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"brad schreiber" Discussed on Unstructured Interviews

Unstructured Interviews

07:38 min | 5 months ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Unstructured Interviews

"And you'd Alenia loan in everywhere you go are fails robots and if one gets in your house they don't have the lead. Have you been open with that. Have you been on facebook lately. It's the same thing. Yeah and so. It's the story. One Guy who hates what side societies become in a sales robot gets into his house and won't leave until he finds the contract that have the sales robot fix everything that's life life and eventually he kind of loses it goes. I'M GONNA take my commuter rocket. Go to that vacation planet and get away from all this. So that's sales pitch and Philip. Philip K Dick was really I think maybe the greatest science fiction writer because the variety of concepts humor humor versus dramatic He explored Mind control he explored the identity of what it is to be human. You know he eh. He was just beyond most writers. What I think is funny? I kind of consider Philip K Dick to be like the velvet underground of of science fiction. You know the old saw the velvet underground not meet people bought their albums but everyone who did started a band Yeah Not many people read Philip K Dick but everyone who did was the SCIFI writer. Yeah but they do now. And what's really tragic about it. Is You know the the van Gawk principle you know. Yeah now you're now you're painting self or you know eighty million dollars but during your lifetime. You are this poor charting that you know well. Philip K Dick was living in an apartment in Fullerton in Orange County. I I been to it. It's no great shakes Powell and once he died bladerunner bladerunner comes out. And now you have to pay plenty to get the rights to even a short story. I don't think that radio series I I wrote sales pitch for could could actually be done today because it would cost too much for the rights it was produced and aired on NPR You know when you could actually afford to pay for the rights. Now you've got to be you know deep-pocketed and of course there are very many film and and Television projects based on his work. But all of it has come after Porterfield left us so I feel bad about that. Wow now to well for today. We're up to wrap it up because we're going to run. We could go on for four hours and and unfortunately not Joe Rogan. Can't and I I'm going to have to take a lot more lozenges if I do that. Exactly so To wrap things up bad curiosity about the guy who wrote a blurb on your book t Jefferson Parker. Wonderful Jeff Parker and I. We're on a panel when death in paradise my book the La Karner came out and we became good friends. I wrote an interview with him up up for the writer magazine and then when I was doing revolutions in I sent it to him and he loved it. He he He started out in journalism as a lot of very successful. Mystery and suspense writers. Do Conley I think's another one Prankul Conway is also another. That's right so so he knows how to tell a really well pay story but there are elements not only of drug cartels and sheriff's deputies. He gets into you know demonic possession. He gets he has three poetic sense. And the one thing I can tell you Eric when I interviewed him is He doesn't read a lot of true crime or suspense fiction. He reads novelists and I think that's pretty interesting that he understands that the dimensionality of characters is something you'd see more in literary fiction and his training as a journalist list teaches him how to really pay a great novel so that you're turning the pages and the blending those two styles I think is is something that really makes him well three time Edgar Award. Winning is the only ones. Yeah yeah very low key guy. I can't believe how ego lists. He is 'cause I've met a lot of Showbiz people who I admire. But you know you kind of want to slap them with fish sometimes because they're just arrogant and Jeff Parker if you just bumped into him somewhere you'd say oh you're kind of a surfer. You have probably a surfboard company that you own on in in Huntington Beach No. He's one of the great you know. Crime novelist of all time. Very cool guy. That's awesome and what is coming up next for Brad Schreiber. Well I'm working on a memoir. That takes place when I was seventeen to twenty two years old and a lot. Lot of crazy stuff happened Also I have a partner and we're taking death in paradise and developing it for both a podcast cast and for television cool and and I love doing. I'm GonNa continue doing the tours for. So Turek there might be a Manson book in there somewhere because the research that I've found from France and land like stuff I've found for the LA and revolutions in still it has been published so again maybe it's up to me. Sit Down and do the damn thing. It'll sell Manson cells there. There you go. And I recognize ignites that too radical politics in the seventies probably doesn't sell as well as drugs in Hollywood and all all the madness connected to the Manson story. We'll fantastic now. People can follow you at Brash. CYBER DOT com. Yeah Yeah I used to working. KCET as a writer producer. And I pick up. The phone was rushed. I go wherever wherever you have ended up from when Brash cyber fiber so that's my website. I'm I'm at Brad Schreiber on twitter. I Have Archives of my writing if you WANNA go to huffing and poster Mr Medium. I do journalism there. But mostly it's Through my website that I connect with people and have samples of my work can and loved hearing from people. You know I love that people come back into your life sometimes. Six seven years after you worked with them shifting principle fantastic and a breath. Thank you so much for coming on. I really enjoyed it Eric. And thank you for the six to ten hours. You have to spend learning about me no worries I enjoyed it me too. Thanks for listening. And if you like what you heard please consider subscribing for free and I mean for free it is always free. There's no billing anything else you can subscribe in your player of choice which is probably right in your hands or you can good unstructured pod dot com and there are plenty of links there. Thank you so much much and in the spirit of sharing. Here's a couple more shows. You may want checkout. Am Studio Steve Veronica and we we have a podcast all about about podcasting we cover everything related to the craft. How.

Philip K Dick Jeff Parker Brad Schreiber writer Eric Manson facebook Jefferson Parker bladerunner bladerunner Joe Rogan Edgar Award writer magazine NPR Huntington Beach La Karner Porterfield Brash Powell Steve Veronica Orange County
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Unstructured Interviews

Unstructured Interviews

13:50 min | 5 months ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Unstructured Interviews

"Also Kinda came across from what little I know touch cynical put touch. He was very cynical but he wasn't so cynical that he dropped out of trying to change the system. This this was is a guy who's more libertarian. than he was democratic he wanted he wanted the country to keep its hands off of you know his pocket book which is a very Lubar -tarian value and don't forget I mean he was a combat. A composer conductor a musician and engineer producer looser and a distributor of his own music. And then he went off into when he did video he also funded that himself. That's typical Libertarian Shall we say combination intern. Because somebody who is so self reliant and smart will often skew libertarian. Because they're in the motive. Leave me alone you know. Well a lot of musicians have been ripped off historically because they didn't pay attention to the contracts they were signing and that was I'm in charge and I will do all the necessary footwork in order to look over contracts because I want to be the boss. I'm wondering what he would think of spotify and things like that now he would hate it by the way John McLaughlin to wonderful electric guitarist who was using the mob each new orchestra and I got to interview him for music power talking about Jimi Hendrix and mcglaughlin told me that that's he knows who had a million hits on spotify and get pathetic royalty checks. Oh yes they are not being compensated. -tated fairly so in essence. Unless you're one of the very few who break big and you get a lot out of television promotion. You can still be a band that gets a lot of renown and a lot of hits and a lot of sales and you. You can barely make a living. And that's a very sad change in the music industry and and mcglaughlin also told me another thing which I agree with with and makes me a little sad. When he left Miles Davis and he started working with his own band the Mojave Snow Orchestra? They used to pair them. mm up with country rock bands and hard rock and folk rock and in a way they would team up people it with with other people that weren't in their genre and people's attitude and going to live music was oh this is going to be kind of interesting. Let's see who's supporting John McLaughlin and sometimes it worked and sometimes people said I don't care I just WanNa see John McLaughlin but you won't see that anymore anymore. You won't see mixing genres in live. Music acts in the US anymore. That's too bad some of that was created by I don't know if you've seen I think it's called corporate radio but in the late nineties. How all of the radio stations you know? Change the laws up and they consolidate its. He had clear channel and groups like that to wind up owning like every radio station. The same town will look. Jazz is music in the. US is always going to be very select and it's always going to be more popular in Europe that's just about tastes. What clear channel did was it? Also eliminated this jockeys influencing the playlist because all of a sudden it was corporate and all of a sudden. The corporation Shen owned more formerly independent station. It's the same artists right around the early eighties are still there. It's time you know you. You know you're talking to a Guy Eric who's cranky. Not a hippie. I I kinda missed the whole hippie thing. I was too young for that. But but the ethos of experimentation and open-mindedness is very important to me as a creative person. So whether I'm writing or I'm working as literary consultant and finding out what the client wants to do and encouraging them no matter whether it's you know something that's very specialized and we'll have a big audience. If the client wants to do it. I want to help them get there and I grew up on radio in the bay. The area in San Francisco so we're talking about Cam. PX KFI IN THE FIRST TWO FREE-FORM FM stations in the country. And those guys would walk into the studio Eric and go okay. Well you know I just heard about this band. You know the pen tangle and they kind of are medieval evil England folk music but then we're going to follow that up with Jimi Hendrix and then it will be Odeta and then buffy Sainte Marie and they would play such a unique combination of music that you could be exposed to stuff you would never hear otherwise and that's not really possible anymore and it makes me really cranky but at the same time I hate to say the independent artists are out there Youtube has been a channel for some artists who never would have gotten discovered come out and by taking a hit us you know the money out of out of it now. It's really kind of. They have have to really believe and really go at it because they're not gonNa do it for the bucks we'll let me put it this way. I think that this is the best time ever in history to be a fan of music because spotify and Youtube and all the different methods of dispersing music. It's fantastic you know. Oh you don't just listen to your. Fm Am radio anymore but the problem goes back to John. McLaughlin talking about spotify. It's harder than ever to make a living as a musician. Same thing is true in books. You know there's been a retraction and publishing it. Sounds like we're going around and around. It's it's it's the corporate talkradio you know. It's five or six companies owning all the major publishers. If you said to me Brad you can publish your own book right now. And and put it on kindle. I'd go great. Do you think you're gonNA make much money. As as getting a book published the by a Major New York publisher probably not unless you're yelled unity and left. Money is what I'm saying right. It's a weird. Yeah it's it's a crazy Z.. Balance I was GONNA say unless you're James and she managed to pull one out. Yeah yeah or you know. I'm not saying there aren't exceptions. E Book Publishing Eric is Actually a very great place for Genre Publishing You know dark gothic stuff. Very sexualize D- novel Romance novels especially those. Because I feel like those are the novels. People wouldn't read on the train because the cover would be up but how nobody Kazuya. That's right that nobody can see that salacious artwork on the cover. Those are also driven by incredible fandom. So and that's that's part of the effort for bands and authors who aren't with the nature label or publisher. Is You gotta find a way to find your audience and it takes a lot of work. It's really a fulltime job. So you need the money to hire you. Know Somebody who's great with with publicists. You know who are really connected or someone who can manage your your social media network and and that's something you have to do every single day so when I work with an author who says well. I want to write this book Allen Self Publish it I said well I'll help you get it as good as you can with my notes which you know that it's GonNa take a lot of work Oh No I don't WanNa do that. I only want to write the book. All right. Well then hire someone who's great great with social media you know. I want them to know what they're up against. Well can we discuss efforts saying because I think it's important there's a lot of creators who listen this is a podcast And it's a similar principle. What I believe is it takes a good three years or more to actually take hold and I'm speaking of especially from like a podcast area but books probably? Aren't that different either. Take some time will. I'm sorry to say again if we're talking about the model model of the big five or six in New York publishing you have a very short window much like if you're making a studio movie in Hollywood it you'll be in stores. Only as long as the book is selling well now. This is of course aside from Amazon which drives online sale. So if you write a book and nobody's heard of you and somehow it's a breakout success. They'll keep it in the stores as long as it selling. Don't forget the volume of books. Being in published traditionally means that. If it doesn't do well you got two months three months. You know now you can still be a success. If you you have efforts to use social media to drive people to Amazon Barnes and noble and all the other online publishers are fraction. Action of what Amazon is Amazon's the big dog. Yes eighty twenty rule In first mover advantage. But yes. Yeah so you can still. You could still fail in the stores and still have a financial in creative success If you drive online sales but you've gotta find your audience audience and in its fraction. Aided you know well audiobooks also have really taken off. Yeah I noted when we talked before before we started recording. That you like listening audio you listen to the audio revolutions end direct and that was incredibly fun but I learned a number number of things about the audio book industry. I didn't know and one is. They go really fast. You're recording being A. You know what was it is eight or nine hours revolutions. And I went into studio here in Los Angeles. That's part of you've The the Producers House he has a home studio. And you're doing six hours of talking today and I'm like can I have a break here. Yeah you can have fifteen minutes to have some hot tea and then we're back in those work we want. We want you to finish in four days brutal and could God God you know I'll be. I'll be lucky for my voice. Start cracking at the end of this interview but it was also incredibly empowering and and I know that it's a different experience here. Someone read a book to You than it is to to read it yourself. And some people have an inclination to e books and some Mike Physical and so Mike Audio. What's timing thing? It's the same reason. PODCAST SIR are very popular to you. Could do two things at once. I can be reading a book while mowing the lawn while doing dishes. We'll drive into work. that that allows me to time into the day. You know what's really ironic ironic about it though. Eric is that radio. Drama is not successful still as a medium in this country and this is the Golden Age podcasting. I'm looking developing a podcast by the way For Death in paradise my book about the La Karner Nice. That'll it'll go. Well Yeah and you know true. Crime Kinda drives podcasting. so that's kind of a natural fit but I love radio drama and you would think would so many people listening to podcasts. That they would be exploring that avenue as well. So it's out there Laura I believe is audio drama Lot audio drama. It's coming up I. I hope so because it's got big programming from from radio stations. Oh no no no no. It's independence but what's happening happening is. It's big enough that like podcast movement. Which is the largest conference has a track? Just radio drama Yeah I was lucky enough to A gap the science fiction work two of my favorite writers Ray Bradbury who I knew before he died. Really wow I I did a short story. It's called the one who waits about a well on Mars than habits the spirit of all the dead Martians. And then when an American American NASA crew land on the planet the Voice of the well takes over each of them psychically. Until they're all doc dead and they join with the will as one very spooky and and then the other is probably my favorite science fiction writer Philip K Dick Dick. He had a short story that I did for NPR's well called Fails pitch and this was you know. Usually Asli Science. Fiction isn't very funny. They're usually very dark or it's driven by hardware and violence but fails pitch is a future future where you walk down the street in your town and there are robots better constantly going. Hello Eric Hundley I would like to offer you my services and they try and sell you on stopping and they drive you crazy..

John McLaughlin spotify Eric Hundley Jimi Hendrix mcglaughlin Amazon publisher US intern Youtube Miles Davis Ray Bradbury San Francisco engineer NASA Europe Shen Major New York Los Angeles
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Unstructured Interviews

Unstructured Interviews

11:20 min | 5 months ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Unstructured Interviews

"How do you change the system? And frankly my opinion is you're not going to get rid of K street in Washington D. C.. Where the lobbyists are what you have to do if you don't like what's going on is to create a huge financial? PAC you see a pack a Political Action Committee for whatever it is that you wanna change because the only way in the system that is controlled by money. He's to have more money money and more influence. And that's the way. I think we change things if you WANNA get automatic weapons off the street or you know change healthcare healthcare whatever. You're not going eliminate the system that we have. It's a system based on money and influence and favors. So how do you convince. It's the senators and representatives to vote for you you go. We're going to give you more money than they give you. It sounds completely insane incorrupt. Uh but it's actually a practical approach to where we are with democracy in two thousand nineteen right and one thing I've noticed is there's only one city in this country that no matter. What during a recession or during the good times said always grows? DC It's booming. They're always growing they're building. There's always something going up there and it's kind of funny because that's one area that produces almost no tangible tangible goods. It's lawyer Heaven there. They they give birth to more lawyers probably than anywhere else on lawyers. There's lobbyists account. It's yeah exactly so moving forward. I think that some would also argue that you can. Dan Influence politics via culture. And that's kind of. The premise of music has power correct. Yes yes the subtitle on that being Popular Songs Social Justice in the wheel to change. I don't know why I came up with the phrase will to change range but it it just resonated because people have such a negative attitude toward and there is a movement of authoritarianism going on in the world. We know that there's a mass migration of peoples based on not only climate change but authoritarian authoritarian and anti immigration policies. And it's not just obviously about the wall in the United States it's everywhere it's A. It's a really he tragic movement and so the will to change means. What are you willing to do to try? And be part of a movement and people. People are so disgusted with politics. That I started thinking people are really moved by music so I decided to do a book that covers covers in the last hundred years every genre of music that's ever had popular quote unquote protest songs. I prefer to call them. Socially socially conscious songs protest song sounds like the whole books about the sixties in. It's not starts with you know Woody Guthrie Joe Hill and Pete Seeger and then into the folk revival Bob Dylan and by says but we've got everything we've got Tom Lehrer and smothers brothers and comedy. We've got hip hop music take with NWEA and grandmaster flash and there's even country music in this book so you know Jeannie. C Riley's Harper Valley. PTA was probably the first socially conscious country song to talk about small-mindedness in in small towns that kind of revere country music and feel that You know they're the salt of the earth and it was a a woman who who had never had a hit Harper Valley. PDA is basically a song about a woman who is being condemned for wearing short skirts. And she goes up in front of the PTA and says oh well how come so and so had to leave town so quickly with with her boss not explaining it. And how come you're always you know nipping gin. How come you walk around naked? And you leave your blinds up so It sold two million copies because the only hit for Jeanie Riley in her career but even in country music mayor's been socially conscious music. Why would actually argue that? Like the Dixie. Chicks are braver than many the artists. You put up because she went against the grain or I'm sorry she. They went against the grain completely the country music air. All right though. You're right though it's Natalie maynes you're talking about. WHO said you know in London? This is ten days before the invasion of Iraq. Air She. She's In Shepherd's Bush in London. She says we want you all know that. We're a shame that the president of the United added states is from Texas. Where the Dixie chicks are from well the country music establishment radio stations the fans? They all turned on them. And in Barbara Coppell's documentary. Shut up and sing. You see when they get a death threat when they're in Dallas. Alice and that's why. I'm saying that they were braver. I mean there's a lot of people who quote protests out. Look Rolling Stone is is not going to trash you for protesting government in any way not like the country music industry if you're going to go against against of traditional style president so that I think there's different levels of bravery and they just wanted to point out that I do think that was actually brave. Yeah and they're actually one of the last two acts that I talk about in music is power or the Dixie chicks and Green Day and Green Day's American. An eighty eight is a really interesting example to come after the Dixie chicks because even though the Dixie chicks were attacked their following album. I'm not ready to make Nice. Actually won a bunch of Grammy's and by the time. Green days touring American idiot and then eventually gonNA musical on Broadway in which some of the characters are decimated by American society including one of them being soldier coming back wounded from Iraq. They benefitted by the passage of time in Iraq so that the lack of weapons of mass destruction. And You Know Oh Colin Powell you know not telling us the truth in front of the UN and you know. Bush saying that the nine eleven attackers connected to Saddam when they're actually from Saudi Arabia which is a client state of the United States. The Green Day by the time they tour for a lot of people who were super critical of Natalie. Maynes just saying you know George W Bush is an idiot All of a sudden they were. You're welcome not only in Europe but in the United States now admittedly. They're kind of hard rock with punk punk. Rock and country intriguing. Music is more traditionally patriotic people. Exactly they tend to be right exactly. And that's why I was saying you know it's like you're you're not going to find many people in the pucker world getting upset if you trash Bush or trump. Or anybody like that. No changing. You know it's fascinating. I mean. Look this is my attitude Eric. When half the people in America don't vote? Anything is possible in terms of political change. If you find a way to motivate the people who have given up on the system apathy is one of the biggest problems uh-huh we have. Yeah but something about apathy but You know what's the point ain't exactly well I look locally. That's part of things funny. Yeah well one of the people. I work with who was very politically active and gets his own chapter and music powers Frank Zappa. He was trying to create a late night. Like show Called night school and I was going to be as head writer. He was fascinating he he grew up. You know the chapter on him. I talk about how he grew up on the grounds of the edgewood Arsenal in Maryland which had huge tanks of mustard gas like a mile. Away from their house and and ZAPPA's the father actually had skinned tiff that had been done with chemicals because he got paid extra if he agreed to be a Guinea pig. And had these you know skin tests. That's with chemicals. Done so and Zappa himself had asthma as a child. So by the time they get to California you can imagine the the shaping of the psyche of this guy who saw this horrible stuff that the government was doing that was directly affecting his family. He was kind kind of ones though himself right. He didn't do drugs. I mean is bizarre and wonderful and strange and scatalogical as his music was he didn't do drugs He he told his band members. You know we're GONNA Rehearse the hell out of this stuff. 'cause his charts were incredibly complex flex unusual time signatures and you know just phenomenal music and agreed variation you know he wrote classical music as well eat. Eat the Sin Clavier Fin Clavier. Some people say but I call it the same clavier which at the time you could load in any tone and you could play it on. The keyboard for the sound of breaking glass could be processed into the clavier and you could play breaking glass On the keyboard In any event he was kind of a remarkable guy to work with and you know show up at his house where writing session and he had fee span and C. Span two on and he'd be listening to the debate of you know the Congress and he it'd be Briley you. That guy is full of crap. I that guy just took money from selling so he was so knowledgeable about the corruption that he was obsessed with it. Ah amused by it. And of course he's a great hero because the Parents Music Resource Center which was trying to censor rock music lyrics with with timber them covers Tipper Gore right. Al Gore was was on that committee and tipper was part of PM. Morrissey so James Baker's wife Secretary of State James Baker that Zappa took tens of thousands of dollars in one thousand nine hundred eighty six dollars out of his own pocket to fight you know what the PM Marcy was trying to do and partly through. His efforts failed so he was rather patriotic. He put his money where his mouth was about politics..

Frank Zappa Iraq Natalie maynes United States Political Action Committee George W Bush president London Jeanie Riley Parents Music Resource Center PTA Harper Valley Al Gore Tipper Gore Grammy Dan Influence Washington
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Unstructured Interviews

Unstructured Interviews

14:00 min | 5 months ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Unstructured Interviews

"He signed onto being LAPD double agent. Basically that was that was the end of his freedoms now back to the altar and all that I did find a book called spiritualism or SPIRITISM BY G H S. Two books are you follow. ESTA Brooks Yeah I'm sorry to tell you that. ESTA Brooks in. My research is one of those guys even middle of mind control. He's like Sidney gottlieb kind of character. He's like the Louis Jolyon west of UCLA who did Mind Control Control Experiments. You know the CIA gave huge amounts of money. The Not only to you know what you would think be. You know typical prisons prisons but also to universities you know to journalists William F. Buckley was on the CIA payroll Eric. So you get a sense of how insidious their influence was back. Then the unabomber. If I recall was part of the experiments show me say. I've heard that as well home so so I guess you get A sense of Reagan and of course Nixon being president and their sense of militarism and paranoia toward what was considered to be a possible revolution. And I don't think we'll ever see it's like again in. US history for literally. Yeah yeah literally I was just GonNa say Eric People like Reagan and younger and Richard. Nixon believed there was going to be a military attempt at overthrowing the US government which I think is absurd. Well they were being. There was a a lot of people who are feeding that stuff too. It's like I couldn't help but think of parallels with Colin Westbrook and how he was sort of running you know donald freeze but then. There's some speculation about Krishna. VENTA being influence on Charles Manson and all of these guys had this running theme of well. Okay I'm it's hard to get my thoughts together but I found it very interesting that you were talking about the worries of I guess you say Black Revolution and they were emulating the situation with the SLA. But Charles Manson was emulating that situation or his family's emulating that situation as well in the opposite one of the things I talk about on the Etro tour a bus tour of Manson land God bless Richard and Kim because they have introduced me to people in the La Sheriff's department and the it once again it's the Black Panthers it turns out that there's an angle by which Manson's since followers especially the quote unquote girls were trading dynamite found in abandoned gold mines in California uh with Black Panthers And in exchange the girls brought back to Manson's group guns and one day the Black Panthers there's greeted Manson's girls with the dynamite and said thank you. Now get the hell Outta here or before we kill you. And that was the end the relationship so the L. L. A. P. D. and the La Sheriff's both could have arrested while they did arrest Charles Manson and his followers initially and then let them out and then the infamous murders happen they could have kept them in jail and basically my research reveals through. You know Richard in Kim helping me that the LAPD and and the sheriff's Department thought that there was going to be an a violent engagement between Charles Manson's followers and the Black Panthers and they left them out. They're hoping for that engagement. So that they could sweep up and arrest any black panthers so so there's a similarity in terms of the theme of we'll do anything to break up the Black Panthers enters Between revolutions and and of course the Manson murders and would it be fair speculation. I've always kind of felt that Charles Manson himself was nowhere near as dynamic or fantastic as as billing. Well if you're talking about as music music Eric I would tend to agree with you. I think it's pretty bland Charles Manson again. I like because I've I started writing in writing feeder when I write a non fiction book I want the protagonist no matter how negative to be three dimensional. Sure and and without apologizing Charles Manson. You've got to remember that. His mother was a prostitute never knew his father he was raped in jail and within the reformatories and he was not a normal guy before he got out of his teams. I agree so one thing he learned was how to manipulate violate young women to to tell them they were beautiful. He learned from Dale Carnegie. He actually worked for a while for scientology. What was wild he were you got cut off? Yeah he was he was a guy who worked for scientology in Hollywood. And we're and we're trying to recruit people and that didn't work out so well my good friend Paul Krassner who we lost. Not Too long ago had done a lot of really great articles about the SLA in about Manson found out that Manson was let go by scientologist because he was a a little creepy but he wanted the reason he studied. Eric is he wanted to learn how to manipulate the the women that would basically become his family and again without going. Too far down the rabbit hole. The Manson land tour talks about the fact that he watching completely in control of the family. Exactly why Tex Watson and Linda Kosabe Ian were running drug deals without his is knowing it Tex Watson introduced Charles Manson to Sharon Tate. We wasn't a random murder so if you take week if you take Quentin Tarantino's amusing movie and you take Tom O'Neill's chaos book which is twenty years of here. All all the people I met and I still don't know what happened. And you set all that aside and say this guy was a lunatic who manipulated people. And he was burning people on drug deals and the people in his family got out of control and and killed people without his authorization nation. You have a better understanding of what Manson was about. And if you look into then Bouli. OC who wrote helter skelter which sold a couple million copies sir. You understand that. He was accused of prosecutorial misconduct. Because he he was trying to use Susan Atkins as a star witness. And the man tonight said you testify against Charleen. You're in big trouble. So all of a sudden she was unreliable liable and Buluwayo say was stuck with Linda Ca Sabin and he said you know. Put your hair up in pigtails and look innocent. Well forget the fact that you were one of the biggest LSD dealers in Boston will forget the fact that you and Tex Watson were burning people in drug deals in Los Angeles Angeles and you will testify that Charles Manson ordered the murders. And if you do that we will give you immunity. And if you don't do that you you will never see the light of day again. This pretty common honestly it's unique to The Manson family. I mean they're always trying to flip somebody sure but in essence they're flipping. Linda Kosabe Ian to lie so so actually Bouli. OC is also Guilty of of Leaking stuff to the press which could have created a mistrial and Charles Manson could've walked and and part of all of this. I guess the best way to wrap this part up part of all this is that they had a legitimate fear the LA DA's office and that fear was if Charles Manson was ripping off people with drugs and Tex Watson and Bobby Beausoleil went crazy in drug burns and killed somebody in a panic. Charles Charles Manson is an accessory and in one thousand nine hundred seventy and accessory to murder could get eighteen months. Can you imagine what the world interest in the Manson murders. What would have happened if the La da even if they got convictions actions against the others? If Charles Manson only got eighteen months they had to lie and say that he ordered the murders nothing. He's a good guy and then it should have walked free but there was no way in hell and again it's ever younger. Are Powell who worked with Ronald Reagan and the SLA Soleil was ever younger. Who basically went to Buoy Osi? Who was two years in the? DA's office went around the DA. who was in charge? WHO said? Hey it's just a bunch of drug burns and and younger realized that Bouli Osi was saying not only. Could it turn our reputation if Manson gets accessory but it will make our reputation in our careers if we say. He's the Spin Golly who hypnotize people to murder rap thing. They're just a bunch of burnout to screwed up in drug burns. And that my friend is the inside nine-story of the Manson murders. Since truthfully nobody would really care if it wasn't for Sharon tate same way nobody really care about the SLA without Patty. Hearst this is this is very true which is a kind of a sad comment because when you when you think about you know what the LAPD in the CIA a were doing. It's terrible it. It's a horrible history and people should know more about this stuff but again people perceive it as radical politics and it doesn't sell and so forth and so on ask you about that a little bit because you you know admittedly elise year I guess Somewhere to the left of Bernie Sanders. We're looking at practical guy. I know that when Elizabeth Warren says I I want Medicare for all that she's making a huge tactical error the politician because to not recognize. That's how powerful the health industry and big Pharma is in. This country is to just be naive. Like they're the things that you and I want in World Eric and then there are things that are possible given the system. You can't boil the ocean now. That's not where I was going where I was going to sit. I I look at you know a lot of stuff. There happened there in. It's obviously from the laugh. Door would be perceived as left. But they're also have been some Bruce Miss Justices or you know real questions about things going to the right and you know a lot of people say that Waco way out of hand and there are there. Instances like that because Waco kind of generated forget the other one ruby rich sorry Ruby Ridge route in college by most as terror waivers and they were hard core right winging borderline Nazis. I I know of that but I'm kind end of wondering if this is not a government. That's anti laughed. Maybe it's just it's a government that's anti anti-government does that make sense it. It's kind of. I'm curious because I've been on Shows we're the host is far right but what they appreciate about. My research is that I'm saying look at what these agencies have done in the name of justice and the law so you it's kind of you all of a sudden there's a middle middle ground shirt now of course if I talked about you know forgiving college debt. They go get off my show. But you know there's this interesting middle ground on of of people who do not trust the government and of course you know if Congress is at sixteen percent and you know. Donald Trump's impeached reached obviously. There's a huge movement in this country. Rejecting trust in government. The question is how do you change the system to make it better. there's so many things that prevent that lobbying You know campaign finance reform. you know citizens united there. There are so many things that enabled this system that a lot of people say. Hey lobbying thing is a form of graft it's a it's a an industry paying someone in order to look at the bills that they wants. Shouldn't it on the floor of Congress. Well that doesn't sound very very democratic to me. But that's the way our country operates so wild well DI radical but then you say okay..

Charles Charles Manson murder Tex Watson LAPD CIA Black Panthers Donald Trump ESTA Brooks Sidney gottlieb Sharon Tate OC Eric People Ronald Reagan Bouli Linda Kosabe Ian US UCLA Louis Jolyon William F. Buckley scientology
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Unstructured Interviews

Unstructured Interviews

15:19 min | 5 months ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Unstructured Interviews

"Say hello and tell me what you think. Thanks my name is Eric and this is unstructured. Or we have dynamic anemic informal conversations with some amazing people. Today we are joined by the author. Brad Schreiber who was self self described as psychotically ECLECTIC. He has written multiple books including revolutions end. Most recently music is power power. He also wrote death in paradise which I think was turned into a TV series. Is that correct. That's right. It was called North Mission road. Look at some the case is in the history of the La coroner fantastic them. It's great to have you on rabbi the way I am not at all insulted by being called psychotically collected because Britain role media and I'm an instructor on the literary consultant and Working in all different media is fascinating to me. Each one has its special challenges and its rewards you Acetate Institute Tourists Reminder Sand with some fun warm people like The Manson family. And I don't tour with the man in the family that I probably wouldn't like the tour that I conduct Eric I work with a company called Esoteric. That is the architecture architectural in La History Tour Company and Richard. Shaving Kim Cooper are amazing. People they're preservationists as well as knowing an incredible amount so I have a tour called Manson land that I've been doing with their company for about four years. And because it's so high high profile you know dealing with the Manson murders and has new information. That's never been published. It's sold out for four years The other tour I do do for them is related to revolutions end That's subtitle by the way on. That book is the Patty Hearst Kidnapping mind control. Aw and the secret. History of Donald to freeze and the S. L. A.. SLA being Symbionese Liberation Army which kidnapped Patty in a nineteen. Seventy FOUR TURNS OUT LONG STORY SHORT DONALD TO FREEZE The black prisoner who became the head had the SLA had drugs used on him at the California medical facility at Vacaville and then a CIA officer her in conjunction with Bill Prison decide to break him out and run him as a double agent. Now you I got confused on. Who is now? I know Coltman Westbrook is kind of figure had versus wholesale. Westbrook was the black. CIA officer who who who led Donald to freeze to believe that he was just going to be a double agent in the bay area. which was the center in seventies of far left activism activism and Ronald Reagan wanted to get the Black Panthers and the antiwar `terrorist locked up You know they considered considered the black panthers the greatest threat in the United States. And of course they were founded in Oakland. So I've done to our radio shows on this if in my responsibility to make coherent in in about thirty more seconds. No Way I'm going to do that is tell you that revolutions revolutions in is about a black man in donald the freeze who never had a chance became a double agent and sadly was wiped out along with five other white followers in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy four in Los Angeles in the largest shootout in. US history three and the white followers never knew was that lurch double agent. I'm sorry something about Waco was yeah. Was that larger than Waco. There were five there were five hundred. LAPD California Highway Patrol and FBI people firing being into a small stucco house in south central Los Angeles on May Seventeen of nineteen seventy four. They fired ten thousand rounds. Owns Eric into that house. And they received fire about one hundred bullets and finally and and this is the one thing that wasn't research search of other people I found out from an La Times report that what the Times reported as tear gas being shot into that. The House on East Fifty Fourth Street really was incendiary devices. Were called myrow technic grenades. There were meant only for outdoor riot-control like flash grenade. Thanks yes and they knew that if they fired in the house it would set it on fire but you had a primarily white police force in a totally black neighborhood on national. TV by the way forgot to mention that on all three networks showing five hundred officers firing into this House House to take out a double agent who they didn't want to live because he would have testified against the FBI the LAPD and so forth and so on a weird thing to hear because that means you're saying all the cops themselves were knowledgeable or Sir no not at all. They're only small group down to freeze had worked for something in the LAPD called criminal conspiracy. Section is a snitch. He it was a snitch. And again referring back to Governor Ronald Reagan and Ever younger was his attorney. German very militant their their attitude was anything we do to undermine the black panthers whether it's extra legal or not is justified because they're a threat so you know local law enforcement well the LAPD was like no other agency in the United States at that time Eric because they had FBI and CIA officers. Here's who would come to Parker Center and liaise with the LAPD about the criminal conspiracy section. And what they were doing because Oakland was what's the center of the Black Panthers and California had more militancy than anywhere else in the US. So it's this wild story. That is very very complex and I knew about it as a young man growing up in the bay area and finally I stumbled onto story by Dick Russell in Argosy argosy published in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy six that put together the final pieces and I went to him and I said why. Haven't you written a book and You said no major publisher's going to touch this Brad. I have all the documents but you know you're not gonNA get a major book deal in New York. I said well I'm obsessed with it so I'll buy your research off you. And he gave me it and you know it was the Rosetta Stone of research about the creation of the SLA was Dick Russell the Pi Dick Russell was and still is a wonderful political writer researcher. Now Roy on environmental mental issues Yeah Yeah but there. It's mind boggling and highly dense But really fascinating and Jeffrey Toobin Book came out the same day as mine. Of course yeah. Of course he didn't follow this because again No major publisher in New York. No matter how much research you have is going to publish a book that criticizes Ronald Reagan The CIA The FBI the LAPD in my defense. I also criticized the far left. And how naive they were But there's a great great book about the C. I. A. M. K. Ultra drug experiments which are part of revolutions in it's called poisoner and chief inspire inspire terrific writer named Stephen Kinzer about Sidney Gottlieb who ran m. k.. Ultra for the CIA for twenty years and a very peculiar accuser guy. So that's kind of fun book and that just came out yeah. I'm starting to get a vibe on some of that. I know you've looked into my back catalogue in. I have some people on who deal with mind. Control and things like that Chase US and I have a book that was written by somebody at China. I think it might have been Cambridge. I can't remember the school why he was very deep into that really early days of Of the mind. Control Back Taylor. I knew about it as I say when I was going to San Francisco State I had the grades and got accepted to Stanford and and UC Berkeley. But I didn't have the money so. SF state was my only choice. But I did a lot of political research while I was in a comedy group. The Bay area called the burlingame Philharmonic Orchestra and It was just something that fascinated me basically started. I did when I was at state and I saw a presentation about the JFK assassination by and. This is kind of weird. An organization based in Cambridge Bridge Mass Moldy Assassination Information Bureau and they laid out a lot of the basic ideas than the forensics that were were proof that it was impossible for one person to kill. JFK So then all the alternative newspapers and KPFA and KPFK the PACIFICA PACIFICA radio stations in California. We're talking about the fact that this donald the freeze character was working for the criminal conspiracy section Shen and what about the drugs that were used on him as a prisoner and I had a big slice of the picture but again until I got Dick Russell's research I didn't realize the full story and you were doing parodies of the phone calls the recordings. SLA in your head or group correct. Yeah the Comedy Theater Group Burlingame Philharmonic Orchestra and we were at KPFA in Berkeley. And we we did. We did a bid called Patty hearst for crafts Philadelphia cream cheese and It it's it's it sounds like patty is on a tape much like the tapes that were being plated. KPFA that communiques from the SLA. And I think the end of the a bit was somebody else off Mike the pigs cheese it with crammed so I figured that the you know ultra hip people in Berkeley quickly would would kinda smile morbidly and say Oh. That's darkly amusing. We actually got calls from people going. Is this another. SLA Communique Nick is the ethylene making fun of Craft Philadelphia cream cheese. What's going on here? Well in fairness you have to admit this. Some of their messaging was kind of confusing using. Oh well you know one of the things I obviously. I'm politically rather far left. So far left and I'm ready to fall off the edge but in revolutions end I say you know you WanNa create an organization that is going to change America in a very militant era. You don't take on military names you also don't Rob Banks You don't kill the I black superintendent of schools in Oakland which which as people were reading revolutions and Difference was ordered to do may thickly. You know how it it is with a snitch. When you're on the outside your controller so you do as I say and if you don't we'll just leap at your snitch and someone will take you out on the outside aside? The freeze basically made a Faustian bargain. That no other black prisoner at Vacaville prison would sign onto because they knew it was a Faustian bargain and that they'd be as good as dead. The only reason that the freeze was the one who agreed is because he was targeted because he'd already been a snitch for the LAPD and they figured this guy's perfect for us and it was the only one to to agree to it. Even though other black prisoners were asked to run the SLA four him. I told you if an insane story and we could spend the whole interview interview talking about it but I'm glad that I wrote it because it stay with me for decades and then finally I figured if I don't write this nobody else else is going to and Dick Russell said you have my blessing and you have my research. Let's it's kind of a dark book you don't walk away feeling good. Yeah it's true. I mean I wrote a humor writing book. So what are you laughing at and You know that's that's my more up a book in the Niners ten that I've written but There's humor believe it or not in revolutions in one thing that I thought was kind of amusing or fascinating living with the attempted rape of Nancy Ling Perry. Well that's Kinda Dr to. Yeah where she. We're some kid. Try didn't know that she was a member of the SLA Rang the doorbell letter safe house. And she basically kicked his ass knocked out of his hand and and scare them away. But Yeah Yeah you. You rang rang the doorbell of the wrong house. Buddy but also the freeze will how can we put this tasteful. He was under under educated. Let us say and he was on drugs. He was a drug dealer while he was in Vacaville. They're giving him women to sleep with and they were given I. Yes yes this is definitely so this is from Dick Russell's research Anyway so quirky story. He is that he would go to other black prisoners. He trusted vox bill and he wouldn't tell them I'm a double agent. And they're breaking the out. He'd say I'm going waiting to break out of here and for my own Revolutionary Group. And then I'm going to have you come with me. Oh really what's it called. And he forgot the name that he was given by Colston Westbrook. So he said called the the the Lebane- Lebanese army got the name wrong. That's right I remember that. Yeah he I guess. He came across sympathetic in some ways. But I I don't know I don't have that much much sympathy for the group personally. Of course not because they were they were violent but it wasn't entrapment and basically freeze.

LAPD Dick Russell Symbionese Liberation Army Eric Donald CIA Governor Ronald Reagan Black Panthers FBI Vacaville Oakland Patty hearst California Coltman Westbrook United States Brad Schreiber Berkeley Waco officer
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

40:36 min | 9 months ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"Doc franchise movie but here's one that you might this is from my man Gil Scott Heron and I know that people are familiar the buckle the dead one on TV into a stolen ambulance be will not be able to predict what eight thirty four from the rubber it will not be televised rubbing the Revolution will be live the songs timeless and it does that all without any lyrics it got me thinking a little bit as you and I were listening to it you're a little bit older than I am not much but a little bit of a lot more gray hair but well yeah and far more handsome but aside from that you know I became aware of the World around my home during Watergate right so I have no idea what camelot was like I have no idea what what you know Eisenhower's America was like I have no idea what pre Beatles America was was really like other than what's referenced in Popular Culture of the time and and things like that so as I'm hearing this and I see the transition that America's going through in the late sixties where we're going from Kate Smith uh-huh right and and Laurence Welk and you know very tried and true traditional Frank Sinatra lecturing kids on how to be a good American right to the to this to what's on the other side Jose Feliciano singing the national anthem with a Hispanic accent at the world world series right and people just losing their mind over ridiculed for it right but also racist I'm was so out front when Feliciano's sixty eight sang the national anthem yet Jimmy playing without any words you know it either forces people to be moved to tears or just kind of gobsmack than they have no wait respond because it's so visceral that's the funny thing I mean that part of the reason I write music is is power is not only because these songs chain changed the perception of people but it's fascinating the way some songs reach people sub reach them through lyrics but some of them reach them musically and some combine the two and those analyst forceful you could argue yeah wow that's really really powerful and of course you know I I wrote a becoming Jimi Hendrix from uh-huh Hendrix historian Steve Roby's research and I found that Jimmy before gone into the next song Jimmy was not the kind of guy who wanted to proselytize you know the Black Panthers said that he was going to perform at a benefit in Harlem that they did not get his permission to do right and if you listen to Jimmy Talk During some of the live performances he never really comes out stridently against Vietnam because of course he was in the hundred I airborne at Fort Campbell Kentucky he understood what it was to serve your country but he also believed that it was wrong and some of the amazing things about Hendrix when you read about them is that he held two sides to a proposition in his head at least about Vietnam he never wanted to come out and do overt song about racism in America but but he confronted you know straight away all the time well he did it in a spiritual way that's the amazing thing yeah and then every once in a while in live live concerts say okay here's a song for the draggy seen going on in Vietnam and then he followed up with Oh in the dragon on in Berkeley because there was rioting and violence in the police so he tried to work symbolically rather than being stridently political crazy and that's the wonderful thing about this and machine gun talk about as well right sound of a guitar representing continuous machine gunfire and you know what's on the other side of those bullets riddled bodies and it's all done without lear it's all completely sonic yeah it's it's really did that I mean I was getting ready to come here I was thinking about this interview and I realized that the only other song I can think of that had a socio political content that was only mental. Is this Jazz Guy David Sanchez and he did a song he did. Dixie I wish I were in Dixie but he doesn't a minor key was synthesizers and it's really ominous and a black jazz musician he is making a comment ought history of racism in the south without a single word do clean this off kilter version of Dixie wow and other than him in Hendricks most people need the lyrics to make the sociopolitical common so I wanNA give a shout out this anxious because that's a phenomenal appease the next track is we're going from one guitar virtuoso to the other and while the song we just heard comments on the state of America politically the next comments socially Yeah Yeah it's about social control I mean this song specifically refers to the power and the manipulation assured needed to television but when you think about it and the career Frank Zappa you'll realize that he is protesting all forms of social role in I'm the slime yeah uh-huh yeah yeah rain missed basis but you can't vocal delicious I say this Louis this totally controlled absence as you want uh-huh the trump wrong the report aw how I gotTa tell you Brad is I was assembling The music for this show and I knew the song was going to be on the list right I couldn't decide whether I wanted to play this version the album cut right or there's another version that I think e serves even more irony and it's the live version that Franken the ban performed you're not you know what I'm talking about Saturday night live where Don Pardo uh-huh actually plays the voice of the slime and frank liked it so much he brought Don Pardo on tour with him to do that part yes you guys if you haven't out there seeing you can find it on youtube and they literally have television monitors with his slimy stuff oozing we're the screen I have no idea how they did it but but you know frank is very close to my heart as you know Tim Yeah during the P. M. C. see the parents music resource center days where he was fighting Potential congressional control of Album Content Censorship yes censorship I was working with them on a TV show that sadly never got done but I got to work with frank for six months on some of the scripts for Night School the TV show that he wanted to do late at night and you know he deserves the whole chapter that I give him in music is power because he is one of those people who really was railing against everything he sought wrong how many pop stars can you think of criticized the music industry criticize the other musicians were doing lame stuff criticized the whole idea of using drugs I mean frank famously never did drugs this is a guy who wasn't afraid to to not only take on Ronald Reagan and his cabinet he would look at anything he didn't like and society and Well I'm GonNa Lampoon it. He was very much a libertarian leftist he never identified himself the way he voted bright but he aided anything that's Mac self can excuse me social control and took away from self control and they on Solipsism yeah he was very much the world kind of needs that voice right now yeah you know that that voice that screams for critical thinking yeah he would have a ball with what's going on with with trump and you know the Ukraine I mean you know don't forget that Frank Zappa of became a liaison with The new established Czech Republic back you know and he was dealing with the idea of because his music was so popular in Europe as well as American may be more so in Europe rob that he became a cultural ambassador you know bots Love Hobble in the Czech Republic and he were talking about how to exchange ideas says in music with one another calls really not many people ever have done that in the history of music you know as I was thinking about this a lot of francs body of work songs on the surface seem like novelty songs are trite things like Valley Girl Yeah Right I are at the same time screaming for that critical thinking in for for saying look what you're being fed and the culture around you is is amusing but dumb yeah and uninformed uninformed armed you have a responsibility to be informed and you're better than that people yeah exactly I mean when I went to his house to work with him on night school he always had CNN on or C. Span two this is one of the few people I've ever met who would listen to people argue in Congress all day long on TV loved it couldn't get enough of it you know phenomenal phenomenal commenter on the way we lived in in what we could be doing uh with our society I mean his quotes are so great government is the entertainment division of the Military Industrial Complex. I mean rain rock and roll stars don't come up with that kind of quotation no that sounds sounds like something from Carlin yeah you know it sounds like it sounds like a which Carl area months so they're very aligned in the way they poke fun at and ridiculed what is not working in American society right right and it's it's fascinating and one chose to do it they both chose to do it through media that you know is easily roomed and easily written off for people who aren't paying attention you know people will look at Carlin and go does that bit about football and baseball you know isn't that cute and then you dig a little deeper the same thing with with with Zappa well in in the chapter in music is power you'll find out if you didn't already know that APP was brought up on his father was a biologist who worked at the edgewood Arsenal in Maryland okay they were developing poisonous gases other bioweapons that's where Brandt grew up and his father would sometimes come home with skin tests you know bandages they had tested out a new cat michaels on his father and he got paid additionally so Frank Zappa is seeing his father basically being an experiment the US government when he's five six years old and you wonder how he got to where he was so I think he deserves the whole chapter. I'm very proud of that in and you know in some way we're talking about musicians composers creators create a p apple who used music not only to entertain and talk about traditional subjects like love but also to sometimes take the idea of love and say wait there's a socio political problem that I can also talk to in this music and we kind of go in that direction with the next group which became one of the most popular contemporary country groups in the history of recording and sadly when the Iraq war run by George W Bush and Dick Cheney may be more so than Bush happened all of a sudden the most popular contemporary country group in history was ridiculed for saying they were ashamed of their president's outright blacklisted outright blacklist it so we're going to listen to and talk about the Dixie chicks sounds good I'm not sure who they say then you stu yeah in a yeah you gotta take your hat off to an artist who will essentially write a song to give the Middle Finger to that center of their fan base that literally tells them we don't care who you are just entertain us yeah and do it in the way that we want you to entertain us we're not interested in who you are as a person and that's what happened with the Dixie chicks that led them to record not ready you to make nice they literally were in shepherds Bush Empire Tim it's less than ten days before the invade Asian of Iraq and Natalie Maynes says you know we're from Texas is you know and we got to tell you we're we're kind of ashamed of the president to go in there well it was a matter of history that there were mostly Saudi Arabian nationals who had attacked us on nine eleven right and of course those weapons were never found so if you ask America in twenty nineteen what their attitude is about what man Natalie Maynes was talking about in two thousand and five they'd say yeah that was a mistake that war so we're not taken seriously until history actually catches up and people understand historically what happens and then commodity right three attractive women who have Andrew Sisters level harmony right and and you know we're video friendly donald subscribe to this show and hundreds more now via AK- or wherever you get your podcasts.

Frank Zappa Dixie Gil Scott Heron Iraq Carlin Natalie Maynes Europe George W Bush president Czech Republic David Sanchez US CNN edgewood Arsenal apple trump Carl Brandt Mac michaels
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

34:27 min | 9 months ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"Play or apple APP store. We'll come back to radio uh shut his and do his job like and he you can shane it's been going on for you take the great you Taylor they are say for now hunger style Taylor he lies still in his as Guy abused a we have a weekend Uh uh where a in your liquor command Oh you know you must choose from nineteen sixty seven Peter Paul and Mary Great Mandela Right here on deep dish radio my guest today is author Brad Schreiber we're discussing his book music is power Peter Paul and Mary featured prominently in Chapter Pretty much dedicated to the to the folk music scene of the of the late fifties and six these yeah they called it the folk music revival that Bob Dylan and Peter Paul and Mary and Joan Baez and all those other wonderful artists fostered yeah this one means a lot to me personally a couple of reasons one is I saw Peter Yarrow do this at San Francisco state and he had kind of a rat speedway's and he was playing Solo and sang side tears pouring down my cheeks at the end of it so years later in fact within the last two years there's I was fortunate enough to interview Peter Paulin not married because she's gone but Pierre Paul and Theo Theodore McKell and I said to Peter do you remember that time um you sang the Great Mandela at San Francisco State he goes no I really don't remember her I say well I'll never forget and richie havens is called this the greatest antiwar song ever written it's pretty interesting if you think about the words him because it goes from the way families were apart during the Vietnam War yeah between father and son to political prisoners dying to the idea that in if you if you you've only given your life you've only wasted your life the idea the ideas metaphysical what is a life for have you really wasted your life if you lose in an effort to change society I don't think any other song in the history of sociopolitical music has ever asked that question which is why I think this is it's an extraordinary song excellent choice as we were listening to it here in the studio I got thinking about all the other songs of that era and of that genre that you mentioned in the book and even some that that you know that exist outside of that and I I I was excited to hear why you chose that particular one it's this it's this very strong message yeah including what they do with the harmonies of the Andy It's just phenomenal Albert Grossman you know some people have if things to say about him but as their manager he's the one who came up with the idea of Peter Paul and Mary on three separate microphones yeah and when you you're on headphones as as tim did it's startling in its clarity in its beauty and you know so Albert Grossman didn't just manage Bob Dylan and Peter on Mary he changed the way folk music was recorded yeah I in fact as a note to the listener if you listened very carefully you'll hear that the the recording that I chose was pulled from vinyl and you can hear the POPs in the hisses so I wanted to give you that that nine hundred sixty seven experience opposed to digital copy I wanted to given the opportunity to really hear the way it was intended to be heard and sonically sonically it's beautiful again it's another one of those songs that if you did not speak English you'd think what Oh what a lovely lovely song lemon tree or something it's so pleasant and and then you hear the words and it pokes you in the is wonderful and and that's what it's supposed to do it's supposed to haunt you and supposed to inspire you and again I can't say enough about that metaphysical message which I think is y Richie havens loved it so much yeah I it's written by the way Peter Paul and Mary of course covered other people's music right so Peter Yarrow wrote this all by himself and Oh my God you should have been writing more songs but where we got to nineteen sixty seven pal yeah yeah did did Richie Havens Cover this did richie havens did as a matter of fact did a great great version of it now of course the Great Mandela is disturbing as it should And is not going to be licensed on TV commercials used an awful lot I know in in movies you know you're not going to hear the great Mondello in like a comic book with it it's called the revolution will not be televised and you will not be able to stay home you will not be able to plug in turn on cop out you will be able to lose your cell phone during commercials because the revolution that'd be televised Revolution will not be televised the revolution will not be you without commercial with the revolution will not John Missile Spiro Agnew confiscated from I'm sanctuary the revolution will not be televised the revolution will not be brought to you by the head will not made the Revolution will not give your mouth feels the revolution will not get rid of the no the revolution will not make you look by because the revolution will not be televised them that will be that means that will be exciting sitting down place run out of all the monorail with a brand new process that won't read great depression just the proper Ho -cation held at me take relevant and women will not have expanded down the chain for tomorrow because black looking for bright nate the revolution will be televised and that will be the Harry Potter woman and the president's Glen Campbell known as the Revolution will not be the revolution will not be right back after a message about a white white lightning bedroom the tag the giant and your toilet bowl the revolution will not go with cope the revolution will not might turn the bathroom will put you in the and Gil Scott Heron the revolution will not be televised all was powerful always powerful great jazzman Brian Jackson that baseline is just incredibly sumptuous. Yeah a song like this of course the pop culture references and the political references are old dated but look we're still dealing with police violence right instead of Spiro Agnew instead of Spiro Agnew and and John Mitchell were dealing with Rudy Giuliani and and trump's other POWs so here here we have the corruption of politics the inequity in society between people of Color and people who are white and you can substitute whatever pop culture references you want in place Oh bull winkle and Julia Julia Being Diane Carroll who recently attorney who was the first running regular black lead character in American television on Julia true so that's what was going on in nineteen seven Andy When Gill wrote this remarkable song which has been used in you know in pop culture over and over ironically exploited in commercials times yeah yeah it made me think that it would be interesting to see this updated every ten or fifteen years idea and have him you know I'm not going to get into politics on the show because it this is really about the book but have him get into you know making updating the rest France's every music is Bauer is about sociopolitical change and these songs in part of the book is looking at the lives of the artists and how what they're dealing with personally while they're writing these songs that changed society and in the case of Gil Scott here and we're talking about being addicted to crack there is AH heartbreakingly beautiful New Yorker Profile of guilt towards the end of his life and he wouldn't leave the house he was always getting high and the writer for the New Yorker said Hey Gil let's go out and grab something to eat and Gil looked at him in that sly sense of humor he has and he said Man when I hear that Sunshine's not good for you you know he was incredibly sensitive poet in some ways we he can say I think fairly that Gil Scott Heron lead us to think about poetry slams you know st poetry yeah you know the watts prophets and and other groups like that where early on in the sixties but Gil Scott Heron said look it's okay to quote unquote rap but what is it about and even win rap music which eventually became hip hop came out Gil. Scott Heron was saying Okay you've got this microphone would you want to say with it what is the song about there's plenty wrong with this country pick a topic don't talk about you know you gotTa Yeah Right Party will you know there's something more to talk about yeah and so he is a very legendary figure not only in terms of socio political protest but in terms of black culture really concentrating on poetry and for that I think he you know deserves the half chapter he gets his power great fantastic chapter and and having this in the back of your head as you read it is a fantastic now transitioning to another prominent black poet who was not only a brilliant poet but astounding musician where do we go next well it's the same year it's nineteen seventy right and Jimi Hendrix's version of the Star spangled banner at the Woodstock again art fair in August sixty nine sixty nine so that's fifty we just celebrated fifty year anniversary of that right so th there were maybe four or five hundred thousand in people to start early in the morning of the last day there were about thirty thousand people who saw Jimmy and a newly put together Dan play this and forever UH uh-huh Sir Yeah yeah in Uh live from Max yes cours farm in August of nineteen sixty nine James Marshall Hendricks and his band covering of course our nation's anthem You go into it in detail in the book but give me an idea why this particular version of the Star spangled banner is is is culturally significant well so many musicians have responded to their emotional state when they first heard this and thank God for Michael Wad Lease Woodstock film in Music Is Power I've interviewed John McLaughlin the amazing guitarist who founded the Mojave Schnur Orchestra he said with first time I heard Jimmy play this heard the recording I was stunned it was it was overwhelming I remember being an interview with Brian Eno physician and composer and producer he said I had tears coming down my face the first time I heard this is maybe one of the few songs in the history of popular music that had no lyrics and was a political statement the promise of America and democracy set against juxtaposed against the sounds of screening and missiles exploding and bullets singing right it speaks to not only our history here in the civil war but the wars that we are continually getting involved with overseas and makes you Chian not world war two whichever way considers the good war but the other wars why we get into them so that's why.

Gil Scott Heron Gil Spiro Agnew apple Julia Julia Gil Scott Taylor Jimmy Scott Heron Jimi Hendrix France Brian Eno Diane Carroll Bauer Mojave Schnur Orchestra attorney bull winkle Sunshine
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

14:12 min | 9 months ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"Tim Keller's and Amish introduce you to musicians authors comedians friends of mine who have all done fascinating interesting things and today's no exception I have a combination of those things my dear friend and regular co host of deep dish reiter as authored a brand new book called musically is power we're going to be discussing the concept of that book and some of the music contained therein you'RE GONNA love it Brad Welcome back thank you so much to me it's great be back here music is power comes out November twenty one from Rutgers University press and they were very kind to include eighteen photos of some of the musicians from basically everything from union songs and Joe Hill all the way to hip hop and everything in between let's talk a little bit about the about the premise of the book the concept is that that that music has been a force of social change for about as long as there has been American Popular Museum it's true it's true I mean the subtitle of music is power is popular songs social justice this and the will to change so what I've chosen is some of the most popular songs in all of these genres that really had an impact on society okay and you know just a blast through the table of contents really quick can all right so number one is musical workers of the World Unite Joe Hill Woody Guthrie and eight Seeger to is there for more than Fortune Phil Oaks Joan Baez and Bob Dylan right three caged artists Lesley Gore who we're going to talk about and into Janis Ian and Sloan who we both knew right Yeah Phil Sloan four parody in Poetry Tom Lehrer Peter Paul and Mary and the smothers others five I get real tricky with this one psychedelic kits situation Jimi Hendrix and Pink Floyd six he's and Blues Marvin Gaye and the temptations seven say it loud were blocked but proud James Brown and Curtis Mayfield right eight hard rock turns metallic the WHO and Black Sabbath nine more than a working class hero John Lennon and the Beatles ten I like this one at a place and in your face the dead Kennedys and the sex pistols were almost done eleven word Gil Scott Heron who we are also going to listen to and grandmaster Flash and twelve global music consciousness Bob Marley and Peter Gabriel thirteen weird funny smart angry Frank Zappa versus everyone fourteen rap not hip hop and W. A. and public enemy and finally fifteen weapons of mass deconstruction dixie chicks and green day and there are other bands that are referential in there but these are the major ones that I included and they all had huge impact societally had you in a and I've read the book of course in in it you describe each of each of the artists the period that they were popular and not only the change that they made but societally what they were reacting into all the way back to you know Union Law in the in the early part of the twentieth century Yeah Joe Hill and all of that well so the first I we're gonNA listen to Ironically had a huge socio political hit if you will may be the beginning of feminist music in Ashley Gore's it's my party and let's listen to it and then I'll tell you the very strange circumstances under which the song actually came to be good from nineteen sixty four on mercury records Lesley Gore's you don't own me right here on the deep dish radio show you do not just one of your you know you can't go with other in Sir Dr Shoulder uh-huh take us uh-huh goers number two hit from from nineteen sixty four right number two to the Beatles Beatles that's right yeah I wanNA hold your hand held the dominate of the number one spot so the thing that fascinates me about this is Lesley Gore was sixteen when years old when she recorded you don't own me she was playing at grow singers which is a resort in the catskills right and she's lying by the pool and to Philidelphia songwriters approach her with a song now remember she had no control over her music she recorded whatever they gave his manufacture where does let's say Fabian yes exactly so so she loved this and the following Monday she's in the office of her producer and for ten thousand in dollars Tim who was that producer was that was a producer Lou Adler no that producer was a guy who would soon be one of the most influential producers in they would quincy Jones Quincy Jones heard the song she brought the two songwriters to play an and two weeks later pulling things worked this past recording today two weeks later they had cut you don't own me just unbelievable what a perfect storm of a great song and a visionary producer Quincy and man the instrumentation on that you know is just is fantastic. It's got that ominous thing too I love the line and I'm not one of your little toys so for for that time in music for every female singer to have that kind of edge about you know being estranged or sexism yeah yeah it it's really important even though she did not have full control of her career she convinced quincy to record it and better for it and it was arguably one of one of our two biggest hits and Lesley's personal history is kind of interesting you talk a little bit about about her her closeted years yeah it's true she's one of the few people I think in the history of Lgbtq who came out on a television show it was a pbs show right you know in the life and even though you would think that people were You know more enlightened when she first came out and she would play gigs and she had a rough time some people were still sexist and gave her gave her a bad time but she she was kind of a a wonderful advocate not only for tolerance of sexuality a but also dating back to you don't own me feistiness that again grew later especially in the eighties in rock and roll yeah so you know people like Jones jet and and you know others kind of get sexy and punkish in their attitude and it all goes back to nineteen sixty four right I it's it's an interesting almost subversive kind of message because if you consider you know what's on the charts at the time you know this sounds like any other You Know Vicki Carr Julie London Kinda thing you know Torch Song with the with the violins and the revert vocals and everything and if if didn't know English right this would sound like just another female torch song and then you get into lyrics and the bite that she that she choose on every word for and you can see how it just resonates with your sixteen you know sixteen year old girls at the time who are like Billy's pushing me around right put up with that and it and it becomes this massive feminist anthem and it's been covered by the you know significant yeah females artists all throughout over the past almost sixty years yeah we're going to talk about a couple of songs that I've chosen chosen six songs from music is power and some of them really resonated very shortly after they're releasing some still decades later when used in the media I'm GonNa not reveal which when I'm particularly thinking of it's the third one coming up yeah that's a good one but but next we have one that really moves me it's by Peter Paul and Mary Yeah it's the year nineteen hundred fifty seven summer of love lot of psychedelic music a lot of the eastern mysticism in the air and they recorded the great Andallah which is subtitled the wheel of life and I'd like everybody listened to it and look for the incredible harmonic of the three any of them when we get toward the apex of the song and they sing we are free now we can kill now we can hate now now we can end the world the it's stunning it sends a chill up my back even today so I told him that he bet uh listen I will and learn things he's bad then his brother do that the keys them to his father brought him I take your plays grade land your brain and when you choose you too ball the edge of bread and water turn is by a till the killings of he's things up Boura but he is a cow He just a he can do You must do.

Tim Keller two weeks sixteen year sixty years
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"Three. Appearance. Sick on you. So there's a little surprise for you little ROY. You blew my mind reconstituted. Okay. So we had the theme to the monkeys in Italian Italian. It's a whole different world from reconstituting reimagining does arby's and she's not there. And when you I played it for me, I thought, oh, this is kind of invented, you know, fuzz guitar, and you know, the baselines different nice string. Then the flute comes in the processing. And I was just swept away was like, I don't know where you're taking me. But I'm following you. I'm not expecting it to sound like the English language version at all. Yeah. Lad, it doesn't. And then you check the POS that with the Monkees theme, which is basically the original backing track. Just with translated lyrics, Saint vocalist who probably spoke it phonetically. Yeah. But you know, the Monkees theme in Italian exists as a result of federal law in Italy that said any TV show that. Programmed broadcast in Italy had to be a hundred percent Italian. There's nothing wrong with literally using the same tracks. And then singing another language. I was fascinated as a kid when I heard the Beatles. Come give me diner. Ho, or whatever, you know. See? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. Those were were great fun, and they hearken back to win those guys played Hamburg and all that. And it was it was totally mind blowing for us. But what does ambi- of done there is and Collins vocal just completely reconstituted? Perfect word for the for the entire thing. Literally reimagined hit and jazzed it up made a really sonically interesting. There's a really good argument that his the intensity and the emotion in his talion vocal is actually better. I think so and what a great opportunity for people fans of group to actually not only hear the music taken different direction. But to get that quality of of emotionality singing, you know, I just thought of it that there's a few years in between the single the English English language single and the Italian reimagined. Yeah. And I think it shows the quick maturation of of the artists involved. You know that they have have evolve. As a band, they've evolved as a creative force they've evolved as humans and matured as humans, and so they're able to approach a song. They did five six years earlier with different is literally a different language and create something brand new, and that's really the purpose of coral courts radio hours to give you something that you've never heard before. Or maybe here's something that you have heard a hundred thousand times differently take it out of its context. And really listen to it as as the work of art that it is. And so for folks, Chem knapsack, and and at Brad Schreiber, and any of the other guests that have been here with music or even my music. Listen to it for what it is. And I can't thank you enough for turning me onto these musics. I never would have been aware of there's just so much out there vice versa. That's what I love about it. So thank you very much for all the kind words on on on itunes, and wherever you get your podcast. If you like the show, tell your friends if you don't like it tell us, but if you don't like it, why are you listening this far if you don't like it tell us we'll tell you off? Let's have let's have a conversation about it. Well, yeah. Post this on your social media. You know, let people know that this shows here, we'd we'd love to hear from you. Thanks very much. Brad. Tell us where we can. We learn more about.

Brad Schreiber arby Italy Hamburg Saint Ho Collins hundred percent five six years
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"I think it was off nine oh one to five. Yeah. And when you hear it off cappella and what Trevor Ray been did. It's even more astounding. Yes. Great to bring in those sledgehammer, echoey, drums, and all that stuff. But when you hear just their voices together, it's a standing and sometimes you need to do that to appreciate all the production and work there starting I think in the mid nineties. There was a trend to start releasing albums with with stripped out tracks you hear the vocal track. Just the piano tracker, whatever. And if you haven't heard pet sounds in that format not only do you get to hear what amazing musicians the wrecking crew were. But the harmonies that those five or six guys together any given time will melt your ears. There's so whether you love the beach boys are hate, the beach, boys, or whatever, you can appreciate the tr-. Medicine out of talent that went into that single album. There were rumors that Rundgren what's going to make a CD ROM of something anything where you could make your own mix and track. What a great idea it really is. Or they should at least build software. We could play anything through it and remix it when that'd be fun. Yes. Yes. Would you'd have to have the master tracks. I mean, I would love to hear just you know, sometimes I would love to hear just Paul's track on rubber soul revolver or just John's tracks on rubber soul. Revolver just to just to hear what those guys were doing. Listen, you know, you know, that I'm big Jimmy fan. So you know in having written the book. So there was I guess behind the music VH one or one of those kinds of docs. And so there's this guy very humorous guy named Mike Finnigan who's a keyboardist any talks about being brought in for rainy day, you know? And he says, you know, they just said, you know, Jimmy said, hey, man, just do something like this. And and you know, I just I didn't know I was just honored that even asked me in. And you got to hear him play the Oregon underneath you know, that incredible wa wa the Jimmy does on the song. Right. And then you, you know, what I love about a lot of these documentaries. Special. They did went on Pink Floyd to dark side of the moon is your at the desk at the one with Alan Parsons at the desk where he's going through individual here. Here's here's the girls. You know? The backup singers that Roger waters was kind of obscuring. And you listen to them you. Oh my God. You know? So it goes both ways. Sometimes you wanna hear just the vocals, and sometimes you just wanna hear as with pro hair is just the music transitioning to the next cut, which where there's classical influences in all kinds of rock and roll. I wanna play the next without introducing it. I don't wanna spoil the spooky. Yeah. I don't wanna spoil the the the the presenter the ban seven caller, if you can guess the classical musician. This is based on you, get fried chicken. I can't even top that. Let's go..

Jimmy Trevor Ray Mike Finnigan Alan Parsons Roger waters Rundgren Pink Floyd Paul Oregon wa John
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"That's the track. Right. So that's what happens in the studio. When there's when there's fade out. I never noticed the tack hammer piano. No. I was as it was playing. You saw me. I don't know. If you read my lips. But I went Pia. No. Yeah. Like I'd never heard that right in the mix. You know, why is it okay? For classical composer to do variations on the theme over and over again. And and for us to not here in what is considered a classic rock song a wider shade of pale. Yes. All the variations of the Oregon line for it. Because when you listen to it without the singing, you realize he's constantly finding new ways. He's not right eating what he's doing. Right. Each time. But it's a different approach every time through all ironically, allegedly based on jazz box era G string. That's right. Well, you know, we've talked about, you know, Emerson we've talked about you know, other groups that have been classically influenced. And you know, what there there's a reason that that attracted them, you know, in the first place they rarely have done it over and over and over again on on the drive in here. I'm listening to the Westside story soundtrack. Okay. You know? And I'm thinking America, you know, Sondheim and burns all that. And I'm thinking why did keep Emerson love this so much and I realized for its time in the early sixties. It was revolutionary not only the quality the dance, but to have a piece of music. That's that lively saying how screwed up and how wonderful America is at the same breath. You couldn't get away with that in popular music in nineteen. Gene. Whatever in the middle Camelot. Yeah. In the middle of JFK's Cam lot. You know? I think I go back to San Juan. I know a you can get on you know, that kind of right sort of back and forth. So, you know, absolutely perfect sense that they would be influenced by bar, and there were other people who also, you know, took classical music beside you know, prog rockers like Emerson lake and Palmer or or which wished it around. Right. Or are pro Clara one of the original prog rock man's. I just I'd love the instrumentation instrumentalization is are they really though. That's that's my question to you. I always I was founded I I will admit hard to categorize pro-coal Harum, but they didn't strike me as progressive rock music. The wasn't as complex and as that they were clean jazzy blues. Rock they were just kind of some melding of all those things. Maybe it doesn't really matter. What you call? The moody blues without pomposity. Beating of my moody blues. I'm going to so far as to say that at least a third of their music was terrific. You know, what that doesn't sound like, you know, damning faint craze. I know it sounds like, but but it's great but back to your your impulse. Which is let's hear the subtleties in the variations right of what they did unwired or shade of pale that you're not gonna hear because the lyrics are great and the vocals, very present. And wow, miss that. You've heard this hundred thousand times, you know, it really just becomes a complete package. If you never hear derivation, you never hear live. You know, I've never seen procra- Hera live. And I would imagine most people who are familiar with whiter shade of pale, accept it. As just this this package that you, you know, presented as a song. And you never really go. Oh, there's a little more to it than that. Because the mix really good on the final final thing. And if you if you strip it out. And you remove it from being a wall of sound. I'm not taking away from the vocals because their powerful wonderful vocals, and he handles it. Capably lyrics are fantastic there. No question. The lyrics. Fantastic. There's something just interesting about going. I never looked at it that way how often do we talk about? Okay. Look, we're gonna hear the acapella version of this Beatles album, or you know, as a big fan of of yeses song, leave it..

Emerson America Emerson lake San Juan Oregon JFK Clara Sondheim Palmer
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"But not by this artist. You've never heard you never heard the Bob. I didn't know there was another version other than Bob Kuban version. Maybe I'm wrong wasn't there. A black Aren be group that did the cheetah perhaps we'll have to look into that. This is I grew up in Saint Louis and Kuban was was a local band, and it was for from my understanding during the the mid to late sixties. It was it was kumons band that you went to go see in barring a traveling band. This was this was the local ban that would do do covers. And they were you know, they that's where all the cool kids went. And this was their only hit and to the best of my knowledge. It was a regional hit. I don't know that it got airplay outside of. Okay. Lewis imagining real weird. Things before I might be making up. When will you listen to it? You can go check and see. Yeah. And it also reminds me of another hit that we're going to talk about on the other side that is also the Matichon link believe it or not to the idea of the cheater right on. So. St Louis, adult rock classic six thirty K ex. Okay. Here's the jeeter. Inside. Just. Gear. Okay..

Bob Kuban Lewis Kuban Saint Louis Matichon six thirty K
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"To the courts radio hour. Presentation of deep dish radio. I'm Tim powers in this is my personal mixed to, you know, every now, and then I put together a set list playlist or a friend of mine comes in with a set list and playlist of music that is important to them, not always the definitive list of music, but certainly things that they enjoy and today is a little bit different. And no exception at the same time today. I put together a list of nine cuts and going through them with me today is my dear friend, author Brad Schreiber hybrid. Hello. We have turned the tables. And now you control the horizontal you control the vertical. It's true. That's right. And I get in Telugu young Tim Powles about Zilly's his chosen Z's very unusual song. Yeah. And man tell you putting together this list, you know, I had. Probably a hundred songs that I would love to play. But if I put them all together, it really shows that I have a horrible fear of abandonment. So I thought all right. I'm gonna I'm going to mix them up a good thing. You didn't say anything about it? So your audience will. No, that's true. So thank you for listening. Thank you for hearing me, all I ever wanted was just to be heard. Thank you so much. In fact, speaking of which we've gotten some great reviews on itunes. Thank thank John for for leaving one on on itunes about how well curated we are like to thank Kathy for for listening and saying good things about Brad and me, and the we know we're nothing if not psychotically eclectic, but what's really going to be exciting for me is, you know, in our previous shows, I've always brought in the music, then Tim would bring in perhaps one song. So now, I'm getting an understanding of not only his appreciation of mine using quote, unquote, my music, but where he came from how he grew up because what you listen to is just sonically would interest. You it's what things move you. Fans of Lear IX, right? What feelings what eras of music speechis star in another site, actually, get to know more about you through this process. And that is why put this show together. He knew who you were who are you? You kinda do. Stuff. So let's let's start with. Let's start with a cut that that I discovered using years ago. Just. I heard it on. I I heard it on what used to be called in an AO our station album oriented form rock and roll station where the jockey to be able to play whatever they want, and it was a station in Saint Louis..

Tim Powles Brad Schreiber Lear IX Saint Louis Zilly Kathy John
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"Deep dish radio. Tim powers. And well, this is my podcast feed. Koro courts radio is a mix tape that. I put together for listeners for friends, and it's just a an assortment of music that that I like to play or that might guests like to play or my friends and guests come and hang out with me like to play. And today, I am pleased to present yet. Again, my dear friend, Brad Schreiber, author of many many books, and if you're not familiar with his work, I suggest you go back deeper into the deep dish radio archives. Listen to our first interview for what are you laughing at thank you. I'm very happy to be here and provide you my mixed up tape. There we go and we're. We have I think one of the things that we discussed that we really liked doing about this show together is that it gives. Not only gives me an opportunity to introduce you the listener to some new music, but my guest, especially you read get to introduce me to some things that maybe have escaped my escaped my purview that that. I I'm not familiar with. So we all get to hear something new. And I love that, you know, and it's reciprocal absolutely Tim. You know, when I create these lists for your show thinking, okay, Tim gonna know about this one. And that's great because we can really expound on it. You know, we can free form rap man as the kids are want to say, but I have a lot of obscure music that thrills me, and I love sharing it with you. And whether you love it as much as me or not it's great for me to say here is why I have this one song from an artist and have nothing else from that artist. You know, there's something to be said for creating your own one hit wonders to there. There's a lot of artists that right enjoy one track. And then I'll try to delve deep into their into their body of work in a couple of things happen either. They don't have a deep body of work. That's readily available or the rest of it is is not as interesting, for example. Most people are familiar with the sixties garage rock. Classic lies by the Knickerbocker. I love that song. It's a great very Beatle esque kind of rock and roll rave up. Right. Yeah. The sound the sound of the tars and the jangling this of it and the the intensity of the vocals had like songs where people are pissed off because their hearts been broken. And I have a couple by the way today that are about both male and female attitude about you messed with me. And here's what I've got to say Brad in lies is. Kind of like, it's it's a great song. But the rest of the knickerbockers. Body of work. Not that good. Then someone didn't sound anything like lives, which is. We'll talk about the next in the next episode. It's a crying shame. It is it is..

Tim powers Brad Schreiber
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"Deep dish radio. Tim powers. And well, this is my podcast feed. Koro courts radio is a mix tape that. I put together for listeners for friends, and it's just a an assortment of music that that I like to play or that might guests like to play or my friends and guests come and hang out with me like to play. And today, I am pleased to present yet. Again, my dear friend, Brad Schreiber, author of many many books, and if you're not familiar with his work, I suggest you go back deeper into the deep dish radio archives. Listen to our first interview for what are you laughing at thank you. I'm very happy to be here and provide you my mixed up tape. There we go and we're. We have I think one of the things that we discussed that we really liked doing about this show together is that it gives. Not only gives me an opportunity to introduce you the listener to some new music, but my guest, especially you read get to introduce me to some things that maybe have escaped my escaped my purview that that. I I'm not familiar with. So we all get to hear something new. And I love that, you know, and it's reciprocal absolutely Tim. You know, when I create these lists for your show thinking, okay, Tim gonna know about this one. And that's great because we can really expound on it. You know, we can free form rap man as the kids are want to say, but I have a lot of obscure music that thrills me, and I love sharing it with you. And whether you love it as much as me or not it's great for me to say here is why I have this one song from an artist and have nothing else from that artist. You know, there's something to be said for creating your own one hit wonders to there. There's a lot of artists that right enjoy one track. And then I'll try to delve deep into their into their body of work in a couple of things happen either. They don't have a deep body of work. That's readily available or the rest of it is is not as interesting, for example. Most people are familiar with the sixties garage rock. Classic lies by the Knickerbocker. I love that song. It's a great very Beatle esque kind of rock and roll rave up. Right. Yeah. The sound the sound of the tars and the jangling this of it and the the intensity of the vocals had like songs where people are pissed off because their hearts been broken. And I have a couple by the way today that are about both male and female attitude about you messed with me. And here's what I've got to say Brad in lies is. Kind of like, it's it's a great song. But the rest of the knickerbockers. Body of work. Not that good. Then someone didn't sound anything like lives, which is. We'll talk about the next in the next episode. It's a crying shame. It is it is..

Tim powers Brad Schreiber
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"Overachiever. And so you know, yeah. Yeah. Grew up in a tiny town and didn't have a father, and you know. I don't know, you know where we be without corruption. Where would we be? Without theoretical questions, you know, we're gonna learn from this. It's just the process of knowing that a lot of Americans are going to suffer and having to roll back a lot of stuff with the next administration. That's that's the really, really sad part. It's not that we always expect enlightened brilliant men to lead us for every election cycle. We've got plenty of guys in the past who've Shane this country. But what are we gonna learn from this and how we gonna improve. That's what I'm concerned with. And that's why I'm looking to the midterms and a lot of people are and it. It could be very valuable time for us. Could be hope. Yeah, let's hope, Brad. We are. We are out of time. So you know, what are you laughing at is available right now wherever you get your books. I always tell people to walk into a brick and mortar bookstore. In order the book revolutions end is available as well. Pick those up. You know, they can find the, they can find the at Brad Schreiber dot com. I've got a website and click on all the books that I have. I write for Huffington Post. So you got a ten year archive if you type my name in there and in Facebook, I kind of put all my interviews and including this wonderful interview, I'll put on my Facebook page. You'll recognize my Facebook page versus the other Brad Schreiber's. I'm the one posing next to Star Wars creature named Yoda. There's a story behind met, but we don't have time for it. That's that's awesome. Bread, it's a pleasure. You are. This is typical of wild doing this show because I get to meet the coolest people. And you know if you're if you're ever up in northeast LA let's get a Cup of coffee, please. Thank you, and thanks for your support and and the wonderful interview you did with my my co collaborator Phil Proctor, which was just marvelous. I, I really appreciate it. And in your appreciation of of that kind of comedy and rock and roll.

Brad Schreiber Facebook Phil Proctor Huffington Post LA Shane ten year
"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"brad schreiber" Discussed on Deep Dish Radio with Tim Powers

"Welcome back to deep dish radio. I'm Tim powers, and this is my show. My guest today is author Brad Schreiber, who has published an updated edition of his fantastic book on the theory of comedy, it's called, what are you laughing at how to write humor for screenplays stories and more. And you may remember Brad as he is the co, author of where's my fortune cookie, Phil partners memoir. About his is amazing. Brad contacted me about this book and I hadn't read it yet, but I saw that it was endorsed by Larry Gelbart the writer and creator of mash as well. That's good enough for me. And then I read the book and I was absolutely inching. So if you are interested in learning how to white funding and. Use principles developed in Brad's UCLA extension writer program class on humor, writing and and learned from a master screenwriter who has written some of the funniest things you have ever seen in critic pick up. What are you laughing at by by Brad tribal? And we will get to Brad just a little bit. But before that wanna thank everybody who has who has tuned into deep dish radio recently, there have been quite a few new developments. We've seen a spike in in traffic and subscriptions recently, some very happy to welcome a lot of our new listeners and one of the title bout the deep dish radio Facebook page. There actually is a fan site for for deep dish radio. And recently we have picked up a lot of new fans. Some of these. Can you s o.'neil forced in heroics Kathy rigs Williams caveat, one of deep dish is best Vandross Kathy. Thank you for for letting everybody know about us. The very funny Courtney Cronin dole vita cola, my dear friend and Christine, Carlson wolf, and Guerrero, Jeff Abram, fantastic fella and and spend Sovan have all come to the disregard Facebook page recently. And in giving us a like hand, if you do the same thing that will ever mentioned, you just head over to your Facebook page than punching deep dish. Radio hit light, and we'd love you can also you can also communicate with me there. There's a guest you like me to to interview. Let me know if connection. There's also the the deep dish radio Twitter feet, had this radio check that out because every now and then I chime in with something interesting from Oprah show, there would love to. Thank you so much for listening fun project for me, and I'm glad that you are along. Brad Schreiber my guest today, in addition to writing, what are you? Laughing has written several books, including where's my fortune cookie co written with the grief Parker revolutions end book about Patty, Hearst, kidnapping mind, control on the secret history of Donald the freeze and the SLA becoming Jimi Hendrix, fantastic book about well, biography of of young Jimi Hendrix's life before you came Jimi Hendrix, always been Japan before he became Jimi Hendrix. We, this one's kind of death in paradise illustrated history of the Los Angeles County department of coroner. Yep. There you go. Fantastic. I enjoyed my conversation with Brad very much. And you will, too. I encourage you to pick up if you're interested in being. Or you interested in wife? Funny, pick up. What are you laughing at? You know, there are several reasons why you should pick up. What are you laughing at? Not only is it a great book on the science of comedy and and the concept of thinking in how that works. But there's also a fantastic deadly with a list of some of the funniest movies ever made some of the most clever writing ever collected and it's it's a list that if you're interested in what's really funny, I encourage you to check out those lists that's in what are you laughing at available wherever you get your books by Brad Schreiber. And now here's the man himself. Brad, I finished greeting. What are you laughing at a couple of days ago. It took me a while to to to get through it, but as a as a standup as a as a comedian as a as a humorous myself, it was really interesting to see the process of humor that that the the breakdown of why things are funny and how they get to. We get it. You're busy. So what if we told you there was a shop where brands, you know and maybe some you don't are all brought together in one place a place that makes shopping for those everyday essentials and discovering something new, easy and enjoyable. The place is jet dot com with free shipping on orders over thirty five dollars and two day delivery on thousands of essentials. So don't go all over the

Brad Brad Schreiber Facebook Jimi Hendrix Brad tribal Tim powers Larry Gelbart Los Angeles County UCLA writer Twitter Kathy Phil Courtney Cronin Japan Oprah kidnapping Patty Donald Christine