38 Burst results for "Brady"

Fresh update on "brady" discussed on The Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show

The Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show

00:27 sec | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "brady" discussed on The Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show

"Of yesterday This is a 2% decrease over the last two weeks Robert Phillips chief elections officer for the Duval county supervisor of elections office is saying the two men accused of trying to register voters were trying to register Democrats as Republicans Devin king and Jordan Daniels were arrested earlier this month and accused of trying to register citizens to vote without their consent The Tampa Bay Buccaneers will play the Indianapolis Colts tomorrow quarterback Tom Brady says they're not letting the Thanksgiving holiday get in their way of victory You know it's short week for us and Thanksgiving so a lot of things can be made of it A lot of excuses can be built in but we got to just push forward and go try to get a win on the road The bucks face the cults at one p.m..

Devin King Jordan Daniels Robert Phillips Duval County Tampa Bay Buccaneers Indianapolis Colts Tom Brady Bucks
Tom Brady tosses 2 TDs, Buccaneers beat Giants 30-10

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 5 d ago

Tom Brady tosses 2 TDs, Buccaneers beat Giants 30-10

"The Tampa Bay Buccaneers got back on the winning track after two straight losses by defeating the New York Giants thirty to ten Tom Brady threw for three hundred seven yards including touchdown passes to Chris Godwin and Mike Evans it was seven seventy second career touchdown breaking the franchise record formerly held by running back Mike Alstott giants quarterback Daniel Jones threw two interceptions each of which led to a Tampa Bay field goal the only highlight of the night for New York was a touchdown pass from Jones to tackle eligible Andrew Thomas I'm Tom Aikens

Chris Godwin Tampa Bay Buccaneers New York Giants Mike Evans Mike Alstott Tom Brady Daniel Jones Giants Tampa Bay New York Jones Andrew Thomas Tom Aikens
Fresh update on "brady" discussed on Strong Opinion Sports

Strong Opinion Sports

02:16 min | 20 hrs ago

Fresh update on "brady" discussed on Strong Opinion Sports

"But I think you have to acknowledge <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that <Speech_Male> every little <SpeakerChange> thing <Silence> Tom Brady does. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Is him <Speech_Male> making <Speech_Male> a calculated choice <Silence> that he thinks <Speech_Male> will help him <Silence> when a Super Bowl. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Another Super Bowl. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> win more games. <Speech_Male> And whether that's praising <Speech_Male> a teammate here, <Speech_Male> taking <Speech_Male> a guy out to dinner <Speech_Male> there, making <Speech_Male> fun of Instagram story taking <Speech_Male> a picture like he doesn't care, <Silence> whatever he thinks <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> will ultimately <Speech_Male> lead to him winning more <Speech_Male> football games. That's what <Silence> Tom Brady will do. <Silence> And <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> that might even <Silence> mean hey, I gotta care about <Speech_Male> these people. <Speech_Male> My teammates. And <Silence> I truly think <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> I'm sure <Speech_Male> it's genuine. You can't go <Speech_Male> for 20 years <Silence> doing an NFL career <Speech_Male> and not <Speech_Male> pretending to <Speech_Male> care about your teammates. <Silence> I'm not saying that. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm not saying that Tommy <Silence> doesn't <SpeakerChange> care. I'm <Speech_Male> sure he does. <Speech_Male> But he <Silence> chooses to care. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Tom Brady chooses <Silence> to invest in his teammates <Silence> and <Silence> man, <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> it <Speech_Male> takes him a long, long way. <Speech_Male> So those <Silence> are my thoughts on <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> man in the arena episode <Speech_Male> two. <Speech_Male> It's Saturday morning. <Speech_Male> Look, I <Speech_Male> gave you if you didn't want to <Speech_Male> listen to this. You didn't have to. <Speech_Male> And again, <Speech_Male> I talked <Speech_Male> about something there that <Speech_Male> is, <Speech_Male> I've kept my lips <Speech_Male> really tight and not talked <Speech_Male> about at all. I think <SpeakerChange> I covered it in <Speech_Male> a way that everyone can hear. <Speech_Male> And that's <Silence> my goal of this show <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is to never <Speech_Male> divide people. I like to <Speech_Male> bring people together. And so <Speech_Male> I don't care where you <Speech_Male> fall politically. I <Speech_Male> just don't care. <Speech_Male> Do you love football? <Speech_Male> Then welcome. Because that's <Speech_Male> what I love. I love football. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> if you love football, you're <Speech_Male> welcome here and <Speech_Male> that's my goal here. So <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I've talked about the VAC <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> VAS, <Speech_Male> probably, whatever. <Speech_Male> I don't care. I <Speech_Male> love you guys. I appreciate you. <Speech_Male> I love Tom Brady. <Silence> He's my favorite player of all <Speech_Male> time. The <Speech_Male> series is fun. <Speech_Male> We got <Silence> the next episode <Speech_Male> coming up <Speech_Male> about Tom Brady's <Speech_Male> third Super Bowl. It's <Speech_Male> probably the second least <Speech_Male> compelling Super Bowl <Speech_Male> Tom Brady has ever won or been <Speech_Male> to. <Speech_Male> I can't wait for <Speech_Male> the 2007 <Speech_Male> season when <Speech_Male> they lose to the Giants <Speech_Male> or when <Speech_Male> they beat Russell <Speech_Male> Wilson after that <Speech_Male> goal line interception <Speech_Male> for Malcolm butler. And <Speech_Male> they're probably gonna interview Malcolm <Speech_Male> butler like, <Speech_Male> I want that kind of stuff <Speech_Male> to be talked about, and <Speech_Male> I know that there's really <Silence> great episodes coming. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm not that excited <Speech_Male> for this next one. <Speech_Male> And that's why part of <Silence> why it took me so long to get this <Speech_Male> out. But anyway, <Speech_Male> I'll <Speech_Male> see you for episode three. <Speech_Male> I love you. I appreciate <Silence> you. And but <Speech_Male> bam, we are done.

Tom Brady Football Super Bowl Tommy NFL Malcolm Butler Giants Russell Wilson Malcolm
Bucs handle Giants...Magic blown out...Comeback honors

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 5 d ago

Bucs handle Giants...Magic blown out...Comeback honors

"AP sports I'm David Shuster the Phoenix Suns got off to a slow start this NBA season but they are in high gear now riding a thirteen game winning streak following Monday's one fifteen one eleven victory at San Antonio elsewhere Memphis scored the final seven points in their win on the road at Utah one nineteen one eighteen other winners included Brooklyn Charlotte Atlanta Boston Milwaukee Minnesota Indiana and Philadelphia who defeated Sacramento off the court lebron James and I'd say it's stored both suspended following their altercation Sunday James getting one game store getting too on the collegiate level this week's a people has Gonzaga at UCLA at numbers one and two both played in one Monday night inside a one oh seven fifty four over central Michigan UCLA seventy five sixty two over Bellarmine Gonzaga and UCLA face off later this week and then pro football Tom Brady keeps rolling on the seven time Super Bowl champion had a pair of touchdown passes is Tampa Bay blew out the New York Giants thirty to ten I'm David Shuster AP sports

David Shuster Phoenix Suns AP Ucla NBA San Antonio Memphis Lebron James Utah Milwaukee Brooklyn Charlotte Sacramento Atlanta Bellarmine Gonzaga Minnesota Indiana Philadelphia Boston Gonzaga
Fresh update on "brady" discussed on Strong Opinion Sports

Strong Opinion Sports

02:00 min | 20 hrs ago

Fresh update on "brady" discussed on Strong Opinion Sports

"That's a lot of quarterbacks focus on that stuff. Brady takes it even further than any quarterback we've ever seen in NFL history. His diet, the way he eats, the way he takes care of his body. And the way he invests in his teammates. It's just its next level of preparation of thought like I said at my first episode of this show talking about episode one of man in the arena. I said, Tom Brady is the most prepared quarterback of all time. And people are like, what about Peyton Manning? It was prepared, absolutely, but paid meant he never stopped drinking beer. Pain never did the next level of preparation, Tom Brady's done with his body, writing a book. I own the TB 12 diet. I've never read it. I thought it would be interesting to buy, and I've never made any content about it. I kind of waste of money. I thought I'd be a tax write off, then I'd never made a video about it. So maybe I should someday. Although I think if I did, it sounded like a stock or more than I already do. But Peyton Manning, I love the guy. Always prepared for game day. But in the off season, I think the reality is and you see it now in the way Tom Brady's body still to this day is healthy. Peyton Manning had a crappy throwing motion that hurt his neck. I love Peyton Manning but he always historic motion. I learned how to throw the ball like Peyton Manning. No, it screwed me up too. I threw the ball way too over the top and the split check throw thing, and flip the booger off your nose. It was cute, but it didn't work very well. And there's little tweaks that Tom Brady's made to his throwing motion to his body to his diet to his teammates everything. That the reality is paid in many willing to make those kind of sacrifices to extend his career. And I just think there's so many.

Peyton Manning Tom Brady Brady NFL TB
Brady picked off twice in 1st; Bucs lose to Washington 29-19

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

Brady picked off twice in 1st; Bucs lose to Washington 29-19

"Taylor Heinicke threw for two hundred fifty six yards on a twenty yard touchdown pass to the Andre Carter as the Washington football team upset the Buccaneers twenty nine nineteen Washington intercepted Tom Brady twice in the first quarter but he did manage to throw two touchdown passes his second one to Mike Evans brought the books to within twenty three nineteen early in the fourth quarter Heinecke then led Washington on the nineteen play eighty yard drive in ten minutes and twenty six seconds for the final touchdown for offense to have the ball there ten minutes left up by four and to go nineteen plays and go down there and and and and it's like that's huge for us especially with how it's been going last for weeks Antonio Gibson scored on a pair of one yard touchdown runs Craig heist Landover Maryland

Taylor Heinicke Andre Carter Washington Heinecke Buccaneers Mike Evans Tom Brady Football Antonio Gibson Craig Heist Landover Maryland
Smith's late goal lifts Hurricanes past Blues

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Smith's late goal lifts Hurricanes past Blues

"Brendan Smith's first goal of the season was the game winner with two fifty seven left as the hurricanes nip the blues three to two anytime you score your first with a franchise it's really exciting you you remember almost every play every who made the pass and I remember when my first one with the red wings and then with the Rangers in here it's just it's really it's really thrilling especially with the G. Doug Brady chance Sebastian I'll also scored for the hurricanes who avoided a second straight loss after holding a third period lead chase scored seventy five seconds into the game and our whole added a power play goal in the second Andrei Svechnikov for Tony deangelo both had two assists Alex Lyon had twenty seven saves in his Carolina debut probably Chevy chin Vladimir Tarasenko scored for the blues on the ferry

Brendan Smith Hurricanes G. Doug Brady Red Wings Rangers Sebastian Andrei Svechnikov Tony Deangelo Alex Lyon Vladimir Tarasenko Carolina
Saints overcome Winston injury, top Buccaneers 36-27

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

Saints overcome Winston injury, top Buccaneers 36-27

"PJ Williams picked off Tom Brady and returned it forty yards for a touchdown with one twenty four remaining securing the seats thirty six twenty seven victory over the Buccaneers Brady threw for four touchdowns but he also turned the ball over three times on a pair of interceptions and a fumble leading to sixteen Orleans points the wind could be costly for the saints who lost quarterback Jameis Winston to a knee injury early in the second quarter Trevor Simeon took over for Winston completed sixteen of twenty nine throws for one hundred fifty nine yards and a touchdown without a turnover Simeone led the saints on five scoring drives it produced two touchdowns and three field goals I'm the ferry

Pj Williams Tom Brady Jameis Winston Buccaneers Trevor Simeon Brady Saints Orleans Simeone Winston
Biden Administration Wants to Use the IRS to Spy on Your Bank Account. Period.

The Dan Bongino Show

01:47 min | Last month

Biden Administration Wants to Use the IRS to Spy on Your Bank Account. Period.

"So peppermint patties up there at the in the Brady press room And she can't stop lying It's like an impulse control problem Peter doocy is pressing her right now on both vaccine mandates and the IRS snooping and she just can't be cheesy incapable I believe physically incapable Like the vocal cords the tongue the whole mechanism for which she produces sound is incapable of producing a sound that resembles the truth Listen to me and listen clearly The IRS under Joe Biden Joe Biden's administration wants to use the IRS to spy on your bank account Period That's not open for debate That's not open for discussion I don't play euphemisms games That's a fact They think your money is their money and therefore they should be able to see everything you spend money on every withdrawal That's why they want a digital currency as well There's nothing more they'd like and to monitor your transactions outside of the bank as well Listen to me This is what totalitarians and tyrants do They do totalitarian stuff which is totally running your life and taking from you what they believe is theirs That's why they want you to stick things in your body like a vaccine whether you want to or not That's why they demand access to your bank account And she can not stop lying She's trying to play this fancy word game Well now we were gonna look at everybody's bank account that had $600 in transactions Now we're just gonna make it 10,000 Folks most people have direct deposit I assure you the overwhelming majority of Americans are going to have some transactions in their account that total the $10,000 or more Why are they entitled to

IRS Peter Doocy Joe Biden
Brady tops 600 career TD passes, Buccaneers rout Bears 38-3

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last month

Brady tops 600 career TD passes, Buccaneers rout Bears 38-3

"The Tampa Bay Buccaneers dominated in all phases of the game and route to a thirty eight to three victory over the Chicago Bears Tom Brady threw four touchdown passes three of them to Mike Evans giving Brady six hundred two for his career thus far Jaelyn Jordan ran a punt back forty three yards to set up a letter of Fournette touchdown and the defense bottled up the bears all day Justin fields past four hundred eighty four yards but threw three interceptions fumbled three times losing two of them and was sacked four times Tampa Bay is now six one one the bears drop to three and four I'm Tom Macon's

Jaelyn Jordan Tampa Bay Buccaneers Fournette Mike Evans Chicago Bears Tom Brady Justin Fields Brady Bears Tampa Bay Tom Macon
Tom Brady throws 2 TD passes, Buccaneers beat Eagles 28-22

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Tom Brady throws 2 TD passes, Buccaneers beat Eagles 28-22

"Tom Brady and Leonard Fournette each accounted for two touchdowns as the Buccaneers held off the eagles twenty eight twenty two Brady tossed TD passes on Tampa bay's first two drives while going eleven of twelve for one hundred twenty one yards he finished thirty four of forty two for two hundred ninety seven yards to win on the road and on I was gonna play our best so we have to get back to work we got a you know a good little break here use it and get back to work to bring a better camera increased its lead to twenty eight seven one four net walked in from the one yard line in the third quarter it was his second scoring run of the game eagles quarterback Jalen hurts ran for two touchdowns but had trouble passing the ball completed just twelve of twenty six for one hundred fifty five yards on the ferry

Leonard Fournette Tom Brady Buccaneers Eagles Brady Tampa Bay Jalen Hurts
Brady's 5 TD passes to pace Bucs' 47-15 rout of Dolphins

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Brady's 5 TD passes to pace Bucs' 47-15 rout of Dolphins

"The Tampa Bay Buccaneers used a high powered offense and lots of defensive pressure to defeat the Miami Dolphins forty five to seventeen Tom Brady completed passes to ten different receivers including two touchdown strikes to Antonio brown and Mike Evans and one to Giovanni Bernard bank try to spread around everybody in here can make some plays Jimmy plays the backs me plays in the pass game I needed I was on the receivers did that's what we're going to keep doing what I keep spin around the books injury riddled defense rose to the challenge with three sacks a forced fumble and an interception Miami quarterback Jacoby Brissett pass for two hundred seventy five yards and two touchdowns but much of that was early in the game before the bucs defense settled in I'm Tom Aikens

Giovanni Bernard Tampa Bay Buccaneers Antonio Brown Miami Dolphins Mike Evans Tom Brady Jimmy Jacoby Brissett Miami Bucs Tom Aikens
McCullers shines as Astros beat White Sox 6-1 in Game 1

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last month

McCullers shines as Astros beat White Sox 6-1 in Game 1

"Lance McCullers junior tossed six and two thirds innings of shutout baseball as the Houston Astros beat the Chicago White Sox in game one of the American League division series six to one the colors allowed four hits all of them singles without walking a batter to go with four strikeouts guard on Alvarez doubled and homered for the Astros well Michael Brantley Carlos Correa and Jake Myers added two hits weights when was tagged with the loss for the white Sox after allowing five runs on six hits in three two thirds innings Jose Brady finished with two hits and an RBI out of schooling Houston

Lance Mccullers Astros White Sox Michael Brantley American League Carlos Correa Jake Myers Baseball Alvarez Jose Brady Houston
Tom Brady, Buccaneers And Patriots discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last month

Tom Brady, Buccaneers And Patriots discussed on AP News Radio

"Tom Brady did what he does best in his return to New England leading is team to victory in the Buccaneers nineteen seventeen thriller against the patriots system of a motion moments thinking about coming up here in planning on again I just I know it's tough to come in here and and when a game Brady passed for two hundred sixty nine yards in his homecoming it broke drew Brees NFL career passing yardage record on a twenty eight yard first quarter strike to Mike Evans I just think it's amazing statistic and that so many people can share it with me mac Jones threw for two hundred seventy five yards two TD's in the pick for the one and three patriots Nick folk missed a go ahead fifty six yard field goal try with a minute to play get

Tom Brady Buccaneers Patriots New England Drew Brees Brady Mike Evans Mac Jones NFL Nick Folk
John Hinckley Jr., Who Tried to Kill Reagan, Will Be Released Next June

Mark Levin

01:30 min | 2 months ago

John Hinckley Jr., Who Tried to Kill Reagan, Will Be Released Next June

"And then the report came out That the president had been shot the 40th president of the United States Nobody knew how bad it was but as you now know he almost died He was bleeding out Punctured lung eternal bleeding Almost died The man who shot him was John W hinckley junior He crippled James Brady two officers were also shot Now I hinkley's 66 years old The Washington compost writes that trial he was found not guilty by reason of insanity after explaining that by shooting the president he's trying to get the attention of actress Jody foster with whom he was obsessed And she played the character in the movie taxi driver about a would be assassin of a presidential candidate The verdict outrage many and led to changes in laws making the insanity defense more difficult to claim but it didn't change the outcome of inky's trial He spent several decades in a government psychiatric hospital where his condition improved and by the 1990s he was going on supervised trips with his family 2016 he was granted a strictly controlled conditional release to his mother's home in a gay de community This is by far the best outcome for any one who has ever shot a president They point out

John W Hinckley Jody Foster James Brady Hinkley United States Washington Inky
Would-Be Presidential Assassin John Hinckley Wins Unconditional Release

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Would-Be Presidential Assassin John Hinckley Wins Unconditional Release

"Beginning in june of twenty twenty two john. Hinckley who shot former president. Ronald reagan will no longer need to have doctors or therapists oversee his meds or how often he attends individual group therapy sessions. He's going to get unconditional release. While must be nice. What a country try to kill. The president destroyed jim. Brady's life shot shot. Four or five people right for a number of people were were shot Prosecutors initially opposed ending the restrictions but today attorneys told the judge. They'd reached an agreement unconditional. Release for the guy who nearly killed ronald reagan. Great

Hinckley Ronald Reagan John Brady JIM
Rams' Stafford throws for 4 TDs, outduels Brady and Bucs

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Rams' Stafford throws for 4 TDs, outduels Brady and Bucs

"Matthew Stafford threw four touchdown passes in the rams moved to three in a row with a thirty four twenty four win over the Buccaneers Cooper Kupp was on the receiving end of two Stafford scoring strikes two Sean Jackson and Tyler Higbee caught the other touchdowns Jackson's one Persephone five yards Stafford finished the day with three hundred forty three passing yards Tom Brady threw for four hundred thirty two yards with one touchdown running and one passing but the Super Bowl champs take their first loss and dropped it to win one mark Myers Inglewood California

Cooper Kupp Sean Jackson Matthew Stafford Tyler Higbee Stafford Rams Buccaneers Jackson Tom Brady Super Bowl Mark Myers Inglewood California
Texas Congressman Kevin Brady Fights For The Unborn

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:53 min | 2 months ago

Texas Congressman Kevin Brady Fights For The Unborn

"Congressman. Brady welcome to the mike gallagher. Show how you doing. Hey go get individually with you sam. How are you doing. And you're right there is Thank you for your leadership on so many conservative issues including especially pro-life you're just all over our region every day and i'm grateful and congressman brady has what's called the eighth congressional district which is just north of houston the At pretty much the most conservative republican district in america it's like eighty percent of it is it isn't it isn't it. Great to be in the pro-life state where we have the heartbeat law. Here pre born congressman. Yes so much. So and i'll tell you we are It has it has caused you know just to uprising Here in congress among nancy pelosi and and democrats in fact today this morning They rushed to the house floor a bill that basically provides abortion on demand through birth As the law land in america it will Eight imposes on demand. Boertien removes nearly all the pro-life protections for the unborn and abolishes state laws on pro-life issues including texas and others and then As any including those the prevent late term abortions. Which look i i don't understand How you know in months seventh eighth and ninth win. The baby is born alive from botched abortion. That they're they are. That is not considered a life and This bill i think goes to the worst of all of that. We know in texas The heartbeat bills already saved over two thousand lives of babies and many of them are babies of color Which is i think. Important for us to be protecting those who don't have a voice in and you've made that tastes beautifully for so many years.

Congressman Brady Mike Gallagher Brady Boertien SAM America Nancy Pelosi Houston Congress Texas
The Cowboys Figure out a Way to Win When Things Aren’t Perfect

KILF Morning New Podcast

01:48 min | 2 months ago

The Cowboys Figure out a Way to Win When Things Aren’t Perfect

"And the cowboys got that win. They did the. Nfl was a nailbiter seats. Wermer and i'm trying to think of other things you could apply to the cowboys first win of the season and it is here by the way we'll sort of like the open. It came down to the last few seconds that was greg's airline who was the goat. And i'm not talking about the greatest of all time. He was the goat after missing two field goal attempts to previous week against the buccaneers and appoint after temp but he was able to get it done yesterday. He lives in a he lives another week. And he's the guy. I mean he's he. He's a really good kicker. Although his quarterback dak prescott was Having to kind of watch from the sidelines go please please. Yes he kicked it. I mean Y'all's over there. Talking to omar checking on amar somewhat. Just trying to get my mind off of it. I guess obviously known in situation like that. You trust the teams and greg's are lying to put it through But yeah. I mean it was great. Obviously believing him make anyone did that and it was just a relief right. I mean the first one. I one a many in the first ones usually the hardest now. I'm not going to get into specifics. But there were some issues with clock management down in that final drive. The cowboys had it back with three minutes and change to go a lot more time than tom brady. Had the previous week when it was less than two minutes to go. But mike mccarthy and i don't know what was going on with keller more in their communication but they wanted to get a little farther down the field than having kick fifty six yarder but zor line had with his leg. Greg leg had more than enough distance yesterday that it could have gone farther than that than that if they needed it. I just know that. Mike mccarthy's happy to finally get this first one in the bow to come in here and win. This game was important on a number of

Cowboys Wermer Dak Prescott Greg Buccaneers NFL Amar Omar Mike Mccarthy Zor Line Tom Brady Keller
Panthers' Matt Rhule Is Making a Bid for Best NFL Coach This Season

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

01:50 min | 2 months ago

Panthers' Matt Rhule Is Making a Bid for Best NFL Coach This Season

"I wanna talk about the best young coach football. And it's not necessarily sean mcveigh. It's clear that it's not only an indictment on the new york jets operation. But what you're seeing was sam darnold in the carolina. Panthers is pretty remarkable the knock on darnold out of college there to know with too comfortable wins but the knock on darnold out of college and i watched every snap was his accuracy issues. What does he completing now. Seventy percent of his throws. He doesn't make mistakes total composure. It would be easy to just say. This is an indictment on the jets but instead of just the negative side. Let's look realistically at the positive side. Not only has met rule made darnold more comfortable. This defense has twenty one quarterback hits and ten sacks in two games. What does that tell you. The culture of the carolina. Panthers is headed in the right direction. It also tells you. This is a remarkable stat on matt rule. The coach carolina going back to the beginning of last year. You will not believe this. Carolina leads the nfl with the fewest. Three and outs that with teddy bridgewater and start with. Sam darnold. nothing about that not mahomes. Not lamar jackson. Not tom brady. Not derek carr not matt ryan not russell wilson not aaron rodgers. No the fewest three and outs matt rule. Teddy bridgewater and sam darnold but this is a offensive line. That outside of right tackle graded poorly left. Tackle all the way to right guard. What matt rule is doing with this sub optimal often. It's of line. The scarce number of three out the revamping rebooting of sam darnold is really mind-blowing

Sam Darnold Sean Mcveigh New York Jets Panthers Carolina Teddy Bridgewater Football Lamar Jackson Derek Carr Matt Russell Wilson Matt Ryan Tom Brady NFL Aaron Rodgers
Brady Has 276 Yards, 5 TDs; Buccaneers Rout Falcons 48-25

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Brady Has 276 Yards, 5 TDs; Buccaneers Rout Falcons 48-25

"Tom Brady threw five touchdown passes and safety Mike Edwards returned two interceptions for scores to lead the Tampa Bay Buccaneers tool forty eight to twenty five victory over the Atlanta Falcons Brady hit Chris Godwin for one score and two each to rob Gronkowski and Mike Evans Evans enjoys whatever he's asked to do everything in its only anything I could do to help my team win I'll try to do that with the score touchdowns blocking get first downs whatever it is I'll try to do that Atlanta closed the gap to twenty eight to twenty five is Matt Ryan threw two touchdown passes body tossed three interceptions in the two pick sixes iced it for Tampa Bay I'm Tom Aikens

Chris Godwin Mike Edwards Mike Evans Evans Tom Brady Tampa Bay Buccaneers Atlanta Falcons Rob Gronkowski Brady Matt Ryan Atlanta Tampa Bay Tom Aikens
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

06:41 min | 9 months ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"Senate composition that currently is the the role of someone like senator mansion becomes all the more important and our message to him and two others who will really be key. Leaders of moving this forward is hr and hr fourteen. Forty six are already compromise measures. We have negotiated. We have determined what the appropriate kinds of mechanisms are to reflect the will of the people around fixing our nation's background check system and this these provisions what are in these bills will allow transactions to recover before family members grandparents are exempted who are putting the transfer of guns in their states. All of these things are considered in the spell. What fixes is arms list existing in a manner. That's an internet site that allows people who have large caches of guns to sell them to individuals who would never pass a background check. And i hope that it means with the passage of these bills that the senate will take them expeditiously and vote on them and passed them. If that does not happen. What that means is that we need filibuster a four wheel and that's a whole other podcast topic which i promise will do one day The cushion. I'm wondering what what about you. What is your opinion so look we are just right like it is historic that the house came in and made the such a high priority. That not only did they name it. As one of their top ten bills right with jury at once again In the primaries that they're gonna move through but they were able to introducing it this past quickly decisively within a one week period to make sure that we that we were able to send this over to the senate as one of the very first packages of bills that this house of representatives in one hundred seventeenth congress said is is is an absolute priority to strengthen and expand the brady background check system. It's huge right. I mean calm night worked for longer than a decade to try to just get one four. Vote right man. I mean had no right unbelievable the progress from when we when we first started christian working together i we couldn't even get hearings on gonna bounce prevention bells when we first started then. We advanced to you know getting hearings and then we got actual votes you while majorities. We didn't get enough to break filibusters after after the sandy hook school shooting but still progress in now. We've progressive in further such that. Were actually going to get pieces of legislation through a chamber of congress right and so every year we are getting closer and closer and closer to where we ultimately want to be and it's because they're you know this whole issue has changed because so many people have made it their issue in decided to vote for in these speaking out against it an organized with it and it's so incredible to see the progress that our movement in the gun safety movement in america has made over the past ten fifteen years and folks like stephan and in the youth generation entering. This movement has been so massively on inspiring motivational and game changing to bring in so many of the more voices of people who live this reality and want to see something different and our action taking action on that and inspired so many other. So it's it's it really is so good to hear that we're we're having votes these votes look to be passed. We're gonna move peaceable legislation down the road because like. I said we were far far away from this When we started this effort and when so many people before us were working so hard and so we have come so far. We still have much more to go. No doubt but we should all be proud of where things are. And how much fargos we've made and use that as motivation to keep pushing keep fight and look you know. We can't give up right. I think that the reason that we are where we are in the place that combines describing this because people keep showing up right the folks who are listening to right. Now y'all keep showing up a stephan and ann. Stephens entire generation continue to show up. And and and that's gonna make the difference. What happens next is is. We have to turn that same power and that same a group voice and directed at the senate. We have a no excuses for for any governmental leader to not want to see a bill. That will fundamentally keep americans safe that will save lives and we'll address this public health epidemic that we have in gun violence and this is the easiest of for steps. Right it is it is it just passed. Both both of these bills just passed with bipartisan support. At we know that this is a bill that will have bipartisan. Support on the floor of the senate as well just like it did in two thousand thirteen the different version of background. Check ill back then and there is certainly don't use now. The politics are hard and and the question becomes even though nine out of ten americans will say that they support these policies. There's one america where that's not true in the us senate for whatever reason because the system is broken and so the question is with the procedural filibuster in place. Can we get sixty votes. Because we know that. The system that that mitch mcconnell uses what president obama has called the relic of the jim crow era in procedural filibuster to prevent so much change that we desperately need and frankly it cannot be an impediment to us protecting americans from gun violence. So so you know it's more of a question but it will be on us because they're certainly no excuse why these bills should be able to get sixty votes. There's no reason why they shouldn't be able to get ninety votes right if we are looking at. What it is that The american constituents gun owners not owners alike across america from coast to coast are demanding day in day out at two to permit gun balances the simplest of first steps. So i'm excited for what comes next. I.

mitch mcconnell america sixty votes nine ninety votes Senate both one week jim crow Both obama two Forty six first Stephens two others one congress two thousand thirteen first steps
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

07:31 min | 9 months ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"Collins point. I mean it only takes one to highlight how horrific this loophole can truly be an avowed white. Supremacist was able to to acquire weapons. Even though he didn't complete a background check. Because this has been this is. This is a problem in loophole in our code and and nine parishioners who were having a bible study and at the ame church in south carolina in charleston south carolina. They they brought him in and he was able to do exactly what he wanted to. And that hate-filled filled attack and we just need to do more. I don't think that americans especially when people listening here but gun owners. Non gun owners like we. Every time we see polling every time that we ask gun owners every time we asinine garner's when we ask americans. Do you think that people should go through a background. Check to buy a firearm. Say yes and that's all we're trying to do here so you know it's so there's so many things we need to do right fixing our background. Check system expanding our background check system. That's not gonna fix gun violence. But it's a critical first step and it's the foundation upon which all other mas work because we can't prevent domestic abusers from accessing buyers can't prevent avowed white supremacist with histories of violence from accessing weapons. We can't all of the people that we know that are in an increased risk of violent behavior from accessing firearms unless we have a background check system that we can rely upon. And and so the things that we're talking about here the that the industry has fought so hard to make sure that they can continue to profit off of the sale of guns to those who who would do harm with them. These early polls that we need to close and the only people who will be upset about it are the gun industry and those who want access to guns to do the worst types of things and can't right i mean let's be really clear about it. This is this is. This is not something that is controversial. More than ninety percent of americans supported. We can't get more than ninety percent of americans to agree. That pizza tastes great or that ice cream is all right. So let's let's not pretend like this is a controversial issue associated lung and and that's why we're so thrilled that things are moving that we're getting these these these votes on the floor and and we're going to renovate like hell to make sure that big assignment the law also finish off people all the time after horrible tragedies. They always say how did this happen. How did something this horrible happen. Well as because you don't have the most basic foundational laws in place that will allow that. I check in the first wave of them actually tried to purchase a gun legally. We don't have that process where they could be of rejected and not being able to fire and everything that goes back to. Even what's going on in michigan right now at the university of michigan where students can't feel safe to protests on campus or doing clinical rallies because guns are allowed on campus and i think obviously with christmas sanitizer so many other things that we can focus on but this This step warranty make our community so much safer because already being the first step to tear people who shouldn't have guns getting those firearms in the first place i powered. Hr eight pretty well. So could you break down. Hr fourteen forty-six style. Basically what hr fourteen forty six does is expand the time period pursuant to which the fbi can complete the background check on any potential purchaser says. Instead of having a three day rule. After ten days. The sale could proceed. That gives enough time based on all of the data that we have seen for the fbi to complete any potential check. And why is that important. Well sometimes these things are very complicated. Let's just keep in mind that the list of prohibited purchasers and what i mean by that are people who would not pass a background check because they have a state law conviction or a federal law conviction that makes them a private purchaser. That's not always easy to research right. I mean when i say. The vast majority of checks are completed within three days. Really what i'm saying is the vast majority of check something like ninety seven percent happened in a few seconds so but we have to keep in mind. Millions of these checks have been any potential year. You now at at twelve million guns were sold just based on records in two thousand and twenty alone. So ninety seven percent of those checks. Just let's think about that for a second. These millions of potential purchasers. It's instantaneous and the dealer has that information in the seal either proceeds doesn't because the person either passes that checker doesn't if you if you have a check that isn't comeback isn't coming back complete. It needs that the fbi. That is the that is actually conducting. These checks has something on that person's record that's a flag. It doesn't mean that they're prohibited. Purchase sir what it means is that they don't have enough information to confirm that they're not intentionally a prohibited purchaser that they need to go into a mode of investigations. You understand what that means back could mean calling local police in a small town about a warrant that is outstanding for an individual or a conviction that for whatever reason isn't it in the database because it is a local kind of issue and understand what that might be that takes time that takes resources in the case of the in charleston. It's chilling and very upsetting to think about when you read the stories of the diligence that was done by the fbi b. i. There and they really did try very hard. It's a story of voicemail messages left that weren't returned and no issues in the local jurisdiction that with more time and more resources actually could have been tracked down so this is the kind of diligence that we're expecting that the fbi look every day. They're doing that. This is this bill is only saying. Let's give them sufficient time to do it. Let's extend that period by seven days because we think the default rule should be at someone who could be. Potentially dangerous doesn't easily get that but after ten days. That's enough time for the fbi. So it's not a complete forestalling of that transaction and temporary one to allow the fbi to do its job so now they've passed the house. Where do we do next. What are you looking forward to while. This is where it gets interesting. So we're so happy that we have these bills passed in. The house am not surprised because they've passed mouse lost last congress and they sat on. Mitch mcconnell's desk new motto. Avoid that going forward. We obviously have different composition in the senate but we have a filibuster to and brady understands the dynamics that we're facing so we have really to attention opportunities here. Wanda's with the.

Mitch mcconnell charleston michigan south carolina ninety seven percent twelve million guns seven days Collins two thousand millions Millions bible More than ninety percent nine parishioners christmas twenty congress first step more than ninety percent Wanda
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

07:55 min | 9 months ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"Kelly. We may have released a unfortunately we are still working from home. I for one am greeting you from increasingly cluttered corner my apartment. I refuse to show on camera. Kelly where are you exactly. It looks fancy. it looks nice I'm recording from the illustrious. Dining room cable recording studios. It's very exclusive. I was going to say. I haven't gotten an invite so. Yeah you know. It's pretty elite recording studio. We buy got a couple of grammy's nobody'll dr fauci is the only one who's allowed to approve gas to tant basically. Yeah while i am very excited to talk. Today's gas Unfortunately also not in person who wants upon a time. I actually got to do a four hour in person interview it if you can imagine a time where such a thing was actually physically possible. If i try really hard. I think i can but it is pretty unmasked more right now right. It feels like a completely different life but luckily at least digitally we get to talk with colin goddard christian heine chris brown and stephanie abrams. All of whom are these great gun. Violence prevention advocates and in particular colin christian and stephan have something in common but i think our listeners may not expect. And you're not gonna tell us. I am absolutely not gonna tell you they have to listen. How dare i jerk. Yes we're going to their butt together. Just some hands were discussing the passage of hr eight and fourteen forty six in the us house of representatives. And we're gonna tackle questions like what are these bills. What do they do. And what is even the point of a background check anyway. Yeah and i know. Some of our listeners are with from day one and so they may be like. Oh i totally know about all these bills and background checks which is awesome. But i think with this episode even if you know all the background checks needs bills it's still going to be really eliminating compensation so definitely station. Hi everyone on. Chris brown on the president's of brady. Hey everyone my name. is stephanie. Abrams i am the executive council member of team enough as well as a a worker debris offices the team fellow when i'm also the national chapter coordinator years well so i wear a lot hats team enough but i love the voice of the youth and i think it's very important especially right now under current political climate ear. I'm christian heine vice-president policy your brady and then call in our loan on brady person on this podcast but you. You were once brady. He's brady at heart. You can say. I know once your winter you're never out island is calling goddard. I'm a survivor. Two thousand seven shootings. Virginia tech former team brady member and a gun of prevention advocate. Thank you so much for all. You've done any work. Amazing job now to and water access right so it's cool really cool job. I feel like in a lot of ways. Similar to engaging a constituency in america that feels like. They've been ignored that their voices aren't being heard. And you know working alongside them to fight to make change. So it's in a of ways very similar to the work at brady and take a lot of the learnings and experiences in carrying it forward and look at the whole workout station in there. Is that a peleton. You gotta pelivan peleton brutal used a mirror now mayor much come see me. I got the. Let's get peleton. Let's go man. You're you're peddling these things. Let's all right. We gotta we can look at each other track record and motivating each other awesome about your pilots on obsession christian concerns me a little bit. You're peleton pusher and it's concerning ballots today so. Let's talking about biking talking about bills. Chris just to start us off. Can you even break down at a very basic level would brady background. Check is sure so the radi background check system was put into effect about twenty seven years ago and a few days and change and when it was i adopted it was in response to actually the nineteen sixty eight gun control act which required background checks to be conducted so this is something that already was part of the federal law that there is no mechanism to ensure that there was real recordkeeping or even technology to make sure that could happen in the brady law. Put into effect this apparatus or sought to to ensure that every federally licensed firearms dealer or f. f. l. was required by law to conduct a background check and use technology that was adopted by the government to conduct that check and not just requires a look at a database that includes records criminal history at cetera about prohibited purchasers in order for that law to work at the time it was based on where most gun transactions happened which were f. l.'s. At the time. Let's just go back to the eighties. There was no internet and big gun. Shows were not big business. They didn't exist today. They do right and you can go online. And unfortunately if you are a prohibited purchaser meaning you have some category that you fall into that makes you viewed as prohibited purchaser than technically. If you're buying a gun from a private seller over the internet no background check in most states needs to occur. Same is true for gun shows and that is a loophole that is being addressed by. Hr aid it requires a gun. A background check to occur before almost any transaction regardless of who the seller is because it doesn't matter if we're all agreeing from a societal standpoint that we wanna make sure these checks occur they need to occur with every gun sale right now estimates indicate and they are just estimates because we don't have any hard data about the number of guns sold that estimates indicate about twenty three percent. Almost one in five guns sold today is sold with no background. Check at all so. Hr a fixes that particular in before we dig more into those bills at eight and eight or fourteen. Forty six colin christian and stuff. And can you. Can you detail your own experiences and buying a firearm without a background. So when i started in the gun safety and gun whilst french movement you know background checks really the issue. I thought was most salient and most kind of common sense that needed to happen and yet most people didn't really know that you could buy a gun so easily without a check so my i actually project that brady was to go. Undercover gun shows at five different states around the united around the us and by different firearms without a background check in recorded so to put a video to it to make it real in show people how simple it was so inaccurate. Just wanna cash in my pocket. Took my idea out and walston to publicly advertise gun shows in five different states throughout the summer and bought all sorts of firearms handguns long guns and got it all on tape and was so easy for me to figure out which dealers were the ones that weren't gonna do a check on me and weren't gonna ask me questions and i just found them and walked out with a gun every single time and it always blew me away. How quick the transaction was man. How i was just meeting a stranger for the first time in they you know they weren't required to know if i could legally on the firearm in the first place and so i don't you know i think it helps. Illuminate this issue and make it real for people to say that. Why should we make it so easy for just about anybody to buy a firearm without a check been my variance years ago when we did. This in in virginia was similar. To what what com did and in.

Kelly Chris Chris brown stephanie abrams stephan stephanie america virginia nineteen sixty eight gun contr eighties today Today four hour about twenty three percent first time colin christian colin goddard five guns Virginia five different states
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

04:58 min | 9 months ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"Everybody to another episode of red blue and brady now brought to you on fridays as always. I'm your host dj. And i'm a co host kelly. We may have released a unfortunately we are still working from home. I for one am greeting you from increasingly cluttered corner my apartment. I refuse to show on camera. Kelly where are you exactly. It looks fancy. it looks nice I'm recording from the illustrious. Dining room cable recording studios. It's very exclusive. I was going to say. I haven't gotten an invite so. Yeah you know. It's pretty elite recording studio. We buy got a couple of grammy's nobody'll dr fauci is the only one who's allowed to approve gas to tant basically. Yeah while i am very excited to talk. Today's gas Unfortunately also not in person who wants upon a time. I actually got to do a four hour in person interview it if you can imagine a time where such a thing was actually physically possible. If i try really hard. I think i can but it is pretty unmasked more right now right. It feels like a completely different life but luckily at least digitally we get to talk with colin goddard christian heine chris brown and stephanie abrams. All of whom are these great gun. Violence prevention advocates and in particular colin christian and stephan have something in common but i think our listeners may not expect. And you're not gonna tell us. I am absolutely not gonna tell you they have to listen. How dare i jerk. Yes we're going to their butt together. Just some hands were discussing the passage of hr eight and fourteen forty six in the us house of representatives. And we're gonna tackle questions like what are these bills. What do they do. And what is even the point of a background check anyway. Yeah and i know. Some of our listeners are with from day one and so they may be like. Oh i totally know about all these bills and background checks which is awesome. But i think with this episode even if you know all the background checks needs bills it's still going to be really eliminating compensation so definitely station. Hi everyone on. Chris brown on the president's of brady. Hey everyone my name. is stephanie. Abrams i am the executive council member of team enough as well as a a worker debris offices the team fellow when i'm also the national chapter coordinator years well so i wear a lot hats team enough but i love the voice of the youth and i think it's very important especially right now under current political climate ear. I'm christian heine vice-president policy your brady and then call in our loan on brady person on this podcast but you. You were once brady. He's brady at heart. You can say. I know once your winter you're never out island is calling goddard. I'm a survivor. Two thousand seven shootings. Virginia tech former team brady member and a gun of prevention advocate. Thank you so much for all. You've done any work. Amazing job now to and water access right so it's cool really cool job. I feel like in a lot of ways. Similar to engaging a constituency in america that feels like. They've been ignored that their voices aren't being heard. And you know working alongside them to fight to make change. So it's in a of ways very similar to the work at brady and take a lot of the learnings and experiences in carrying it forward and look at the whole workout station in there. Is that a peleton. You gotta pelivan peleton brutal used a mirror now mayor much come see me. I got the. Let's get peleton. Let's go man. You're you're peddling these things. Let's all right. We gotta we can look at each other track record and motivating each other awesome about your pilots on obsession christian concerns me a little bit. You're peleton pusher and it's concerning ballots today so. Let's talking about biking talking about bills. Chris just to start us off. Can you even break down at a very basic level would brady background. Check is sure so the radi background check system was put into effect about twenty seven years ago and a few days and change and when it was i adopted it was in response to actually the nineteen sixty eight gun control act which required background checks to be conducted so this is something that already was part of the federal law that there is no mechanism to ensure that there was real recordkeeping or even technology to make sure that could happen in the brady law. Put into effect this apparatus or sought to to ensure that every federally licensed firearms dealer or f. f. l. was required by law to conduct a background check and use technology that was adopted by the government to conduct that check and not just requires a look at a database that includes records criminal history at cetera about prohibited

Kelly Chris Chris brown stephanie abrams stephan stephanie america virginia nineteen sixty eight gun contr eighties today Today four hour about twenty three percent first time colin christian colin goddard five guns Virginia five different states
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

07:00 min | 11 months ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"That question less. Oh we can take a new media wing twenty minutes. But it's it's creating that time. I think that is so important to get us all all through this and also to have time where it's okay to talk about howard yelling so when my children were growing up i would say to. You could have two positives for one native statement because i always great that fleet just have negatives that becomes complainers. Were weiner's so as always too hazardous for my negatives and make it into a joke. Humor tipping in in a now. It's time to be creative. Quick that i have to say this if you don't mind that's where i desperately asked us all to be mindful of how much time mar on our screens. And what are we actually doing when we're on our screens. It's just a lot is bad. And i think we have to remember. Is that there are some basic things. We can do terms of lockdowns that yeah might take a little effort to get educated and advocate near school district by parents cope board members. Just do a little more reach out on here to help you know college royal. Make sure it's under ten minutes. All those different things sped you can do in to go through the list. But they're make sure there's more funding goes for teacher training to talk about the emotion on mental health of our children. It's it's silly to think that this isn't traumatic and it's silly to think that we just have to keep doing the lockdown drills the way we were because the If you're a year ago the the who is broken it was silly who is making these decisions. What i found were their word. The people like me from the mental health perspective didn't come up with the protocol that millions of american children go through so now your year later. This is my call to action. We can't pretend that it's not. It's not okay. We're bearing witness to it and we can do something about it. You know if if folks came to your right now or came to your website. And we're like dr kis lyn helped me. What is what is the one thing that i need to be discussing with my family discussing with my school district discussing with the local lawmakers that are involved in setting these policies. You know about about these drills What what would it be a wine thin. That's hard for me. It could be multiple things at be multiple transparency. Tau conversation on happen open community conversation about. Why are we doing the drills right now. Where's the wiggle room because for example on new jersey new jersey people. Some school district still believe that. Have actually jude physical lockdown drill with the but like the example. It's okay a lot actually around that you can just had a discussion about the lockdown jail. You don't have to have the children middle. Have covid hiding smushed in a closet. So that's where transparency open Conversations energy focus on educating parents. Because it's rare that i'll get pushback from parents ones. I take them through the journey like we just went through today. knowledge is power. Oh i didn't know that. Or even the ones who like my kids not bothered by august follow-up emails. Hey my kids said. They're not father but their friend cries during the lockdown drill exactly one is this transparency communication and. Don't be afraid to ask for help there. Every community has wonderful resources right now. A lot of people just don't know how to ask whether it be people within school counselors. Religious organizations services really are resources out there. It's it's always better to ask for help. There's also box things. And i don't know if i even put the last thing. I did on the website. But i've done workshops for the national association of social workers on this topic. People come more. I recently did a workshop for new jersey. School board association. Rethinking lockdown drills in kobe era. We thinking lockdown drills in cogan error. You can look bucket bad. Most obvious hot to your talk to the children in your lives using stories has always been my best tips if i even if your kids roll their eyes who cares. You're doing great role The better you're doing us yourself. Martin is also it takes courage to be that parent to show up to have those comfortable conversations. And i feel for you because you have so much harder than i did just in these last ten fifteen ten years sticking years because the amount of material out there is is so challenging. But that doesn't mean you can give up as our kids are coming on us. Well thank you so much for your time. Thank you great so much. You're a wonderful that you do this so important that parents educators feel empowered. We can do better for our kids. We have to do better for kids now. Podcast listeners can be in touch with us here at red blue and brady be a phone or text message simply text us at four eight zero seven four four three four five two with your thoughts questions concerns ideas whatever. Thanks for listening as always. Brady's life saving work in congress. The courts in communities across the country is made possible. Thanks to you for more information on brady or how to get involved in fight against gun violence. Please like subscribe to the podcast. Get in touch with sobriety. No you don work or on social upgrade buzz be brave and remember take action not seconds..

dr kis lyn new jersey weiner howard School board association national association of social kobe Martin Brady congress brady
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

06:21 min | 11 months ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"Our children in there until house so okay there's two levels here one parent scoreboards school teachers. Unions need to get involved in advocating on state and national level to change the guidelines. Which new jersey. I don't think it was happening since the last time we talked. But we're getting very close to having a bill presented that way mandate that every time there is a school security that it would be called a dress that no more would leave. our children. Thinking is time could be the real thin. And why is that so important. Because then betsy came into the classroom. She would have watched it to zoom. She would have known. It was a trail the second pieces that we have to help the teachers. Because i have many teachers that interview. That i talked to that i know and of course this is so much for them on every level from fear of getting covid. Why not help them and train them. We need provide Training on trauma had you identify. How do you work with children to know when to refer how has well as basic things they can do to help. Make that child feel safe and in my book in chapter six. Do a whole piece on mindfulness and never has that been more important in giving our children coping skills to get through this in before we go in. Because i definitely want you to talk about sort of some of the coping skills that are there in their president. Because i always know. We're always gonna end with a call to action. But i do like to try to give folks who you know like a laundry list of things they could do to try to try to mitigate some of this disaster. I'm wondering if can maybe even take a step back and talk about you know. Are these drills actually even effective. So are they do these drills do what they're set out to accomplish which is ideally and the case of tragedy to help alleviate some of the possible unfortunately injuries and fatalities are they actually useful. A a teacher told me that. Certainly times. And i'm sure her parents have heard my kids done minded day. Vikings it's an interruption from class. It's not a big deal about like. It's a fire drill right but then that commits you're making that mass assumption. That because of that. So i remember two things that come to mind one. When i interviewed some of the students the survivors park land. They talked about how many of them didn't pay attention. Prior to the shooting during the lockdowns. So there's that one he said has always stayed in my mind as if we're doing this often how to the typical child are they just making a joke out of this hard day camouflaging their own feeling pretending. Little k is the teacher tuned in or is just another to do. S but from the research that i've been doing an i mark with some very interesting people in the last year is that there isn't we don't know that i can't say to you when i stand in front of a school district and say you have to do these things because they're going to keep your kids alive. I focus on. How do you teach your children to the the most resilient. How do you teach them to be able to cope and be able to think for themselves because tragedy comes. We all know it's surprising it comes in all different ways to me. It's not that we train our children to be like oh guess Grab rocks more that. Hey something just happened. How we've worked on this. Trust my gut gut. Tell me my my teacher told me we leave the classroom. Ever but i hear gunshots real gunshots in the hallway and there's an exit door here. I don't know about you. I want at kitsch. People think honor fee to be like. Okay you guys next door. Let's run so. I think we need to have used hired on shift to really put the energy on the money that we are putting to lockdown proof glasses. Okay that's fine. But what else are you doing for the mental emotional health of the china. That also is so important to include. Resilient and i'm still. I'm still thinking of the story of the safe place for the student which was to come home and maybe to sit in their bed and to have. This moment is no longer a safe place. Because now the sort of the lockdown drill has i don't want to say invaded but it almost seems that sort of its followed them home and what that's like then for for students or young people who were home already wasn't a safe place. Ideally your home is the place where particularly I'm still thinking of younger. Junior students who might not be able to articulate as waller like to feel comfortable communicating with their peers. Because i know that peer networks are huge. Because you have six seven year olds at home doing these drills now and what that's like for them for you know if home is already not a safe place if they're already worried about firearms in the home. What it now means that. There is a lockdown drill. There well wonderful question. Wonderful point and i think there is absolutely rather a new. There's no research on that right now. And i think we are going to be talking about this time for years to come. But in the immediate. I love what you're bringing to light is we need to assume that this is adding more trump. Choose that child so fat child already has seen lots of anger in house knows that there's tons in the house that aren they went napa that it's not properly locked job. They just know that. Hey data keeps a gone on the dresser so.

betsy new jersey trauma Vikings waller china napa
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"That is so important to make sure that we are unpacking those and making sure that you can make a difference and there's things that we can do with Brady's resources to make a difference in our communities on crime against work and that we're really doing it just to save lives and that we belong At these intersections are important and We Takin count for all of them in every aspect of our confidence work as well and less education aspect, right but that's deaf and brings up is just so important thing to work because frankly the supply-side approach is really not talked about that much, you know at the national level or or really so much even at the the state and local level. And I think there's a lot of reasons for that. Right? We can unpack those and later episodes or or some have been unpacked before right? There's not a lot of transparency about the sources of guns because of things like the T art Amendment which I really clamped down on data coming out from the ATF about the sources of crime guns. And as everyone else has said before is that this is a difficult and tough conversation to have because we're talking about in a sense proving a negative that that a supply-side approach will cut back on gun crime in particular communities, which we believe to be true. So, you know this education component of of educating communities about the supply side approach about the importance of the supply-side approach is such an important and critical first step to then be able to identify the problems in the sources of crime guns and ultimately reform them so that they that guns are not sold in a in a know legally responsible manner that leads to them being recovered in crime wage. And in this case the I mean it took years after but the The Man Who Sold it in this case he he did end up getting charged for selling it also incredibly rare. Yeah, that's a tragic story and you know, it sounds like from what you're describing it really egregious and and.

Brady ATF
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"Everybody this is the legal disclaimer where I tell you the views thoughts opinions shared in this podcast blink slowly to our guests in house and not necessarily Brady or Brady's Affiliates. Please note this podcast contains descriptions of violence that some people may find disturbing. It's okay. We find it disturbing too long. Dead body welcome back to another episode of Red Bull and Brady today. I'm flying solo, but I am excited to be able to share Brady's combating crime guns initiative and some of the amazing work the crime guns team does but first, of course, you know, we need to unpack what a crime gun is and what this work is about in the first place now to do so, I'm joined by a fantastic group of people. We've got Josh Scharf Eric Rice on a on a stickman and Steve Lindley all of the Brady combating crime guns team and stuff in Abraham's of Team enough together were all talking about what everyone needs to know about crime guns. What a supply-side truck and gun violence has and why gun dealers need to be involved in the conversation then an unbelievable blood segment. I'm explaining why you should never sleep with a gun finally in our news wrap up birth. I'm covering CDC funding and a Baltimore artist who paints portraits of those lost again violence and I'm.

Brady Josh Scharf Steve Lindley Brady combating crime guns Eric Rice Abraham CDC Baltimore
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"I'm interested to learn more and one of the places where I wanted to ask you guys about is there's this myth that we see that quote unquote violent video games cost gun violence and it down, Doubt sometimes after you'll see some of these public mass shootings. And so number one. I was just wondering you know, why do you think people especially lawmakers in media sees on that narrative and they you know, it's interesting that video games and other forms of media have been used as a scapegoat. When as you said video games are so diverse. There's so many different types of them. And then is it even true? Oh, I want to jump on this one. That's an easy one. You just said, you said the magic word scapegoat. It's like hey, this isn't really what's going on. This is just something that we can use to focus away from the actual conversation, which is you know, the availability and wage laws pertaining guns in this country and America's love affair with guns. That's a pretty easy one. I mean it's and that doesn't work. It's literally you can almost feel like the NRA marketing people just spinning a giant wheel over there. All right. What are we going to blame it on this time? All right. It's violent video games. It's like all right. Now on the other side of that fence. I have definitely had that feeling a couple of times like off. Remember once upon a time. I got really hardcore into this game called Need for Speed Hot Pursuit, which is an Amazing Race game where you are playing as a racer and you're being chased by the police took this high-speed high-intensity racing game and I'm not much of a racer guy. But I remember leaving the house getting in my car and having this feeling like I really want to stomp on the gas right now. It's like no wait. It was like it was a brief half second. Like I'm totally just going to go for it and it's like no no no, no, no calm down. Now I can see why some people get into that like maybe but again wage in the context of legislative individuals trying, you know, trying to blame violent video games for much of anything. It's just like it's it's the Dungeons and Dragons Panic of the 80s. It's the rock and roll panic and 60s. It's it's different. It's new. It's dangerous. We have to contain it. And that's all it is. Yeah. I couldn't agree more with like with all of that. I mean, I think even your Need for Speed example is is pig. Fake because it's kind of intellectually lazy of people to be like this is you know, there's it's violence and you can shoot guns. So people are going to shoot more guns because on the surface level that makes sense like oh, yeah, I could see that happens, but then I mean there's been tons of studies done and you actually look is there any causal relationship behind it? And it just doesn't hold water. So it's an easy one to repeat and I think for a lot of lawmakers again just deflecting away from the the harder issues and the things that that's really their job to pay attention to it's easy to deflect to do something like video games and historically you don't lose votes. If you blame video games as opposed to, you know, blaming gun manufacturers or gun laws or whatever. It may be it's so much less risk for them. And and for me that was one of the important reasons of doing the campaign is to try and kind of rally The Gaming Community to understand And that they are being used as scapegoats and that like hopefully it does start costing them votes because then it gets harder for a lawmakers to Pivot to that excuse because then there's repercussions for them because that's really what they understand more than anything else is is the power of the people there like to vote and and and make their voice

Brady Stephen machuga Kelly Juniper Park League of legislators
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"All right by having you two gentlemen introduce yourselves. Sure. My name is TJ Arch. I am a creative director at a advertising agency called Juniper Park tbwa. We're a global advertising agency based in Toronto and I lead a some creative teams there and you know, we we kind of harness the power of of narrative often and and so we've had the opportunity to speak with Brady on a league of legislators Campaign, which was like a great a great thrill because we do a lot of work with all sorts of Industries, but there's nothing better than when we get to work on wage. And causes and things that we believe in though. It's been a really a pleasure to work with Grady. All right. My name is Steven. Machuca. I run military charity Stack Up. Org. We're a charity that supports you took us and Allied veterans through gaming and geek culture. We send video game care packages two units deployed to combat zones folks recovering a military hospitals and individuals that are just struggling way back home. We have a 24/7 Suicide Prevention Hotline through a gaming chat client called Discord that's available for veterans primarily, but I'm a team of volunteers that are there any our the day at night to help out where where they can as far as that goes. So those are our two main programs right now, and we've got a couple other ones as well like volunteerism and Palm Terrace L programme, which is where we fly disabled the deserving veterans to various gaming events or conventions. Like Comic-Con game Studio tours, things like that, but obviously all that's been on hold. Thanks to God. the magic of covid-19 Very official badge. So I'm hoping you did you get a media badge the matter now sure now that you're on the list. I mean when they you know, cuz they're saying hey they're looking to do PAX East in June ish next year, which is exciting. It's nice to be in be nice to be in Boston in the summer for a change issue February. Yeah. Well fingers crossed on that that we can we can all see each other person then. Yes, ma'am. Well and then I think we can just jump right in and this is going to be a weird question probably for all of you and as Kelly and I were talking earlier from folks who grew up with like Super Mario Brothers, maybe a little weird but why why video games as a is a job focus in in what both of you do so both in sort of doing these like direct Veterans Services and then I'm doing the sort of narrative Outreach to sort of change outlooks on how folks can interact with the lawmakers and their country like why video games. Is that ankle? Why not crochet birth? Dance, you know why why video games why the interest so gaming has been a huge part of my life growing up like I mean it was one of the one of my first memories is my dad taking me to Arcade Putt-Putt course back in my hometown and it was just ever since I could hold the controller in my hand. I was Off to the Races and that's always been the through line of my life. And so why would it be any different when I went into the military or deployed overseas? It was all about gaining when I went over there is like a thing to do to keep me from going crazy.

Juniper Park tbwa Machuca Brady Grady Toronto Steven Boston Kelly
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"Week marks forty years since <Speech_Female> the murder of John Lennon <Speech_Female> in New York City on December <Speech_Female> 8th. Nineteen <Speech_Female> eighty. We talked <Speech_Female> about his murder and <Speech_Female> what it meant for gun <Speech_Female> violence prevention and <Speech_Female> and far more detail <Speech_Female> in episode 105, but <Speech_Female> it is important <Speech_Female> to note that he was <Speech_Female> an artist beloved by many. John <Speech_Female> Lennon was also <Speech_Female> a son a <Speech_Female> father and a husband <Speech_Female> and his lost <Speech_Female> two yoga Julian <Speech_Female> Sean and all him <Speech_Female> knew him intimately was <Speech_Female> profound to <Speech_Female> quote Yoko Ono <Speech_Female> the death of a loved <Speech_Female> one page a Halloween <Speech_Female> experience. And <Speech_Female> so 40 <Speech_Female> years later gun <Speech_Female> violence continues in <Speech_Female> DC the <Speech_Female> city has been struggling with <Speech_Female> its worst year in gun violence <Speech_Female> since two thousand <Speech_Female> five fifteen <Speech_Female> month old <Speech_Female> Carmelo Duncan <Speech_Female> died this past week <Speech_Female> after unknown individuals <Speech_Female> fired ten <Speech_Female> or so rounds into the car. <Speech_Female> He was in as <Speech_Female> his father drove him <Speech_Female> in his eight-year-old brother <Speech_Female> home Carmelo <Speech_Female> was the youngest victim <Speech_Female> of gun violence this year <Speech_Female> nearly 200 <Speech_Female> people have lost their lives <Speech_Female> to gun violence in <Speech_Female> DC in 2020. <Speech_Female> Meanwhile <Speech_Female> in Miami twenty-year-old <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Skyler <Speech_Female> he was murdered <Speech_Female> and her death is <Speech_Female> still under investigation. There <Speech_Female> have been nearly a hundred <Speech_Female> murders in Miami <Speech_Female> this year. The Skyler's <Speech_Female> death marks another <Speech_Female> maddening. Statistic <Speech_Female> she is <Speech_Female> the 40th <Speech_Female> known trans women <Speech_Female> who have died by violence <Speech_Female> this year and <Speech_Female> according to the advocate <Speech_Female> about 3/4 of those <Speech_Female> murders had involved Firearms. <Speech_Female> It's important <Speech_Female> to note that experts agree <Speech_Female> that the number of <Speech_Female> those killed <Speech_Female> is undoubtedly higher than <Speech_Female> that reported as <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> trans. People are often <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> mixed gendered by police or media <Speech_Female> something <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that actually happened to Skyler <Speech_Female> as well. <Speech_Female> Nevertheless twenty-twenty <Speech_Female> has been the deadliest <Speech_Female> here on record for <SpeakerChange> Trans people <Music> in the US <Music> Iraq. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I'm sure the <Speech_Female> podcast Lester's <Speech_Female> cannot get in touch with <Speech_Female> us here at Red Balloon pretty <Speech_Female> via phone or text message <Speech_Female> simply call or <Speech_Female> text us at 480-744-3452 <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> off with your thoughts <Speech_Female> questions concerns <Speech_Female> ideas, whatever. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Thanks for <Speech_Female> listening as <Speech_Female> always for these life-saving <Speech_Female> work and Congress the courts <Speech_Female> and communities across the <Speech_Female> country is made possible. <Silence> Thank you <Speech_Female> for more information <Speech_Female> on breeding or how to get <Speech_Female> involved in the fight against gun <Speech_Female> violence, please <Speech_Female> like And subscribe to the podcast <Speech_Female> get in touch <Speech_Female> with us a breeding united.org <Speech_Female> or <Silence> on social Arriba's <Speech_Female> be brave <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and remember <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> taking off. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> not sides <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> wage <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> wage

Carmelo Duncan John Lennon Yoko Ono Miami Lennon Julian Carmelo New York City Sean Skyler John Lester Iraq Congress US
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"She don't say these things before you give your dog. His final grades your friend used to say to the uterus was wondering around remember that was the computer center. That was sort of a be a answer for anything that a woman was going through. Well, let's I would like to maybe recognize that the person who suggested suggested to KY that she just had some woman problems or however, you mentioned it that maybe that wasn't the best care in the world and I'm hoping if I can speak for my colleagues that the vast majority of us would not do that when we get out of whatever it is that we're in it's going to be it's going to be a massive transition back. We had a massive transition into this house and it was dramatic. It was overnight..

KY
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"Well. Thank you all for joining. I am really excited to talk to each of you because this conversation is really important especially as we move into the holidays and to start JJ often talks about how one of the things we do is often sort of a school house rock just defining our terms and sort of getting on the same page. So to that and I was wondering if we could talk about what suicide is it's mainly what is something that every American should know about that's quite a question. Yeah, right. Well, it's interesting. I I found myself sort of stunned by the question frankly because it's such a question. Yeah. It's such a huge sort of waited question. But I guess I would say first and foremost suicides an epidemic. I mean, I think it's a massive public health problem in our country and log Those of us that care greatly about veterans and about the military connected Community. It is a major and and really important problem in in those communities and one that people smartest people in the world have been trying to figure this out for a while and I think we're finally starting with all these conversations coming together. I think we're finally starting to potentially knock on some wood here. We're potentially maybe getting to this point where we're going to be able to crack this a little bit. I'm feeling thoughtful about it about about our ability to potentially make make a dent in that sat at last and in my comments are really a follow-on to this, you know, my my answer to talk to Americans need to know about suicide is how complex it is that it is massively complex and we haven't figured it out, which is essentially what Heidi just said and I agree. There's there's reason Hope we're really bad at predicting it right we could we can list off 12 or 16 warning signs. And then we can acknowledge that there are hundreds and thousands and innumerable warning signs that there's no definitive list. There are a lot of warning signs and none of them accurately predict who will die by Suicide. So that's one piece that that needs to be said, it's really complicated and we haven't fully figured it out yet. The other thing that needs to be said is we are getting closer to how to knowing how to treat it that we do know that we do have methods that prevent suicide that treat suicide and that's that's just as important as figuring out how to predict it right? I mean, even if we can't predict it we can prevent it. I mean both of those things actually can go together and one of the ways that song We know we can prevent it is through I mean, I'm kind of jumping to the chase here, but you know, lethal means safety and how to store Firearms is a reliable valid way to prevent suicide so I don't need to mean to blow past these other important more general questions, but that's a really important thing that I think we need to say up front. I don't know that we saved up front all the time. One thing. I think a lot of people don't know is that if you do limit access to a a method that someone was planning to use them and does not go on to find a different way. This is I think I teach this when I teach it and I I am baffled by the number of people in my audience have no idea about that. I think that is a that is a math out there that people will find a way if this is where they are and that's just the literature just doesn't back that up. So yeah, just just kind of reinforcing what Ted just said Thursday. To take a related but a little bit similarly different track. I think something that's often a misnomer is that suicide isn't a individual problem or a just a mental problem or just a clinical problem either? I think we need to this goes I think to some of what he was talking about it being an epidemic in a Public Health crisis and that way that it is a it's an American problem and it needs American Solutions in that in terms of like it's a public problem that needs public Solutions and both in the fact that suicide doesn't just impact the individual who has taken their life it you know, I think readers shows that for every every time an individual takes their life. It's your there are a hundred plus people who are directly impacted by wage loss of that individual and I think when we were talking about some communities in particular that makes it even more of a, you know, bigger bigger ripple effect of communities like the military Community, for example It's so important what you just said because another myth is that suicide is just about depression and therefore the domain of psychologists or the mental health field, but we know that that's not true. There are different studies and research and populations and etc. Etc. And anywhere between 50 and 90% We don't need to get into a specific statistic other than to say about half of at least about half of the people that died by Suicide do not have a diagnosable mental illness, which means it's about something besides mental illness suicide remains a problem. It doesn't mean that mental health professionals can't help those people also, but we have to look elsewhere besides just professional Mental Health Providers to solve this problem. It's a much bigger problem than I mean we know this that if you treat if you just give people treatment for depression, we don't address the issue. Problem of suicide the suicide numbers don't go down. So we have to look at other ways to address the problem of

Brady Dr. Kyle Ted Bedard Kelly Hunter John Lennon
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"I could really claim to be an expert in the area. But i have been involved an in hawaii for quite some time now. I think one of the most difficult problems of gun gun violence protection. Laws is the guy who initially seems to be perfectly normal. No priors no mental health issues. Which we already checked for when you buy a gun but what we don't do in what most jurisdictions don't do because it's it's prohibitively difficult in terms of human resources. Is you know every few years. Rechecking them to see if they still don't have a prior still. Don't have a mental health issue in getting to that getting those people are. I think one of the most difficult problems we face in regulating firearms and so the red flag seem to me like a like i said i don't think it's a panacea but it's a way to get to that problem without having to make an in hawaii. The police departments are the one who wants process gun permit applications. And it's a way to get to that without having this huge bureaucracy that has to go back around and look at everybody who has a gun licence all the time we don't we have very low gun violence here but we have a lot of guns We have more guns than people. So it's an is as my father of the mathematician would say this is re re making everybody re permit their guns. Every five years is a non trivial problem. Non trivial so. That's that's why. I was interested in that there. There was resistance to it to house. House has fifty one members in hawaii. And i think eleven of them voted which a pretty substantial number when you consider the makeup. I mean there's only when that bill passwords five or six republicans in the entire body and three of them voted. No but that meant that you know seven or eight. Democrats voted no car. Can i just ask you to talk a bit about what you learned about how often it's been used this year since the past january first i believe and you'll feel that it's being used efficiently and being promoted enough to so people know about it. Well it's only been used once. And that was a case that was filed in connection with a domestic violence case. And if you get a domestic islands t. o. On hawaii get your guns away too. So it ended the The red flag petitioning of being dropped his mood. Admittedly this is a weird year. And i don't know everybody's minds have been other places so i'm not sure this is a good year to really give us a good idea of how often it will actually be used none a normal year but yes it's it's not just gun protection confines protection legislation where you have to communicate that it's out there and you can use it. There's a lot of things like that. On what i like. To see it more widely communicated yes but having said that the we we cast the net pretty wide we allow the the petitioner can be law enforcement family household member medical professional educator business colleague. So it's pretty. Broadly cast and the the major institutional players have been informed about it. The bar the attorneys practice at family court where these petitions would go are have been made aware of it of the department of health for the medical professional side have been made aware of it..

hawaii House department of health
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"I was wondering if you wouldn't mind talking a little bit about your book which is entitled guns and suicide an american epidemic and wondering why you defined it as an epidemic and why that public health frame as necessary. Yeah sure and that's a word. I chose really carefully and also thank you for the kind words. I really appreciate that Epidemic is a word that i think a lot of may be pushed pushed back on for a number of reasons when you talk about social media guidelines talking about suicide one of the things people will will mention his it. You don't wanna sensationalize things you don't want to create the headline. And just to get people revved up without a sense of a solution and mindful that but like you said suicide is something need to talk about. We need to handle it head on. And so i also didn't want to beat around the bush. And so what i was looking for was a word that highlighted the scope of an issue. That people quite. Frankly just don't realize is such a big issue right and so you have to use a big enough to get their attention. And i also think that people think about apodaca especially in in a pandemic moment brand right now as as a really scary term but just like the marin right now is is scary it also comes with an end right like people were conspiring hard to come up with vaccine to get us on the other side of this right like epidemics caused a lot of harm and a lot of tragedy. But they're also things you can solve if you're willing to figure out how to do it right. And so. I looked epidemic as an appropriately strong term to says it say this is causing untold harm in our country and we can probably solve it but not if we keep on the same path. We've been on. I think the using framing epidemic too. I think goes back to what you mentioned earlier with idea of firearms culture and firearms culture and people's comfortableness with firearms in type of firearms. They're comfortable with. I think that's so different across the us. And i think we have a lot of international listeners. And i think that's something that it's sometimes hard to explain that the us is huge and it is very different. Regionally and folks relationship with firearms are different but everyone interacts with nepotistic. Everyone interacts with public health. Although cova has shown us that that itself is very regional and in very different. So i i think it's important to flag to sorta pellets universalize. Is that experience. I wonder if a there's a few times i'm going to do this to you. And i hate to ask you to to speak for all americans. But why do you think that americans in general don't now or or appear. You'll very uncomfortable talking about suicide especially firearm suicide. When we know that the majority of gun deaths are suicides and we know that the majority of suicide deaths are gun. Deaths you know. Why is there this strange separation happening from reality. So i don't think there's one answer i think there's a few things that sorta stand out e. n. The obvious one would be things like stigma right to. There are a lot of sort of cultural norms around talking about feelings and and demonstrating what someone might think of as weakness or inability to solve problems. Right you think of america very individualist society or culture is very much about pull yourself up by your bootstraps and find your way to a solution. And the way i think people think about suicide is that it's something that we people do. They call it the easy way out. Even though it's exceedingly difficult to do right and so no one wants to be identified as that and so i think there are a lot of cultural norms that that caused people to not seek help under report their thoughts of suicide and because of this that that impacts the conversation how people think about right so that's one aspect of it is that it's sort of this secret duty to stigma. I think the other part of it though. That is maybe less obvious. Most important i think particularly in terms of firearm suicide is is this idea of salience right at and so most people just feel like that's something that happens to someone else. Even though the great scientists like julie cyril shown how many of us are are considered lost survivors and who have been impacted by suicide. One way or another in still tends to be something. I think that people think about something happens to someone else. And so if you think about that from the firearm owners perspective right they understand. The accidents are problem. And so you want to make sure that you keep the fire out of reach of your child. Maybe in nets salient. But the idea that you should take firearm and stored out at home or make it more difficult to access well. That doesn't make sense. Because what salient to that individuals that somebody might break into their home in the middle night threatened. Them and their family sent to reach the firearm. And here i am telling them no lock it up. Sort unloaded in fact. Get it out of the home and that sounds like lunacy to them because suicide is something happens to someone else and so because i don't think we've done a very good job of helping folks connect with the idea. That suicide isn't a sign of weakness and it doesn't something that happens to some other person happens to everybody across all walks of life in fact if you close your eyes and picture out of person i bet what you picture as very little do a reality of day to day american suicide. We've done such a poor job getting that message across that people haven't connected with the idea that would motivate change and when motivate the conversation to map

brady aubrey Kellyanne the new york times Dr michael anastas new jersey gun violence resear rutgers school of public healt Kelly us
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"Like firearms and culture and firearms culture, and people's comfortableness with firearms and the type of firearms they're comfortable with. I think that's so different across the US, and I think we have a lot of international listeners, and I think that's something that it's sometimes hard to explain is that the US is huge. And it is very different regionally, and folks’ relationship with firearms are different. But everyone interacts with an epidemic, everyone interacts with public health, although COVID has shown us that that itself is very regional and very different. So I just think it's important to flag too, sort of how it universalizes that experience. I wonder if, there's a few times I'm going to do this to you and I hate to ask you to speak for all Americans, but why do you think that Americans, in general, don't know or appear to feel very uncomfortable talking about suicide, especially firearm suicide? When we know that the majority of gun deaths are suicides, and we know that the majority of suicide deaths are gun deaths. You know, why is there this strange separation happening from reality?</div><br><span style="background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">So I don't think there's one answer, I think there's a few things that sort of stand out, you know, the obvious one would be things like stigma, right? So there are a lot of sort of cultural norms around talking about feelings and demonstrating, you know, what someone might think of as weakness or an inability to solve problems, right? You think of America as a very individualist society or culture is very much about, you know, pull yourself up by your bootstraps and find your way to a solution. And the way I think people think about suicide is that it's something that weak people do, they call it the easy way out, even though it's actually exceedingly difficult to do, right? And so no one wants to be identified as that. And so I think there are a lot of cultural norms that, that cause people to not seek help, to underreport their thoughts of suicide; and because of this, that impacts the conversation and how people think about it, right? So that's one aspect of it is that it's sort of this secret due to stigma. I think the other part of it, though, that is maybe less obvious, and most important, I think particularly in terms of firearm suicide, is this idea of salience, right? And so most people just feel like that's something that happens to someone else. Even though the great scientists like Julie Cyril have shown how many of us are considered loss survivors and who have been impacted by suicide in one way or another, it still tends to be something I think that people think about as something that happens to someone else. And so if you think about that from the firearm owner’s perspective, right, they understand that accidents are a problem. And so you want to make sure that, you know, you keep the firearm out of reach of your child, maybe and that's salient. But the idea that you should take this firearm and store it out of the home, or make it more difficult to access, well that doesn't make sense because what's salient to that individual is that somebody might break into their home in the middle of the night and threaten them and their family. So to be able to reach the firearm and here I am telling them “No, lock it up, stored, unloaded, in fact, get it out of the home”, and that sounds like lunacy to them, because suicide is something happens to someone else, right? And so because I don't think we've done a very good job of helping folks connect with the idea that suicide isn't a sign of weakness, and it isn't something that happens to some other person, it happens to everybody across all walks of life. In fact, if you close your eyes and picture a suicidal person, I bet that what you picture has very little to do with the reality of day-to-day American suicide.</span>Thank you so much for for joining us today. I am so excited to start digging down into into your work everything that you do so i'm wondering if we can just start by just having you introduce yourself to our audience. Yeah sure estes. I am as just this past july. The executive director of the new jersey gun violence research center and an associate professor of urban global public health at rutgers but for the eight years. They didn't up to this summer. I had been a core faculty member in the clinical psychology program at university of southern mississippi. So aerobic jumped from the deep south back to where i spent most of my life. Which is the northeast and in terms of my work. I m soussan researcher by trade. And so i work with thomas joiner at florida state in graduate school and have spent the last fifteen plus years really focused on suicide prevention but most relevant to our conversation today over the last half decade or so. My work has become increasingly focused on the role of firearms in suicide. Open the military but but also just generally speaking across the us. And i think that sort of begs the question I'm always curious about what people choose to focus their studies in a particular way. What got you into this particular niche. Because i know for example what i i think kellyanne both done. We're at a party and someone says what you do. Is the gun violence prevention. It's not always exactly. That's not the the happy fun thing to study or to work in. And so what got you into this. Yeah you know. I think the most inspiring stories on how folks find their way to their work are often personal narratives of things happen and to be perfectly honest. That's not really how i got here on this. I think i. I got into suicide research just because i wanted to do some good in the world and i like complicated problems. And that's what this feel like a chance to work on some incidents difficult that that maybe would help somebody and then obviously living in the deep south for the last really. It was over ten years. And you factor in graduate school and residency and all the stuff. That's down there for a long time. And firearms are so much more present there than they are. Where i grew up a grownup in southwestern connecticut. It just really wasn't my radar all that much. In fact i grew up just a couple of towns down from where sandy took took place and so it was real perspective shift and i again always prefer to be. Someone's trying to solve a problem and not just complain about it and and so feeling very different than a lot of my community in the deep south on these in a lot of other issues. I figured i could rant and rave and and argue with people where i could sort of take my nerdy niche set of skills and apply them to a problem again. That maybe do some good and so that's sort of i ended up. I think i'm a person is relatively good at getting along with folks and so maybe position to to do some work in this space where people fight a lot and not be someone who's who's fighting people but instead of instead of saudi make a difference to thing you talked about different types of stories and narratives in how they're in firing 'cause i i actually find it very inspiring that you wanted to do some good and wanted to do some good and area that's hard and confronted it head on because i know in previous podcast about suicide especially one of the things that comes out is how we have to talk about it and we have to face it head on and not treat it as sort of a secret so i actually find it very very inspiring you went towards it and i was wondering if you wouldn't mind talking a little bit about your book which is entitled guns and suicide an american epidemic and wondering why you defined it as an epidemic and why that public health frame as necessary. Yeah sure and that's a word. I chose really carefully and also thank you for the kind words. I really appreciate that Epidemic is a word that i think a lot of may be pushed pushed back on for a number of reasons when you talk about social media guidelines talking about suicide one of the things people will will mention his it. You don't wanna sensationalize things you don't want to create the headline. And just to get people revved up without a sense of a solution and mindful that but like you said suicide is something need to talk about. We need to handle it head on. And so i also didn't want to beat around the bush. And so what i was looking for was a word that highlighted the scope of an issue. That people quite. Frankly just don't realize is such a big issue right and so you have to use a big enough to get their attention. And i also think that people think about apodaca especially in in a pandemic moment brand right now as as a really scary term but just like the marin right now is is scary it also comes with an end right like people were conspiring hard to come up with vaccine to get us on the other side of this right like epidemics caused a lot of harm and a lot of tragedy. But they're also things you can solve if you're willing to figure out how to do it right. And so. I looked epidemic as an appropriately strong term to says it say this is causing untold harm in our country and we can probably solve it but not if we keep on the same path. We've been on. I think the using framing epidemic too. I think goes back to what you mentioned earlier with idea of firearms culture and firearms culture and people's comfortableness with firearms in type of firearms. They're comfortable with. I think that's so different across the us. And i think we have a lot of international listeners. And i think that's something that it's sometimes hard to explain that the us is huge and it is very different. Regionally and folks relationship with firearms are different but everyone interacts with nepotistic. Everyone interacts with public health. Although cova has shown us that that itself is very regional and in very different. So i i think it's important to flag to sorta pellets universalize. Is that experience. I wonder if a there's a few times i'm going to do this to you. And i hate to ask you to to speak for all americans. But why do you think that americans in general don't now or or appear. You'll very uncomfortable talking about suicide especially firearm suicide. When we know that the majority of gun deaths are suicides and we know that the majority of suicide deaths are gun. Deaths you know. Why is there this strange separation happening from reality. So i don't think there's one answer i think there's a few things that sorta stand out e. n. The obvious one would be things like stigma right to. There are a lot of sort of cultural norms around talking about feelings and and demonstrating what someone might think of as weakness or inability to solve problems. Right you think of america very individualist society or culture is very much about pull yourself up by your bootstraps and find your way to a solution. And the way i think people think about suicide is that it's something that we people do. They call it the easy way out. Even though it's exceedingly difficult to do right and so no one wants to be identified as that and so i think there are a lot of cultural norms that that caused people to not seek help under report their thoughts of suicide and because of this that that impacts the conversation how people think about right so that's one aspect of it is that it's sort of this secret duty to stigma. I think the other part of it though. That is maybe less obvious. Most important i think particularly in terms of firearm suicide is is this idea of salience right at and so most people just feel like that's something that happens to someone else. Even though the great scientists like julie cyril shown how many of us are are considered lost survivors and who have been impacted by suicide. One way or another in still tends to be something. I think that people think about something happens to someone else. And so if you think about that from the firearm owners perspective right they understand. The accidents are problem. And so you want to make sure that you keep the fire out of reach of your child. Maybe in nets salient. But the idea that you should take firearm and stored out at home or make it more difficult to access well. That doesn't make sense. Because what salient to that individuals that somebody might break into their home in the middle night threatened. Them and their family sent to reach the firearm. And here i am telling them no lock it up. Sort unloaded in fact. Get it out of the home and that sounds like lunacy to them because suicide is something happens to someone else and so because i don't think we've done a very good job of helping folks connect with the idea. That suicide isn't a sign of weakness and it doesn't something that happens to some other person happens to everybody across all walks of life in fact if you close your eyes and picture out of person i bet what you picture as very little do a reality of day to day american suicide.

brady aubrey Kellyanne the new york times Dr michael anastas new jersey gun violence resear rutgers school of public healt Kelly us
"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"brady" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"And then the brady bill and the ban on us all weapons in the mid nineteen ninety s and so we have this evidence that is sort of lay out in detail in his book that when we pursue an enact change it matters and it doesn't just matter for handgun violence it sends a moral signal to the nation that the highest levels of leadership in this country are taking the issue violence seriously and that legislation in the late thirties in the mid nineties helps to reset norms for behavior. And so i. I just want people to understand how impactful it's going to be when we finally get this next major anti gun. Violence bill passed. But as you mentioned you know the nra just built up a political juggernaut from the sort of mid nineteen seventies when these sort of radical anti government right-wingers. Take over the nra until sandy hook. And you know for much of that time brady had gotten some big wins but it was basically brady brady alone and we now have all of these partners Working with brady. Everybody feels a little bit different lane. Everybody's sort of works together on big projects we've now been able to build a political infrastructure. That's justice powerful. Probably more powerful right now than the gun lobby is. And that's why we're starting to win in state legislatures were The precipice of winning at the congressional level but we just had to build up a big enough political movement that we could rival the gun lobby and we can talk more in depth about how we all did that. But we're we're at that point. I think now. I can't say that are than my friend chris just to answer that question really except to say that i think what happens in the states is equally important because that builds momentum overtime as virginia. I feel this acutely because you couldn't have predicted five. Six seven years ago that we would have a general assembly elected. That is a gun. Violence prevention majority general assembly. And that you would have a governor having been elected in twenty seventeen that exit polls show in the commonwealth of virginia..

nra anti government brady brady brady sandy hook chris general assembly virginia