantly filter the blood as long as the kidney and liver recognize this stuff it has enzymes to get these job's done when you start putting stuff inside the body that it doesn't recognize then the liver and kidney need extra help the shove this stuff out of it or long enough you're going to have a toxic buildup including the brain because a lot of these things will go clot across the bloodbrain barrier and if it era takes the local tissue long enough which is where a lot of cancers tom from you're gonna get abberant development of these stem cells that become cancer the most dangerous form of brain cancer and i don't know if it's wet she and her mother have or not is a blessed dorm altered form this is meningioma brain too well okay so there's a tumor on the moon injuries those are the sax the the bags that cover the brain that contain the cerebralspinal fluid that's dangerous but not as dangerous and it depends on where it is in the brain unusually surgery can get rid of something like that but you have to go to the under run our ching reason as to why that happened in the.

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"brain cancer" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on What It Takes

"Are pretty much now used by the the pharmaceutical industry in in in many different ways to formulate make drugs and then in some cases we've actually started companies and help companies do this if you look at all of that i mean you know now there new treatments based on these things for prostate cancer for brain cancer off for schizophrenia for narcotic addiction for type two diabetes for a lot of things and you know they all have you know either linked in lives in some cases save lives so i you know so i think that you know that leads to new better medical treatments and lenders personal experience his let him to staff his own labit mit with people who come from all different disciplines sale and molecular biologists chemical and electrical engineers materials scientists an an eclectic array of medical specialists they work together to tackle problems from multiple ankles and sometimes they start their own companies to bring new products into the medical market that's something else that distinguishes lingers lab and it's something he learned from experience early on with his polymer drug delivery discovery you know i was pretty naive about this i worked on this for nine or ten years nobody was using it but then one company and then a second company one an animal health and one in human health wanted to license it and they actually gave me consulting fee and grant money and i was so excited about this i i went i got a better car and i had money to support our lab.

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"brain cancer" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"brain cancer" Discussed on WDRC

"That prevents brain cancer about the that's for the university of edinburgh just in of the research shows that oleic acid the primary reading it oliveoil a has shown that it can help prevent cancer causing gene's from functioning and cells and may help to prevent cancer developing in the rain scientists analyze the effect of a lake acid on a cell molecule known as m i are seven right of because we will be doing a pop quiz after the show speak though you don't have loathes but the mri s am i are seven a is no to suppress the formation of tubers so uh it turns out that uh olive oil helps to enhance levels of emma mir seven something i didn't know about until i read this article to brand new research and it helps to prevent tumors from forming now the researchers caution that while we cannot yet say that all of oil in the diet helps prevent brain cancer our findings to suggest that a lake us and can't support the production production of tumor suppressing molecule wolves in cells grown in the lab of course we need further studies that could help determine the role that all boil might have in brain health well we know for sure that from the standpoint of dementia and alzheimer's diets high in olive oil and whether it's the lake acid or the beneficial polyphenols that give all oh boy ilitza color and it's aroma a it's unclear which of but there many different compounds.

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