35 Burst results for "Braden"

Coan's 3 TD throws lead No. 7 Notre Dame past Virginia 28-3

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 weeks ago

Coan's 3 TD throws lead No. 7 Notre Dame past Virginia 28-3

"The fighting Irish have now won twenty three straight regular season games against ACC schools Saturday night was a twenty eight to three no doubt or over the Cavaliers Virginia played without quarterback Brennan Armstrong who leads the nation in total offense but suffered a rib injury two weeks ago Notre Dame's Jack Coan threw three touchdown passes connecting with Michael Maher from six yards Braden Lenzy from four and Kevin Austin from fifteen coach Brian Kelly says his team is ascending you know anytime you try to put a resume together it's about how you play later in the year so you know the I. test is this football team is playing better defensively offensively and you know we're sitting here nine one Notre Dame came into Charlottesville at number nine in the college football rankings I'm Ben Thomas

Brennan Armstrong Jack Coan Michael Maher Braden Lenzy Kevin Austin ACC Cavaliers Notre Dame Brian Kelly Virginia Football Charlottesville Ben Thomas
"braden" Discussed on The Proffitt Podcast

The Proffitt Podcast

05:34 min | 2 months ago

"braden" Discussed on The Proffitt Podcast

"I love how this audience is so invested in your financial and legal all the things, right? That you have to have to legitimize your business on the back end. And so this is why we have people that are CPAs and lawyers and I you're just going to be so excited about today's guest because he is a licensed attorney and tax professional. So it's like, boom, boom, double whammy, and it's just gonna be so much fun 'cause I know you'll always have questions about running a business, especially when it comes to running a business with a podcast and I've gotten so many questions over the years and I always feel like I'm like, I feel like I need to disclaimer tattooed on my forehead. I am not like, I was gonna say legitimized. I'm not able to give you legal advice, right? I'm not able to give you financial advice 'cause this isn't my thing. This is why I have professionals come onto the show and tell you all of these things. And so today's guests, like I said, it's bright and Drake. I'm so excited for all to meet Brighton. We had a fantastic conversation. And he's someone that I know through the Amy Porter filled circle. We have been a momentum together and he has been just he said so much success in really putting himself out there as someone who is online in a really big way with his courses and serving his community, and we're going to talk about how he transitioned into that and what the business looks like for him, but let me give you a little backstory and Braden. So he is a California license to turning a tax professional. His tagline is your gay best friend here to help you get your legal and tack stuff together. We're gonna talk about that in a second. Brayden works primarily with service based creative small business owners through his courses where he educates on contracts, business entities, cash flow systems and taxes..

Amy Porter Drake Brighton Braden Brayden California
How Manufacturing Platform Raven Found Opportunity for Growth in the Medical Field

Code Story

01:43 min | 5 months ago

How Manufacturing Platform Raven Found Opportunity for Growth in the Medical Field

"What does the future look like for raven the product and for your team. I think it's it's really bright. It's a really exciting time for answering right now. So we've we've grown about thirty percent in terms of the team in the last six months and we're delivering features functionality improvements at faster pace than we've ever done before the potential is enormous in this industry. I'm forget the number here at the time. There are hundreds of thousands of manufacturers in the world. it's a it's a huge part of the economy and there is huge potential for improvement so we see a lot of a lot of great things happening in addition in story here at the beginning of the pandemic one of our first employees or i think he was technically the first employee gave us a call and he's now a surgeon and he said hey. I think i think raven could be useful in our operating rooms at our hospital to help us with our cova productions to keep our our staff safe and and also to just help us be more productive over you know. Use this sort of scarce resources more effectively. And so we've been you know looking at how that works. And we now have of a variation of our product installed as an operating which is which is pretty. We do see you know at its core. We're trying to help people use their time. Better use their resources better. And that's not just manufacturing but it's also a lot of other areas manufacturing stuff is is super exciting. That's our core but we do see this potential for growth expansion into these other other areas as well

Raven
Raven Founder Believes Fixing Mistakes is a Team Effort

Code Story

01:36 min | 5 months ago

Raven Founder Believes Fixing Mistakes is a Team Effort

"Let's flip the script a little bit. Tell me about a mistake. Made and how you and your team responded to so this is one of these things that specifically talk about. We've all made mistakes of varying degrees. And i can think of of cases where we've accidentally deployed wrong pieces of software or deleting a node where we shouldn't wear we intended to upgrade a single pod or or something like that the amazing thing whenever we have sort of one of these issues that comes up. I love a jumping in whether it's a discord room or slack all or whatever or you know back when we could over the shoulder. The team is just vicgory focused on solving the problem. In a non-judgmental way. And then we we. After the fact we do failure causes inquiry where we go through what happened and in and realizing we're part of system here in it's not the individuals it is the system. You know the when you when you mess up you know your your heart starts beating you feel that that anxiety but you've got a whole bunch of people who were there with you trying to help the system backup and then support you as we all learned from it and try to make the system more robust so that that doesn't happen again unlike what she said there about the system. We're a system. Were not an individual. So how do we fix the system. That's a good. It's a good way to scope it when you have to have hard conversations or no retro on an

"braden" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

06:57 min | 5 months ago

"braden" Discussed on Code Story

"Is a cultural fit and now we don't use that one kind of think of it. Is that a cultural add. We're always looking to grow the culture in a way that everybody wins. We're not looking for people who think exactly like the way we already think there needs to be a certain amount of overlap. But it's really exciting. When we bring in people who kind of share those common values respect and continuous improvement. Who come in with some different perspectives on on other things. Challenge the rest of the team in an effective way to improve. So you know we are looking to push our culture to to grow it evolve from that common core and part of that is not talk about culture. We talked about the things that are effective or are not effective both in general terms in our specific teams and we continuously work on it. It's it is a. It is a a conscious deliberate practice. This episode is sponsored by immensely. If you're ready to add photo or video editing to your application immensely is a great place to start. Image lee provides a software development kit. That handles all the technology for adding photo and video editing. Right inside your application there. S decays are fully customizable. And can match your abs looking feel and support all major platforms. Let users share beautiful photos or videos create imagery for marketing campaigns. Build photo books were even automate designed with templates. Their video and photo editor 's decay is used by chiappa fi hoot suite shutter fly and hundreds of other companies helping them. Ships offer faster the imagery software development. Kit is the fastest way to add photo or video functionality to any application visit i n g dot l. y. slash coat story today to try the whip demo. That's i m. g. l. y. slash coats. Story this episode is sponsored by radical. Are you interested in joining a team that encourages intellectual periodicity problem solving and openness. Not only that. But one that provides the support and mentor ship needed to succeed learn and grow meet radical the team radical has built a world class platform for modern bill payments payouts and invoicing radical helps companies speed up their business payments using a secure invoice and bill payment system and not just for accounting groups. The company's solving problems for the cfo controller the accountant and the developer rabble is engineering lead and fully. Remote they're looking for the best engineers and operators to join their team and drive forward their mission of removing the burden of business payments to apply. Today go to radical dot com slash about and click view open roles. That's our ou t. a. b. l. e. dot com slash about checkout radical today. And join a team whose changing the face of business payments. What's flip the scale ability. Did you build scale efficiently from day one or were you fighting this as you grew and gained traction one of the things that we wanted to prove that we had a product that was worth building and from a technology perspective. I think it's very large stack that we try to. We try to do the end. End being data collection data cleaning to get to the truth of the analytics to the insights of the feedback to operators. And so there's just a very large technology stack so when we build our technology we would try to pick an architecture that is extendable extensible and it's flexible and we wouldn't necessarily build all the scale ability to start but even try to leave ourselves the options from a product perspective when we built our product. We did think about scale ability absolutely from the beginning to be able to help operators at an individual process we wanted to be able to help the corporate executives overseeing one hundred plants that mike have hundreds of production processes and so thinking about that product skill was was something that we do did from the beginning thing about the technical scale with something that we considered but didn't necessarily always implement we'd hit the limits and and that was through continuously monitoring the performance of the system. We would go back and we would adjust for our particular case. It's an appropriate way to to build it small team looking to move quickly deliver quickly and it's about that speed of providing value to our customers so it sounds like you started out building in such a way that you could prove out the product but you architect it to where you could scale easier later on down the line that right. Yeah and we're continuing to do that. You know so. We've made some technology changes and we're continuing to make those changes in the last couple of years here. We've we've really found a lot of great product market where our customers are they want. They want things they want them. They want them quickly and building in that flexibility and the technology is something that we you know. We now architect in that flexibility in that quick speed of being able to adapt and taylor to them. You know we're building a product so we want to build the product. That's it's it's flexible because that's what we need in this market as you step out on the balcony and you look across what you've built. What are you most proud of. So i think there's two things the first is is absolutely the team. I think the growth of the team has been amazing and seeing the individuals how they taken on new responsibilities And and and how the organization itself the culture that like kindness that that curiosity that that drive to to be better people better engineers is really amazing and also what are our president. Likes to post these things we get you know. He gets text messages from some of our our bigger customers talking about when they hit records in terms of their productivity for a day. You know their effectiveness going from single digits to high seventies in the course of less than eighteen months which is which is amazing right and so seeing those cases where our customers are so excited that they call our president and say max look this. What a day we've had that. That's pretty exciting. Because that's the other thing which is like we're making those people's days data right when we when we help them produce like that. Let's flip the script a little bit. Tell me about a mistake. Made and how you and your team responded to so this is one of these.

lee mike taylor
"braden" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

02:32 min | 5 months ago

"braden" Discussed on Code Story

"What's flip the scale ability. Did you build scale efficiently from day one or were you fighting this as you grew and gained traction one of the things that we wanted to prove that we had a product that was worth building and from a technology perspective. I think it's very large stack that we try to. We try to do the end. End being data collection data cleaning to get to the truth of the analytics to the insights of the feedback to operators. And so there's just a very large technology stack so when we build our technology we would try to pick an architecture that is extendable extensible and it's flexible and we wouldn't necessarily build all the scale ability to start but even try to leave ourselves the options from a product perspective when we built our product. We did think about scale ability absolutely from the beginning to be able to help operators at an individual process we wanted to be able to help the corporate executives overseeing one hundred plants that mike have hundreds of production processes and so thinking about that product skill was was something that we do did from the beginning thing about the technical scale with something that we considered but didn't necessarily always implement we'd hit the limits and and that was through continuously monitoring the performance of the system. We would go back and we would adjust for our particular case. It's an appropriate way to to build it small team looking to move quickly deliver quickly and it's about that speed of providing value to our customers so it sounds like you started out building in such a way that you could prove out the product but you architect it to where you could scale easier later on down the line that right. Yeah and we're continuing to do that. You know so. We've made some technology changes and we're continuing to make those changes in the last couple of years here. We've we've really found a lot of great product market where our customers are they want. They want things they want them. They want them quickly and building in that flexibility and the technology is something that we you know. We now architect in that flexibility in that quick speed of being able to adapt and taylor to them. You know we're building a product so we want to build the product. That's it's it's flexible because that's what we need in this market

lee mike taylor
Raven Founder Braden Stenning on Achieving Flexibility for Optimal Scalability

Code Story

02:32 min | 5 months ago

Raven Founder Braden Stenning on Achieving Flexibility for Optimal Scalability

"What's flip the scale ability. Did you build scale efficiently from day one or were you fighting this as you grew and gained traction one of the things that we wanted to prove that we had a product that was worth building and from a technology perspective. I think it's very large stack that we try to. We try to do the end. End being data collection data cleaning to get to the truth of the analytics to the insights of the feedback to operators. And so there's just a very large technology stack so when we build our technology we would try to pick an architecture that is extendable extensible and it's flexible and we wouldn't necessarily build all the scale ability to start but even try to leave ourselves the options from a product perspective when we built our product. We did think about scale ability absolutely from the beginning to be able to help operators at an individual process we wanted to be able to help the corporate executives overseeing one hundred plants that mike have hundreds of production processes and so thinking about that product skill was was something that we do did from the beginning thing about the technical scale with something that we considered but didn't necessarily always implement we'd hit the limits and and that was through continuously monitoring the performance of the system. We would go back and we would adjust for our particular case. It's an appropriate way to to build it small team looking to move quickly deliver quickly and it's about that speed of providing value to our customers so it sounds like you started out building in such a way that you could prove out the product but you architect it to where you could scale easier later on down the line that right. Yeah and we're continuing to do that. You know so. We've made some technology changes and we're continuing to make those changes in the last couple of years here. We've we've really found a lot of great product market where our customers are they want. They want things they want them. They want them quickly and building in that flexibility and the technology is something that we you know. We now architect in that flexibility in that quick speed of being able to adapt and taylor to them. You know we're building a product so we want to build the product. That's it's it's flexible because that's what we need in this market

Mike Taylor
"braden" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

06:13 min | 5 months ago

"braden" Discussed on Code Story

"To change and industry and build and lead a team. That has your back. i'm your host. No allow part today. Help raden stint built the best system to account for every second of production time. All this more on code story brenston has always been interested in technology. His earliest memories include the desire to be aerospace engineer. To be the guy to build the spaceships. He's been a lot of time exploring computers being interested in math and science and even founded a high school robotics team. This really opened his eyes to offer development as a career and lit up something inside of him. He's a curious person who often has a plan and keeps his eyes open for what is happening around him. He did his undergrad at carleton university studying aerospace engineering and he realized he really loved school so much so that he got his from the university of toronto at school he met his wife and they decided to stick around what they left to spend time outside in the green space as he puts it getting their two boys outside or walking the dog. Through some project ideas he was working on and networking in the tech space of ottawa. He was introduced to his co founder. Martin cloak together they combined ideas around machine telemetry in the next level of insight into continuous improvement. This is the creation story of raven raven. We're helping manufacturers than people work at manufacturing be more productive more efficient with their time. We help them understand what actually happened. Get a record. The truth of what it was and then be able to understand how they can improve what they can do to avoid losses in the future so if think about manufacturing one of the ways we can think about is how are you. Spending time is always sticking once. You've lost a second youth you've lost second and so in factoring often very focused on. How do you build a really stable production process producing high-quality at target rate. And how do you keep it going. And that means understanding when it stops so we have a framework that we work with our customers on how they think about losses helping killer. Those losses helping provide instantaneous feedback. Helping do reactive curl active work with them so that they can make more efficiently with the same people saying processes were you know when they're looking to scale they can maintain their productivity that they have when we moved to ottawa. I was actually still. I was working at. Ut post doc was instructor for four spaces design course and i was sort of halfway between toronto and ottawa was commuting back and forth for those not aware. It's about a four hour four and a half hour drive. That wasn't working for me. And so i started to kind of work on the problems that i was interested and i was doing tana systems for my research and in one of the things that was interesting. How do we. How do we monitor the state of these things. There's nobody around or if there's nobody around who sort of his paying really close attention to and so. I started working on some project where i was doing. Stay decimation is the machine or the thing that make sound. You know which was what i was primarily using operating well or is it. Does it have a problem so there are some really challenging things about that because the the idea was that wasn't connecting into direct signal. I was trying to infer thought there. Was you know it was sort of a half kinda hobby project half thinking. Hey this could be actually something. I started to connect with the community here in ottawa. A really great tech community. Lots of founders helping founders and i eventually got introduced to my co founder martin cloak. Who's our ceo here and the person that introduced us at. Hey you should talk to martin. He's an old friend of mine he sounds like it. Sounds like you're sort of thinking about something similar to what he's working and so martin and i met up chatted. We met some. You know we cross paths at events and sort of started thinking about collaborating insertive in the background. I was trying to see. Okay well if i was going to turn this thing to a product i need a whole lot more than just and that was one of these. Things really got me excited about meeting. Martin is that he was a email he was one of those complementary people and he had a bunch of other complementary people in its serve he had a few people working on what was then called machine to him and it was largely collect on off from machines and put it on a dashboard. We started talking and he recognize the value that next level of insight into what was going on when we started sort of collaborating the floor. You knew we were kind of working together on the same product and it's is one of those examples where i kind of had a bit of a plan but you. Something better came along. While i was working on what i thought i was going to be working on and realize that. That was what i shouldn't pick. I made the decision to to join up with martin in that was in twenty fourteen. And it's been it's been awesome but tell me about the mvp that i you know. Version of the product t. built. How long did it take you to build. What sort of tools did you use to bring it to life you. Martin has a background in manufacturing and he always sort of had this vision for he wanted to be the what was going on with the on the shop floor and what we found is this is something that many many people who are manufacturing thought about it over the time with us. We always have taken this approach. Where you want to be delivering code and new features and.

raden brenston ottawa carleton university university of toronto Martin martin cloak martin toronto
"braden" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

06:53 min | 5 months ago

"braden" Discussed on Code Story

"Of the bigger trade-offs happen which was just how simple we wanted to make that user experience we use a lot from manufacturing in lewd. If you're not doing something value added and you're losing an operator typing something into a computer question. Whether that's value added. My name is brandon skinny and i co founder and cto at rape. This is code story. The podcast bringing with tech visionaries who share in the critical moment of what it takes to change and industry and build and lead a team. That has your back. i'm your host. No allow part today. Help raden stint built the best system to account for every second of production time. All this more on code story brenston has always been interested in technology. His earliest memories include the desire to be aerospace engineer. To be the guy to build the spaceships. He's been a lot of time exploring computers being interested in math and science and even founded a high school robotics team. This really opened his eyes to offer development as a career and lit up something inside of him. He's a curious person who often has a plan and keeps his eyes open for what is happening around him. He did his undergrad at carleton university studying aerospace engineering and he realized he really loved school so much so that he got his from the university of toronto at school he met his wife and they decided to stick around what they left to spend time outside in the green space as he puts it getting their two boys outside or walking the dog. Through some project ideas he was working on and networking in the tech space of ottawa. He was introduced to his co founder. Martin cloak together they combined ideas around machine telemetry in the next level of insight into continuous improvement. This is the creation story of raven raven. We're helping manufacturers than people work at manufacturing be more productive more efficient with their time. We help them understand what actually happened. Get a record. The truth of what it was and then be able to understand how they can improve what they can do to avoid losses in the future so if think about manufacturing one of the ways we can think about is how are you. Spending time is always sticking once. You've lost a second youth you've lost second and so in factoring often very focused on. How do you build a really stable production process producing high-quality at target rate. And how do you keep it going. And that means understanding when it stops so we have a framework that we work with our customers on how they think about losses helping killer. Those losses helping provide instantaneous feedback. Helping do reactive curl active work with them so that they can make more efficiently with the same people saying processes were you know when they're looking to scale they can maintain their productivity that they have when we moved to ottawa. I was actually still. I was working at. Ut post doc was instructor for four spaces design course and i was sort of halfway between toronto and ottawa was commuting back and forth for those not aware. It's about a four hour four and a half hour drive. That wasn't working for me. And so i started to kind of work on the problems that i was interested and i was doing tana systems for my research and in one of the things that was interesting. How do we. How do we monitor the state of these things. There's nobody around or if there's nobody around who sort of his paying really close attention to and so. I started working on some project where i was doing. Stay decimation is the machine or the thing that make sound. You know which was what i was primarily using operating well or is it. Does it have a problem so there are some really challenging things about that because the the idea was that wasn't connecting into direct signal. I was trying to infer thought there. Was you know it was sort of a half kinda hobby project half thinking. Hey this could be actually something. I started to connect with the community here in ottawa. A really great tech community. Lots of founders helping founders and i eventually got introduced to my co founder martin cloak. Who's our ceo here and the person that introduced us at. Hey you should talk to martin. He's an old friend of mine he sounds like it. Sounds like you're sort of thinking about something similar to what he's working and so martin and i met up chatted. We met some. You know we cross paths at events and sort of started thinking about collaborating insertive in the background. I was trying to see. Okay well if i was going to turn this thing to a product i need a whole lot more than just and that was one of these. Things really got me excited about meeting. Martin is that he was a email he was one of those complementary people and he had a bunch of other complementary people in its serve he had a few people working on what was then called machine to him and it was largely collect on off from machines and put it on a dashboard. We started talking and he recognize the value that next level of insight into what was going on when we started sort of collaborating the floor. You knew we were kind of working together on the same product and it's is one of those examples where i kind of had a bit of a plan but you. Something better came along. While i was working on what i thought i was going to be working on and realize that. That was what i shouldn't pick. I made the decision to to join up with martin in that was in twenty fourteen. And it's been it's been awesome but tell me about the mvp that i you know. Version of the product t. built. How long did it take you to build. What sort of tools did you use to bring it to life you. Martin has a background in manufacturing and he always sort of had this vision for he wanted to be the what was going on with the on the shop floor and what we found is this is something that many many people who are manufacturing thought about it over the time with us. We always have taken this approach. Where you want to be delivering code and new features and.

brandon skinny raden brenston ottawa carleton university university of toronto Martin martin cloak martin toronto
"braden" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

05:54 min | 5 months ago

"braden" Discussed on Code Story

"More on code story brenston has always been interested in technology. His earliest memories include the desire to be aerospace engineer. To be the guy to build the spaceships. He's been a lot of time exploring computers being interested in math and science and even founded a high school robotics team. This really opened his eyes to offer development as a career and lit up something inside of him. He's a curious person who often has a plan and keeps his eyes open for what is happening around him. He did his undergrad at carleton university studying aerospace engineering and he realized he really loved school so much so that he got his from the university of toronto at school he met his wife and they decided to stick around what they left to spend time outside in the green space as he puts it getting their two boys outside or walking the dog. Through some project ideas he was working on and networking in the tech space of ottawa. He was introduced to his co founder. Martin cloak together they combined ideas around machine telemetry in the next level of insight into continuous improvement. This is the creation story of raven raven. We're helping manufacturers than people work at manufacturing be more productive more efficient with their time. We help them understand what actually happened. Get a record. The truth of what it was and then be able to understand how they can improve what they can do to avoid losses in the future so if think about manufacturing one of the ways we can think about is how are you. Spending time is always sticking once. You've lost a second youth you've lost second and so in factoring often very focused on. How do you build a really stable production process producing high-quality at target rate. And how do you keep it going. And that means understanding when it stops so we have a framework that we work with our customers on how they think about losses helping killer. Those losses helping provide instantaneous feedback. Helping do reactive curl active work with them so that they can make more efficiently with the same people saying processes were you know when they're looking to scale they can maintain their productivity that they have when we moved to ottawa. I was actually still. I was working at. Ut post doc was instructor for four spaces design course and i was sort of halfway between toronto and ottawa was commuting back and forth for those not aware. It's about a four hour four and a half hour drive. That wasn't working for me. And so i started to kind of work on the problems that i was interested and i was doing tana systems for my research and in one of the things that was interesting. How do we. How do we monitor the state of these things. There's nobody around or if there's nobody around who sort of his paying really close attention to and so. I started working on some project where i was doing. Stay decimation is the machine or the thing that make sound. You know which was what i was primarily using operating well or is it. Does it have a problem so there are some really challenging things about that because the the idea was that wasn't connecting into direct signal. I was trying to infer thought there. Was you know it was sort of a half kinda hobby project half thinking. Hey this could be actually something. I started to connect with the community here in ottawa. A really great tech community. Lots of founders helping founders and i eventually got introduced to my co founder martin cloak. Who's our ceo here and the person that introduced us at. Hey you should talk to martin. He's an old friend of mine he sounds like it. Sounds like you're sort of thinking about something similar to what he's working and so martin and i met up chatted. We met some. You know we cross paths at events and sort of started thinking about collaborating insertive in the background. I was trying to see. Okay well if i was going to turn this thing to a product i need a whole lot more than just and that was one of these. Things really got me excited about meeting. Martin is that he was a email he was one of those complementary people and he had a bunch of other complementary people in its serve he had a few people working on what was then called machine to him and it was largely collect on off from machines and put it on a dashboard. We started talking and he recognize the value that next level of insight into what was going on when we started sort of collaborating the floor. You knew we were kind of working together on the same product and it's is one of those examples where i kind of had a bit of a plan but you. Something better came along. While i was working on what i thought i was going to be working on and realize that. That was what i shouldn't pick. I made the decision to to join up with martin in that was in twenty fourteen. And it's been it's been awesome but tell me about the mvp that i you know. Version of the product t. built. How long did it take you to build. What sort of tools did you use to bring it to life you. Martin has a background in manufacturing and he always sort of had this vision for he wanted to be the what was going on with the on the shop floor and what we found is this is something that many many people who are manufacturing thought about it over the time with us. We always have taken this approach. Where you want to be delivering code and new features and.

brenston ottawa carleton university university of toronto Martin martin cloak martin toronto
"braden" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

03:13 min | 5 months ago

"braden" Discussed on Code Story

"This episode is brought to you by. Cto dot ai. You guys know that. I interview a lot of great builders on this show and one of the most important aspects of a great code story. Episode is how a team works together to continuously deliver a great product and not only a great product but one that will scale to meet growing demand. It's easy for growing teams to get overwhelmed by you. know it. Complex tools complex tools can be a major source of frustration across team to spend all of your time managing tools instead of building great products meet. Cto dot c. t. o. dot. Ai is a workflow automation platform. That simplifies developer operations. So you're growing team can improve. Their delivery velocity and hit their launch dates. What i love about the platform is that it doesn't matter your experience level. You can be a junior deb. You can be a senior deaf..

The Role Shift of Voice Assistants to Search Engine-Like Voice Aides With Braden Ream

VOICE Global 2021

01:44 min | 6 months ago

The Role Shift of Voice Assistants to Search Engine-Like Voice Aides With Braden Ream

"Would hope we start to see more intent based queries for the actual general assistance Googles of the world where are no longer asking acknowledged based queries like hey hotels april tower. It's i'm hungry right. It's more of an intention and we start to see that consumer behavior shifts. There's a bit of a chicken and egg Around this but let's just accent assume or a perfect world for a second when you see that consumer may shift words. I'm hungry or you know. Where's the nearest restaurant is another way to say i'm hungry right. You're implicitly saying that you're going to start to see these assistance act more like search engines which is really exciting. Because i think that's when You know we can start to viewer assistance. The reason why they're called assistance right. They're meant to be helpful mill to help us in our everyday tasks not just voice you know. Search of google acceptable often with a lot of assistance are for most folks. It's whether alarm clocks ability to search for information We want to be able to Access manipulating engage with information right I think we'll definitely see that in the next five years. Ten years is like without with extreme certainty Two years is a little bit. you know. It's plausible and then in five years. I i feel pretty confident that you'll start to see the voice assistance that we all know in us today really become search engines and the allowing access the world around it access information and access services around us really with the use of a personal assistant concierge that we have in our home.

Google
The Latest: Rose the exception on a tough day at the Masters

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 8 months ago

The Latest: Rose the exception on a tough day at the Masters

"Justin rose has taken a remarkable full shop lead after the first round of the masters the English one nine under for his last eleven holes on his way to an improbable seven under sixty five on an extremely challenging first day at the hot and flushed Augusta national course it is the fourth time he's one of the first round at Augusta and he said that putting full clear of Hideki Matsui yama and Brian Harman Patrick Braden Webb Simpson are among those at two under with jobs space at one under on a day with just twelve players broke par on Graham make us

Justin Rose Augusta Hideki Matsui Yama Brian Harman Patrick Braden Webb Simpson Graham
"braden" Discussed on Detour To Neverland

Detour To Neverland

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"braden" Discussed on Detour To Neverland

"Thing that i think i can remember but in line yeah. I don't remember dream flight at all. No if i went when i was open. That's definitely one that my family would have skipped. They skip a lot And then i did end up giving it pretty higher marks for the immersion category again a lot of it ties into our research so we tried to be unbiased but sometimes we just can't help it after we learned so much about these rights because it does make us appreciate them more so yeah what about you. Braden give six point seven five six. You gave it a six point seven five yes tried to steal your score there for a second read it a high for nostalgia and for immersion. I think what i rated that low end was how long i'm willing to wait for it I think it might scores. Strictly based on space ranger spin was yours as well. Yes astro blasters would get a higher score but specifically and.

Braden
"braden" Discussed on Scene Of the Crime

Scene Of the Crime

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"braden" Discussed on Scene Of the Crime

"Want. To be voted. MISSOURI THAT SPEAKS To, how wrong? He's wrong for city new Josh. Powell. Was a suspect in the disappearance of his wife Susan the presumed murder of his wife Susan. But the state was still allowing boys to have visitation and not only have visitation but go to Josh Powell's home and have this station there, which is something that we now know because of this jury verdict never should have happened. Yeah and it's taken the family a long long long road to get to this point but we talked to Anne Bremner it was when the jury had been. Midst of the pandemic that got Kabosh they couldn't go in there anymore, and so they recently resumed the court procedure, and now we have this historic historic case. Then I got a chance to talk with Charlie Cox Checkups. He is the grandfather of Charlie and Brayden he and his wife. Judy. Are the ones who sued the state and they say it is taken eight years to get to this verdict the process. Has Been Delayed for many years originally, the judge decided he wasn't gonNA listen to any of our evidence or anything basically dismissed it. Then we went to had to go to appeals that started back what two thousand twelve once the appeals court finally ruled and it was back then started to delay tactics and basically what appeals court had told us and that's what I came to realize how important this was really The state's position was that they had no responsibility for safety of children. The appeals court just told them. Yes. They did have a specific responsibility for safety children in their care, and so with that appeals court decision had to go back for trial. So this has been going on forever and a day in February the trial was postponed. As you said, because of covid pandemic, it just recently restarted within the last month and they finally have this jury verdict and what's crazy is you can hear the the dog tiredness and his voice I don't know if you hear that too. But like, but he said how important this is and some families might say, Oh, well, they're getting a huge payout, but this is not this is not that not at all no, and they have. Not only Charlie and Braden in mind when they when they filed this lawsuit but all of the other children that are in the care of the state here in Washington and also around the country well, before the children even went missing back in two, thousand, one or two, thousand, three or something like that. There was this domestic violence issue. It's an issue across the country that apparent would be come distressed and he or she would kill the children in themselves and they. They realize that it's not only the ones that hurt the children and our abusive physically abusive. It's the more emotionally these people that are dangerous that actually when they explode, they didn't generally do the hillside and take out the family. So they get a a study across the country. They put a group of people together and came up with a panel to how can we stop this. So they came up with a new plan a new way to look at domestic violence and we had people in our guest hfs here that we're on the board for that, and they came up with US national change in how you look at things or domestic violence policy, and of course, we adopted it we were part of it. So they came up with procedures and practice manual the following year or so and laws changed actually policies procedures changed. But they didn't get the training out to the people. So basically what he's saying is that before Charlie Brandon's death, there was a change in the law that should have prevented those boys from ever going to Josh Pals home. But because there was no training for the staff DS HSS it didn't happen well, and for me the biggest takeaway from what he just said and I think from our from doing all the research on our. Two part series was the the emotional abuse like I. It was a huge eye opener to me that in that particular case from what we understand from what I understand you know josh was not physically abusive. He was mentally and emotionally abusive toward his wife and his children and I think that as he sat there that we're looking at this all wrong and because you know even if she would have called the police, he didn't hitter. Right he didn't. He was absolutely abusing her but there were you know he didn't leave the marks on the outside. Yeah. So anyway, I just think that's that's that's such a huge point that I learned from doing that case. As, we celebrate this you know record setting ninety, eight, million dollar jury verdict. Chuck says you know obviously the boys are still gone you know nothing hammering Charlie back to. Our and our daughter still missing and that doesn't change. But we're hoping for the biggest judger, but you ever saw or something so that the other states go well, we don't want that happening here. So it is making a change for the better for the children. I got a chance to speak with Mr, Cox right before this verdict came down. So they had no idea but they were hoping they were hoping and hoping for a massive award not because they're seeking money. But because they know that's the only way the state's GonNa. Listen I wonder how that payout will happen ninety eight, million dollars do you have any idea how people get paid on that? I don't the state released a statement it was like literally three sentences I think that was just like our attorneys are going to look at the verdict and decide next steps basically was a non statement. So basically like this isn't over maybe It's hard to say we'll find out. You know I had a chance to talk with Chuck Cox couple of years ago about Charlie's dinosaur and they. I just they do. They're so involved like this. The worst thing happened to their family and yet. They wanted to do something good for people and to make it change and I think that when something horrible like this happens like you can either go into the negative you know world or you can try to make change and so charlie dinosaurs just one example of the things the Cox family has done and basically it's like getting a kit together because we have so many homeless kids in Washington state I mean and there's not enough foster parents and so basically that when they found out that foster kids would often carry a garbage bag full of their stuff they were like we need to do something and so Charlie's dinosaur was based on a on a picture that Charlie. had, drawn a dinosaur that they're like, okay this is our logo. This is what we're going to do, and so now they they have kits and they make them so that when a child goes to another foster family that they ha, they don't carry along a garbage bag full of their belongings but they have a case you know that has a toothbrush and other things and it know just a little things but they mean so much. Yes. If you want to find out more about Charlie's dinosaur, you can header our website scene of the crime podcast dot com and also go back and check out our Susan Powell two-parter that we've got out there because that story still baffles me. You know I mean this family. And talked about what these kids went through that at their father's hands..

Charlie Josh Powell Susan Powell Charlie Cox josh Chuck Cox Cox Charlie Brandon Anne Bremner MISSOURI murder Washington Josh Pals Judy US Brayden Braden
"braden" Discussed on I Do! Life, Love, and Traditional Marriage

I Do! Life, Love, and Traditional Marriage

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"braden" Discussed on I Do! Life, Love, and Traditional Marriage

"And we are looking back to the very first episode of I do. Love and traditional marriage. Again. I'm Dan. Brain and I'm here with my beautiful. Then Brayden. Welcome back sedan. Talked about it a few times before, but maybe explain to people why we started the trade life network. Just I think that's a good idea. For me, the reason is I see so many people today struggling with their lives. They're marriages how they live and relate to one another. So I. Thought that perhaps the best way to deal with that was share. My knowledge of what traditionalism is. And how we can go back to a life that worked for ancestors, a life to thousands of years of natural selection has brought us to, and we're setup for right, and I think people need to understand that we're not some kind of far out grouper nodding. We're just people that want to get back to our roots and live traditional lifestyle absolutely well. Let's start talking about traditionalism. Start talking about what we're here to talk about. Sure so traditionalism. If you look up in the dictionary, it says it's the upholding and maintenance of tradition especially so as to resist change. Now I don't think we can truly resist change. It. Happens the world changes over time and people changes well yet. We shouldn't outright dismiss what does work and what has worked for hundreds of years. I think we've left behind a lot of what makes things tick in this world to me. traditionalism is a counter movement to what's going on today. Today's cultural focus isn't on what has been proven to work some call liberalism others call it progressivism yet. No matter what you call, it is the same idea a cultural movement where we have left behind the scientifically valid concept that we were biologically psychologically assigned to predetermined roles of birth, and those predetermined roles are a good portion of what defines us as human beings. These roles established in the most part RDA. Define our behavior, our relationships and to a great degree, our place in society night. If you mentioned this to most people. They think you're saying that we should all go live like the cleavers or the Waltons. Some all. Let's go back and live in the nineteen fifties idea. These roles are supported by current medical and psychological science as we study what makes up the differences between the sexes, and how we come by the behaviors that define our relationships. We have discovered that were built operate in a certain way now there's always exceptions to the rules, but those are only exceptions. They're rare and they're not. What is generally the rule for how we operate? Yet we've moved into a time where the cultural focus is more on the individual and what they feel they should be and that feeling opposes what is real. We're just supposed to accept it even if it is detrimental to that individual. To me, this seems foolish and counterproductive. It's right down. We live in a society of feelings over facts, so it seems like the concept of traditional ism might be hard for some people to understand or even to figure out how it fits in their life. This is a complex and do subject, and it's somewhat difficult to unpack in just a short twenty five minute episode. Suffice it to say that in general traditionalism is a social and political movement that essentially says that we honor and respect the predetermined roles that we've been created with, and in respecting those roles we operate within the constraints of those roles to the betterment of ourselves, our family, our community and society at large, and sadly we've left behind those roles. We've also left behind the roles of extended family and community I think to the detriment of society. In the past if I didn't have something, I could trade or barter with my neighbor. They helped me with my harvest and I would help them do their harvests. No one was left behind now we've left that behind and in the process we've become obsolete, isolated and compartmentalized. I think we can look around the world today and see that it's not working for us at all I'm not even a huge proponent of what they call the nuclear family, just the father of the mother and the children. We've left behind the extended family as well. We've lost grandparents. We've lost aunts uncles. We've lost all of that support structure that made family and community work. We need to start looking at those family and societal structures. Evolved and operated, and then go forward utilizing the best elements of the structures. Yeah, well, that's a great introduction to traditionalism for our listeners. I think it gives them a lot to think about before our next episode I agree well folks. We've reached the end of our episode for today before we go. Let's give you a little preview as to what's coming up over the next few episodes of this foundation season. Our next episode is going to be about. What is it traditional? We thought we would start with what isn't trant, because there are plenty of examples out there that people claim as traditionalists for example, the nineteen fifties, or the eighteen hundreds or the dark ages yeah. Regale you with tales of all. It was just terrible back then. And we'll use a pretty humor along the way, and we're going to explain how those examples are traditionalism. Instead they're fairly modern caricatures, or Straw man arguments. Yeah, and after that will dive into a thorough discussion about what traditionalism is, there is a lot traditionalism, the societal side of it and the political side of it which tend to go hand in hand. Next we will go step by step through personal and family relationships from a trad point of view, we'll discuss dating versus courting. We will look at living together outside of marriage and discuss couples can successfully live long-term outside of societal legal and offered religious contract of marriage. Yeah, we'll also discuss marriage. Itself Betrothal the wedding, and after the honeymoon we'll closely examined traditional family structure where you would have the wife who would be the homemaker and the husband who's out there working hard to provide for his family. We're GONNA take a look at reason kids. We're GONNA touch on some other issues about being a widow and death grieving and that remarriage process. We'll discuss living as a traditionalist in a world that seems to want to disappear. And I think we're going to wrap up this first season of foundation episodes with talk about sex. Sex in a traditional marriage, a fun subject that progresses tend to mock can distort. A I would say it's my favorite subject. Beyond this foundation season, we planned to interview experts in the fields of traditionalist sociology, psychology politics, and we look forward to episodes where we answer your questions about traditionalism as well. Yeah, well, it's been fun telling you a little bit about us in our backgrounds. What traditionalism is and where we're heading with this podcast? Look for us and our next episode. That's not. Bad in two weeks until next time, if you want to check out our other shows or sign up for our newsletter, go to the Trap Life Network website at T., l.. An dot asked him. Again that's not L. and DOT FM until. Next time, go.

"braden" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"braden" Discussed on KOMO

"First big league basic Braden bishop stings this into center field after the former husky hopefully the first of many perforated shortly after that his rookie campaign was cut short when a fastball lacerated his spleen an injury he suffered while coping with his mom Susie's loss of memory through early onset Alzheimer's and she can do much on our own anymore you know so we have full time care for trying to get home as much as possible seizure but an Alzheimer's is a devastating disease Susie passed last October at the all too young age of fifty nine her athletic abilities and spirit shine in both of her boys Braden and hunter the San Francisco giants first round draft choice with help from Braden's alma mater they set up the four mom dot org foundation to make a difference for five point eight million Americans living with Alzheimer's and their loved ones caring for them and now is my goal was to start a conversation now you know that Alzheimer's affects you know the person affected but also the families you know so we try and educate caregivers because there's no book that teaches you you know how to care give written works out of his California home waiting for baseball season to start the heartache and special memories were very strong yesterday his first mother's day without mom Susie was a film producer so they will honor her with a full fledged documentary due out next February part of a nationwide tour of fundraising walkathon and bay area Alzheimer's awareness conference the number four mom dot org I'm bill Schwartz come on news at twenty and fifty past the hour on komo news your call will propel insurance money update a mixed performance by stocks to a week without us feels fell one hundred nine points the S. and P. five hundred was essentially flat but the nasdaq composite rose for the sixth straight session gaining seventy one points this was already becoming a trend now even more so we're holding onto our smartphones longer in fact the study by Barclays says that amid the corona virus pandemic people will likely hold on their smartphones four and a half years up from three and a quarter years the firm came to that conclusion by analyzing purchasing habits following the financial crisis in the late two thousands bars and restaurants in the region have been hit hard by the pandemic and the popular rebar says it will not be re opening in its current Denny triangle spot instead the nightclub and theater announced over the weekend it'll take a hiatus and re open in the fall of twenty twenty one in south Seattle when it's your money now I'm Jim Tesco komo news share your political insights from ABC news president trump is implemented a new White House policy requiring all of his staff wear face masks while at work they've learned about I see everybody just about everybody has a face mask on the new policy comes after two people who work at the White House tested positive for the corona virus last week president trump sought to take a victory lap on testing I mean the United States has met the moment and prevailed even as many public health experts warned that the United States continues to lack the widespread testing needed to properly traced the virus we've developed a testing capacity on managed an unrivalled anywhere in the world Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer on the other hand remains deeply critical of the administration's response saying the United States performance has fallen short of other countries and to think the United States always been the leader in.

Braden
"braden" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"braden" Discussed on KOMO

"Baseball player uses mother's day to honor his mom with a national campaign more from come as bill sports it was early may last year when Braden bishop savored a career highlight first big league basic Braden bishop stings this into center field after the former husky hopefully the first of many perforated shortly after that his rookie campaign was cut short when a fastball lacerated his spleen an injury he suffered while coping with his mom Susie's loss of memory through early onset Alzheimer's and she can do much on our own anymore you know so we have full time care for trying to get home as much as possible severe but it also covers the devastating disease Susie passed last October at the all too young age of fifty nine her athletic abilities and spirit shine in both of her boys Braden and hunter the San Francisco giants first round draft choice with help from Britain's alma mater they set up the four mom dot org foundation to make a difference for five point eight million Americans living with Alzheimer's and their loved ones caring for them and now is my goal was to start a conversation now you know that Alzheimer's affects you know the person affected but also the families you know so we try and educate caregivers because there's no book that teaches you you know how to care give written works out of his California home waiting for baseball season to start the heartache and special memories were very strong yesterday his first mother's day without mom Susie was a film producer so they will honor her with a full fledged documentary due out next February part of a nationwide tour of fundraising walkathon and bay area Alzheimer's awareness conference the number four mom dot org I'm bill Schwartz come on news while other people are changing their summer plans and staying home with the corona virus some businesses though are reaping the benefits of it nineteen pandemic is change the plans of many people so in Kansas city summer adjusting they want swimming pool says Michelle Pruitt shields above and beyond pulls in says their phones are ringing off the hook about one of every four pitches that we hear is because their their vacation has been canceled but if you want a swimming pool don't expect any time soon she says they're installers are booked they can anticipate late summer install he has a good short term.

Braden bishop Susie Britain Alzheimer producer bill Schwartz Michelle Pruitt Baseball San Francisco California Kansas city swimming
Flamingos Can Be Picky About Company

60-Second Science

02:45 min | 1 year ago

Flamingos Can Be Picky About Company

"Spend some time watching. Swimming goes and you might think that goes on tiny heads but these elegant avian actually lead complex social lives. Each bird has certain other individuals it prefers to spend time with and others that avoids in other words bingos have friends the wildfowl and Wetlands Trust the WW T. manages a number of wetlands in the UK some of which have communities of captive aquatic birds including bingos. They didn't quite know whether they could just take it for Bingo. I to the environment is ticket new flock and it would be fine will. Should they care more about the social choices at the birds? Were making Paul rose a psychologist at the University of Exeter's Center for Research. In animal behaviour for five years rose in his team observed the daily goings on of five. The world's six different flamingo species housed at the WW T. slimbridge wetlands center in Gloucestershire. The five species were the Chilean and Andean American James and Lesser Flamingos the partnerships that we say between bad saw Don Braden. The badge are choosing Haizhu associate with male female pairs spend time together so do same sex pairs and even groups of three or four and those relationships can last for many years. The findings are in the Journal behavioral processes so there was some flamingos in the group. That really didn't care who the caught was for that day they would flittering and they would have many different relationships in many different birds. And of course there were other flamingos. That were less social butterfly and more lone wolf but even they had a few close friends. Those beds that at least Gary s had more investment in a small number of sexual bonds. Living that they knew really well. Rose thinks that for Mingas may have evolved their social lives due to their wetland habitats in which the resources they need are concentrated in a small area. The Sexual Organization is layered on top of this need to be in one environment. So you have to be gregarious. If Flamingos know that partners if they know that the six birds off friendly and they get on with them they can then waste less energy scrapping and squabbling with other birds or they didn't get on with by spending time with their friends. Flamingos can more efficiently director limited time and energy to active these. Like foraging and mating if I want to get one standard one in pre my feathers. Garin stand on my leg and prayed my feathers next to Fiona because I get on with her all the next of frank because I haven. We'll just scrap if all this sounds familiar while we all know. Feel now as well as a friend.

Ww T. Slimbridge Wetlands Cent Wetlands Trust Don Braden Rose UK Sexual Organization University Of Exeter Fiona Gloucestershire Haizhu Gary S Paul Director Frank Mingas Center For Research
Washington, DC - Braden Holtby taking it easy in quarantine, even with uncertain contract situation

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Washington, DC - Braden Holtby taking it easy in quarantine, even with uncertain contract situation

"The NHL season remains on ice metaphorically instead of literally how is capitals goaltender Braden Holtby passing the time do much right now Mr in the summer and takes a few months off completely anyways is trying to get my mind completely away from everything so is it's gonna be tough once there's kind of a game plan and play whatever we have a bit of time we're going to we're gonna come back hope you had a goals against average of three point one one the highest of his career when the season was suspended

Braden Holtby NHL
Redskins put franchise tag on guard Brandon Scherff

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Redskins put franchise tag on guard Brandon Scherff

"Even the Washington amid widespread Redskins a place postponements the franchise sub tag sporting on three events time worldwide Pro Bowl guard Japan Braden says sheriff the twenty the twenty two thousand summer fifteen Olympics first in Tokyo round selection will had go been in on talks as with planned the club despite on a long the corona term deal virus outbreak instead the Redskins Japanese ensure prime he would minister not reach Shinzo free agency Albay said Saturday Washington the Tokyo use the regular games will franchise still take tag place meaning in sharp July could still without talk with basing other teams Japan will the host Redskins the Olympics would have the right quote to match without any problem offer or as receive planned two first U. round S. draft president picks as Donald compensation Trump suggested earlier they could in still the week negotiate that Japan a long term should deal consider until postponing July fifteenth the Olympics the franchise as of Friday tag property Japan had Wyman over fourteen is expected hundred to be confirmed worth upward cases of fifteen of the covert million ninety dollars virus this season and around thirty Michael deaths Reaves I'm guessing Coolbaugh

Washington Redskins Japan Braden Olympics Albay Japan President Trump Donald Trump Wyman Coolbaugh Tokyo Shinzo Michael Reaves
"braden" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"braden" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Financial advisor Blair Braden thanks so much player thank god but I the opening bell seconds away we've got our money editor password standing by with those numbers coming up first let's head outside and it's been an awful driver for several things are clear south of I. twenty five at I. seventy six that crashes gone all your backed up solid as you make your way down from a hundred and fourth you've got a really really crowded drive on the southbound I. twenty five through downtown and that drive south on I. twenty five through the tech center now the price up by twenty five dry creek that's also gone the backed up solid back to him that it's gonna be a long time before those delays really filter out but at least only drove it in front of your results are jammed up southbound Choo Choo five westbound I. seventy six approaching broadly late you've got an accident up in the Brighton area up near bar lake right Boulevard a Colorado Boulevard just on the east side of two seventy near Vasquez there's an accident there in commerce city at both lanes are blocked right now self that I twenty five at county line the county line south of gals rock in the gap project are you've got a crash the other trying to clear it but about but shoulder there and she'll stop at I. twenty fives of the standstill at county line Val Barker one sixty four as you make your way from gas rock down toward monument this report is sponsored by big O. tires next update ten minutes on KOAA news radio eight fifty AM I don T. four one FM for your listening to Colorado's morning news check in throughout the day for the latest updates on the hour and thirty minutes passed away newsradio addition of Colorado's morning music when Marty with you this morning right now thirty six degrees highs today in the sixties more of the same tomorrow before shift at the end of the week with some possible rain and snow coming our way right now it's Colorado's morning.

Choo Choo Vasquez Colorado Marty advisor Blair Braden editor Brighton Val Barker don T.
"braden" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"braden" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Station threaten edge good morning Friday part two waiting by the phone debut yeah welcome back let's call Braden you guys you met at a bar downtown exchange numbers went on a date that you thought was successful your indoor and now she's not responding to you and you want to know why yeah we you got it we're gonna call her now good luck thank you hello high may speak with Braden please hi Britney it's friendly and even the morning radio show on kiss FM in Chicago and I'm sorry to bother but I do have to tell you that we are on the radio right now and I need your consent to continue with the call can we talk for a couple of minutes okay thank you do you hang up whatever you want sorry to bother but we're calling on behalf of a guy named Dave who reached out to us says that he met you at a bar and you guys went on a date okay well he he likes you and die the day went well I was hoping to see you again says that you're ghosting him any kind of wants to know why okay did he tell you about where we went on our date and what happened no he just talked about the day said it was great what happened okay well we went to a comedy show which I thought was a really good idea of birth birth date yeah so we went there and during one of the things that he excused himself to go to the restroom and then next thing I know he's on stage and he's performing yeah he was one of the acts in the show he didn't tell you that maybe I should have caught that before I I really wasn't paying attention to the roster or anything but open Mike night or was he assigned comedian I open Mike going up before I thank the median no I don't I don't really know what's going on I didn't ask too many questions but I was there he intended to go on stage and tell jokes and he didn't tell you that right yeah what happened it was pretty crazy I mean besides the one liner dad jokes which I can get over that everyone like to get that joke time but he would also thing a lot of Texas gal new I mean they're a cliche things like being in the kitchen making family K. hi all we all are like what what date are you can you can tell a lot about a woman by house to eat ice cream we want to do a Louis C. K. I'm sitting there I mean of course they weren't paying attention to me but after he came to sit down they believe that I'm with ten now there's an association bad luck yeah it looks like it I would date someone like that which let me I'm proud to mention that the Davis year Dave the comedian you didn't share with us that you were a performer as well well I yeah I I I get a bill to mentioned my my my gig what's his jokes yeah yeah and you were trying to surprise her with a little there are no rules in comedy and and I Braden I I I'm any yeah I think so does it okay look so maybe that's your your your deal and people think that's funny I don't know but she doesn't know you to know that that's not your personality you don't really believe those things and so what is she supposed to believe exactly your point I see your point but it would it would it states comedy big no no for consoles yes there are there are how many there are can't beat those silly unintelligent and leave happy audience wanted you gonna go no rules in comedy or whatever then then then you have to get the care you will be prepared for what the reaction of people are going to have to the jokes I mean she did like assuming they were funny thought they were inappropriate yeah maybe you don't get like that the younger people last well why not I think it really was so look so she'd be out I don't know that's bold I gotta tell you you're taking a woman who you just met to watch you perform that's bold I didn't go well would you consider another day Braden I mean maybe give this guy another chance away from the comedy club did not tell bad jokes I think that we're on different labeling and if you think that that that the golden and not not something that I want to be around what do you have a man Braden I can excuse me Dave not going to be a a match I thank you for your thank you for doing them but I mean I'm I'm in the lead and tweet your said did yeah I don't know sounds kinda kinda little antiquated law outdated man long dad jokes and sexist jokes I mean come on okay I'll get back to the writing board yeah you.

Braden
Ovechkin nets pair of goals as Capitals beat Wild 4-3

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Ovechkin nets pair of goals as Capitals beat Wild 4-3

"You know is a pretty good night for the capitals and wizards they were winners on the road tonight to rebound from road losses the caps beat the wild four three in Minnesota they got a pair of goals from Alex a veteran and a big third period score from Tom Wilson and stood as the game winner Richard Pontic adding the other capitals goalie Braden Holtby thirty seven saves as the caps Snapple four game road losing streak they up their division lead over Philadelphia to three points entering their head to head matchup on

Tom Wilson Richard Pontic Braden Holtby Philadelphia Minnesota
Durham, Jackson-Davis lead Indiana past No. 9 Penn State

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Durham, Jackson-Davis lead Indiana past No. 9 Penn State

"T. in J. a game Oshie of extreme scored the go runs ahead goal Indiana snapping a three had all the one tie that midway mattered through most the third in a period sixty eight as sixty the capital win snapped over a four number game nine losing Penn streak state beating the penguins the Nittany five lions to three were down by the nineteen take over first late place in in the the first metropolitan half division but led by six the capital ten minutes scored later three goals in Indiana the first eleven answered with minutes the thirteen of the third to nothing it spurt was the penguins and held the lead third down straight the stretch loss Carl outdoor Haglund led and a the pair Hoosiers of goals with fourteen including an points empty netter as Indiana late improves the penguins its got big tallies ten record from Patric day in an Hornqvist eight Sidney after Crosby winning eight and Marcus in a row Pedersen Penn state has dropped Braden its Holtby last made two thirty three Lamar saves Stevens in the win led the Nittany Greg lions heist with Washington twenty nine points Tom McKay Bloomington Indiana

Indiana Penguins Haglund Sidney Crosby Pedersen Penn State Lamar Stevens Washington Penn Marcus Braden Tom Mckay Bloomington
Capitals snap skid, beat Penguins to vault into first place

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Capitals snap skid, beat Penguins to vault into first place

"T. J. Oshie scored the go ahead goal snapping a three all tie midway through the third period as the capital snapped a four game losing streak beating the penguins five to three the take over first place in the metropolitan division the capital scored three goals in the first eleven minutes of the third it was the penguins third straight loss Carl Haglund and a pair of goals including an empty netter late the penguins got tallies from Patric Hornqvist Sidney Crosby and Marcus Pedersen Braden Holtby made thirty three saves in the win Greg heist Washington

T. J. Oshie Penguins Carl Haglund Patric Hornqvist Sidney Crosby Marcus Pedersen Braden Holtby Washington Greg
Seattle: Trial begins over violent deaths of missing mom Susan Powell's sons

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Seattle: Trial begins over violent deaths of missing mom Susan Powell's sons

"Civil trial under way now against the state department of social and health services over the death of Susan Powell's young sons eight years ago students parents Charles and Judy **** claim social workers were negligent in allowing Josh Powell to have visitation with his sons one of those visits ended in Powell killing Charlie and Braden and themselves in February twenty twelve at his home in view all up after he locks the social worker out of the house this is an attorney for the coxes all over the state of allowing this visitation a warm for the son Josh but attorneys for the state argued that they didn't have access to much of that information about Josh as investigators in Utah couldn't provide it so they had information Josh Powell maybe some sort of threat reason to his voice they could not sure that what the department Susan's body never found though investigators believe the Josh killed her

Susan Powell Charles Judy Charlie Attorney Utah Josh Powell Department Of Social Braden
China counts 170 virus deaths, new countries find infections

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

China counts 170 virus deaths, new countries find infections

"Earlier this week about two hundred Americans arrived back in the U. S. remove Han China the center of the virus outbreak the US government chartered plane carrying them landed Wednesday in southern California they're being tested and monitored at a military base there the CDC's Dr Chris Braden we're gonna be monitoring them twice a day with symptoms and fever checks at the end of three days we think we'll have enough information to know their status and their risk as the US plans more flights in the next few days to evacuate more Americans in China the White House is announcing a task force that will lead the U. S. response to the new virus read a fall les Washington

Han China Us Government California CDC Dr Chris Braden United States White House Les Washington
What a mess: Predators beat Caps 5-4

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:19 min | 2 years ago

What a mess: Predators beat Caps 5-4

"Choppy ice let the sloppy play with some weird balances to when the capitals way but the predators prevailed five for scoring twice in the third period Nashville had blown a three one lead the caps bouncing back though on a bounce off the end boards that went past goalie you say sorrows who was there and guess who was there for the layout which is still story Steve this is is the the third third the the cavs tied up when Nick Bonino put the puck in his own net Braden Holtby gave up a short handed goal with his clearing but pass was intercepted the gas going just one for five on the power play coach Todd reared in those I can do better than that those are same things we saw before the break and shows its face again here right away after the break so I'd say it's great chancery address and let everyone know that those problems and go away and you know we gotta get back to work and and fixing them because as a games get higher and higher level of importance those are ones like that will cost you games and we need to learn lessons from the predators have the capitals number they have beat them how eight straight

Nashville Steve Cavs Nick Bonino Braden Holtby Todd
Cook, Vikings upend Saints 26-20 in OT in NFC playoffs

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Cook, Vikings upend Saints 26-20 in OT in NFC playoffs

"Lars Kirk cousins eller score and Kyle to Rudolph a one connect in overtime on a four in yard that gave touchdown the capital's on the first an amazing drive of five overtime four as come the from Viking behind stone win over the saints the sharks twenty six the capital's twenty trail drew for Brees two and the with saints forty rally six from point ten nine points seconds down in to the go fourth but Jacob then Parana the game to cut overtime the lead to on one a forty with a second nine yard goal field of the goal game by wil Lutz and then T. J. the Vikings Oshie won tied the overtime the game toss with and chose fourteen to receive point two that's seconds were cousins to go took over setting the capitals up the game of winning scored pass seven to Rudolph goals with this a year forty with a six three yard on five bomb to advantage Adam three one eller I got says Minnesota there's down a reason to the why New Orleans even to though things be were protected coming use of force we ran with it the we football didn't quit and probably had thirty five and forty we just rushing got reported attempts that young to there's to a whole opportunities lot of reasons and we won the game to the quarterback cabelos play on a role both in that yes Evander but Kane had a hat it trick was it with all was a three team goals went to coming sixty in the second Vikings period advance the San Braden Francisco Holtby made twenty without five facing saves NFC's in the win top seed Greg the forty heist Niners Washington I'm Deni count

Football San Braden Vikings Eller Lars Kirk Greg NFC Francisco Holtby Kane Evander Kyle New Orleans Minnesota Adam T. J. Wil Lutz Jacob Brees Sharks Rudolph
Eller's goal completes Capitals' stunning OT win over Sharks

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Eller's goal completes Capitals' stunning OT win over Sharks

"Lars eller score to a one in overtime in that gave the capital's an amazing five four come from behind win over the sharks the capital's trail for two with forty six point nine seconds to go but Jacob Parana cut the lead to one with a second goal of the game and then T. J. Oshie tied the game with fourteen point two seconds to go the capitals of scored seven goals this year with a six on five advantage eller says there's a reason why even though things were coming use of force with it we didn't quit and and we just got reported that young to to opportunities and cabelos on both Evander Kane had a hat trick with all three goals coming in the second period Braden Holtby made twenty five saves in the win Greg heist Washington

Jacob Parana T. J. Oshie Evander Kane Braden Holtby Washington Lars Eller Greg
Bruins score 4 in 1st to chase Holtby, beat Capitals 7-3

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Bruins score 4 in 1st to chase Holtby, beat Capitals 7-3

"The Bruins had had enough of their losing ways and took it out on the league leading capitals in a seven three route Boston had lost eight of nine but scored four goals on eleven shots in the first period to chase Washington's Braden Holtby Patrice Bergeron had two goals and take the brusque Brad Marchand underscore David crazy and Charlie Coyle also scored coils tally in the second was his one hundredth NHL goal from the squirts wonders when when games like that against good teams when you're home building and Christmas time you know and it's it's it feels good Alex Ovechkin scored his team leading twenty third for the capitals who had won ten of twelve Washington at one sixteen of seventeen against the Bruins and eight street in Boston given Coolbaugh Boston

Bruins Boston Washington Braden Holtby Patrice Bergeron Brad Marchand Charlie Coyle Alex Ovechkin David Crazy NHL Coolbaugh Boston
"braden" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"braden" Discussed on VUX World

"Making the tit of me. This I think might be in the the future voices the future again open twitter show numbers fourteen. Eighteen scroll down. I'll tell you what's happening right. Just right what happens with voice control troll boys and girls if you ever try and use it if you till you phone buck so that it's kind of like you know if you're on loud speaker until you form bucking and you kind of speak down the MIC. It turns out it turns it off. You need to have a kind of fairly upright right do it again open twitter. Show numbers fourteen. Now I'm on my notifications onto right. Scroll Down Scroll down. Sheila numbers seven now on view in a tweet show numbers ten. I've just like someone's tweet. That's cool. It sounds a bit like you know. You've got to show numbers quite a lot and that's a a bit of a headache but if you're in the middle of doing something else on you can just glance at your phone and then do literally any every single click thing on the phone has a number the next to it and so you just tell the number over time if you learn the numbers then you can just say the number basically I think that highlights a pretty important important point a lot of people think about voices this like binary interface of a mother gonNA use Voice GonNa use a screen like the future of human human computer interaction is going to be going to be tapping typing speaking looking like it's all these interfaces have pros and cons right. The pro voice is out is friction lists really fast and really fast for input speed and you don't need to have a direct line of sight you don't need to actually touch anything But it's not the perfect perfect interface right like it's in the future you're gonNA use voice control some of the time and tapping some of the time like it's just GonNa be awesome feature where you can choose. Whatever interface is best suited for that for that particular setting perfect nice way to end bread and welcome people reach out to? You will follow what you're doing voice flow even driveways they wanNA give they haven't already yeah. Voiceless free voice slow dot com spelled. How how you'd expect and you can find me on? Twitter ream Brayden so R. E. A. M. B. R. A. T. The N. that's been pleasure bidding. Thank you so much. Thanks for having me on Dustin Things I'm on twitter..

"braden" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"braden" Discussed on VUX World

"Better off to target to that long 'til that organic implicit vocation traffic or do you think it would be better to to really create a brand yourself within their. For example are you creating and invocation name. That is Stock prices or I should go the route of superstock or something along those lines. That's a great question I think it's really tough to build a brand in the space right now. I think voice branding is just starting to become more and more more a thing but for for the most part. I don't think you've seen many long tail brands emerge so some. That would come to mind. would be invoked. OPS has done an awesome job. Volleys done an awesome job at a bunch a couple other these skill makers who didn't have an existing brand but they've built a brand voice base I think that's really really difficult. Oh and so you know kudos to to the folks to do it successfully I don't think so. Do you think those Brunza recognized by the uses of those ops or do you think that's just knowing within the community because there's a pretty strong community. Yeah that's a good point actually matter to us if the new bruns Pope Invoice do they. I think there are some power users who use a lot of Alexa skills. You know it's sort of like the power law that you have most people. Don't use that many skills but the people who do a lot of them I think at that point you know they. They started more visual branding. Actually more so than audio branding. Where he knows volley has their gold rings? INVOKED APPS has their little emblem it has some recognition. But that that's a good point actually don't don't know whether consumers care too much especially if they're found by implicit invocation than I don't I don't think they know it all McCain. It's interesting.

"braden" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"braden" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"My name's Braden jet. I'm the president of the national border patrol council. I've been abortuaries agent for twenty one years. I can personally tell you from the work that I have done on the southwest border that physical barriers that walls, actually work. You hear a lot of talk. There are experts that say that walls, don't work. I promise you that if you interview border patrol agents, they will tell you that wall's work, we need those physical barriers, and we appreciate President Trump and all of his efforts in getting us those physical barriers. There's also a lot of talk on this shutdown that federal employees do not agree with his shutdown. I will tell you. That's not true. Thank you everybody. My name is the window. I am vice president with the national border patrol council. I want everybody to take the time to understand what's going on. We are all affected by the shutdown. We have skin in the game. However, it comes down to border security, and we are extremely grateful to President Trump, and we fully support what he is doing to take care of our nation's borders to take care of the future of the United States. It has nothing to do with political parties, we fully support the president and all his efforts to secure nation's borders. My name is Hector on the vice president of the national border patrol council. I am also voted patrol agent of the Texas border. I just want to talk about some of those criminals that border patrol agent apprehend on a daily basis, we're talking about murderers, rapists, people that commit very serious crimes in this country is has been doing an amazing job in deporting a of these people back to their countries. Unfortunately, once we can port these people. These people will not stay their country, these criminal aliens that have been released from jail that have been deported. We'll come right back into the United States. However, we had a physical barrier. It we had a wall we will be able to stop that. Again. We will thank President Trump for a advocating for patrol agents. And again, we asked her congressman to fund board security and fund the border wall. Thanks. Situation with you would accept dollar wall. Funding for this president. Dollar..

national border patrol council vice president President Trump President United States Braden congressman Texas Hector twenty one years