35 Burst results for "Brain"

Is There Life After Death? With Dr. Jim Tucker

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

01:55 min | 1 d ago

Is There Life After Death? With Dr. Jim Tucker

"Dr jim tucker. Welcome to the podcast. It's an honor to have you here. Wonderful to be here while. I'd love to start off with a story and i was hoping if you might take one of the stories slash case studies that you featured inside of your book which is excellent by the way and start us off from their well one well known. American case is a little boring. James line anger. Who around the time of his second birthday started having terrible nightmares multiple times a week in which he would be kicking his legs up in the air screaming airplane crash on fire. Little man can't get out event during the day he would take his toy. Airplanes and repeatedly crashed them into the coffee table. saying airplane crash on fire. And all this going on he really. He looked like had been traumatized that he had not been through. Any sort of plane crash in this lies and there were several times for his parents could talk to him about these things while he was away in what he described as being a pilot who had been shot down by the japanese and He said that he flew off of a boat and the parents asked him the name of the boat and he said in a toma which seems like an unusual name for us aircraft carrier but his parents who were quite opposed to the idea of pass lies at the beginning Did it online search. Discover that there was this. Uss matola bay that was stationed in the pacific during world. War two

Dr Jim Tucker James Toma Uss Matola Bay
General Tom Thumb: Not a Colonel of Truth

Your Brain on Facts

02:01 min | 1 d ago

General Tom Thumb: Not a Colonel of Truth

"Life started out. Pretty normal for charles sherwood stratton when he was born to a housekeeper and a carpenter in eighteen thirty eight in connecticut pretty normal ended when he was six months old as did his growth he basically just stopped growing. He was otherwise healthy. In doctors were stumped normal ended completely in the winter of eighteen. Forty two when one finneas taylor. Barnum showed up at his family's home chasing rumors of an extraordinarily small child. Four year old. Charlie list now in show business earning his family three dollars a week. Barnum immediately began promoting his tiny talent. When charlie and his mother arrived the following week to new york. They were surprised to see banners on the american museum bragging about the arrival of general tom thumb in typical barnum style. He had taken absolutely wild liberties with the truth. He took the name. Tom thumb from an english fairy tale character. Basically thumbed lena posters and handbills claiming that general tom thumb had been brought to america from europe at great expense and that he was eleven years old not sure how that jibes military service and eleven year old and it was nice that he aged him up to eleven. We wouldn't want people to think that he was exploiting a small child. I don't kid yourself. This is pre child. Labor laws are really any labor laws. There was no such thing as a cultural concept of exploitation. Charlie and his mother moved into an apartment in the museum building and barnum said about teaching charlie to sing dance and do impressions and act. Like a preteen. Instead of a preschooler i guess. Barnum recalled him as an apt student with a great deal of native talent and a keen sense of ludicrous. By all accounts young charlie stratton loved performing and he and barnum were genuinely fond of one. Another

Charles Sherwood Stratton Barnum Finneas Taylor Charlie Connecticut American Museum Tom Thumb Lena New York Europe America Charlie Stratton
"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

03:58 min | 2 d ago

"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"What one of the things. that's really important To mention again is that even though so much of your work is a corrective to our over reliance on the left hemisphere. You are cautious to separate yourself from those who would say the worlds of science and reason are expendable that those worlds. Don't actually give us anything of value. Oh absolutely opposite absolutely opposite. I love science since a child. I was captivated by science I depend on science in my work. And i depend on scientific discoveries from my life. The argument in my book s people have pointed out is sequential. Analytic and rational. In fact people say is quite a left hemisphere book. And i say good. I hope i used both my hemispheres in writing this book. Because if not i wouldn't be a very good one so we need both and what i feel is that science and reason depend on balance of these things there is a distinction to be made between rationality by which i mean the mindless following out of rationalist stick procedures and what i would call reason. Which since their source has been exalted as the muck of a truly educated person which just to make balanced informed judgments but not just informed by data but informed by an understanding in the whole context of living being belonging to a vibrant society of this means in other words judgment judgment is being taken out of our intellectual world and replaced by something a machine can do and that may look good to certain kind of way of thinking. But i think it's a disaster. The right hemisphere sees the need of the left. That's in the image of the master in the embassy the most and knowing the need for the mystery the mystery not knowing the value of the most and if i may use a quotation from einstein i think this gives us the full picture. He said that the rational mind is a faithful servant. The intuitive mind is a precious gift. We live in a society that honors the servant but is forgotten gift. Ian mcgurk is the author of the master and his emissary the divided brain and the making of the western world. He and thank you for joining me today on hidden brain. It's been a huge pleasure. Thank you hidden. Brain is produced by hidden. Brain media are audio production. Team includes bridge. Mccarthy ryan cats laura chorale andrew chadwick autumn bonds and christian wong. Tara boy is our executive producer. I'm hidden grants executive editor. Thanks to mfl. Kevin beasley alex. Curly and lauren landau for their voice acting our unsung hero. This week is judas. Far she got in touch with me to tell me. Ian was going to be in washington and that allowed us to schedule an in person interview with him some years ago. Thank you for more hidden brain. Be short subscribe to our newsletter. You can sign up at news. Dot hidden brain dot org. That's n e w s dot hidden brain dot org. If you'd like to support our work go to hidden brain dot org and click on support. I'm sean covey danton see you next week..

Ian mcgurk Ian sean covey danton washington Curly judas Kevin beasley next week lauren landau Tara boy Mccarthy This week both Dot hidden brain dot org einstein today christian wong dot hidden brain dot org some years ago hidden brain dot org
"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

05:39 min | 2 d ago

"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Support for hidden brain comes from indeed. If you're looking great minds that move the world you can hire them with indeed. It's job site that makes hiring. It's easy as one two three post screen and interview on indeed. Get your quality shortlist of candidates faster. You only pay for the candidates who meet must have qualifications and you can schedule and complete video interviews in. You're indeed dashboard tools. Like indeed instant match give you quality candidates whose resumes fit your job description immediately and you can choose from more than one hundred thirty skills tests get started right now with a free seventy five dollars sponsored job credit to upgrade your job post at indeed dot com slash brain. Get a seventy five dollars. Credit at indeed dot com slash brain indeed dot com slash brain offer valid through june thirtieth terms and conditions apply support for hidden. Rain comes to masterclass with masterclass. You can learn from the world's best minds anytime anywhere at your own pace. Get dog training tips from brandon. Mcmillan improve your cooking skills with gordon. Ramsay malone about writing from roxane gay with more than one hundred classes from a range of world class. Instructors that thing you've always wanted to do is closer than you think. Each class is brought out into individual video lessons. Usually around ten minutes long. Each class is supported by downloadable materials lessons and recipes. These lessons are available anytime anywhere. On ios android desktop apple tv amazon fire tv and roku get unlimited access to every masterclass and as a hidden brain listener. You get fifteen percent. Often annual membership go masterclass dot com slash hidden brain. That's masterclass dot com slash hidden brain for fifteen percent off masterclass. This is hidden brain. I'm sean covey. Dont'a ian gilchrist is the author of the master and his emissary a book about the divided brain. He uses research drawn from patients. Who have brain damage to one hemisphere or the other and patients who suffer from serious mental disorders ian argues that the left and right hemispheres of the brain have competing visions of reality and that increasingly. We live in a world dominated by the left hemisphere. I asked ian to imagine a world where all of us only had one hemisphere. The right what kind of a world would that produce the right hemisphere. If it were really without the left hemisphere would see a lot of connections between things and would see a broad picture but it might not be so good. At focusing on details emotionally the time might be somewhat melancholic inside. Because i think it's one of the aspects. I'm afraid of the right hemispheres realism and sympathy capacity for empathy. That it does feel suffering. We would not be able to make calculations in the same way most arithmetic calculations made by the left hemisphere. So we would be good at coming up with ideas. We might not be good at actually sort of carrying out the nuts and bolts and getting it working as a machine. Now let's let's run the opposite thought experiment. What if all of us just had only left hemisphere. What would that were clack oversee. We would lose sight of the big picture. That's i've emphasized throughout there'd be an emphasis on on the details instead. The would be a great emphasis on predictability organiz ability anonymity categorization loss of the unique and inability ability to break things down into parts. But not really see what the holiest like the need for total control because the left hemisphere is somewhat paranoid after right hemisphere damage. People often develop a paranoia. And and that's because when count understand quite what's going on one needs therefore to control it. Anger would become the note in public discourse everything we've become black and white. The left hemisphere needs to be decisive. Because don't forget it's the one that's catching the prey. It's no good going. Well yeah it could be a rabbit but it might not be is going to go. I'm going to go for it. So it likes black and white. It doesn't like shades of meaning so in this world we would. We would lose the capacity to grades of difference. We would misunderstand everything that is in place in metaphorical and have to make rules about how to achieve it. And it's your contention in some ways that the world that we have come to live event is a world that increasingly looks like that ladder picture. I think what. I observe is an overemphasis on predetermined systems of algorithms the sense of social alienation the way in which we live divorced from the natural world which is a very new phenomenon the insistence on extreme positions which is what the left hemisphere understands..

fifteen percent Ramsay malone seventy five dollars Mcmillan Each class android sean covey more than one hundred classes more than one hundred thirty s fire tv one dot com ian gilchrist around ten minutes apple tv june thirtieth brandon ios one hemisphere roku
"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

07:02 min | 2 d ago

"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Do. The surgeon sliced the corpus callosum the nerve fibers that connect the left and right hemispheres enjoys case the soldiery accomplished. What the doctor is hoped. His seizures stopped and our left hemisphere and right hemisphere now. I work in independent of each other. But you don't notice it now you just kind of adapt to it. It doesn't even have a feeling that feeling different than it did before. Psychiatrist ian mcgill crist says many other patients with epilepsy have been helped by this procedure. See by simply separating the two hemispheres so that An electrical storm if you like in one hemisphere couldn't cross over and invade the other they were able actually to carry on a remarkably normal life so this was a lifesaving procedure but it also had the consequence that by clever experimentation you could deliver information to one hemisphere at a time and find out what that hemisphere knew and had to say about it. These experiments showed the left and right hemisphere approach everyday tasks very differently. The left focuses on narrow details. The right on general vigilance to use a basketball analogy. The left hemispheres focused on the mechanics of dunking. The basketball. the right on where all the players are. The current situation in the game one sees the small picture the other the big picture. You see something similar. When it comes to language language has many components one of them is attending to the tone of voice in which i say something for example i can say yes or i can say yes i in turn that in probably a dozen different ways quite different meanings so for example. I say it's a bit hot in here. You using her right hemisphere. Know that what i mean is could we had the door open could be put on the air conditioning. But you're left hemispheres wondering meanwhile why i'm supplying this quite unnecessary meteorological information so. It's really focused on the granular detail. And because of this all kinds of things happen because of its narrow focus. He doesn't see anything that isn't explicit. It only sees what's right in the center of the focus of attention and he doesn't understand things that are not said often that's as important as what is the way in which it is at my facial expression my body language. All of this is lost as well as the interpretation in the whole picture. One of the important differences you point out is sort of understanding the role of metaphor and language for example which is that the left hemisphere really is incapable of understanding what what metaphor is or how it works. Yes and that's no small thing because as some efficacy has pointed out. Metaphor is how we understand everything and they point out that actually particularly scientific and philosophical understanding is mediated by metaphors in other words. The only way we can understand something is in terms of something else that we think we already understand and it's making the analogy which is what a metaphor does that enables us to go. I see i get it now if you think that metaphor is just one of those dispensable decorations that you could add to meaning. It's kind of nice but probably a distraction from the real meaning. You've got it upside down because if you don't understand the met of understood the meaning. Literal meaning however is a peripheral diminished version of the richness of metaphorical understanding. And what we know is the right hemisphere understands those implicit meanings those connections of meanings what we call as well as just dina. -tations it understands. Imagery stands humor in understands all of that. Do the hemispheres differ in how they think about time their orientation to the future in their orientation toward the past. Well that's an interesting question and not in a clear cut way although the left hemisphere is tending to look for the next opportunity. So it's very gold ribbon but very short term goal driven. It wants to grasp things that we didn't reach remember the left hemispheres. What controls our right hand with which we grasp things within reach so it has a very direct linear idea of a target. And let's go and get it is is some of this played out in sort of the relationship. They have with tradition with history. As you say in some ways if i'm primarily focused on what's right in front of me i don't really need to know what the last two thousand years of history of talk me. I think that certainly right time can be seen rather light the flow of a river which isn't made up of slices or chunks of river that are then put together we as personalities in time a coaches in time. I like this flow left hemisphere. Can't deal with anything that is moving. It fixes things like things to be fixed because then you can grab them. You can't grasp your pray. You can pick up the unless you've you can at least immobilize it for that second while you're interacting with so he doesn't like flow motion which are in my view basic to not just life actually to the cosmos so instead it sees lots of little punk tate moments little slices of time and things have to be put together by adding them up. I mean it's it's almost like a form of calculus of taking slices and then trying to integrate them together. You're absolutely right. And calculus is an attempt tic- to achieve something which is indivisible by dividing slices. The two hemispheres even appear to have different value systems. The left hemisphere professor reduce moral questions to arithmetic for example. If you this experiment is being done if you disabled temporarily the right temporary parietal junction which you can do with a pain. This procedure and asked people to solve more problems. They give quite bizarre on them. Based on entire utilitarian understanding of an example is a woman is having coffee with her friend. She puts what she thinks is sugar in her friend's coffee. In fact poison the friend dies scenario to a woman is having coffee with a friend who she hates. She wants to poisoned and she puts what she thinks. It's poison the coffee but it's sugar and the friend lives. Which was the morally worse scenario. Now all of using our intact brains say well the one in which she intended to kill her friend but no if you disabled the right hemisphere the good old left hemisphere says what august the one that she died the consequences. What but soon values are not well appreciated. I think by the left hemisphere..

One two hemispheres two thousand years one ian mcgill crist a dozen different ways one hemisphere game decorations
"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:54 min | 2 d ago

"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Support for hidden. Brain comes capital one with no fees or minimum on checking and savings accounts banking with capital. One is like the easiest decision in the history of decisions kind of like choosing to listen to another episode of your favorite podcast and with that top rated app you can deposit checks and transfer money anytime anywhere making capital one and even easier decision. That's banking reimagined. What's in your wallet. Terms apply capital one a.

One Head, Two Brains

Hidden Brain

01:21 min | 2 d ago

One Head, Two Brains

"If you type into words left brain verses right brain on youtube. It's not long before you will find yourself in a vortex of weird claims and outlandish hype with left brain balance. The overall function of the brain is stunted so that the oldest parts of the brain the reptile brain takes over on an instinctual level. Men men they'd formulas we need systems. That's left brain by the way for men. Now the problem is that most people are either exclusively left brain right brain there one or the other for decades pop psychology books and plenty of youtube. Videos have made dramatic claims about people who are left brained and people who are right brained. It got to the point. That respectable scientist felt. They had to steer clear of the study of hemispheric differences. I was so when i got involved in this area to touch. it's toxic. Don't even go that this week on hidden brain. We follow the work of a researcher who went there what he's found is much more nuanced and complex than the story on youtube. His conclusion still might be even more dramatic. He argues that differences in the brain and western societies preference for what one hemisphere has to offer have had enormous effects on our lives

Youtube
When Crisis Strikes With Dr. Jennifer Love

The Addicted Mind Podcast

01:51 min | 2 d ago

When Crisis Strikes With Dr. Jennifer Love

"Hello everyone welcome to the addictive mind. My guest today is dr. Jennifer love arthur of when crisis strikes jennifer. Please introduce yourself. Hi thanks for having me today. My name is dr jennifer laugh. And i am a psychiatrist. Also word certified in addiction. Psychiatry and addiction medicine. I'm in a large group practice outpatient and so my sweet spot medicine is the overlap of psychiatric symptoms anxiety stress insomnia etc with either substance use disorders or behavioral addictions and. Treat everything from trauma to schizophrenia. You name it. I do it in the brain. I love got while also a ton of ton of knowledge and a ton of experience. It sounds like Too many years of higher education will leave that. I think that's going to be good. Because i have a ton of questions as we were talking a little bit earlier before we started recording. I have a ton of questions about anxiety stress in the brain and you know win were in crisis and especially this last year of cove it all of that anxiety and stress so if a ton of questions about that but first i want to know a little bit more about you and what motivated you to write this book and and put it out there so i met my co author. Idaho wrote when crisis strikes with a norwegian clinical neuropsychologist and we realized how different our backgrounds are but there is a lot of overlap. And when i decided i wanted to start writing

Dr Jennifer Jennifer Insomnia Schizophrenia Trauma Idaho
Nurture Your Soul With Creativity

Mindfulness Mode

02:01 min | 3 d ago

Nurture Your Soul With Creativity

"Talking today about creativity and specifically about how you can nurture your soul with creativity. And don't you think that just feels amazing to just think of how you can nurture your soul with creativity fall. I think it does. And i think back to different times in my life when i felt like i was just really allowing myself to be creative every single day and that fed me that definitely did nurture my soul. Think back to the happiest times in your life. Does there seem to be any connection for you between your most creative times in your happiest times so as a i would tell you that some of my happiest times have been when i was spending hours creating music writing songs or even helping other people to be creative teaching music to my students teaching them how to play band instruments teaching them how to play drums teaching them how to just embrace their creative side in that truly fed me. I personally think that meditation can be a way that you can become more creative. And we talk about meditation all the time on the show but i think sometimes we just get so busy in our own heads in a lot of times it can be left brain stuff not so much the creative things and we can just get so busy that using meditation to allow ourselves that space so that we can nurture our soa with creativity. I think that can really be a huge key to helping you to be more creative and to enjoy your life

A Private School in Miami Bars Vaccinated Teachers From Contact With Students

Weird AF News

01:58 min | 5 d ago

A Private School in Miami Bars Vaccinated Teachers From Contact With Students

"A private school. In florida tells teachers that have been vaccinated cannot be around the students. A school in miami is coming under fire. After it reportedly sent out a letter telling vaccinated employees. They could not be around the students. Citing false claims linking the vaccine to changes in women's reproductive cycle stance. Let me say that again. False claims linking the vaccine to changes in women's reproductive cycles. This is the first i've heard of this. Lewis center is the co founder of the centre academy in miami. She's the idiot that sent out the letter to the entire staff reportedly telling the employees. They would not be allowed to be around the kids if they got the co vaccine pointing to reports that she claim that surfaced recently of non-vaccinated people being negatively impact by interacting with people who have been vaccinated. Here's a quote from the letter that sent her sent out even among our population. We have at least three women with menstrual cycles impacted. After having spent time with a vaccinated individual the misinformation comes medical experts have continued to debunk false claims. Alleging that corona virus vaccines could be transferred from those who have received the shot to others who have not which is just complete cockamamie. There's a lot of misinformation a lot of false claims out there. It's just very very unfortunate. When someone who's in charge of educating hundreds of students buys into this crap. It's just a shame that someone who's in charge of educating the youth is into conspiracies is a barrier to having a normal brain if you are attending the school i feel so bad for the kids in florida. There's just so many barriers to getting a normal brain by the time you're in adult in florida. We gotta do. We got save. These kids men. The article says here. The cdc is told people that cove in nineteen. Vaccines are safe and effective. While also recommending americans receive vaccine as soon as they are

Centre Academy Miami Lewis Center Florida CDC
Playing Your Big Data Hand to Win

Chasing Poker Greatness

01:59 min | 5 d ago

Playing Your Big Data Hand to Win

"I thought poker was supposed to be played one way. I thought that fish in general did a reacted in one way and the data has just shown me over and over and over again. That a lot of these assumptions i made are just not right and that to me is exciting because that represents a possibility for just growing at leaps and bounds of comment a questionable astakhov question. Actually so i think it can be hard to sort of access data in a very data form when you're playing or trying to memorize those sorts of things. A lot like the assumptions that it are very narrative inform. You know this player. Does this because they have this nature Experienced this thing they feel this way. Are you trying to kind of convert data into maybe structures that fit better into just like the human brain for you trying to really train your brandon in just in terms of data. I tried to train my brain to think. In terms of data people ask me about narrative like why do players do this all the time and i tell them i don't know don't think about it. It's not worthy of attaching a story to why they're doing it. I just know the data reflects that they do and i accept that and and so really it becomes a mathematical equation at that point of just under standing the lines in question and understanding what the data tells me. These players are likely to do the actions. They're likely to take and then making the highest decision at that node in the decision tree like that's really basically measuring weighing fighting the best lines and then compiling them in such a way that you can study and you can memorize you can

Brandon
Screens: Are They Ruining Our Brains, Mental Health and Eyes?

Science Vs

01:45 min | 6 d ago

Screens: Are They Ruining Our Brains, Mental Health and Eyes?

"So people pretty worried about screens taking over our lives. And there's been a lot of hand-wringing recently. About what screen. Time is doing to the keats. Some say it's ruining their attention span. Language skills might even messing with their ability to read. So how do we need to be here. And what's the right amount of screen time before it's time for the little ones to switch off to find out. We called up brennan a desk. She's an assistant professor of psychology at pace university and brennan studies. How kids interact with these nasty beasts screens. Yes screen and brennan doesn't just steady this. She lives it. She's got a seven year old son and they've been pandemic together. I'm living the situation now. At home i have a child at home. Who's doing school. And if i need to get some work done and he's done with school is it. Is he gonna spend more time on a screen. Maybe and yeah brennan says it can feel kinda to watch a kid getting sucked in by screen but is it really that bad. The best worry we're going to tackle is whether these screens are screwing up. Kids attention spans. Making it harder for them to concentrate. 'cause looking at what's sunscreens these days brennan's like it kinda makes sense that they wouldn't be great for focus a screen. You know you go on a screen. You can watch whatever you want. You know when you want it and you can switch between all kinds of things you could go on tired of the show. I'm gonna play an app. They're looking for that next. Hit

Brennan Pace University
A Fever is Your Child's Friend

Adventures with Grammy

02:39 min | 6 d ago

A Fever is Your Child's Friend

"Let's talk about fever. Fever is an elevation of the body's core temperature and it's regulated by several different things but mostly by the immune system and the brain. The reason why we develop a fever is the body's immune system recognizes that there some kind of germ ordinarily now not talking about extreme cases of you know weird things causing fever but just for your average typical child who starts running a fever. The basic start this so the body the immune system recognizes that. There's a foreign germ in the body. Most of the time. That's going to be a virus infection now. Sometimes it can be a bacterial infection or some other kind of organism that can cause the infection but for the most part most children when they run fever. It's because they either have a virus or bacteria and maybe on another podcast. When we get together we can talk about the different's between victory ses and bacteria because there's a big difference but the body recognizes this foreign entity in. It says you know you're not supposed to be here. And because Childhood we get introduced to these viruses and germs and foreign entities. Immune system knows that one of the biggest ways to kill a virus. Or another germ is to elevate the body's temperature because viruses in particular cannot live in the presence of heat exp- especially extreme heat to the body. Says well i know what to do about this. And so it begins to raise the body's temperature to the point where it slows down the viruses replication in the body. You know the virus just keeps having babies. It just keeps replicating in replicating a replicating until it overwhelms the body and so the fevers job is to intervene and to slow down the replication of the virus or to stop it completely like to just kill the virus in the

Fever
Praying for Revolution with Linda Perry

Chosen Family

02:16 min | 6 d ago

Praying for Revolution with Linda Perry

"I really wanted to ask linda if that was the intention with beautiful. Was it made to be this moment of queer empowerment during a very hetero. Normative time when i write songs i don't really think about the song prior to the song i it just kind of shows up and with beautiful. That was more like like. I never thought i was cute. Person never thought is of interest in that way I am the i account myself out like. No one needs to tell me what. I'm doing something wrong. I'm the first one this already pointing it out. So that song was coming from a place of me. Trying to tell myself euro k. Euro k- kid. You know and there's others that are feeling like you. That are okay so in a weird way. The song had nothing to do with being gay but it has everything to do with being gay and has everything to be with doing being different. You know the way people's brains work You know people just feeling out of place because they simply feel like an alien You know that's where that song came from and a took me a second to be able to finish song. Because when i i said i am beautiful. I was like no. I'm not no. I'm not what. What the fuck sane one. You can't sing a song like that. So then when cristina showed up the story took a different turn then she came in very you think from the outside. Here's his very confident hot chick. It's got the world around. She's got gina bottles. She's got lightning. She's got everything right and then i'm thinking that she heard the song because she asked me to break the ice. I play her the song. Because it's i just wrote it. And i might just play the song and then she was like i want that song. Can you demo it for me and give me the lyrics and i'm thinking right away like know you're hot chick you can't fuck and have a

Linda Cristina Gina
Manchester City Stage Superb Fightback to Stun Paris-Saint Germain

ESPN FC

01:55 min | Last week

Manchester City Stage Superb Fightback to Stun Paris-Saint Germain

"Dan thomas joining the cd. Today by craig burley we also welcome to the program. You can frank and native newer. Of course only one place to start today show and that's in paris. We saw that champions league semi final between manchester city. Another brilliant game. She completely dominating the first half one deservedly. Thanks to a great header from martinez manchester city completely different side though in these second up kevin lebron's and riyadh marez giving them a two one league going into the second lack in manchester next week. Craig let's start with you and just talk about the then. If half time. I told you the city. We're going to win this game. Two one it would be a big stretch pants completely. Dominant well at halftime. If you said to me we're going to play in the monitoring wasted the second half of would have been surprised. That's how big a turnaround was and credit to them for that dot was they set the and the second that we know can perform but the so much talk about for all the guys just quick summary here yeah they look to let tentative mindset in the first half wary but that was known to what. Psg dead psg. The depressed setting normally have that flustered. seti pushed back to the walls the edge of the box when psg varada was coming in off that left side when they didn't eavesdropping by making a four foot. Making it difficult and set. You looked flustered but then swung sixty. He followed up the field and he's economic mindset people nado silver pushed up the brain appreciate they got the press on and they passed so much better from a possession of twentieth thirty yards higher up the field so the starting position in the second half was so much better. An passing in the second half was so much crisper excellent.

Dan Thomas Craig Burley Martinez Manchester Kevin Lebron Riyadh Marez Manchester City Frank Paris Psg Varada Craig Manchester PSG
The Connection Between Menstrual Health and Mental Health

Therapy for Black Girls

02:20 min | Last week

The Connection Between Menstrual Health and Mental Health

"Thank you so much for joining us today. dr flowers. thank you so much for having me. I'm so thrilled to be a part of this conversation. Yes i'm very happy to have you. Years has hawk all about minstrel health. And how that impacts on mental health and. I think this is a conversation that is often kind of overlooked. As i'm sure you're aware in a lot of your work and so can you really just talk with us about like the life cycle of our menstrual cycles. When you're harming your question. I immediately in my brain went to the way that people with over you actually have all the egg. From the moment they're born essentially means felt like i was in my mother's who is in her. My grandmother's who's been my great grandmother's like we are all connected right. There's like a power there and your astray in your ancestry and i know. We're talking about menstrual health. But like when you think about the connection between needs and thinking about young people learning about their bodies change a learning puberty learning about the cycle and how it works what it means for your potential for becoming pregnant thing pregnant. Parenthood menopause peri menopause. All of these stages just feels like there's so much unpack and then also like a really basic thing is like thinking about the way the uterine lining shed every twenty eight days. Which on some level is very clear concise on some level almost oversimplifies. It's really complex experience. People universes have so. I feel like there's a lot of talk about and i don't want to go too far in any one direction. Well i think you bring up a really good point around context for you know being in our mothers and our graham of his and all of those things because i think when you think about how those conversations happen around what's happening with our bodies it is very much connected to how the conversation has been head maybe with our mothers and grandmothers that really resonates with me absolutely and we could all tell stories about what we learned. I mean i remember. My mother taught me about what about a period and really thinking about like. How do you really explain to a kid. Lead is gonna come out of your diet. And that's the thing that's going to happen to you like. That's kind of a wild concept for kids to their brain around.

Dr Flowers Graham
A Brief History of Neuroscience

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

01:56 min | Last week

A Brief History of Neuroscience

"So neuroscience. The study of the nervous system has had an interesting history of being both extremely old and extremely new Ancient greeks and egyptians went back and forth whether the brain or the heart was the center of intelligence and hippocrates argued that the brain was the center though this wouldn't gain traction until the roman physician galen proposed it It took until an understanding of electricity. In the nineteenth century before we could really understand the brain the experiments of luigi gala vanni and the electrical activity of the body pave the way for research in the nervous system for awhile. Neuroscience research was divided into different fields such as physiology anatomy zulu psychiatry etc David roche helped integrate these fields creating the neuroscience research program at mit in nineteen sixty two. james mcgowan established the first department of neuroscience at university of california irvine in nineteen sixty four and later major neuroscience organizations were created including the international brain research organization. Or i bro. because it's a bunch of bros. Working on brains at that could be like your pneumonic for it That was established in nineteen sixty one and the society for neuroscience was established in nineteen sixty which is known for its annual meeting. One of the largest scientific conferences in the world so we're gonna start with neurons aka the small stuff so adam is and again. This is all adams words. I i am not the data scientist or the neuro scientists in this situation. I am just. I am the female voice of adam. Large in this specific instance. Everyone so all my words are his words. Except when i do inside you'll know when that happens on many less syllables. Yeah it would be those. Those observations will be much

Center Of Intelligence And Hip Luigi Gala Vanni David Roche James Mcgowan Department Of Neuroscience University Of California Irvin Galen International Brain Research O MIT Society For Neuroscience Adam Adams
Why We Should Delay Kids' Screen Time

Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

02:04 min | Last week

Why We Should Delay Kids' Screen Time

"What did you discover with the research. What's what was hap- what is happening in the brain. What are some of the effects of screen time on infants and young kids. Yeah so when we're talking about. I really like so when i talk about young kids so under-fives i use the acronym swat for swat screen time because those are the five big areas where i think we have. You know the best research In terms of some of the negative associations we see with screen so s stand for sleep Children who have high amounts of recreational screen time. This means for fun for pleasure That they go to bed leader and they have a total Their total sleep. Duration is shorter. W is for we that. There's an association between recreational screen time and wait for kids a for attention which is overweight time. Yeah yeah yeah. Thanks for clarifying that A for attention. Which i think is really interesting looking at the ways in which you know a two three four year old we think of as generally inattentive and looking at the ways in which screen time affects their attention we have Experimental and longitudinal research that shows a negative effect of recreational screen. Time for young kids And then their attentional abilities at age seven when they're in school The second as for aggression so kids are great at modeling. That's why your work in terms of helping us to be mindful right and to carefully choose our words. is really important because they're watching what we're doing and they are watching what's onscreen to and they tend to attend to the content that is Most overwhelming for them in a way right if they watch his show. And there's there's maybe some aggressive content that the moral of the show is that you know. Aggression is not good and we shouldn't. We shouldn't say unkind things. Kids tend to remember that we hit right for that. We say things and here. I'm talking about little

Hubble Telescope: The Story of Edwin Hubble

The Past and the Curious

01:56 min | Last week

Hubble Telescope: The Story of Edwin Hubble

"Dr james naismith is said to heaven. Dented the game of basketball in massachusetts in eighteen. Ninety one the next year not far away in connecticut. Another sport took a big leap forward. When a man named pudge heffelfinger became the first person to officially get paid actual money to play for an american football team. Soon after mr pudge heffelfinger somewhat stardom as the first professional athlete each of these sports grew in popularity on college campuses but while football grew in popularity it also grew violent by the early nineteen hundreds. There were so many gruesome injuries and worse that it was almost banned entirely president. Teddy roosevelt door. All right sir. Theodore roosevelt had to get involved schools. Were canceling their programs. And more importantly mothers would not let their kids play the game. One of these. Nay saying moms was virginia hubble. She pleaded with her son. Edwin powell hubble not to run basically helmet lewis at full speed and to also basically looks heads of other college students. He listened to his mom and when he graduated. He hung up his dinky non protective helmet. This is a good thing because he was carrying around. What would be one of the most brilliant minds of the twentieth century and has had. He didn't need to go smashing that incredible brain into the rock hard cranium. Curiously oh mama. Hubble didn't make him stop. Boxing apparently edwin was a really great boxer and he continued his pugilist pursuit through college but when edwin hubble enrolled in school at the university of chicago he was planning to honor his father's wishes and be a lawyer. Lawyering wasn't really what made his heart thing. What did make his heart sing. Or the stars in the sky

Dr James Naismith Pudge Heffelfinger Mr Pudge Heffelfinger Football Edwin Powell Teddy Roosevelt Connecticut Massachusetts Basketball Theodore Roosevelt Lewis Virginia Hubble Edwin Hubble Edwin Boxing University Of Chicago
Nicole Begley: What Every Photographer Should Say to Their Email Subscribers

PhotoBiz Xposed

02:50 min | Last week

Nicole Begley: What Every Photographer Should Say to Their Email Subscribers

"Today's guest is us based and specializes in pet and equine photography before professional photography in two thousand and ten she spent thirteen years working as a zoological animal trainer. She's also the brains behind haired dog academy a platform for pet photographers to improve. They crossed and grow that photography business and the author of the book and equine photography for. Everybody i'm talking about the lovely nicole. Bigley who has appeared on the podcast episode. Two hundred and seventy three where she shared how to generate leads and terrific styles from solid. Now we were recently exchanging emails and the topic of leads. Email marketing landing pages and thank you. Pages came up. And how important for anyone doing business online. I asked if she'd be happy to come back and share her thoughts on those topics and she said yes. it's on rat tabby with us now nicole. Welcome back thanks for having me back to be here. I always love talking business with you. And i know you so switched on and what i love about and your photography academy and you business is that you're actually still shooting as well to photography still play a big part in your life now the photography's not as centers. That used to be. But i do still take clients. Mostly i mean to keep my foot in and know what's working and what's not but also still to have that creative outlet like there's nothing i love more than seeing a big piece of my work printed on a big wall piece like it's just it feels my soul so i keep taking a taking a few clients here and there for that knows and obviously spending a lotta time on hair. The dog academy and you'll using marketing and advertising strategies to build that. Are you applying those tactics to your photography business testings. Yeah yeah so you know. As i accidentally kind of ended up diving into this online education space about five years ago. You know. i've been learning so much about marketing and how to run an online business and so many of the things are so incredibly applicable to photography business. Even though we're kind of quasi online as a photography business because we serve a local market and were meeting people in person but we don't have a storefront many of us and even if you do have a retail location people are going to your website. I and the way we're marketing as often online even a physical location. You're still sending them somewhere online to make that connection with you so really. Online marketing and photography businesses is really pretty critical. Yeah i guess you could say we're service base online business almost. Yeah yeah absolutely. Yeah because even again like i said even if you have a storefront retail location. You're still doing that marketing. They're not coming in the foot traffic and figures not coming into your business. You have to do the marketing to get the traffic into your

Bigley Nicole United States
Go to F**king Sleep

Mind Body No Soul

01:51 min | Last week

Go to F**king Sleep

"Napoleon bonaparte's once famously. Said let a bitch sleep or wind. She wakes she will move mountains or something often may wish that there was an auden for your mind or perhaps it was never an to begin with because you are not working with a full deck and maybe our chest own little bit stupid regardless of your cerebral bandwidth. Hyperactive brain can really fuck up your rent cycles whether you are mensa bound or complete shit for brains this guided. Meditation is intended to quiet the mind so you can relish in a beautiful slumber a well rested is crucial from product titi and mental stability. So you don't act like come. Malfunctioning psychopath commerce. State of mind allows for you not only sleep better. Anxiety increases focus makes you more enjoyable. In mixed company treats stops circular thinking improve. Your memory satisfies the body and makes you less like up. Busted

Napoleon Bonaparte
Why Do Children Give the Cold Shoulder To Someone They Love?

Nurture vs Nurture with Dr. Wendy Moge?l

05:50 min | 2 months ago

Why Do Children Give the Cold Shoulder To Someone They Love?

"The time. I will let it go and how resentful indignant frustrated and annoyed are you. It depends. I don't like getting to the place where. I feel resentful so i try to do that. Enter talking and decide. Okay if i'm not gonna let this bother me. That i really have to let it go but i will say yes. There are times where. I will let it go. And i might be just a little. Ooh yeah like he's feeling for sure. Yeah it takes me just a little bit being like that and then we'll get through it and then it's fine and then there are times where i have that talk and i'm like nope. This is not okay with me. And i i wanted to talk about it and say something and have a conversation. Does it do any good. It does like we had a recent disagreement. Please tell so. I did not know that daisy and eric had had a conversation about getting daisy on tiktok to see an older cousin that we have in the family who has an account and she was excited about it and i did not hear about this and cut too i just heard that daisy was signing up for tiktok. How did you hear. She was coming over to eric and saying okay. Now what do i do. And he was telling her. Don't forget your password. Write it down somewhere and i ask. Oh but she doing joining terrorist groups ugly saying getting on tiktok. There was no discussion in my mind. I just reacted in that moment. And i said oh no. I don't want her on tiktok. That was a big thing for me. In hindsight i probably should have waited to. Maybe reacted one of the reasons that you react. That way is you are at a state of semi alert to alarm at all times and your waiting for the intel to drop. Yeah so you heard the words get on and tiktok and it had not been passed by you and that fell on top of a pile of frustration about this child man's judgment and the ambivalence you have about. What a warm loving fun guy so close to his daughters his daughters who are coming of age and we'll have crushes on boys and they are getting so deeply cherished by their sweet dad and at the same time you know so much about what goes on in the world of social media and girl self esteem and identity and sexuality that you have your good angel and the devil gas each on your shoulders arguing at all times. The corpus callosum the connects the right and left hemisphere of women's brains is thicker than in men and it means that women naturally us both sides of their brains to make decisions and for men. It's sometimes a little bit more easier and direct. Is it a cousin or a friend who was on tiktok. it's my cousin's daughter cousins to hire so exciting celebrity family member on tick doing adorable vance and she has her own channel. So cool and now spoilsport. Here is hyper vigilant. That's what we call it. Then psychology jumping in to say you did what so what happened in that moment. The main reason. I got irritated as we were with our pod and there are a couple guys there too and it was very emasculating issues. Like no. she's not watching. Tiktok that okay. And i'm like and furs liberal. As i am parenting. I do default to whatever she says. I mean. i'm definitely the beta as far as you hear me fall to whatever. She says. you can't read her mind right. And so that's your intention and that's your kind of moral position but in a case like this and this is a beautiful example here you were joining with your daughter. In a celebration of cousins expansiveness on the magnificent new platform tiktok swirling the pandemic world with joy. And then this bitch comes in humiliates you in front of your friends or male and female pie and you think okay. I'll just swallow this and eat some more sugar with the girls and it will be totally our country. Exactly the ugly. What happened so get resolved. So the next morning i went to bed it was bothering me and i did feel bad for the way that i handled it so no conversation between the afterward no thanksgiving night. We're both. oh yeah. Yeah so the next morning. I said something i said i you know i'd really like to get this off my chest. What time what plays what. Words was probably around nine. Am and i think. I use the words. I'd really like to get this off my chest and were the two of you alone. Girls there were alone and he was not in the most open mood. But i felt like i really wanted to talk about it in the kitchen. Seated standing i was seated. He was standing. How'd you had breakfast her. Yeah so i started with. I really wanna get this off my chest and correct me if i'm wrong. I said you know. I want to have a conversation about tiktok ortho. I want to back up just a little bit. Because we're going to parse words sir. I really want to get this off my chest. Strikes

Tiktok Daisy Eric Intel Vance Tiktok Ortho
"brain" Discussed on Brain Inspired?

Brain Inspired?

08:11 min | 4 months ago

"brain" Discussed on Brain Inspired?

"Can fall apart at the seed stage where own. Just the idea does not get any traction at all of their. You've talked to multiple. People just cannot raise any money on. You might bootstrap it for some time but if it's not getting traction or if it is an idea that accurately quest capital to get that customer action than it only fall upon a that at that state then Later on What can happen is that companies can scale too quickly because You always want to scale because he said pursued customer demand but if you if you scale too quickly and then. The customer demand doesn't materialize in time. That's something go wrong and later in the life cycle than scaling slowly sometimes can also be bad. You make it sound so fun because then somebody else gives lasted than you. And so yes. There are many many things that can go wrong. doesn't cost a has a nice analogy for what life is like it's mickley is a each leg jumping on an airplane and the building parachute on the way down and then the goal is to visit you. Just non hit the gun note note to self deep does not suggest starting a startup. No it's it's it's like diving. Yeah that's right there you go. Yeah okay well. That's great so you've made it you've built your own parachute seems like your or hang glider. Even maybe i don't know what you you've built but you've done a nice job so far so anybody can continued success of course with bike areas. But what we're really here to talk about. Today is the second of two recent papers the first of which we talked about last time so so the second one is all about well. I'll just read the title. A detailed mathematical theory of thessalonica and critical microcircuits based on inference in a generative vision model in. I'll just kind of introduce it here and then you can correct me and we can. We can get into it. So the neo. Cortex seems important for our general intelligence However narrow that generality maybe as we were sort of just discussing you have argued. That the cortex is you know in on the one. Hand the the important thing to understand but on the other hand that It's it's the easier bit of brain to understand because the rest of the brain is so complex and specialized honed through eons of evolution. Okay so so cortex just to bring everyone to up to speed. Is this big sheet. Made up of a repeated architectural motif. What's called the cortisol column or micro circuit Which is repeated throughout the cortex fairly uniform but with variation But you know it's the basic Organization is similar across cortex. And you've argued that if we knew it was doing a as many have that we could apply that and and then take us a big step forward not only in understanding our own Human intelligence but in in building artificial intelligence and there are many theories of which you have worked on already but they're based on sort of two. I would say main approaches. One approach is to think of cortex feed forward bottom up series of hierarchical processing so going from these simple to more complex and abstract representations so like envision they'll be going from like lines and edges building up to all the way up to an image that you can identify an object like the face of abraham lincoln someone famous right the other approach. The one to which you can subscribe is to think of cortex. More as a top down. Inference ingen which creates generative models of possible worlds a to than best explained the data. That is that is coming in to our senses and i am. I am point so far here yes. You're exactly on point. Yes okay new alexander. No no just just wait deletes on a deletes on a treadmill. This is great. This is the first time. Someone's exercise during the podcast. I love it so it's great to be standing under walking by talking. It's one yeah. I should get a treadmill. Because i i do. I use a standing desk. Okay all right. So i'm gonna continue here. So most focus has been on the canonical micro circuit asking. What does that call him do. What does that critical metric do But of course cortex doesn't act alone in the brain it's a interconnected with lots of other brain areas In these complicated loops between cortex and and the other brain areas one of which is the dallas and the role or roles of the foulness has been debated for many a year now. was originally thought. You know just to be a relay from our sense organs to the rest of the cortex and it does do that but but more recently it's been thought that it's played a role in attention and the regulation of information flow between quarter areas and from our senses to to those critical areas so the circuitry and the loops between the dallas and the cortex. have led some people to kind of rethink the canonical micro circuit computation right. What what is the canonical micra circuit actually computing So to move beyond just cortex and an actually involved Involved the thelma. So i had randy o'reilly on recently. And he has his deep predictive learning model Where there's a feed forward projection to the famous from From cortex ns feedback projection to thelma from cortex and the idea and this happens in the pull the nar for individuals at least in the visual system this these feed forward and feedback connections joined together on the poll and act like a predictive learning mechanism in the style of top down. Predictive coding inference approach. Yeah and and so. And i say that because i mean you know this conversation we're having is is basically the closest thing that That we've talked about on the podcast to that is randy's predictive learning mechanism here. Okay so that brings us up to speed now. Sort of up to speed. So you had these cursive quarter networks that you've been working with for years. Yeah and you realized that they could be implemented with networks of neurons. And you realize that. You could map the computational properties and the flow of these rcn's onto the portugal column and thus the bio rcn was born. Yes and so I'm gonna hand it already so We've done this already multiple times. But just really broad overview. Let's just recap what Reclusive networks are and what you've used them for in the past. Yeah so our models for visteon It builds a hierarchy from box of full line segments at the bottom going all the way to object level models i deduct and decided all of an essay published a graphical model and then a new piece comes in like a scene of doctors or sinop objects. This model can wash that scene as best explanation under the model a on the houston for cracking gap chose of defeating the fundamental defense and usage of excess for picking detecting boxes of all those things. Say we shouldn't model. That can be.

Today second abraham lincoln each leg randy o'reilly two first first time two recent papers second one portugal One approach randy one a year alexander cortex thessalonica
"brain" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"brain" Discussed on Kwik Brain with Jim Kwik

"And that of course is your mind. I believe that you can only really love a person to the degree that you love yourself and a great place to start is loving your brain and you know why right because your brain is the Control Center for all of your body all the functions whether it's talking or swallowing or walking or breathing and tasting and smelling your heart beating all of that he controls all of our thinking functions our emotions how we behave our intellectual abilities how we show up for things how we perceive and understand the world how we understand our physical surroundings how we learn how we read we remember and if you WanNa love yourself more if you want to improve your self esteem overnight I always tell people to start by really studying your mazing brain so I'm GonNa give you a few facts about your brain that if you struggle with your own self worth this is going to boost that tremendously make you one of love yourself and in this episode I'm also GonNa give you the four keys for things you could do right away to love your brain so you nourish it it flourishes and you show up the best version of yourself we've discovered more over the past decade than the previous thousand years about this incredible supercomputer between your ears called your brain and it's really exploded so here are a few things the brain roughly contains it's about one hundred billion billion brain cells. I mean that number is staggering. It's on par. With the number of stars in our galaxy and each of these neurons they could transmit about a thousand nerve impulses per second and make as many as tens of thousands of synoptic connections with other neurons. I mean it's absolutely astonishing. A piece of your brain tissue. The size of let's say a grain of sand contains like one hundred thousand neurons and one billion synapses and they're all communicating with each other. And if you laid out the blood vessels that are feeding your brain end to end. They would stretch almost halfway to the moon. Brain information travels about two hundred and sixty miles per hour and this is faster than most formula one race cars which top out around two hundred forty miles per hour. Your brain generates about twelve to twenty five watts of electricity. Isn't that interesting? There's enough to power low wattage. Led light the average brain is believed to have about fifty to sixty thousand thoughts per day. Fifty to sixty thousand per day I remember Deepak Chopra telling me once that the only challenges ninety five percent of those thoughts the same thoughts they had yesterday and the day before that. So I appreciate you. Wanting to entertain more thoughts and newer thoughts. The brain is capable of about a thousand or more processes per second which makes more powerful than any existing computer. Your brain storage capacity is considered virtually unlimited. It doesn't get used up like Ram in your computer. How do you begin to love your brain? How do you begin to love it and I just WanNa give you four reminders? And just remember L. O. v. e. The L. stands for learn right. This is lifelong learning. And you know this because we're friends and we're kindred minds and kindred spirits. We are addicted to learning. We love to learn and constantly improve ourselves the science of neurogenesis and neural plastics. State that in order to be able to create new brain cells in order to be able to create new connections. You need two things. You need novelty and nutrition so the brain love novelty. So how are you improving your learning? What are you learning right now? How often do you read? How often are you listening to podcasts? How often are you going to classes or conferences? How often are you? Listen to audio books and you know this because you're listening to one right now. I would suggest that the most important thing is that you schedule it and you schedule your learning time so for me. I WANNA make sure. I read thirty to sixty minutes a day for me. I want to listen to an audio at least thirty to sixty minutes a day and usually this is during on time when I'm commuting uses time when I'm traveling usually around time when I'm maybe working out but you need to schedule it because if you don't schedule it it doesn't happen. The Ohio in love stands for oxygen. And we're really what I mean by this just anything. That is nutritious for your brain. These are the nutrients though. Is the air that you breathe the water that uterus the food that you eat because a typical brain comprises about two percent of the body's total weight it's about two percent but he uses about twenty percent of the resources the energy the oxygen intake the nutrition? So remember what you put in is what you get out and so take time to do your deep breathing that we've talked about in prior Take time to have your brain breaks. Refer back to my top ten favorite brain foods when we talked about the foods that you eat and how it's essential that you're getting the right nutrients whether it's vitamins and the minerals. Essential fatty acids in your diet. Because that's one way you could love your brain. The V. In love is vacation now. I'm going to get some really mixed feedback on. This are mixed responses. I imagined when I say vacation I mean taking a digital break going on a digital fast. I don't mean of physical vacation L. But if you are fortunate to be able to do that you know whether it's from improving your heart health to daily creativity. There's new research shows that both the mind and the body need the clock off every now and again. That rest is so important that you can't be focused all the time. You need time to be able to disconnect so you could reconnect and most of us heard about the benefits of unplugging right. You are being able to truly relax be able to rest has been shown to boost productivity increase creativity reduced long term risk of potential fatal ailments such as heart disease and steaming. We take time off. There's countless studies and articles have been published urging people to really not just take time off but the power off and take time away from your digital devices and your brain will also be grateful for you. Make sure that when you're taking this time off because we know our digital devices are wiring us to be distracted is requiring us to be overloaded and overwhelmed. It's wiring us to also be reactive or we're just trying to react to everything and respond to everything that people need from us with every APP notification and text message. And so besides just unplugging make sure you take time. Also when I say vacation is to sleep because there's at pedantic of sleeplessness and it's very critical for your brain to get the appropriate rest so with rejuvenate itself and clear out the plaque that leads to dimension Alzheimer so sleep. Take your naps if you need to. And finally the e. In love stands for exercise. And this is kind of a real no brainer. But as your body moves your brain grooves and so exercise affects your brain on multiple fronts and increases your heart rate pumps for oxygen to the brain it also AIDS in the bodily release of incredible amount of positive hormones all which participate in aiding and providing nourishing environments for your the growth of new brain cells median APPs. Which we've talked about in the past. Exercise stimulates the brain's plasticity. It stimulates growth of new connections neurogenesis neuro plasticity with counts for a wider range of important quarter cle activities but thinking activities areas of your brain and there was a recent study done at Ucla demonstrates that exercise increase the growth factors in your brain making it easier for your brain to grow New Neural connections. It's kind of like fertilizer. Miracle Gro if you will for your brain so those are the four things that you WanNa Remember L. O. V. Makes You love your magnificent quick brain learn oxygen which is really all the nutrients vacation give it a little bit of a rest and exercise because as your body moves your brain grooves and really the key to this his scheduling these four things scheduling times to learn to listen to podcasts to read scheduling times to be able to nourish yourself with air with your breeding techniques with your hydration with your food. Make sure you schedule a time to vacation. And even if it's not a physical vacation make sure you're taking daily breaks to be able to unplug so you get the rest and the rejuvenation that you need and finally is exercise because as your body moves your brain grooves and this is really about love right self love and self care is not selfish and with all things what you appreciate appreciates it grows..

Deepak Chopra Control Center heart disease Alzheimer Ohio AIDS Ucla L. O.
"brain" Discussed on Mom Brain

Mom Brain

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"brain" Discussed on Mom Brain

"<hes> i was talking about skin health the other day and someone asks you. What do i do to take care of my skin and the first thing i do is i don't strip it with a lot of stuff like i really use a lot of i use use coconut oil. Take my makeup off. I use oil-based cleansers <hes> a really don't tax it very much and the less i do the better feels and a lot of that's because i i really spend a lot of time thinking about the food basis for healthy skin so it's tons of water try to stay away from acidifying foods like sugar and red meat and caffeine and alcohol which is hard but it's you know it's not saying you can never have it. It's just saying these are things that create an acidic environment in the body which is the perfect breeding ground for disease and over stress <hes> and <hes> and lots of water and then you know having a good ten splurging sons tyler sometimes but yet probiotics and try dill pickle crowd because how and it's not just my pregnant lady self telling you this is the pregnant lady is telling you to go eat till pickles. They also have a kimchi virgin the caraway you actually have to eat in order tab at count you can have. I mean there's no. There's no recommended dosage. It's really you want to like. I mean you can add half a cup into a regular salad did you could i mean straight out of the bag. As people say you should take a daily provide how exactly how many pickles i don't know that's a that's a really interesting. I don't equate them back and forth but the what you do wanna make sure of is that whatever product you're getting what their advertising as has the quote unquote lives strings are live strains as measured at the expiration date because a lot of companies will not even live there just there it's kind of like dishonesty misty by by omission where they'll tell you what the concentration was when they packaged it but it goes away very quickly. These are live organisms so if they don't preserve it properly and that's what i was interested. It'd be like what about these things. Were the chewable cap. I don't know about those i again. I'm not i don't make vitamins. I don't know i don't know how those but i what i will say is for me personally i i. I really only trust the ones that are refrigerated because at least then you know that the strains are in like some kind of emulsion. That's helping keep them alive so i like. I like bioch- okay plus which is like they. They like by okay because they can do. They do a fermented rice one. That's kind of sweeter that you to berry flavored one that they they'd like i do for them. I make them eat a lot of weird stuff but i also okay so. There's this other thing that order. I just ordered it so i can pull it up. At my order history. Go into my amazon account. It's called. It's a spray and again addicts phraya and i i don't make this stuff and and i can't vouch for like it's not like it's not the kind of thing where you're going to see you know the next day this happens except for as my experience with postpartum anxiety but <hes> there's this thing called baby -biotics and it's a spray rabe this spray probiotic that you can spray on their skin. I find it's really great for diaper rash because it helps you to helps with any imbalance of of any of sort of the floor going on their in bacteria so i use it for diaper rash. I use spray it on there like chess just to give a little to their skin <hes> but but yeah that really our panelists that i'm going to have to write all those down <hes> all right guys will thanks for listening. Don't forget to rate review. Subscribe watch us on youtube. Follow us <music> on mom brain at on instagram and an email lists mom brain pod at gmail.com. We love hearing from you until next time. We're gonna need some mexican food. Come on columbia for mexican food. This is mom brand with alario baldwin and jaffna's mom brain gallery media group original production..

diaper rash caffeine jaffna instagram tyler alario baldwin youtube amazon
"brain" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

The Brain Candy Podcast

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"brain" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

"Well, yeah, I got no plan that, that but, you know, say there, what were something you just have to get out, real fast. I hope land it was like, I'm just leaving and use abandoned everything. And I'm not real good at that. I think it's because we grew up poor but land didn't have money growing up. So I don't know what his deal is. But I feel like that. What is that for me, male thing, where it's has to do with nesting and this being like? Our identity is. I mean, minus so attached to the whole, like that's my fear of house burns down got his long putting it all together. Oh, right. I'm sure you would you really put a lot of time into that. Like my the article was saying that it was about how in moments of complete chaos that it's called them cognitive disorientated, and so your brain that goes into habit mode. And when you 'cause it's like all, you know, yes. And so you're have it is to get up out of the plane, grab your bag and go. What they said. But I mean that makes sense. It does make sense. It's still weird that you brain veiling by the, the survival instinct would be greater. You would think that are lizard, brain should be like, dude. Yeah. Get off the plane. Yeah. But for whatever reason our and maybe it's also denial. I, I was going to say there's maybe a little bit of that because. Has so many different ideas of like. Awful this. Yeah. Whatever. So it almost like comfortably accepts the easiest. Like safest explanation yes, it's going to be fine. And it and you a MAG, I would feel this sense of, like everything's refined and I'm not gonna wanna not have my phone, or whatever it is, when I'm waiting around to his paperwork that. So inconvenience afterwards, we'll never know maybe you should just enjoy that time of being bored and not phone. Let your mind wander so I won't I won't enjoy. I mean I don't know the human brain. I get frustrated with because I feel like it fails us, it does. Yeah. That's what we have to work. So hard to master it and control it and train it like any muscle. And you know, it's like if you went to go pick up a hundred pound weight, and you'd be frustrated with your inability to pick it up. We'll okay, strengthen yourself. There's done that. Yeah. And it's still just there's some things that it's really insistent upon. It's practice in. You know it's. When you come into new awareness, there's an integration, there's, there's a whole model to how change occurs in how, you know, you reach this place where you're like. I gotta make some changes, so you research or you go to therapists talk somebody or whatever. And then you have this new awareness of like what's really going on. And then it creates this chaos where rather than that awareness improving. Your overall wellbeing. It. Decline because this new awareness, it's like that, I agree that with that. And then you hit a point at the very bottom, where some new information comes in, like where the ideas get integrated where all of a sudden, you may be try this, you, you have this new awareness, and you make one little change, and you see the positive effects of that change. Or you try to approach the problem at different way or reacting to different way than you did before. Like when I chose to not call my husband out for claiming that he was the one who discovered the slap leak and I swallowed that information and kept that and decided to not make the snarky comment because if that was important to him. Let it be. Who did he say this to Sarah? Okay, I'll just start. They have to, I'm so glad I cannot believe it. So the other day yesterday, I'm getting ready for for work and Landon answers, he's on a conference call, and he's like waiting for the people to join and he's on speak. For phone and some guy was like, oh, hey, what's going on with your house? I heard it was like construction or whatever and land in, he must've listened to the episode, where I talked about it, because he essentially stole my whole, like how I told the story didn't like the punch lines and stuff..

Landon Sarah hundred pound
"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Ian has brought thesis about the brain. But also brought thesis about how these differences might affect daily lives. Increasingly he argues relive in a world that prizes. What the left hemisphere offers and has contempt for whether right hemisphere brings to the table. When we come back. I asked you about what happens when the misery usurps, the master. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators entrepreneurs and disrupters. That's why the company who built the nation's largest gig speed network is moving beyond beyond connecting your business to helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast. Visit Comcast business dot com for more. This message comes from NPR sponsor, indeed when it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help. Getting your shortlist of qualified candidates fast with indeed post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates. And when you need to hire fast, accelerate your results with sponsor jobs. New users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR, podcast, terms, conditions, and quality standards apply. This is hidden brain. I'm Shankar danton, Ian, McGill Chris is the author of the master and his emissary a book about the divided brain. He uses research drawn from patients who have brain damage to one hemisphere or the other and patients who suffer from serious mental disorders, Ian argues that the left and right hemispheres of the brain have competing visions of reality. And that increasingly we live in a world dominated by the left hemisphere. I asked Ian to imagine a world where all of us only had one hemisphere. The right what kind of a world that produce the right hemisphere? If it we really without the left, hemisphere would see a lot of connections between things and would see a broad picture. But it might not be so good at focusing on details. Emotionally, the term may be somewhat melancholy inside. Because I think it's one of the spects afraid of the right? Mrs realism and sympathy capacity, for empathy that it does feel suffering. We would not be able to make calculations in the same way. Most arithmetic coke nations made by the left hemisphere. So we would be good at coming up with ideas. We might not be good at actually sort of carrying out the the nuts and bolts and getting it working as a machine now. Let's let's run the opposite thought experiment. What if all? All of us just had only left hemisphere. What would that were look like well over we would lose sight of the big picture. That's the thing I've emphasized throughout the an emphasis on on the details. Instead, the would be a great emphasis on predictability organiz, ability and inimitably categorization loss of the unique and an ability to break things down into parts, but not really see what the whole is like the need for total control because the left hemisphere somewhat paranoid of two right, hemisphere damage people often develop a paranoia, and and that's because when count understand quite what's going on and one needs therefore to control it anger would become the key note in public discourse. Everything we've become black and white the left hemisphere needs to be decisive because forget it's the one that's catching the prey. It's no good going. Well, yet could be a rabbit, but it might not be it's going to go. I'm going to go for it. So it like. It's black and white it doesn't like shades of meaning. So in this world, we would we would lose the capacity to see grades of difference. We would miss understand everything that is implicit metaphorical and have to make rules about how to achieve it. And it's your contention in some ways that the world that we have come to Levin is a world that increasingly looks like that ladder picture. I think what I observe is an overemphasis on predetermined systems of algorithms. The sense of social alienation the way in which we live divorce from the natural world, which is very new phenomenal and the insistence on extreme positions. Which is what the left has understands. Not a nuanced arguments about the pros and cons of every single thing. Meeting

Ian NPR Comcast Shankar danton Levin emissary Chris
"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

07:04 min | 2 years ago

"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This is hidden brain. I'm Sean curvy Dont'a if you type into words left brain versus right brain on YouTube. It's not long before you'll find yourself in vortex of weird claims and outlandish hype with left brain balance the overall function of the brain is stunted. So that the oldest parts the brain the reptile brain takes over on an instinctual level men men, they'd formulas we need systems that's a left brain, by the way for men. Now. The problem is is that most people are either exclusively left brain right brain there. One or the other. For decades, pop psychology books, and plenty of YouTube videos, have made dramatic claims about people who are left brained and people who are right brained. It got to the point that respectable. Scientists felt they had to steer clear of the study of hemispheric differences. I was so when I got involved in this area to touch it. It's toxic. Don't even go that this week on hidden brain reformer, the work of a researcher who went there. What he's found is much more nuanced and complex than the story on YouTube his conclusions, though might be even more traumatic. He argues that differences in the brain and western societies preference for what one hemisphere has to offer have had enormous effects on our lives. Support for this NPR podcast and the following message come from Microsoft technology, exceleron faster than ever and things that once felt far off are making a real impact in our lives today. See how AI is empowering business innovators at Microsoft dot com slash AI. Diene McGill Chris is a psychiatrist he has spent years studying the human brain through case studies of his patients and a detailed examination of scientific research. He's found himself fascinated by a question that is intrigued philosophers and scientists for centuries. Why is the human brain divided in half? How does each hemisphere shape? Our perceptions e-ends book on this topic has been on my radar for many years. It's called the master and his emissary. Ian, join me for a chat in our studios in Washington DC, I asked him to start with a basic overview of what the two hemispheres do in motivations. It's fairly straightforward that the left hemisphere controls the right side of the body and receive messages from it and vice versa. But in terms of psychological life, they have quite different kinds of rose. They have quite different dispositions. And I believe louche nearly they are if you like addressing different questions if you look at the last twenty or thirty years, the end there's been a lot of work or speculation really looking at how these two hemispheres might operate when it comes to perception when it comes to behavior you argue in the book, there has been many over simply. Vacations of how the two hemispheres work and what the different roles are. What does that look like what is this world of over-simplification? Look like will the conventional modal is something that sprang up probably in the sixties and seventies and had some life into the eighties and even into the nineties, and is now probably mainly at home in middle management programs and pope psychology books, and I was so when I got involved in this area to touch it. It's toxic. Don't even go there. And basically that was that the left hemisphere is logical and verbal and the right hemisphere is kind of moody and possibly creative. But all of this turns out to be much more complicated than some plain role. When we look at the ever Lucien of the brain not just among humans, but other species do we find a similar division and other species who simply to this is not something that was invented by human beings is there in all mammals amphibians reptiles fish, insects negative. Wombs which have you know, like one of them has three hundred and two neurons, but it's booking symmetric. And in fact, the oldest creature that we know of that has a new rule net of any kind is cool nemesis. Televi- tenses it's seven hundred million years, and it's thought of as the origin of neural networks. Guess what the neural network is asymmetrical? And so in some ways, this does prompt the question, why would have why would you have the brain be divided? Right. I mean, it does beg the question. It Sunday begs the question, particularly if you buy which I emphatically don't the idea that the rain is a computer because if it is surely, it's fast waste of computing power to have this brain divided into two biz. If you go to an antique store, you might find poster showing a human head with the brain divided. Like a map reason is in one quadrant emotion in another memories over here imagination there for a long time, the popular representations of hemispheric differences focused on what different parts of the brain. Do. Ian, says what really distinguishes the hemispheres is not what they do. But how they do the same things differently. The reason that we got things wrong in my view is that we were looking at simply the functions as we sold them and divided them up in much the way that we would if we thought about machine this machine does this post machine does that. And if you instead of using the machine model use the modal of this is part of a human being a person, you would give slightly different question. Which is not just what does it do? But how does it do it? And that turns out to be a profoundly important question. When looking at the hemispheres because they both involved in doing everything. But there is a difference. It's quite consistently each misfield does leasing in a totally different way with a different kind of spirit towards the different end. If you like to put it that way. Ian believes the brain is divided into two hemispheres. So that it can produce two different views of reality. One of the hemispheres the right focuses on the big picture the left. Focuses on details. Both are essential. If you can't see the big picture. You don't understand what you're doing? If you can't home in on the details. You kinda -ccomplish the simplest tasks this fundamental difference in orientation turns out to have profound consequences for everything. The two hemispheres do Ian uses the example of learning a piece of music to explain how this works. Imagine you a attracted to a piece of music and you playing he says a wholly new you love it. Do

YouTube Ian Microsoft Sean curvy NPR Washington AI researcher emissary Chris Televi seven hundred million years thirty years
"brain" Discussed on Mom Brain

Mom Brain

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"brain" Discussed on Mom Brain

"Being a mom is the toughest job there is and it doesn't come with instructions. So it's okay. If you don't have all the answers, we'll figure it out together. This is mom brain with malaria, Baldwin and Daphne us. Hi, guys. Welcome back to mom brain to after news. Sure. Who are you? Tell me about your what's your name? That's going be mom brain season. Let's have a neat. You. The kids all the time are like who are you again? It's like building a Bijou Giovanna BIC. So funny, John, by the way, because I always think of you. Children think that my silent whose name is John junior. But she thinks we call John boy and Carmen thinks his name is jumble. She's like and he's obsessed with few minutes. She's like can we go have played it with feeling Philomina and John bull. Guys. Welcome back to mom rain. I'm alario Daphne today on the show. We have eaten Grinch pan. She is a chef. She is a momma, she is a TV host soon to be cookbook author all around like if you have a friend who just lights up a room. She is a party in person and just like my favorite image of her is her dancing on the beach at I think her sisters bachelorette party in Israel, just like three months after she had a baby in this. Awesome. Bikini, just like raging on the page, and it was just to me. She is such a spirit animal in so many different ways, and she's an incredible friend, and we go all over the map, literally. She tells us about our time in India and in Thailand and bringing her travels home with her new restaurant does here in New York City life with a new baby keeping the sexy time alive. She is an amazing human, very, honest, very honest, and very real and very fun. And we know you guys are gonna love our chat. Today. We have eaten and she is going to tell us a little bit about herself go, okay. My name is eating Grinch ban. I am co founder and executive chef at Dez. I'm also top chef Canada host. I have you know, I guess an online presence my Instagram is at Eden eats. I dunno online presence. What do you say? Like an online. Whatever perfectly. And I am a mother of a delicious twenty month old named Abe, and I live in Brooklyn with my husband, and my daughter, he donate. She seems so peaceful on your stories like such like an angel eight like a, you know, what she isn't angel. She's a sweetheart. But she knows what she wants. And she is fiercer and like she will not stop until she gets it. You know, what she's going to grow up though to be such a little I like on the one hand, I think she'll be a little bit of a reader. I'm sorry. I'm breaking the bubble right now. I know she will she loves like turning Slyke. She loves twirling until she gets. So dizzy that. She doesn't she is. And she's laughing and laughing, and I'm like, you guys But have like been. you guys have been so good about since she was baby exposing her to so much music and all the, dancing and all the leg outings. I just feel like she's going to be such a it's it's of course, you'll be a little beautiful wonderful wild child. It makes perfect sense. So my mom's going to be so happy about that. She found out. I was having a daughter. She's like. I'm like. He does great. You know, we're just Mike we're going a little bit through a regression right now. So like it's pushing us so you did sleep train. We did sleep about that. I was so it's so crazy because like when you give birth and you have a baby like Mike Thursday, like an intuition that you have like you really like I did believe in following your God. Like you like when the baby called you. You went like it's something that you know, is just like a part of us after you have a kid so add like the six month. Mark I was shooting top chef Canada, and.

Daphne Mike Thursday Carmen Bijou Giovanna BIC malaria chef Canada John junior John boy John Baldwin New York City Philomina Israel Brooklyn Canada Abe Mike John bull Mark I co founder
"brain" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"brain" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"Welcome to the fiftieth episode of your brain on facts, considering the vast majority of podcasts are abandoned after seven episodes. That's no mean feat to celebrate. I brought on a bevy of guest hosts to help me tackle a topic. I've been wanting to do since the very beginning. The dubious proclamations and legacy of Sigmund Freud. Psychiatry's arguably, the least science-based of the medical specialties and forty and psychoanalysis arguably the least science based of those the father of psycho analysis for its impact on twentieth century thought is undeniable even though he got almost everything wrong. My name's moxy. And this is your brain on facts. Let's start from the beginning. Which is a very good place to start for some background on the man himself. Please welcome our first guest presenter. Hi, this is Emily Procup from the podcast the story behind the extraordinary history of the ordinary, and this is the story behind Sigmund Freud on may sixth eighteen fifty six seek Eastman Freud was born. He was one of eight children to Jacob Freud. Who was a wool merchant and Amalia Nathanson who is Jacob's third wife, although his family were his Siddiq cues Sigismund or segment as he became known didn't practice when Sigmund was four his family moved from. What is now known as the Czech Republic to Vienna. Austria where he ended up staying to study medicine at the university of Vienna. He began studying the anatomy of the brain, including the effects of cocaine before the dangerous were as widely known as they are today. He moved away from that. But still used it occasionally for his mind. Greens and a self medication for his depression. He began working as a clinical assistant, then moved onto studying psychiatry when he met physician and physiologist Joseph brewer, he learned about hypnosis for use on patients suffering from hysteria. He watched his patients would come into brewer get hypnotized, and then we're able to talk through experiences they wouldn't have been able to otherwise. And at the end, the patients would feel much better Freud was fascinated with this. And after traveling to study hypnosis some more returned to Vienna to open his own practice in eighteen eighty six. He soon realized that many of his patients didn't need hypnosis though. But that they just needed an open space to talk. It helped that they could lay on the couch and didn't have to see Freud taking notes next to them. The couch is a fairly well known trope for therapist and movies and television. But Freud had originally used it to help people into hypnosis, and it had originated when a patient gifted him one. He also coined the term psycho analysis for his way of allowing patients to talk about anything that entered their brains. He began developing theories, we still learn about today like the ego and superego as well as the Oedipus complex, and if you're still in the dark about whether you've heard of Freud or not you might have heard a Freudian slips the situation when you mistakenly say something you didn't mean to but was actually an underlying truth. Instead like when I say, I'm just going to have thirty pieces of chocolate. Oops, I meant three he was also known to study dreams believing that they held the key to people's deepest desires his most famous book the interpretation of dreams wasn't a big seller. When it was first released in eighteen ninety nine it only sold three hundred and fifty one copies in the first six years. He became a professor at the university of Vienna and began attracting others interested in learning about the complexities of the brain, including Carl young his group was called the psychoanalytic society and soon other chapter. Followed and other cities. But as World War Two loomed Freud kept him and his family in Austria as long as possible, although by nineteen thirty three Nazi's began burning his books because even though he is said to have been an atheist. He was still of Jewish heritage by nineteen thirty eight he and his family had run into problems with like a stopover in Austria and left for England. He had married Martha Byrne as back in eighteen eighty two and went onto father six children with her. He also began smoking in his twenties believing the habit increases productivity, but it became a lifelong addiction even after doctors found a cancerous tumor inside his mouth when he was in his sixties, his mouth cancer became inoperable and on September twenty first nineteen thirty nine he asked his colleague and fellow. Dr max sure to end his suffering. He received three heavy doses of morphine slipped into a coma and died. Thanks, emily. If my listener enjoys hearing the surprising origins of everyday items, you'll definitely want to check out of the story behind Sigmund..

Sigmund Freud Vienna university of Vienna Austria professor Martha Byrne Czech Republic Joseph brewer Emily Procup Amalia Nathanson morphine coma Jacob cocaine Carl England six years
"brain" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"brain" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"Welcome to the fiftieth episode of your brain on facts, considering the vast majority of podcasts are abandoned after seven episodes. That's no mean feat to celebrate. I brought on a bevy of guest hosts to help me tackle a topic. I've been wanting to do since the very beginning. The dubious proclamations and legacy of Sigmund Freud. Psychiatry's arguably, the least science-based of the medical specialties and forty and psychoanalysis arguably the least science based of those the father of psycho analysis for its impact on twentieth century thought is undeniable even though he got almost everything wrong. My name's moxy. And this is your brain on facts. Let's start from the beginning. Which is a very good place to start for some background on the man himself. Please welcome our first guest presenter. Hi, this is Emily Procup from the podcast the story behind the extraordinary history of the ordinary, and this is the story behind Sigmund Freud on may sixth eighteen fifty six seek Eastman Freud was born. He was one of eight children to Jacob Freud. Who was a wool merchant and Amalia Nathanson who is Jacob's third wife, although his family were his Siddiq cues Sigismund or segment as he became known didn't practice when Sigmund was four his family moved from. What is now known as the Czech Republic to Vienna. Austria where he ended up staying to study medicine at the university of Vienna. He began studying the anatomy of the brain, including the effects of cocaine before the dangerous were as widely known as they are today. He moved away from that. But still used it occasionally for his mind. Greens and a self medication for his depression. He began working as a clinical assistant, then moved onto studying psychiatry when he met physician and physiologist Joseph brewer, he learned about hypnosis for use on patients suffering from hysteria. He watched his patients would come into brewer get hypnotized, and then we're able to talk through experiences they wouldn't have been able to otherwise. And at the end, the patients would feel much better Freud was fascinated with this. And after traveling to study hypnosis some more returned to Vienna to open his own practice in eighteen eighty six. He soon realized that many of his patients didn't need hypnosis though. But that they just needed an open space to talk. It helped that they could lay on the couch and didn't have to see Freud taking notes next to them. The couch is a fairly well known trope for therapist and movies and television. But Freud had originally used it to help people into hypnosis, and it had originated when a patient gifted him one. He also coined the term psycho analysis for his way of allowing patients to talk about anything that entered their brains. He began developing theories, we still learn about today like the ego and superego as well as the Oedipus complex, and if you're still in the dark about whether you've heard of Freud or not you might have heard a Freudian slips the situation when you mistakenly say something you didn't mean to but was actually an underlying truth. Instead like when I say, I'm just going to have thirty pieces of chocolate. Oops, I meant three he was also known to study dreams believing that they held the key to people's deepest desires his most famous book the interpretation of dreams wasn't a big seller. When it was first released in eighteen ninety nine it only sold three hundred and fifty one copies in the first six years. He became a professor at the university of Vienna and began attracting others interested in learning about the complexities of the brain, including Carl young his group was called the psychoanalytic society and soon other chapter. Followed and other cities. But as World War Two loomed Freud kept him and his family in Austria as long as possible, although by nineteen thirty three Nazi's began burning his books because even though he is said to have been an atheist. He was still of Jewish heritage by nineteen thirty eight he and his family had run into problems with like a stopover in Austria and left for England. He had married Martha Byrne as back in eighteen eighty two and went onto father six children with her. He also began smoking in his twenties believing the habit increases productivity, but it became a lifelong addiction even after doctors found a cancerous tumor inside his mouth when he was in his sixties, his mouth cancer became inoperable and on September twenty first nineteen thirty nine he asked his colleague and fellow. Dr max sure to end his suffering. He received three heavy doses of morphine slipped into a coma and died. Thanks, emily. If my listener enjoys hearing the surprising origins of everyday items, you'll definitely want to check out of the story behind Sigmund..

Sigmund Freud Vienna university of Vienna Austria professor Martha Byrne Czech Republic Joseph brewer Emily Procup Amalia Nathanson morphine coma Jacob cocaine Carl England six years
"brain" Discussed on Mom Brain

Mom Brain

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"brain" Discussed on Mom Brain

"Being a mom is the toughest job. There is an a doesn't come with instructions. So it's okay. If you don't have all the answers, we'll figure it out together. This is mom brain with malaria, Baldwin and Daphne us. Hey, guys. Welcome back to mom rain. I'm me Loria. And then Daphne and today's episode is actually all dedicated to you guys we have been so grateful. Thank you for sending an all your comments and your questions and topic ideas on Instagram, of course. But also to our Email, mom brain pot gmaiLcom. And so today, we thought we would read a bunch of our favorite questions and give you our answers so rundown show. Yeah. And you know, what this is kind of the reason that we that we created this podcast. You know, we wanted to really develop a community here of of us. Moms all of us moms, and you guys are the biggest part of that. And so we want to include you and have your voice here and an answer your questions and here your words of wisdom. Also, as we interview the the wise the wise talkers on our show to yes. So should we begin? Yes. And just you as a picture what's happening here who are in are sitting cross legged and barefoot in our chairs, we're getting cozy Gary. Oh. Get cozy. All right. Here's a question from N marine from Emory high deafening Loria I'd love to hear your perspectives on how long we can expect to have mom bring. I'd also like to hear not the podcast these symptoms the disease here from I'll probably never while. It's going to be here longer than your mom brain is around. I'd also like to hear about any hacks. You've come up with to deal with anything falling apart or through the cracks when in the middle of membrane. Thank you and Marie she's up. The features editor at motherly one of our favorite sites. High Imrie what happened? Oh. Giggles from Cal. It's so. Kind of your happy. It's kind of a me thing because you're just like okay with that really greatness curate is odd. Great. I mean, I, you know, it'd be interesting to to have like an expert come in and talk about what happens to the brain. So okay. So what I've always read and the the place that I think mom bring comes from is when you're growing an infant in your womb? They are taking a lot of your nutrition. They're taking a lot of your son's fatty acids, which is why by the way, a lot of moms. If you find that when you're pregnant, and even when you're nursing after after back if you have a lot of like little kind of scaly bumps like white. They look like little white heads on the back of your arms kinda where there was nobody in bumpy feeling. A lot of the times that is a symptom of a essential fatty acid deficiency. So you can supplement with like fish oils, or if you're if you're vegan there are lots of you know, like a algae-based options and things like that. And they they clear up really fast. Once you were I found them to cleverly fast. Once you start to get the right levels of. Oh fatty acids in your food. But because the baby is so greedy for them because they're so important in in developing the brain. But anyway because baby is taking so much of your vital nutrition. It actually does sort of deprive your brain in a way. And I also I mean again, I'm not a doctor. I'm not saying this medical expertise. I'm just saying what I've read and heard from people and also what I found to be true. I also think just when you are sleep deprived and extremely hormonal. And you're juggling a lot and a lot of different sort of priorities and to do list, of course, things are going to slip through the cracks mean, mom Rina's. It's it's sort of just a symptom of having you know, two or three rains or four brains that you're trying to keep track of all at once. And to answer the question of how long it'll be around for you know, I've talked to grandmothers all the time who still feel like they have mom brain who still feel like they are missing the the the used to be able to count on themselves and rely on themselves to like, oh, logging my brain. I I gotta get my dry cleaning tonight. If I don't write it down like write it down..

Daphne malaria Instagram Marie Rina Baldwin editor Gary
"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Began. John having a political scientist at the university of Nebraska, Lincoln here, spend your studying the psychological a neurological differences between liberals and conservatives along with Kevin Smith and John Alford. He's the co, author of the book predisposed liberals conservatives and the biology of political differences. John, thanks for joining me today on hidden brain. Thank you, Sean Carr. It was a pleasure to be with you. This episode of hidden brain was produced by Thomas Lou and edited by Tara boil and Camila Vargas Restrepo. Our team includes Raina Cohen, Jenny Schmidt parts Shah and Laura Correll our unsung hero this week is Alex Yang. Alex works with our IT team at NPR. He recently helped us update our archiving systems throughout the process, and this was a massive undertaking involving more than one hundred hidden brain episodes. He answered all our endless questions without once rolling his eyes. Thank you, Alex. You can find more hidden brain on Facebook and Twitter if you like the show gleese tell one friend about us today. Again, if you love hidden brain, take one moment. Think of one friend and spread the word. I'm Sean Covey downton, and this is NPR. If you can't pay your debts in China, you could end up on the blacklist. Won't be able to get a Bank account and your face might even be projected on a billboard. That's my picture on my ID card and my ID card number and my name this week on the indicator from planet money.

Alex Yang John Alford NPR Sean Covey Sean Carr Camila Vargas Restrepo Raina Cohen scientist university of Nebraska Lincoln Kevin Smith Tara boil Facebook Thomas Lou Laura Correll China Twitter Jenny Schmidt Shah
"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

08:27 min | 2 years ago

"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"Place. Now there are all kinds of confounding factors when it comes to studying how politicians speak in the actual world, political considerations that are difficult to disentangle, from psychological and biological traits. But John another studied these differences. In experimental settings, John wants showed liberals and conservatives positive and negative pictures, and he found the reacted very differently. A positive picture would be something like a beautiful sunset, or somebody enjoying themselves on a ski slope, happy child, a negative picture would be things like a house that are just been leveled by a hurricane or guy eating worms or children who are male nourished we had people hooked up to some physiological devices. The most obvious one is electro dermal activity or skin conductors, which is a common way of seeing if somebody is just having a reaction, having a physiological arouse. Zyl to that stimulus. And what we found is that people do have arousal when they see these kinds of images because they have some emotional content, but we tended to find that liberals were more reactive to the positive images and conservatives are more reactive to the negative images. I understand that in one brain imaging study that you conducted volunteers was shown disgusting images and brain activation from even a single image was actually pretty good at being able to tell who was liberal and who was conservative. That's true. There have been three or four studies that attempt to see if the brain activation patterns of liberals and conservatives is different, and the one that we did goes back to kind of our favorite thing, which this show them these, these different kinds of pictures. Actually, we had the most luck with pictures of mutilations and and you're right when we did that, it was very easy to categorize people, you know, without knowing anything about them, all we would look at what's the brain scan results, and we could be incredibly accurate knowing whether they're liberal or conservative. Just on the basis of that liberals brains when they looked at mutilation images were much more active in part of the brain called the s. to some out of sensory to this is part of the brain that will will be activated if you suffer pain. So I, if I kick you in the shin Madison Ansari to be active, but it's also active if you see pain and others. And so if you would see a movie of somebody stepping on a rusty nail goes right through their foot, you're so Mattis sensory to be active. And what we saw in these in these brain scans was that liberals were more likely to have activation in Madison to than conservatives doesn't mean the conservatives are hard-hearted just means that things are happening differently when they see different images. Now, you could argue that a lot of this research is car relational. You could also argue that a lot of the patterns that John others find are consistent with the power of upbringing in shaping political preferences. Here's how let's see. I'm raised in a conservative home. I learned to be politic. Really conservative from my parents, but my family also influences all kinds of other things about me that have nothing to do with politics, the shape the kind of food I like to eat the kind of movies. I like to watch the kind of sports. I enjoy by this line of reasoning. The fact that liberals and conservatives are different on manner of things isn't about biology. It just shows you how your family environment can affect lots of things about you. There's a really interesting way to separate the effects of biology from the environment. Think about fraternal and identical twins, identical twins, have identical genes. Fraternal twins have similar, but not identical genes. If you follow a group of fraternal and identical twins, each twin pairs raised in the same household, each pair. It's the same food listens to the same conversations. What is the same movies? Now, if you find differences between identical twins as a group and fraternal twins, as a group that suggests that biology non environment is the driver I asked John, what set studies reveal about political preferences. We were fortunate to have access to data set as a very large includes thousands and thousands of twin pairs collected by Guinan Lindon eaves a long ago. It's fairly dated data set, but it was a valuable one for us. Because it included lots of information about their political views. And when we subjected these data to the standard twin design approach, we did indeed find that their political views were quite heritable, although people oftentimes mis read this, our results suggested that maybe thirty or forty percent of our political views come from genetics. But no, that bothered a lot of people. And this was quite a controversial study in political science. Many people didn't like that at all, and they tended to over interpret those results and make it sound like we were saying that everything was was genetic, but you know if it's thirty four percent, genetic obviously is fifty sixty seventy percent that comes from the environment. So all we're saying is that that genetic component is not zero, but apparently that was enough that people were upset about that. And so you basically you're able to tell in some ways that there is a closer link in the political orientation of identical twins than in the political orientation of fraternal twins, and that tells you that there is. Some element of the biology some element of genetics that is driving political preferences. Exactly. No, that's well put. And again, it's nice to compare political views with other kinds of things. Height, for example, turns out to be about eighty percent heritable. When you see these when you subject to the same kind of design personality traits are about fifty six percent, political views thirty to forty percent. I would say one of the big implications of all of this work besides just being interesting in itself is that it helps us. I think think about the political conflicts we have with fresh insight and and you've made the case that in many ways, the more we're able to see the differences between groups of people as inherent or biological. In some ways, it changes the way we think about those differences. Talk to me about that idea. John. Yes. When other traits have been understood to be biological, I'm thinking of something like handedness, you know, we used to think that if you were left handed that was just because you got into a lazy habit, my father was left handed and the teacher, you know, this would long ago would beat him on the on the hand with a ruler. Whenever he wrote with his left hand, train them to to write with his right hand. So we've used that as as a flaw, something that needs to be driven out. Of course. Now we understand that being left handed is very biological. This is something much deeper than just a lazy habit or of course, you know, the big one today would be sexual orientation when people realized that sexual orientation is indeed biologically driven and not something that they just have decided to do, then people are much more tolerant of that. So we were wondering if perhaps the same thing might happen with regard to politics, if we realized that our political opponents were not simply being lazy, but rather were oriented to the world in a different fashion that maybe we would be a little bit more tolerant of them that this is the only way we're going to get anywhere if at least understand where they're coming from, even if we still might deeply disagree with their conclusions. What would you say to critics? Who would say, you know, the argument that psychological traits in biological differences are beneath our d. political conflicts doesn't make sense because we didn't always have this deep divide in our country between liberals and conservatives there was a time when. We had many, many more people in the center. The most liberal Republican was often to the left of the more most conservative democrat, and you know, the really has been a sorting of the political parties in recent years. What explains this change? Especially over the last twenty thirty years. What I would say to that argument is that I believe we have always had this very same division. This very basic difference between people who are fairly sensitive to threats and think we need to be vigilant and those people who are more into experimentation and trying new things. Ralph WALDO Emerson has a great quote, and I'm sorry, I can't give it to you verbatim, but it's basically that the division between those people who are supporters of tradition in those people who are supportive of innovation is very old and a structured, the world since time began.

John Zyl Ralph WALDO Emerson Madison Madison Ansari Mattis pain Guinan Lindon forty percent fifty sixty seventy percent thirty four percent twenty thirty years fifty six percent eighty percent
"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"brain" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"This is hidden brain. I'm Shankar tham. We start today with an account of two communities. One is liberal. The other conservative. I want you to guess which is which. The schools would stress patriotism and respect him. It would be a very rules based educational system. The houses would be fairly similar. The lawns would be very nicely kept in a beautifully green and mode, the town, it'd be quiet with lots of churches that's down one. Here's town to the schools would be based more on experiential kinds of things rather than than rope. Memory people would prefer older houses with wooden floors rather than wall to wall carpeting. They would keep the yards natural, lots of bars and community theaters and foreign films more of those than churches, nosy, right? Conservatives order liberals embrace ambiguity. Now you may be rolling your eyes or even getting angry at these stereotypes, but we all know there's more than a green of truth to them. So how did these towns which our guest today refers to as liberal and conservative on get this way. When most of us think about how we came to our political views. We tend to have a straightforward explanation. We use our upbringing and life experiences as the basis for political beliefs. We imagine that our parents, teachers and friends shape our views on everything from taxes and the economy to immigration and national security. But what if I told you there is something deeper to those attitudes drives that shape the music. We listen to the food. We eat the politicians, we elect. This week on hidden brain how the partisan divide in our country might arise, not just from our bringing and lived experiences, but from biology support for this podcast and the following message come from Doctors Without Borders, providing vital medical care in over seventy countries to those who need it most learn about including doctorswithoutborders in your state plans by visiting legacy dot Doctors Without Borders, dot org. Support also comes from the business platinum card from American Express, platinum, enhance his life's moments, both big and small so that you can do business to the fullest. Don't do business without it. On a regular basis right before an election, someone will share an article with me about how science proves that the brains of liberals are stunted or a post on Twitter will say, Republicans are less intelligent than Democrats. These claims obscure something far more interesting and far more accurate. There are genuine psychological differences between liberals and conservatives understanding. These differences can give us fresh insight into our political conflicts. John hibbing is a political scientist at the university of Nebraska Lincoln. He has spent many years studying the psychological and neurological differences between liberals and conservatives. He is co, author of the book predisposed liberals conservatives and the biology of political differences. John welcome to hidden brain. Thank you Sean car pleasure to be with you. When most of us think about how we came to our political views. John, we have a relatively straightforward explanation that has to do with our upbringing and background. How does that theory go. Well, whenever asked my students where their political views come from the first thing I say as their parents. And I think we had this sense that those of us that are parents passed along are supplemented by those from clergy member trusted relative, a close friend, but we sort those through our own view of the world. And we come to a very rational understanding of the world and an understanding of what social policies our best to make the world better. So we didn't look in debt that some of the psychological and brain differences do exist between liberals and conservatives. But I want to start by looking at how differences between partisans are not limited to politics. These these differences show up in many demands that have nothing to do with politics, Republican president. George H W Bush wants spoke about an issue that had bothered him for many years. I do not like broccoli, and I haven't liked it since I was a little kid and my mother made me eat it and I'm president of the United States and I'm not gonna eat any more broccoli. What do food differences tell us about liberals and conservatives. Well, we tend to see that there are differences in tastes conservatives do like meat and potatoes. More liberals are more likely to prefer ethnic food, so you you see that in and that we think is part of a deeper pattern of conservatives are a little bit fonder of kind of predictability of substandard kinds of things. And liberals are a little bit more willing to experiment in this comes through and food tastes and a variety of other things. Here's another example. Researchers once went into the living spaces of people offices and dorm rooms, and they recorded the item said they saw what was different about the living and workspaces of liberals and conservatives. Well, conservatives tended to have lots of things like sports memorabilia. Whereas liberals tend to have more experiential things that lots of books, lots of CDs, especially diverse CDs, whereas conservatives were more likely to have things that organize their lives, calendars, closed baskets. Also, the researchers suggested the liberals rooms were not quite as tidy or as well lighted as the conservative rooms and offices. This even been some research looking at differences in our preferences for different kinds of pets. I understand Jonathan height and others have explored that liberals and conservatives gravitated different kinds of dogs. Different kinds of dogs at tends to be the case that conservatives prefer purebreds and liberals will will go with mixed breed dogs. There are some studies that suggest how you view pets there isn't that much difference in in how many have pets both liberals and conservatives like to have pets at about equal level, but they might view them somewhat differently. Liberals are a little bit more likely to them as part of the family rather than you know, just a pet. So you have those kinds of very interesting things not just in pet ownership but kind of an orientation to the pet. The patterns that John and others have identified a more than just curious. These patterns suggest that our model of political differences is wrong in an important way. Liberals and conservatives don't just have different political preferences. They have different temperaments. Conservatives don't just care about lower taxes. The also care about whether poetry rhymes that's right, should poetry rhyme. We also ask, are you more comfortable with novels that end with clear resolution, those kinds of things? And you know, you can start to see a pattern already. I think in our discussion that it is the case that liberals are more likely to say, sure. I'm okay with free verse. Whereas conservative say now, we really think there should be a pattern. Music should come back to a recognizable melody poetry should rhyme and novel should should wrap up in a way that we are are comfortable with.

John hibbing Doctors Without Borders president Twitter American Express George H W Bush United States Sean university of Nebraska Lincoln Jonathan scientist