36 Burst results for "Brad"

Fresh update on "brad" discussed on Evangelism On Fire

Evangelism On Fire

00:33 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "brad" discussed on Evangelism On Fire

"Episode 119. In today's episode is called the normal Christian. Today's quote comes from anselm. If it is possible that God exists, then it follows logically that God does exist. Our scripture today is Jude 23. And it goes like this. Rescue others by snatching them from the flames of judgment. Normal, Christianity. Have you ever thought what that really is? Normal Christianity. Sometimes people think that followers of Jesus are those who just attend church every Sunday. They think those are Christians and that's normal Christianity, but is it? Our recently read a blog called four signs you're a normal Christian bob Brad marchman and man it fired me up to the talk about today's episode. What does it mean to be a normal Christian? Before I read some of Brad's blog, I want to drop a truth bomb in your spirit. Most Christians never serve their faith in Jesus, and if there are some who do it, usually, it's a very small group of churches that actually go about what the bottle says about telling people about Jesus. In most of the time, we consider those people who share their faith to be, let's just be real. Super normal. You know, we look at them as superstar Christians. We look at them and think, wow, these people are really getting after it. They're doing big things for Jesus. And everyone else is considered normal. I believe beyond the normal excuses we hear about of what followers of Jesus don't share the gospel with people. Excuses like, well, I'm scared. Or I don't know the Bible well enough. I don't have enough information or God can't use someone like me. I believe we have made it normal through the leadership of the church to not share our faith. And that simply goes against all their greatest selling book of all time. The Bible says about us being witnesses for Christ. You know, sharing the boom with the world. So the truth bomb I want to communicate to you, evangelism on fire nation. Today, this is what I want to communicate to you. I hope this gets down deep in your spirit. It gets deep down into your DNA. Normal Christians are individuals that share their faith. Let me say that one more time. That normal Christians are individuals that share their faith. They share the boom. If you read the biblical record, you will see that the normal Christians were Christians who shared their faith as a lifestyle. I heard Brad say on a podcast once. I think if the apostle Paul came to our churches today, he would be shocked that nobody was sharing their faith. He would be like, what's up with you guys? Man, I 100% agree with his statement, and I believe it should set our hearts ablaze to make a change to make sharing our faith in Jesus with others actively as a lifestyle. I love the story Brad begins, his blog with. Take a listen to it. Lamar lagrone was surprisingly and miraculously saved out of a lifestyle feel what the world's vices when Lamar was saved, he immediately began to share with everyone who would listen about the difference Christ made in his life and how they could be saved. It was amazing to see and God was using him in a mighty way. The church was excited to see how God was using Lamar, but most saw this passion for sharing the gospel as something that was not normal for the regular Christian. Finally, one of the deacons went to Lamar and told him that he was excited to see him sharing the gospel so boldly, but one day he would calm down and be like the rest of us. The deacon saw himself as a normal Christian in one day Lamar would join him after he settled down. Man, that isn't amazing opening statement because I have found through my own personal experience that this is a sad reality and most churches. Somebody is on fire with their faith and people kind of look at them strange like you're sharing the gospel where you work, you're sharing the gospel at the gym, you work out at, and you're sharing the gospel every place you go, are you serious? I can't believe that you're doing that. Here are some of the reasons the church has settled into a normal mode of operating that doesn't match biblical principles. And I'm gonna be real with y'all. These are not reasons. These are excuses. Come on somebody, can you handle the truth? Here's some of the reasons for I should say, here's some of the excuses. People were so busy all the time to share their faith in Jesus with others. Or, here's the biggest reason I hear all the time. Fear. And I believe 100% with the thought that Brad speaks about. He says, it's something that we just don't think about a lot. That the church at large, the body of Christ as a whole, the church has given people permission not to share. We don't hold people accountable and it starts with leaders. He gives this example that I absolutely love. He says, how many times have people come up to a pastor saying, hey, we don't think you've been sharing Christ enough, right? I mean, let's just be real. You never hear people complain about that. Listen, here comes a truth bomb. People want to argue about everything else in the church, but as far as coaching inspiring and holding people accountable to share their faith in Jesus, we really don't do that. You will never hear anyone arguing about that. Evangelism on our nation, look, I'm a pastor, and I've never seen someone come up to me and be upset saying, hey, pastor Mark, we're just not sharing the gospel enough, and I am upset about it. This has not happened, not even once in all my years of pastoring. And man, you know what? I would love for us to have arguments for sharing the boom, the gospel message more. Do you hear what I'm saying? Evangelism on fire nation. I would absolutely love that. So we have a given permission for Christians not to share. You know, it's no big deal. Just come to church. Being a Bible study or a small group. But we really don't want to hold people accountable, coach, or inspire them to share the gospel message as part of their walk as they follow Jesus. Evangelism on fire nation, hey, check, check, check this out. I am sounding the alarm right here right now. We've got to get back to sharing the gospel with people who need Christ just as Jesus did when he walked the earth. Jesus came to seek and saved the loss. You know what? Don't take my word for it. Please fact check me now by going to the holy scripture in Luke 1910. Take a look at that with your own eyes. So I just want to raise Brad, marchment up for his amazing blog and acknowledging him for what he points out the apostle Paul points out in second Corinthians, chapter 5 versus 14 through 21. Man, that's so good. Let me say that one more time for the people in the back. Come on now. You know that I'm most definitely want to raise Brad marchman

Lamar Brad Bob Brad Marchman Lamar Lagrone Anselm Jude Deacon Paul Mark Marchment Jesus Luke Brad Marchman
Small Business Saturday entices local shoppers

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 d ago

Small Business Saturday entices local shoppers

"After all, the Black Friday sales at the big box stores and online retailers, it's now small business Saturday created to support all the neighborhood stores. Awesome Brooklyn is a small gift store that just hit the 5 year mark and owner Vanessa raptopoulos calls it her baby. My neighbors and my customers are like the best people ever. They get me up in the morning. They get me motivated to find them the best gifts in Brooklyn. Nicole hill and Brad clem vicious recently moved to Brooklyn from Canada and it's their first small business Saturday. We're getting some ornaments. We don't have any of our holiday ornaments. Supporting the people that live in the community instead of just giant. Giant corporations that don't really care where you buy their stuff. Julie Walker, New York

Vanessa Raptopoulos Brooklyn Nicole Hill Brad Clem Canada Julie Walker New York
Vaccinated People Now Make up a Majority of COVID Deaths

Mark Levin

01:27 min | 5 d ago

Vaccinated People Now Make up a Majority of COVID Deaths

"So yeah there's a lot we gotta ask Fauci about particularly as a new report came out today and said the majority of people who've died of COVID have been vaccinated which of course is shocking As they also buried another report that vitamin D levels may have a direct correlation with your ability to survive the virus But again Fauci worked directly with the tech companies to silence quote unquote disinformation If you remember anybody who went out of line and said anything even about the lab origins of COVID was probably shut down and silenced There's a lot to answer for My theory of course is that we can now trace the gain of function research funding from Fauci's office and Collins office He's another one that should be hauled in Directly to the Wuhan lab we know that they were experimenting with these viruses These guys admitted in these emails they were working on this fury in cleavage They were working on these weird Frankenstein mice and the cells in the lungs and everything like that They created this thing and they knew that they did and they tried to lie and cover it up by finding a way they could justify this came from nature And because the media in this country the corporate media loved Fauci and don't forget Brad Pitt played the guy in Saturday Night Live He was a hero to people The nation's leading infectious disease doctor you actually have to say that by law whatever you say his name Did you know that Well they love him so much so anything he said they just went with gospel so when he said no no no this was this came from a bat

Fauci Wuhan Collins Brad Pitt Saturday Night Live
Tarantino Is Making Excuses for Not Standing up to Harvey Weinstein

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:56 min | 5 d ago

Tarantino Is Making Excuses for Not Standing up to Harvey Weinstein

"I was there. Obviously you know, my ear was not only to the ground. It was below the ground. Both ears. I heard everything back then and Harvey was close to me. I talked to him several days a week. I never heard a rape story. Now, Quentin Tarantino was closer to Harvey. They worked together in tandem. I'm sure he heard something. Let's not forget the fact that Brad Pitt wanted Harvey Weinstein when Harvey made a play for Gwyneth Paltrow or some kind of shit in Brad Pitt, let him know. Even Ben Affleck, let him know, this shit doesn't wash with me. So the stories were out there and guys like Quentin Tarantino would have heard that more than me, but you know, look, I understand, look, you do this to me, you're not gonna get this movie. I never heard actresses talking like that. You know, Quentin said he heard, don't get in the back of a limo with this guy. Courtney Love said something to that effect on the red carpet one day. But it's funny. My girlfriend, the girlfriend, will tell me, no, no, I even heard that stuff, and I wasn't even there, but I heard it. And I'm like, I don't know what to tell you. I didn't hear it, and I was a gossip columnist. I'm not lying to you. I heard the hobby was a bully. I heard he got things done. I assumed he got laid like every other studio had got late since Louis V mayor. But, you know, bathrobe, raping, injecting drugs into his penis to get hard. No, I never heard any of that stuff. Or else, I would have done what Quentin Tarantino said he would have done. Like I did for Harvey when I found out he was banging some girl in England and, you know, cheating on his first wife. I would have said, hey, boss. Because there was no reason not to call him Boston. He wasn't, you know, condemned yet. I was a boss. I don't know what's going on, but here's what I hear. There's a story out there that you're raping chicks. I'm going to put it right in his lap. Not to threaten him that I was going to write the story, but I want to, like I said here, here's this bomb diffusing. It's out there. So, you know, I don't know, but I really think Quentin Tarantino because of his position and because Harvey took him under his wing, Quentin Tarantino can tell you all he wants that he never heard this stuff. I don't believe it. And some people will tell you when did Paltrow's father was a top director. And her mother, Blythe Danner, was a star. But the person who went to Weinstein about his behavior toward her was Brad Pitt. Who was a born fan at the time. So how can people not know about this guy doing that shit? So you know Quentin Tarantino was on the front lines. I think he's full of shit when he talks about this. He's making excuses for why he didn't stand up like a real man and confront Harvey.

Quentin Tarantino Harvey Brad Pitt Harvey Weinstein Gwyneth Paltrow Ben Affleck Courtney Love Quentin Louis England Boston Blythe Danner Paltrow Weinstein
Bergeron gets 1,000th point, streaking Bruins beat Lightning

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

Bergeron gets 1,000th point, streaking Bruins beat Lightning

"The Boston Bruins extended their win streak to 7 straight with a 5 three road win over the Tampa Bay lightning but trees bergeron notched as 1000th career point as a Bruin assisting on Boston's fourth goal of the game by Brad marchand It means even more when it's a guy that I've been has been on my side for such a long time and has such a big impact on the team but also on my career Nick Paul scored Tampa Bay's first and third goals the bruins answered with tallies from David crece Nick foligno Charlie Coyle Marshawn and David pasternak Rudolph bolsters also scored his first as a lightning Tampa

Brad Marchand Boston Bruins Tampa Bay Bergeron Nick Paul Boston David Crece Nick Foligno Charlie Coyle Bruins David Pasternak Rudolph Marshawn Tampa
 Obama to campaign for Warnock on Dec. 1 before Ga. runoff

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last week

Obama to campaign for Warnock on Dec. 1 before Ga. runoff

"Saturday in Georgia I Norman hall A Georgia appeals court has cleared the way for counties in Georgia to offer early voting this coming Saturday in the U.S. Senate runoff election between democratic senator Raphael Warnock and Republican Herschel Walker Warnock and walker were forced into a December 6th runoff because neither won a majority in the midterm election this month Republican secretary state Brad raffensperger had told county election officials that early voting could not be held Saturday because state law says it's illegal on a Saturday if there is a holiday on the Thursday or Friday preceding it It's not clear how many counties will open polling places this Saturday I Norman hall

Norman Hall Georgia Appeals Court Raphael Warnock Herschel Walker Warnock Georgia Brad Raffensperger U.S. Senate Walker
Brad Mills Saw Red Flags With FTX Ages Ago

The Bad Crypto Podcast

02:10 min | Last week

Brad Mills Saw Red Flags With FTX Ages Ago

"We know FTX is a big what the FTX just went on. We've talked about it. We saw that it happened. I don't know how deep we want to go in that right now, Joel. Is that what we want to do? We want to go into and talk about FTX. You know, I think we could talk a little bit about it, but you warned about this as well, right? When were you talking about FTX and the red flag? Back? Back in January, when I started first paying attention to the large growth in DeFi Ponzi schemes like ohm protocol, Wonderland protocol, Tara Luna. I started to realize that this massive bubble was going to blow up the same as other bubbles and Ponzi's in the traditional markets have before because they've basically just rebuilt everything that was toxic and over leveraged nonsense from the traditional markets. In crypto. And they called it innovation and they put it on a blockchain and called it DeFi. Well, it doesn't take a lot of digging to start to realize it's unsustainable. To be able to get that kind of yield, ten, 20% yield when we're at historically low interest rates and traditional markets, something risky, extremely risky is going on there. And every time that there was a huge hack, like the wormhole bridge got hacked or there was a problem with the Luna, the exit door, the protocol only had a certain amount of liquidity for you to get out to burn the USD tokens and turn it back into Luna and then sell the Luna. There's only so much liquidity. And as these things grow so big, they just become unsustainable. And FTX, like Alameda, three hours capital, jump, which is another one that still hasn't gone down yet. That's at risk of it. And a bunch of other big, huge VC firms like paradigm and a 16 Z and all these bellwether VC brands. I mean, they're all kind of doing all this degenerate stuff and bailing out all these hacks that always happen in DeFi. And trying to provide liquidity into the system, like a Central Bank does.

Tara Luna Joel Ponzi Luna Alameda Central Bank
Bergeron, Bruins beat Canucks 5-2 for 11th win in 12 games

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 2 weeks ago

Bergeron, Bruins beat Canucks 5-2 for 11th win in 12 games

"The bruins have continued their best start in 93 years by earning their fourth straight win 5 two versus the Canucks Patrice bergeron scored for the third time in two days At Brad Marshawn notched his 5th in just 8 games this season Hampus lindholm had three assists for the bees who also received goals from counter Clifton Pavel zacha and Thomas no shack The bruins have won 11 of their last 12 games and are 14 and two this season The 1929 30 bruins opened up 19 and two Thatcher demko stopped 27 shots for a Vancouver which fell to one in three on a 5 game road trip I'm Dave ferry

Bruins Brad Marshawn Hampus Lindholm Patrice Bergeron Clifton Pavel Zacha Canucks Thatcher Demko Thomas Vancouver Dave Ferry
Was the Race Stolen From Dr. Oz? Mike Lindell Weighs In

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:56 sec | 2 weeks ago

Was the Race Stolen From Dr. Oz? Mike Lindell Weighs In

"I'm talking to our friend Mike lindell about the election, Mike. So you just said basically that the race was stolen from Doctor Oz by the Democrats. Now, my question is, why wouldn't he get involved in contest that? Why would he just say to fetterman, I can seed why? Wait, wait, I don't know. I can't answer that for us. I haven't talked to him, but I have talked to Doug mastriano, and he is not conceding. And everyone says, well, he lost by a huge amount, my, no, they just told him by a huge amount. And when you say Democrats, be careful, Eric, remember you got Brad rauschenberger down in Georgia that steals the elections like they're going out of style down there with his little dominion machine. And he's a Republican Republican. This is a uni party everybody. This is what we're up against.

Mike Lindell Fetterman Doug Mastriano Mike Brad Rauschenberger Eric Georgia
Hurricane Nicole forms; Florida awaits rare November storm

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hurricane Nicole forms; Florida awaits rare November storm

"A rare November hurricane will make landfall overnight along Florida's east coast The last November hurricane to make landfall in the U.S. was Kate 37 years ago Hurricane Nicole has top sustained winds of 75 mph as it rolls towards floor disease coast Storm surge beat erosion has already wrecked dozens of homes and buildings Brad Reinhart with the national hurricane center says the surge runs some 370 miles along the coast into southeast Georgia From north Palm Beach to altamaha sound Georgia We're calling for peak storm surge values of three to 5 feet Disney World and universal Orlando closed early Wednesday Airports including Orlando international have closed as much as a half foot of rain from the system could fall along the blue ridge I'm Tim McGuire

Hurricane Nicole Brad Reinhart Georgia From North Palm Beach East Coast National Hurricane Center Kate Florida U.S. Orlando Georgia Disney World Tim Mcguire
Matthews scores 2, Toronto ends Boston's 7-game win streak

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

Matthews scores 2, Toronto ends Boston's 7-game win streak

"The ruined 7 game winning streak is over following a two one loss to the Maple Leafs Auston Matthews scored both Toronto goals on assists from Mitch marner Matthews snapped a one one tie with a power play goal with four 51 left in the second period I think just really pleased with the effort throughout the 60 minutes I thought you know playing really good team on the other end you know they're gonna get their chances and get their momentum swings but I thought we did a really good job just sticking with it Ilya samsonov made 13 saves for the Maple Leafs before leaving the game at the end of the second period with a knee injury Brad Marshawn scored on a penalty shot for his 800th NHL point I'm Dave ferry

Auston Matthews Mitch Marner Matthews Maple Leafs Toronto Ilya Samsonov Brad Marshawn NHL Dave Ferry
Lindholm's OT goal lifts Bruins over Penguins

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

Lindholm's OT goal lifts Bruins over Penguins

"Hampus lindholm scored over three minutes into overtime as the Boston Bruins rallied to beat the penguins 6 to 5 Lindholm's goal capped a Boston comeback from down 5 two around the midway point of the game This is one of those nice one pucks kind of started going in and obviously we can clean up some stuff you don't want to be down 5 two to a team like Pittsburgh but it shows a lot of character to when we come back Charlie Coyle Jacob loca Brad Marshawn Pavel zaka and Taylor hall scored for the bruins Now 9 and one Sidney Crosby and evgeni malkin both scored for Pittsburgh losers of 5 straight Josh Valtteri Pittsburgh

Hampus Lindholm Lindholm Boston Bruins Penguins Charlie Coyle Jacob Loca Brad Marshawn Boston Pavel Zaka Pittsburgh Taylor Hall Bruins Sidney Crosby Evgeni Malkin Josh Valtteri
Hughes scores to back Vanecek, Devils beat Avalanche 1-0

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last month

Hughes scores to back Vanecek, Devils beat Avalanche 1-0

"VTech vanicek and Jack Hughes loved the Devils to their 5th win in 6 games since an O one two start One nothing versus the avalanche Then it turned back 24 shots in his first shout out since joining the Devils But neither team scored until Hughes deposit her to power play goal past Pavel Franco's two 59 into the third period Jasper Brad picked up his team high tenth assist on the Hughes goal extending his season opening point streak to 8 games Frances May 22 saves for the defending Stanley Cup champs who are four three and one I'm Dave ferry

Vtech Vanicek Jack Hughes Devils Pavel Franco Jasper Brad Avalanche Hughes Frances Dave Ferry
Marchand has 2 goals and an assist in return, Bruins roll

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | Last month

Marchand has 2 goals and an assist in return, Bruins roll

"Brad Marshawn made his season debut and delivered three points as the bruins earned their fourth straight win 5 one versus the red wings Marshawn wasn't expected back until December following off season hip surgery He burst out of the gate with two goals and one assist as Boston improved to 6 and zero at home this season David pasternak added a goal and two assists and Jeremy swayman stopped 27 shots Adam erne's goal got Detroit within two to one heading into the third period I'm Dave ferry

Brad Marshawn Marshawn Bruins David Pasternak Jeremy Swayman Adam Erne Boston Detroit Dave Ferry
Graham asks Supreme Court to intervene after election ruling

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last month

Graham asks Supreme Court to intervene after election ruling

"Republican senator Lindsey Graham is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to block the order that he must appear before a Georgia grand jury that's investigating the aftermath of the 2020 election Attorneys for the South Carolina Republican have gone to the nation's highest court seeking to block a lower court ruling that senator Lindsey Graham would have to appear before a Fulton county Georgia special grand jury The district attorney wants to question Graham about calls he made to Georgia's Secretary of State after Donald Trump lost in 2020 Brad raffensperger said that he thought Graham had suggested that he toss out legally cast votes something that Graham has dismissed as ridiculous The senator's office says he wants the high court to overturn the ruling that would quote significantly impact the ability of senators to gather information in connection with doing their job I'm Jackie Quinn

Lindsey Graham Georgia U.S. Supreme Court Graham Brad Raffensperger Fulton County South Carolina Donald Trump Jackie Quinn
Dinesh Interviews the Attorney for Oath Keepers' Founder Stuart Rhodes

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:54 min | Last month

Dinesh Interviews the Attorney for Oath Keepers' Founder Stuart Rhodes

"Guys, there's a huge trial going on the oath keepers trial and I'm delighted to welcome to the podcast Ed tarpley, Ed's a criminal defense attorney from Louisiana. He's practiced law there for 42 years. In fact, he served as the district attorney in Louisiana from 1991 to 1997. He's one of the attorneys on the team representing Stuart roads Stewart Rhodes, the founder of the oath keepers. And welcome to the podcast. Thanks for joining me. A lot going on. I know in the courtroom and thanks for taking the time to step out and give us an update. How in your assessment is this trial going? And where is it at what stage are we at right now? Yeah, let me just say, first of all, that it's a pleasure to be on the podcast today. As you know, the local court rules prohibit me from discussing the evidence that's in the case that we have to be careful not to run astray of violating the local court rules. But there are many things I can tell you. First of all, I can say that we think the trial is going well. That we have an outstanding team of attorneys working on this case. I'm representing Stewart roads along with Bill linder with Phil lender and James Lee bright from Dallas, Texas, to outstanding lawyers, we have the other defendants, Kelly maggs has Stanley Woodward and Julie Halle from Washington, D.C., Ken harrelson, has Brad guy from New Jersey. Jessica Watkins has a Jonathan Chris from Pennsylvania and mister Thomas Caldwell has bay Fisher from Maryland. So we have a lot of outstanding attorneys on this case and we have a great camaraderie and rapport with each other. So I just think we have an outstanding team in this trial on behalf of the defense.

Ed Tarpley Stuart Roads Stewart Rhodes Louisiana Bill Linder ED Phil Lender James Lee Bright Kelly Maggs Stanley Woodward Julie Halle Ken Harrelson Brad Guy Jessica Watkins Jonathan Chris Mister Thomas Caldwell Bay Fisher Dallas Texas D.C. New Jersey
Brad Smith of National Right to Life Michigan on the Left's Goals

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:54 min | Last month

Brad Smith of National Right to Life Michigan on the Left's Goals

"I'm delighted to welcome our guest today Brad Smith. Brad Smith is the development coordinator at right to life Michigan covering Detroit and southeast Michigan. Brad, thank you for joining us. Oh, thanks so much for having me. It's great to be here. Well, this is great. Well, I want to start on a positive note. We are so blessed that roe V wade has been overturned. It's a huge victory, something that pro lifers have been working for for decades. And now this issue has gone back to the states. So that's where the battle really is now. Before we dive into Michigan, I want to ask you a little bit on kind of what the left's goal is and all these states and what do we need to look out for is kind of their broad strategy. Well, and I think even the step back so people understand what the real battle is here, my wife and I have a little girl with trisomy 18 significant disability and one of the things that when we were pushed to have an abortion, they wanted us to kill her. And we thought when we said no and did that fight with them, that that was the end of our fight. And little did we realize it was actually the beginning of our battle. And I kind of feel somewhat the same way with this. I mean, we've been fighting for a long time against roe versus wade. But I almost feel like it started the real fight now. Because now that it's come back to states, it's every state is battling and that the battle has only grown much more intense. And much bigger things even on the line now as we go state by state and each state is fighting this battle. So it's going to be an interesting thing to watch as these states do it, but Michigan is a crucial one. So it's one that we are working hard to make sure we don't lose here.

Brad Smith Roe V Wade Michigan Southeast Michigan Brad Detroit Wade
Lawyer: Pitt will keep responses to abuse account in court

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Lawyer: Pitt will keep responses to abuse account in court

"Brad Pitt has responded sort of to the latest set of allegations by his ex-wife Angelina Jolie An attorney for Brad Pitt says the act will not engage in a public back and forth about a 2016 incident aboard a private jet flight that led to their split in a statement and Kylie says Pitt has taken responsibility for everything he's done but will not cop to parts of Julie's account that are not true She didn't say which was which In a new court filing Julie rehashed and in flight incident in which she says pit roughed her up then got physical with two of their kids when they tried to intervene The filing is part of a legal fight over a French winery the two co owned their divorce has gone final but they're still haggling over custody and money I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Brad Pitt Angelina Jolie Julie Kylie Pitt Oscar Wells Gabriel
Jolie details Brad Pitt abuse allegations in court filing

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

Jolie details Brad Pitt abuse allegations in court filing

"It appears things are winding down in the Alex Jones defamation lawsuit in Connecticut The final family member of a victim of the sandy hook elementary school massacre has now taken the stand mock Barden's son Daniel was one of the 26 victims of the shooting He says he and his family suffered again when they heard that people were desecrating his son's grave and that some conspiracy theorists had planned to dig up his 7 year old son's grave to prove the shooting was a hoax the plaintiffs are expected to rest their case when court resumes in the morning his lawyers say InfoWars host Alex Jones is unlikely to testify again which will make the defense case a brief one Jones has already defaulted on the defamation part of the case the jury will decide how much he and his media empire must pay for his repeated claims that sandy hook was all a hoax I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Sandy Hook Elementary School Alex Jones Barden Connecticut Daniel Jones Oscar Wells Gabriel
"brad" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:48 min | 5 months ago

"brad" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"And I accept it because I know that it will do a disservice to me and to my kids and to my wife and to my family and friends, if I don't, and I also know that too much of non acceptance is insane. Because this is how things are, whether I like it or not. This is my life. And to sit around wishing that it were not my life, what a profound waste of time. And what a profound misallocation of time. When, in the aggregate, and at the end of things, my children, these are magical creatures, how did this happen? People come out of people. I mean, I know I sound like a college freshman right now, but you know, if you spend too much time in regret or in the past or in wishing that things were other than the way that they are, then you miss the real magic. And I'm desperately want to not do that. So that's what I'm trying my best to manage. And it's imperfect, I think it is for anybody who's coping with something. But it took me a while to understand that. I think maybe the way that acceptance is talked about in the culture, we can sometimes think that it's supposed to be accompanied by some profound peace. And maybe there's a little bit of that, but there's also it's sort of accepting defeat in some ways. You know, it's accepting that things are not the way you wish they were. And that it really hurts and that it's not going to ever stop hurting to some extent. And you just move forward with it. It's such an important lesson, sharing. I don't want this to sound like a cliche. Because I mean it in the truest sense of the words, but it's a way for people to see how to integrate or live with the aspects of life that we sometimes refuse to want to see or deal with, and I think that it's the most beautiful thing you can give someone. Bread, the last thing I want to talk to you about is about a new project that I read about that you're working on. I don't know if you are still but especially as we're listening to the January 6th hearings, I read that during the days between September 2020 and January 2021, you kept a meticulous diary of both your personal activity as well as a very meticulous log of breaking news stories and tweets and you're now going back through and unpacking it all looking at the news stories, reading through them, pulling quotes, assembling a very rough collage that at last count, I read it was a million and a half words and almost 4000 pages long. What do you planning on doing with this material? I want to make a book a bit. The impetus for the project was a sense that I had as we kind of careened toward election day 2020 that it was going to be rocky, which proved to be a correct instinct. And even beyond my quote unquote dreams as a writer of narrative, I mean, the January 6th insurrection is quite an end to act too. Do you know what I'm saying? It really unfolded to script almost. Maybe it shouldn't be that big of a surprise considering who Trump is and his reality TV instincts and his kind of showmanship. Yeah. I mean, it's all there. And you can kind of predict it, but I guess when it actually happened, there was still some element of shock to it. And so I had experienced the years of his presidency with a lot of horror and anger and disgust. I think a lot of people did, not everybody, but I certainly did. I was haunted by how much got washed away and how fast the news cycle moved. And how the strategy that Trump seemed to be executing, which was in the words of Steve Bannon to flood the zone with shit. Was really working. It was working on the media and the media culture, but it was also working on the population. You know, you can only keep up with so much. It's easy to forget. And it can be manipulated. People's minds can be manipulated. History can be manipulated if we let it be. I got tired of that. And I want to fix in a work of literature. I think it will be nonfiction, but I'm not entirely sure because I'm too early in it. I want to fix in a work of literature. What it was actually like. And what actually happened in those crazy days at the end of 2020 in the beginning of 2021. It feels like a vital act of resistance to me. And I think what I learned in the writing of be brief and tell them everything is that if I'm going to write a book and sustain the energy necessary to see it through, I have to have a real sense of urgency in a really deeply felt emotional connection to the material. My job now is to take this enormous research document, which is essentially like a collage timeline. Just as you described it of events as they unfolded, both for me personally and also in the news cycle and on Twitter, which is where a lot of the Trump presidency happened. And to try to distill it. Into something that will be enjoyable for a reader edifying a little bit terrifying, but also hopefully something that can be passed down. I think it's kind of for my kids too, because it's not just the election and the craziness of Trump. It's also the pandemic. We were living through some history. And my kids, eldest, in particular, old enough to comprehend it a bit, but I do want for them to understand what happened. We need to tell this story. We need to tell this history openly and honestly, and not just this one, but many of our histories. There seems to be an argument in the culture about whether or not we should tell our darker stories and our more difficult truths. And I come down on the side of emphatically, yes, we should, because it's the only way we're ever going to improve things. And to really heal and to move forward in a way that's saner. And so that is the mission that I'm on now. I hope I can do it. I hope I can wrangle this giant document into something that makes sense to people. And that adds some insight. I hope so, too, Brad, and I can't wait.

Trump Steve Bannon Twitter Brad
"brad" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

08:28 min | 5 months ago

"brad" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Yeah, I mean, it's crazy how it becomes like a fiction, you know, and you tell yourself, or I tell myself stories, especially when you're trying to harken back to big moments, you know, the things you're not supposed to forget. Like meeting your spouse and how those early days were, that big date where the kind of lightbulb went on and you knew that it was serious. And you know, without hopefully going too far afield, I think when I wrestle with this question about sense of self and how slippery and mysterious it is, this is tied to kind of my, like the Buddhist lens that I look at existence through. And the Buddhists have quite a lot to say about not self and how if you start to investigate it, there's really no there there. And it can be very easy. I mean, this is part of the human condition, I think, to invest certain experiences or people or things even. With a sense of identity, we do this over and over again. And we fool ourselves. So I think again, it's just, it's one big aspect of this kind of broader confusion. I live with openly. As a human being, and I can't help but tether it to this acute sense of the passage of time. We all feel this as we advance through middle age, right? It's like, wow, it's really going fast. I want to sort of hang on to things. I want to have a sense of what's going on. I want to, I want to live well. You know, I want to be good at life. Then you can find yourself looking back on, say, that big first date or the birth of a child, some big moment, and realizing like, I don't really have it. It's disintegrating, everything does. Another piece of the book that I loved was how you were struggling, how you articulate struggling to find the narrative arc that you want to take through the book. And then how you begin to understand that you have to write about your shame. And so you articulate that here in this paragraph. On the flight home, I wrote the following in my notebook. In the end, all art is about the artist's personal struggle. And whenever I get away from this essential fact, I lose interest. I lose the thread. Feel phony, go adrift. The most critical thing is to tell the truth, even if it's fiction, especially if it's fiction, even though it's impossible to ever do such a thing. You can never tell the full truth, but you try. And this is the project. It's about the attempt. Maybe kids can do it. Adults can't. This is why kids art is charming. Maybe the only way to do it as an adult is to write something that will never be read, write your story as honestly as you can include every lingering guilt and scalding shame, share it with no one and you go on to write the entry ends here in abrupt fashion, followed only by the word turbulence written in a wobbly hand a couple of lines below. So Brad, you write out a lot of your shame what you see as shame, which I just see as comrades. Redshift. In the book, how hard was it to do that? Maybe not as hard as you might think at that point, I think I was surrendered to it, and I was exhausted in a certain sense. And for the period of time that I wrote this book, this final draft. It was a very intense creative experience and the best one that I've ever had. And there was a sense of abandon. There was just a sense of, in a kind of experimental frame of mind, I wanted to try to write it as if I were already dead. And I think in retrospect, that might have been colored by the pandemic because this last draft was written in the spring. That spring of 2020, when the pandemic was just coming on board all of our lives and affecting and upending everything. And so maybe there was like this sense of mortal doom or something where it was like fuck it, like just write it. What do you have to say? And then there's also a part of me, like a pretty strong part of me that thinks like, isn't this what we're supposed to do as storytellers and as writers in his communicators, isn't this what we're all hungry for is for somebody to drop the mask and really say what's on their heart and on their mind, you know, I say that and I'm sort of on board with it as a reader. I'm like, yes, that's what I kind of want. But I also understand that it's not for everybody. Some people just want to escape into a fantasy world in the books that they read and to have some middle aged man reckoning with his shame. Might not be their idea of a nice day at the beach. So I will cop to that. But for me, in this stage of life and maybe for me temperamentally and spiritually or otherwise, this is what I'm drawn to and maybe this is what I'm just plainly wired for. Another line in the book that I loved was when you write the first half of my existence has been spent with only moderate success trying to become someone. And the back half would be spent learning to become no one. Talk a little bit more about what that means. Well, I think it's just having a really acute sense of death, which I want to believe most of us have. I know, I'm not alone in this. I think a lot of people are really death obsessed and not in a bad way. I think it's healthy to comprehend your life through that lens. It's coming. We are going to die. It could happen today. It could happen tomorrow. It will be the end of this incarnation, or the end period, depending on your worldview, or your spiritual framework. I am often at odds with cultural values. For this reason, it can seem crazy to me, I think it seemed crazy to be in the phase of my life when I was trying to quote unquote become someone, which I'm not entirely divorced from. I mean, we all have to do what we have to do to get by in life. But I think maybe the grief experiences that I've lived through these untimely losses made me who I am in a lot of ways. It gave me that acute sensitivity. And brought to mind all these big existential questions. Like, what's it all for? What are we doing here? I want to try to deeply reckon. With my own mortality. And I don't want to use the phrase I want to die well. A lot of people say that. It's like an accomplishment. It's like, no, you know? I'm sure it'll be messy and a little terrifying. But I do want to have courage and I do want to look at it because I'm fascinated by it. It's kind of the ultimate reality to me. And I don't think it has to be this kind of heavy morbid albatross that you carry around. I think it can actually be a positive even daily ritual that adds a sense of urgency to your existence and helps to put things in perspective. And helps you to relate to the people in your life, whom you care about the most. At a level of depth, that would otherwise not be there. When you have a sense of like, wow, the clock is ticking. What matters most? Who matters most? It's these kinds of things. You know, it's like priority inducing. And so that's the way that I try to relate to it. And maybe I just have a deeper sense of it or a bigger fascination with it than most. But I know I'm not alone in it. No, not at all. In thinking about this structure of the book, you stated that it required a lot of failure and, for example, there's a chapter in the book where you talk about a miscarriage, a single miscarriage that you and your wife experienced, even though you experienced multiple miscarriages. I believe 5 miscarriages..

confusion Brad
"brad" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:34 min | 5 months ago

"brad" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Them because usually they're in there again just to help the narrative along what I found in writing and struggling to write this book is that if I delivered it just the facts it became a little bit suffocating or maybe a lot suffocating and it just didn't work. This was just the way that I could make it work and I wanted it to be as truthful as possible. And sometimes as the saying goes, we can, you know, you can be more truthful in fiction than you can in nonfiction. And I don't have a great memory. In some cases, that was the impetus. It was like, I don't even remember. In the chaos of life, you know, we have kind of maybe an emotional memory or something of a moment, but we don't have a clear picture or I don't. I should say too, as you mentioned Roxanne, that her book hunger was instructive for me. I remember distinctly reading hunger as I was struggling along on my way and being like, oh, well, here's how it's done. You go right at it. Like you go right at it. And that book is a great example of that. And I knew that I had tough stuff to talk about in my book. I knew that I had to, you know, the phrase that I always go back to is slow down where it hurts, which is as Steve Allman line, you know, which I think is really what you need to do as a writer, it can be counterintuitive because you're sitting there writing and you're like, oh, you know, this is where you just kind of want to gloss over. I'll be very succinct here, but that's actually where you do need to kind of stretch out a little bit. And it's not the most natural thing in the world to do. And it can be very easy, even for a person who likes to think of himself or herself as an honest broker. It can be easy to trick yourself into thinking you did it. And you got it all out there and it's like, no. We need to see even more as a reader. And that's where the emotional power and the real human feeling of a book comes through. I can't tell you how many times I've experienced that as a reader. Without a problem. It's exactly what you want as a writer. It can be more difficult and even up to the point of publication for my book. The sections of my book that are the most personal and heartfelt and wrenching and difficult were the ones that I was most concerned about when it came to how the book would be received. And of course, without fail, these are the sections of the book that people have responded to most strongly, and we'll talk about when they write to me or talk to me. Yeah. So go figure. Ordinarily, when I interview a writer about their book, I will talk and ask about specific things in the book. In the case with you, Brad, what I actually really wanted to do was read some short excerpts from the book that I truly loved and I wanted to talk to you about because it didn't feel fair asking you questions about things you written about in the book without actually sharing little pieces of the book because it's so beautifully written. So you cool with that. I'm cool with it. So the first thing this is the longest excerpt and this is really, I think my favorite paragraph in the book. And this is where you're writing about the question of whether or not to write a memoir. So I wanted to start with that one. You write, memoir, but is this true? I can't help but wonder, did I really know, did this moment actually happen in the way that I recall? Some version of it certainly did, but it's possible, and even likely that over time, I've come to embellish it as a way of apprehending the past, giving our history some definition and a sweet cinematic beginning. Because this is what humans do. We tell ourselves nice little stories and believe them as if they were true. But they aren't actually true. At best, they're only kind of true, and the more that a person remembers a thing, scientists say, the less likely it is to be accurate with each retelling the essence gets lost, which, if true, leaves me wrestling with a fairly big conundrum. If my sense of self is constructed from memories, but the memories are not to be trusted, then how am I supposed to have any kind of clear sense of self. I'm never entirely who I think I am. Also, what the fuck actually happened and how has all of this time gone by? Yeah. Like mic drop, Brad. Mic drop. I love that paragraph. I mean, the idea of memory, the sort of thing that I've come to understand about my memories is that some of them are true and some of them are false. That's about as far as I've gotten. I have diaries that I have kept from the time I was in the 7th grade until I was about 30. And so those help me reconstruct specific things. I also have a piece of jewelry that I remember getting as a result of this or that thing happening or a T-shirt and that becomes evidence of that experience. But other than that, it's all sort of ad hoc as far as I'm concerned at this point at 60 years old..

Steve Allman Roxanne Brad wrestling
"brad" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:13 min | 5 months ago

"brad" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"I'm dying to talk with you about your new book. There's so much else to talk to you about. And I have so many other questions that I'm just now skipping over to get to your book. Because I'm just antsy and want to talk about it. Your new book is called be brief and tell them everything. And you start the book with this statement. This book took 12 years to write. It started out as a novel, and then it became a different novel, and then it was another different novel, and then it was an essay collection, and then it was nothing for a while, and then it was a memoir, and then it became a novel again, and now it's whatever this is. First of all, I think that's one of the most perfect first lines of a book I've ever read. Like I sat down, ready to read your book, read that line, and it was like, okay, I have to put the book down and just live with this beautiful first line. How long did it take you to write that opening? It's so good. You know, I mean, in practice, it probably came out of me pretty quickly, but it took me many years to get to the point where it could. This is usually the case. People say like, oh, I wrote this draft. This book shout out to me in three months. They don't tell you that they spent like 6 years in the wilderness. Torturing. Themselves. So the way that I've been describing the book that you've read in the book that's out there now is a work of art that involved a lot of surrender. It's basically me surrendering. After so many years of frustration, so many different failed versions and very frustrating experiences trying to find a way to say what I needed to say. And ultimately, because of life circumstances, I think I got to a place creatively where I was like, fuck it. I just have to deal with this head on. I have to say what happened. As plainly as I can. And auto fiction became the right fit. And I think maybe if I had a big picture epiphany about the book that helped me see it through, it was that I understood finally that this was a book about creation and creative exasperation. Not only artistic creation, but also the creation of family. And these questions around why. Why do this? Why make art? Why make a family? Why subject yourselves to the risks of love? As a human being, you kind of put your heart on the line when you decide to have children, especially in this day and age. But you do it as well when you get married or lock into a relationship or put your heart on the line in any number of ways. Likewise, there is something kind of insane about writing books. Making art in a world that's so distracted. You know, and kind of making this slow food in a world that seems so designed for fast food and is anybody going to care and why am I spending all these years on this? You know, you can start to feel a little bit nuts. And so these were all the kinds of questions that I had and all the kinds of experiences that I was dealing with. And I think what happened was that for this particular narrative, I just finally landed on an approach that was pretty close to the truth that gave me some flexibility as needed to make the experience readable, which is very important. But which finally allowed me to articulate my confusion, as I say, in a way that felt satisfying. I can not tell you what a relief it was. To finally get to the point where I was writing this book and felt like it was coming together. After all that time, because I didn't know if it would. You mentioned the term auto fiction and for our listeners that might not know what that is. Can you talk a little bit more about the genre, which seems to be gaining in popularity quite a lot over the last couple of years? Yeah, and I don't know if I'm just sensitive to it because I have a book of auto fiction out or if it's something that a lot of people have been noticing, but sort of like podcasting. It's one of these cultural punching bags. It's like, oh, auto fiction. And I let that. I'm like, hey, listen, people writing from their lived experience, which is what auto fiction is. It's autobiographical fiction. And then tweaking it a bit for the purposes of narrative and readability or the protection of innocence. Sometimes you change details to protect the people who might be implicated. There's nothing wrong with it. And at its best, for me as a reader, which is I think the point of genesis for me as a writer of auto fiction, when I'm reading a really good work of auto fiction, it comes as a huge relief to me. I respond very strongly to works of art where I can really feel the artist in there. Grappling and talking to me plainly. This can come in a variety of forms. I think it comes most directly in auto fiction and memoir. If I can feel the artist in there and I can feel a sense of personal truth permeating the book and I can get a real sense of the human being inside of the art, makes a big difference to me. And I think with this in mind, it makes sense that I would be a person who would be interested in talking to people on a podcast. I'm always interested in the artist. And I know some artists go, no, don't be interested in me. It's about the art itself, just enjoy this world that I've built. And I'm like, no, I want to know what's going on with you. And I think we write the kinds of books maybe that we most respond to. For me, with this one, auto fiction ultimately was the form, and it was the only form that it really could take. I tried other ways. Trust me, and they just didn't work. I'm very similar in that I like to know everything about somebody that I'm talking with and as I was reading your book because I know you know my wife roxane gay and she adores you. I keep asking her, did this happen? Is this true? Is this really, does he have this? Does this and she kept giving me the answers that I was needing to be able to sort of figure out the narrative in my own way. And you said that auto fiction is a very natural for you as a writer. But you also really appreciate it as a reader and I was wondering why I was wondering wouldn't you rather given how curious you are and how interested you are in the details of a person's life rather know what exactly did happen and to whom? As opposed to wondering if is Brad talking about this or is he talking about this or is this made up or did this really happen? Yeah, I mean I think like with auto fiction that's as close to the bone as my book is and as a lot of works in the category are you usually can tell you have a pretty good sense of the person giving it to you straight. Maybe with some tweaks and I think I can accept.

confusion roxane gay Brad
"brad" Discussed on The Poker Coaching Podcast

The Poker Coaching Podcast

01:31 min | 7 months ago

"brad" Discussed on The Poker Coaching Podcast

"Ask me anything session, we've been doing in the Discord. This month, we're fortunate enough to have long coats of PC, cash game, crusher, live, or line after a phenomenal coach. He has a podcast that's phenomenal as well. All kinds of people in the poker world. He's had on. So yeah, let's have Brad Wilson. How are you doing buddy? Very kind. Brad, both of us have been on the CPG podcast and now the tables have turned. The turntables have turned, as they say. So for anyone out there who may not be familiar with this or if you know the deal, the way this will work is if you do have a question for Brad, feel free to go ahead and raise your hand. There should be a little hand feature there. If you want to raise your hand, come on stage, you can ask your question to Brad, or on stage or that we have a threat there. You can type it and then we'll kind of get this going. But to get it started in time as well. I generally ask, ask the coaches a question that I think may add some value to the community and whatnot as well. So Brad, question I would have for you is coming into the game, you know, someone who may play a lot of live online poker, you know, maybe going out to the series and you feel like you.

Brad Brad Wilson
"brad" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

04:27 min | 10 months ago

"brad" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"Hey guys, how are you today? Great. How you doing? Good, good. Hey, two questions, Brad, one. How do you handle nerves and superstitious superstition before your races and two, where does mister man fit into the Brad Cox team? The first part, did you say handle nerves? Yeah. Superstitious. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, I don't really get too nervous. We've done this enough now to where I always tell people. I mean, listen, if it's a big huge duration, you're like, two to 5. Yeah, you'll get a little nervous. But yeah, try not to get too nervous and too wound up. So I think I stay fairly calm. Once the race starts or before the race, and superstition I don't. I'm not superstitious or I'm too many horses to be superstitious to be honest with you. You know, I do tell people I watch most of my races on a television. And if I do, run a few horses, I feel like should run well. I will change TVs. But that's the extent of my superstition. All right, how about mister man? That was the second half. Oh, I'm sorry. I'm sorry. Sorry. I'll follow it, Christie. He's like, I guess a mascot, what does a Matt what does a mascot represent? I guess some mascots somewhat like a cheerleader, but mister Mann just kind of gets in everything he's not supposed to be into. So yeah, I don't know. I mean, listen, he does hang around the barn, the horses don't mind him. You know, they say, you know, farm animals, chickens, whatever goats, can have a calming effect on horses. We do see it from time to time with a Philly hill tend to bond with a Philly from time to time. So he and Juliet foxtrot feeling like she's been retired. She really got along with him well. There's been a couple other Phillies through the years that responded really well with having a goat. Right now, I don't think there's any particular affiliate that he'll live in her stall all the time, but you'll see that he kind of gravitates to the Philly so a little more than obviously the coats and the Phillies and Georgia a little more than the coats I do believe this is a fun question, Steve, and appreciate that. 8 8 8 9 6 6 four 7 7 6 that's 8 8 8 9 6 6 HR N, the number of the car we have about two minutes left for you to get your call in, probably time for one more caller with two time champion trainer Brad Cox. Brad, I'll follow up on Steven's question about the superstitions. I think if you're watching the same television or switching televisions, if you think you have a horse that's going to run, that's a superstition, man. Yeah, yeah, no, I agree. I agree. Yeah, no, you're right. It is. But it's not as if I won't ever go back to that TV. If I were like three in a day and I'm like, man, this isn't going on. I've been watching them all that TV is like the hell with this team. I'm going somewhere. That's my superstition. That's the extent of it right there. I am like that with tellers and now I'll go ahead and bet online. Most of the time. But if not, I'll go to a teller when I'm at the racetrack and I have a lucky teller theory and if for some reason I'm going there and I'm winning, I keep going to the same teller. Once I lose, though, that streak is broken, I have to find another teller. Yeah. There you go. There you go. What's the craziest superstition you've ever heard somebody have being around the racetrack? I don't know. I hear people talk about underwear and socks and all that nonsense, but I just always say like, you know, when the horses are out there running and that's another thing like with me like I'm like, well, these horses aren't performing because I'm watching them on a certain TV. They're not at the 8th pole thinking Brad's not watching that race on the TV should be. I'm not gonna win this race, but no, you know, it's one of those things where, you know, I don't know. I think a lot of people maybe keep that stuff guarded too, but you know, I think there is a lot of superstition. I really do with a lot of guys, but I can't say I know of anything that's like crazy crazy stuff. Yeah. Well, Brad, listen, again, congratulations on the second consecutive eclipse award, really appreciate you taking time to be here and answer questions from our listeners. And all the best. Let's go get three in a row this year. Sounds good, like.

Brad Cox mister Mann Brad Juliet foxtrot Phillies Christie Philly Matt Georgia Steven Steve
"brad" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

02:18 min | 10 months ago

"brad" Discussed on The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

"With the first one, I think they let us know a couple days out that we won because obviously it was a virtual. Where this one, you know, no one told me I just was told that, you know, I probably should show up and obviously worked out well for us and but I think definitely there were more memories made with this second one as opposed to the first one due to the pandemic. I'll follow up on that question with you, Brad, because I said on this program about a month ago that I thought that category was a little closer than it looked on paper. And I'll be honest with you. You got my vote. I voted for you. But I thought it would be a little closer between you and Steve, and I thought Todd might get a little more respect. But it didn't happen. You won in a blowout. Is that surprising to you? Well, sure. Absolutely. It was. And like you said, I mean, I thought Todd, you know, Chad had an incredible year. And Todd, obviously, had a tremendous year and it's definitely the favorite right now for 2022 with what he accomplished at Gulfstream a couple of weeks ago. So, you know, yeah, it's been a great, very run and great year and hopefully we can build off of it. But yeah, I mean, you know, to be honest with you, you know, I thought that race was close. I thought that the three year old colts race was close as well. So yeah, no, it's definitely some divisions that were some close voting going on. All right, you get to be the host 888-966-4776. The number to call and talk with two time champion trainer Brad Cox Ronnie is in Louisville, Ronnie go ahead, you're on with Brad. Good morning, gentlemen, and congratulations, Brad. This is Ronnie and I grew up in the neck of the Woods where you come from. The south end on beecher street. Okay. Familiar Yeah, what I was wondering is that if your mom still live in that area on Evelyn, I know that's where you're from and I'm quite a bit older than.

Todd Brad Chad Steve Brad Cox Ronnie Ronnie colts Louisville Evelyn
"brad" Discussed on The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"brad" Discussed on The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

"And <Speech_Female> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> I do have lots of <Speech_Female> great things in the <Speech_Female> works, I am <Speech_Female> working on a book <Speech_Female> and I'm <Speech_Female> working on trainings <Speech_Female> and courses <Speech_Female> and live events <Speech_Female> because I just <Speech_Female> love <Speech_Female> teaching <Speech_Female> and encouraging <Speech_Female> people, <Speech_Female> modalities <Speech_Female> to help them <Speech_Female> release their trauma <Speech_Female> stored in <Speech_Female> their bodies. <Speech_Female> And to <Speech_Female> connect with each other. <Speech_Female> Because <Speech_Female> life is so <Silence> short <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> it's meant to be <Speech_Female> lived peacefully <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> in connection with one another <Speech_Female> and to have <Speech_Female> fun. <Speech_Female> We can have fun. <Speech_Female> There's not enough fun. <Speech_Female> There's so many distractions <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> hustle and bustle <Speech_Female> and really it's <Speech_Female> encouraging people <Speech_Female> to slow down <Speech_Female> and to be present <Speech_Female> and to enjoy <Speech_Female> what is <Speech_Female> rather than <Speech_Female> what we don't <Speech_Female> have or <Speech_Female> getting caught up <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> all these external <Speech_Female> factors. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> start <Speech_Female> moving the body <Speech_Female> more <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> pain and <Speech_Female> creating <SpeakerChange> all <Speech_Female> these playful <Speech_Female> things that we <Speech_Female> forget <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> that we <Speech_Female> once were as children, <Speech_Female> and the innocence <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> we lose <Speech_Female> that when we <Speech_Female> grow and get, <Speech_Female> you know, bogged <Speech_Music_Female> down by other people's <Speech_Music_Female> leaves, so maybe <Speech_Music_Female> move up some of our other <Speech_Music_Female> people's energies <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Female> both believe, <Speech_Female> right? Like so <Speech_Female> now we lost our joy. <Speech_Female> So I just want <Music> to encourage people to <Speech_Female> be themselves <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Female> let the light in <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Female> do more fun things <Speech_Female> and things that help <Speech_Female> them feel <Speech_Female> happy and <Speech_Music_Female> true to themselves. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Many thanks to <Speech_Male> angel hiles <Speech_Male> for being our guest today <Speech_Male> on the beyond <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> adversity <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> podcast, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with doctor Brad Miller, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I promised you, <Speech_Male> we would talk about what <Speech_Male> you can do now. <Speech_Male> We're talking about what you <Speech_Male> can learn <Speech_Male> during <Speech_Male> the time of the podcast, <Speech_Male> learn about <Speech_Male> this process <Speech_Male> of identifying <Speech_Male> and dealing <Speech_Male> with emotional trauma, <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> we talked about <Speech_Male> the feeling the emotions <Speech_Male> of the dysfunctional family <Speech_Male> that she went through <Speech_Male> and those functions <Speech_Male> of many families <Speech_Male> and how <Speech_Male> we can have to deal with <Speech_Male> that. But now let's talk about what <Speech_Male> you're actually going to do <Speech_Male> about it. <Speech_Male> We talked about <Speech_Male> here and here's what you can <Speech_Male> do about it is <Speech_Male> about being <Speech_Male> accountable <Speech_Male> to yourself. And <Speech_Male> identifying the emotional <Speech_Male> trauma, <Speech_Male> in order to do <Speech_Male> that, you really, <Speech_Male> it's <Speech_Male> really, really tough to do that <Speech_Male> on your own. And you <Speech_Male> need the <Speech_Male> help of a professional <Speech_Male> person. To <Speech_Male> help you make the <Speech_Male> connection <Speech_Male> between mind <Speech_Male> and body and <Speech_Male> soul, <Speech_Male> and as holistic <Speech_Male> approach that angel <Speech_Male> advocates <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> it can be <Speech_Male> made whole be <Speech_Male> made <Speech_Male> manifested <Speech_Male> through <Speech_Male> connecting with a coach, <Speech_Male> connecting <Speech_Male> with a therapist, <Speech_Male> connect you with someone <Speech_Male> who could be helpful to <Speech_Male> you. That <Speech_Male> means taking the <Speech_Male> action on your part <Speech_Male> of reaching <Speech_Male> out to <Speech_Male> someone like angel <Speech_Male> highes for coaching <Speech_Male> and guidance. There's <Speech_Male> many people available <Speech_Male> out there, but a great <Speech_Male> place to start <Speech_Male> is with <Speech_Male> angel herself. <Speech_Male> She's got lots <Speech_Male> of helpful <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> information and processes <Speech_Male> that she connects <Speech_Male> up with can <Speech_Male> you connect you up with <Speech_Male> at her <Speech_Male> website angel <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> dot com? <Speech_Male> And I would <Speech_Male> advocate that you <Speech_Male> do take <Speech_Male> the action <Speech_Male> to begin to make the <Speech_Male> holistic connection <Silence> between <Speech_Male> body <Speech_Male> and mind <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> spirit and <Speech_Male> do what you need to do <Speech_Male> in order to affect <Speech_Male> healing in your <Speech_Male> life so you <Speech_Male> can have <Speech_Male> peace and joy <Speech_Male> and prosperity <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> as angel says, <Speech_Male> have some fun <Speech_Male> in life. Here <Speech_Male> at the beyond adversity <Speech_Male> podcast, that's what we're <Speech_Male> all about.

Brad Miller
"brad" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

The My Future Business™ Show

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"brad" Discussed on The My Future Business™ Show

"On loans. We didn't go into debt. We really said well. Our bank account is zero right now. We have to make it go up. And so that was that was really where it started and and and and yeah exactly so Thankfully i had I had a co founder. Who's a partner today in sense. A third party which we'll talk about later but what What i really attribute to what how why we've been successful as we learned all of us in our prior experiences learned so much about how to work in a successful company before we started a company. And i really look back at my time in the energy business. The energy company i worked at i learned from two incredible leaders of that company on how to grow not only a profitable business but a business that is doing the right thing is transparent is ethical and and provides a great culture so a lot of things that a maybe a twenty two year old twenty-three-year-old right out of school that wants to start a business might not know at thirty thirty eight thirty nine years old when i started this company. I feel like we've been we've we've been able to avoid the pitfalls you might have early on and that just be. That's that's really because of the experience that we've had working in learning from other successful leaders you count by experienced. That's one thing. I nine fisher said brad. Now i'd love to talk about the variable nitra of human beings in the way they think about business now because we have a lot of small a sparring entrepreneurs on the show small and medium size business owners who are in existing businesses. They take a lot of. You're listening from people like you have already walk the path now when you have days days. That things in your mind weren't going the way you would hope them to. What did you do. did you talk to somebody. Did you refer to your mentor and headed to manage that experience. That's a great question Yes thankfully. I have several mentors in my life. Two of them are my former bosses that i often lean on. I have other Fellow business leaders gains was a very small community but it's a very thriving business community so there's other other business owners. I'm part of a mastermind group here of above six six other entrepreneurs that have some very large businesses some very small businesses that are just growing and being able to to to let go and get feedback and get honest feedback about struggles. That were that. I'm having is is just so incredibly valuable and and the third thing i'll say is having having business partners that i trust wholeheartedly that bring different skill set in a different level of experience to the table While while we all have the same shared goals and ethics is is also very reaffirming and that. And that's something i i know. A lot of companies struggle with that especially if you have business partners most business partnerships fail and and a lot of lack of trust and so having trust with your business partners Against something i've learned from my former mentors or my current source former bosses. Is that when you when you have that. Trust monster leadership team. It makes things so much better in such such. You can go so much faster. You thank you wanna touch on ladyship as it applies to cultural development within an organization. You've done it. You're walking the path route now..

fisher brad
"brad" Discussed on The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"brad" Discussed on The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

"To watch him go from sort of it listening. It's kind of an undisciplined. Young adult to just like a man. It's been such a Process to watch that poland's disciplines to move from undisciplined. To links life together overcoming some bad habits establishing some bad habits. It's just been a joint watch. most. I don't work with people who are counselling right. I'm working with people. Got doing good ones better. And he's just been fun to watch. I spoke out weeks. Go in front of realtors. Was there just help me. Want to be there for some reason so i had him at. Just talk about what nasty end until the show at one of the afterwards you you want me. He's mentoring i suggest telling you her. Yes so he's just it's been so fun and brings us joint. You need to watch him. Make changes ragging to all always just just hours. Just astound me. Just great but from my perspective. Sure that's what's really all about You see life. Transformation happened is nothing better. I mean nothing better than that. And that's what jazz. Sorry reason i'm loving. Be around my grandchildren. These days one is three and one is about nine or ten months old. You see those dramatic physical and verbal changes and all. That kind of thing is just so exciting but it's also exciting when you see when you work with someone and they're kind of stuck at life i call it you'll to kind of that malays in mediocrity when you get stuck in those when advert when life happens when a crisis happens are the things some people get stuck you will find a way to move through it and people like you are helping people Moved through it. And when you see that happen to know from the people who i coach and work with when i get happened when you see a life change half an eight people move through adversity till i had to call a life of peace prosperity and purpose man just nothing better and you got some good stuff here in your book and just to clarify to tell people how they can get to tell people how they can get the book and get connected with you. On mike master info dot com. I'm really easy to find out there for some on facebook. Nothing unusual always willing to contact you back this point i can do that. The book is available on amazon. Now life mastery personal progression towards potential by sherry storming finance and there's also the free downloads on the website. Lots of great resources there. And it's all you'll find it all life mastery info dot com is a sheri's website. You will also put connections in links at our website. Dr brad miller a dot com to as we always like to provide resources from authors leaders and teachers who are all about helping you to transform your life so it's been our guest to our pleasure a round the beyond diversity by guests to have a great leader and mentor. Who can be helpful to your life. Her name is sherry sterling finance and her she is the author of life mastery personal progression towards infinite. Potential thank you for being our guest under beyond adversity podcast. I hope you were impressed. As i was with our conversation with sherry sterling fernandez and her book life mastery journal she blogs at life mastery info dot com and you can find out more about her book and her coaching and her resources there and i commend him to you. One key takeaway here friends from today's so our interview with sherry Sterling finance is simply this make chart make a chart. Have a list of things that you can do your life. She has eight aspects of life. Mastery that cheap charts out but you know what some of them are for for you. You know what some of their are those daily disciplines that you need to do but she talks about writing them out charting them charging them have a checkmark the system where you check them off on a day by day basis. Let's say your habit is Is exercise or any ri- our personal prayer life for generally put those on a chart. She has some helpful resources at her website. That can help you with this but put them on a chart and check them off the power of pencil depowered of writing something down and the visual cues of making progress. It's going to be helpful to you. We are here to help you make progress here onto beyond adversity podcast. Dr brad miller please please please head on over to dr brad. Miller dot com where. We've got a free gift for you there and we can be helpful you to your life and you can check out over. One hundred. Sixty episodes of the podcast. Who are we speak into your life. Were her to be helpful. But it begins friends whether choices you make the change. Don't stay stuck. Choose to evolve. Choose to move out of your adversity to toward your promise. Life a peace prosperity and purpose. It's all about making a promise and keeping a promise and know that in this process you can get through it. You can do it because here at the beyond adversity. Pa podcast with dr brad miller we teach and emphasize that you only grow through the things that you go through. We're here for you every week until next time. Friends continue to do all the good that you can thank you for listening to the beyond adversity. Podcast with dr brad miller. You can find a complete archive of all episodes at dr brad. Miller dot com. That's dr brad. Miller dot com or subscribe for free apple podcasts. And never miss an episode. Each week we bring you a message to crush adversity and live your life of peace respiratory and purpose..

Dr brad miller mike master sherry sterling sherry sterling fernandez life mastery journal poland sherry Sterling dr brad sheri sherry amazon facebook dr brad miller Miller apple
"brad" Discussed on The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"brad" Discussed on The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

"Is those bold actions means taking a step. You know taking a high staff baby. Step run run run. What's the what's the end. So the end. I step four is n. For not your mind state in that really talks about the benefits of journaling. There's a lot of research around the benefits of journaling. Just a just a similar to the benefits of of prayer and meditation in terms of Stress reduction when when you take the time to actually write your thoughts out it. It does a couple Does a couple of things for for me. and i'm you know there's tons of evidence that Does this for others in that it allows you to reflect back on You know as you as you reflect back on your old journal entries. You see that you may not you might not faced this exact same circumstantial previously. But you've been solution things and you've gotten through them and i say you can take that and say well i i was able to get through this by the grace of god. I was able to get through that than so now. I can actually get through this. And that gives me hope for the future brad in that this won't be the end of me at all. It it it. It doesn't necessarily have to be the end of me is based on on your choices but the benefits journaling are are are manifold and the fact that you're recording it right down for some people audio journal things like this but also the you can't combine the spiritual element and the journey no of element together as well if you choose to as well as other things you know. Some people kind of. I'll give an example. Soviet will kind of journal in a way by letter writing. They'll write letters to of loved one or a neighbor or even a fan of someone so letters. Don't even send him but they process and that's a message way but writing things down or processing them Audio or tactile author. Writing is so important. And michael you've been able to this whole plan the p. l. a. n. Plan here is all about your resilience building blueprint. Is that correct at at his correct. I always say brad if it you know in terms of building or rebuilding a house if you will or any you know any structure right..

brad michael
"brad" Discussed on The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"brad" Discussed on The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

"But i was so thankful to get that phone call from him. I quickly returned to call. It was such a relief to hear his voice brad. Unfortunately three days later that got voice messages and spoke to him on saturday on september twentieth. The asking the september twentieth is when i got a fateful phone. Call from a childhood buddy of mine that i wrote with on saint thomas letting me know that my dad was gone while my dad was gone we lost him in the midst of a hurricane and this was devastating to say the least brad to myself and my family and that was an inflection point in my life that caused me to do a lot of reflecting out which caused me to create this plan results resilience building framework that. I'm sure we'll get into to wear now. I am on a mission to as i say inspire holland Professor believes the bounce back from setbacks. And what is stronger from stress and adversity. Death is one guy when you say gone. I'm su- you mean. Even deceased see has unfortunately hurricane talking floodwaters looking while one of the major points pivotal points defining moments for all of us often is death of a loved one or sometimes our own mortality or have a devastating disease or supply. Debit really helps us to really define what's truly important in what is Temporary life is in how we've got some opportunities. Do something now about if we choose to and i will let me say. I'm so sorry for your loss. I've just so sorry for your loss how. How devastating that is. I lost my own father a few years ago and to to cancer in it was devastating ended of itself. Also say just kind of as a side note was on in the virgin islands on vacation. Oh about four years ago. Three or four years ago not to law after the hurricane. But i just remember in the island that there were still major. Impact of the devastation. So i just have just a tiny bit of understanding of the devastation. That took place. So that's that's dramatic and traumatic of itself. So you had this devastating moment here but the thing is michael so many people when they have a devastating moment like a death in the family gets stuck they stay there they stay in a place of hurt or bitterness over. Just They stay at a stuck place. But you chose not to stay. Stuck in you have now have has message of resilience. So what are some of the things that you did to not stay stuck in grief and all the other things that came with losing your father. What does what things that you then did in response to that Defining moment absolutely great question brad. So i yeah. I thought no one four getting getting stuck at all We all get stuck at times in life The question is You know are. Are we going to stay there. So i i. Certainly you've dealt with some some powerful emotions. Some powerful negative emotions after receiving that news. But i had a stronger desire brad to To to to do something to take action in some way that would allow one outta my earthly father but we e jackson and also honor my heavenly father as well. I'm amanda fate though that was important to me and thirdly do something to help my island bill back stronger so what i did. I had heard about a a a hurricane..

hurricane saint thomas brad holland virgin islands cancer michael jackson amanda
"brad" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"brad" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Visit arjun main dot com or hit the link in today's show notes. Use the promo code lays ten. Save ten percent off and go get som- joining me now. First-class father brad. Thor welcome to first-class fathers. That's my pleasure to be here. Alex thanks for having me all right. Let's start like this. How many kids do you have. How old are too. I have an eighteen year old and a sixteen year old. Wow very cool. But what kind of sports activities into. Let's see so. My daughter is a into figure skating. Big time and my son is a is a is a game of rainbow six siege That's a that's a big deal and does a lot of stuff with the theatre group at school. Loves loves just anything. Entertainment related awesome. Yeah i got a gamer myself. I got no ice skater. Oh yes oh pretty cool if you could please just take a minute to hit my listeners. A little bit about your background what you do. So i am a thriller novelist. I would see in a travel television. I had travel show on public television for years in the late. Ninety s and on my honeymoon my wife asked me nine hundred ninety nine. What would you regret on your deathbed. Never having done. And i said writing a book and getting it published in c. Said okay when we get home you need to start spending two hours protected time every day making that dream become a reality and twenty one novels later here. i am. Yeah what an amazing writing career. You've had congratulations on all your success. We're gonna talk about the the new book and just a minute here. But take me back to the beginning of your fatherhood journey then brad. About how old were you when you first became a dad and had to becoming a father got to change your perspective on life. Let's see sue. I got married twenty nine so those at a child three years later. So what does that big. So i was in. I was in my thirties. When i had my first so i'm fifty two next month. My daughter's eighteen so you can do the math. It was something we were ready to do. Something i was looking forward to doing and it kinda was never questioned. My parents had two kids and they always expected me. And my brother to have two kids My brother's got three and we wanted to have even more than two kids but unfortunately we couldn't get beyond having are two. We're very blessed to have them and have them be healthy and all that kinda stuff and it just. It physically wasn't possible for us to have a third child. We would love to but we've got great kids as it is so we're very blessed. Yeah awesome stuff. Yeah we got four kids over here and and we we have ourselves. We had several miscarriages along the way. So there's a little bit of a gap between You know some of my kids ages but what would you consider to be the top values that hope to instill in your kids growing up. Well this is the thing so we tell people alec that we're not raising children were raising adults. That's that's the job here is to get them so that they are self confidence. Good responsible members of society. My dad is an longer active marine. My mom was a flight attendant for twa. We were raised with very mid western values. That we've passed down to our children in chief. Among them is the fact that none of us own this country we are merely stewards for the next generation. So it's incumbent upon us to do everything we can to leave a freer more equitable more successful more prosperous safer nation. Just better better better. In every single category for the next generation that will come and be stewards for the generation after them so particularly with my dad. Being a marine we take we take. Our responsibilities as citizens varies seriously. It's something that that means a lot. So we try to teach our kids the importance of giving back and working hard. That stuff is really important. You've got to work hard. Be honest show up for work every day. As if it's your first day and you work your butt off as if it could be your last if you don't give it all you've got so and also to be loving be kind. It's there's so much that is almost not said that we do by example right so even down to being good readers. I grew up hearing that. If you read to your kids that would make them great readers and then the book freakonomics came out which blew up so many minutes in the freakonomics book. They said actually the key to making your children. Great readers is. Do you have books in your home. And do they see you reading because if they do the model that behavior so that's a little bit of what we've been working on at home at our place. Yeah very cool. yeah i'm a. I'm a ferocious myself brad. So i try to read at least a book every week and my older son is he took up after that. My third son. He's huge into reading as well. So i think reading is so important. And i love what you say about the military about your dad's serving. I do my best to bring on a lot of military. Dads on the podcast. You're so important. And i talk on this. I kiss all the time about the fatherless crisis that we have going on in our country we have so many kids growing up without a father or father figure in your life and it's really having a devastating effect our side. I gotta tell you alex. That's we live in nashville now and we left chicago and one of the key drivers that one of the key reasons we left is because of lack of foppish so would break my heart. I'd go on. Tv shows radio programmes in chicago. And i would say it breaks my heart. The most is the violence particularly in black and brown communities where we want these kids to grow up to be successful productive members of society yet. You can't even get him on the lower rung of the american success story ladder if they can't have a paper route if they can have a lemonade. Stand in front of their house because they're afraid of getting shot.

brad Alex twa alec chicago nashville alex
"brad" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"brad" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"So greg i think when we get the call from. Cbc radio that. We need to decline monday. We need to decline morning the morning show. I don't think we should do the morning show. I think we're good with like metro metro morning. Yeah so when is my lot when he retires or breaking news here. We well we are. Were sort of were. Were breaking news in terms of you know we're breaking it we're not. We're not announcing anything necessarily but Weekly meeting to make sure we go for the night show. You know when when we've had enough Caffeine or whatever it is. That's a our bodies needed to be more awake in more invive with chatting about music. I don't think mornings could fit for us. Not when i'm not when i'm trying to slam out a three year projection in a spreadsheet. That's the null. Greg you can make up really like everyone who in twenty nineteen made a three years right. She wasted their time. That's true whether you are on the god kit hardened or you benefited from the pandemic end. Yeah it was the waist everybody in my space totally under projected their numbers. Absolutely 'cause my space. I don't know if my space exists anymore. That's true let's see. Greg mornings are good. This is my first coffee literally my first so our guest today is toronto. Councillor brad bradford but were not having him on to talk about anything except Music in toronto To be fair to him it to our listeners. we're not gonna talk about encampments or removing people from campus housing. That is a quarter of your. It's important to to you. And i as as residents of toronto but we're not going to talk about that On on on the podcast when bread. He's worth that to let people make people aware of that. So it's not going to be a gotcha conversation. We can't bring up. The fact that i found out that he was once a contestant on the prices right that i think you can bring up. I don that's not true. I mean that. I was gonna say a contestant on american idol or canadian idol but then i thought that would be music so that would actually fit in floor storrow. It wasn't it was around story. Yeah indeed come up often once a year. But when i do yes yes good reason so just to confirm brad. Bradford has not been a contestant on the braces right nor american idol nor canadian idol or which doesn't exist anymore in has non quite some time. That's true high. The following podcast is brought to you by radical road brewery. The best craft beer in the heart of leslie will find him at eleven..

brad bradford toronto Greg Cbc greg storrow Bradford brad leslie
"brad" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"brad" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"Welcome back to the sunday. Sit down podcast now. More of my conversation with brad paisley as we take a walk around the hallowed halls of the reimann auditorium so brad. What's it like the stand right there and look up at this audience and see those windows all the history that comes with it. It's great. I mean you can hear it like i mean it's gotta thing you. I've always thought you almost don't need to mike in here especially certain types of music. Bluegrass in this place is great. It's use sense like you look at the fluid flow. We were talking about this. I mean these been here a long time. That's they got some stories to. It's pretty crazy and they actually in these accuser here so that people stay awake. They're uncomfortable. You want it was the church trick right right right. Stay awake for the sermon but we. It's an amazing place to play because you just how many places how many types of music have a building. That is like the cauldron that began right right. I don't think many and when you were inducted into the opry that took place here. I was on. That's right there. That's a moment it was. It was like parents were here. Everybody's crying. i wore. Buck owns jacket from my favorite album. Which was live at carnegie hall album that he did which was yellow with sequins. And i actually worked for the induction. He let me borrow the actual jack. Yeah one when. He warned carnegie on. Oh my gosh. He was a buddy. So i was like i was always into the romance of these things out of you. Make the most of the moment and and have little things that that kinda matter. You know. You seem like you were. I know you're respectful of the history of country. But you seem so you sound like you stop in the moment and appreciate you still have pinch me moments these steps that have come on. You're on your path. I definitely do. And i somebody to that. I take advantage of the opportunity to be friends with heroes. When i can and same with buck george. Jones and jimmy. Dickens became he. Was this place..

reimann auditorium brad paisley brad mike carnegie hall Buck buck george Jones jimmy Dickens
"brad" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"brad" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"Is three time grammy award winning country music superstar. Brad paisley i just got back from nashville. Last night was down there. Shooting a couple interviews including one with brad paisley and we shot it. Oh my gosh. What a thrill on stage at the reimann auditorium which is known as the mother church of country music. If you've never been in nashville when you go make time to stop at the reimann. It is a cathedral literally. It was a church so the seats inside our pews. There are stained glass windows upstairs when you stand on that stage first of all you feel the history of every artist who's ever had a name in country music who stood on that stage but also just looking out at the pews. It's tight room with great acoustics watching the sun stream through the stained glass windows. Absolutely incredible. So brad paisley and i sat on that stage and chatted The room were I flew in and got ready in this room. Backstage at the reimann. It was the johnny and june cash room where they spent a lot of time. And there's a picture on the wall of johnny cash and elvis presley must have been late fifties early sixties arm-in-arm backstage mike. God can you imagine what they'd been up to that night so there's just so much history in that beautiful beautiful venue and It was great to talk to brad as he was getting ready to perform a fourth of july concert on lower broadway downtown nashville the estimate three hundred thousand people to be at that show so we got to talking about his journey. He's got this song out called city of music. Which is the story of a musician who comes to nashville. Like him and like just about every other musician with that dream with a guitar. Not quite knowing what to do with it. How are they going to get their way to the top. How are they going to become their hero. That person they listened to on the radio and he did it So great to talk to him about that about how he spent his time during the pandemic with his wife. The actor you all know kimberly williams paisley. She was in father of the bride. There's a little story behind that how he loved that movie and eventually met her and cast her in a video. Also the work The couple does with an organization called the store which they founded a right around the time right before the pandemic head around the time the tornadoes that devastated nashville head and they just opened it up to people who needed food food insecurity and ended up now since then in a year and a half delivering one point five million meals to people who need them so a great guy who you know from commercials you know from hosting the. Cma's he's funny..

brad paisley nashville reimann auditorium church of country music grammy award johnny cash elvis presley kimberly williams paisley brad mike Cma
"brad" Discussed on The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"brad" Discussed on The Beyond Adversity Podcast with Dr. Brad Miller

"You have control of one practice that i recommend people to do when they lack. That sense of clarity on how to deal with the situation is to do loving kindness meditation. Amateur if you if you have heard about the staff of meditation unpack it a little bit for us please. Yes basically is a meditation that you focus on repeating phrases that you want to bring into the relationship. Let's say you're dealing with a problematic situation with a loved one that you are thinking that ended up in divorce just to put something out there and you are hoping for that person to change but that has not happened and you want to find a place of ps so you can have the resources to deal with a relationship but whatever it's happening so you bring this phrases of the things you feel. You need that relationship whether is love whether its patience whether it's empathy compassion and you feed the this phrases for yourself and for that person you are having the challenge with and just to give you a simple example it will be be peaceful. May i be patient. May i have wisdom to deal with this relationship. And then you say the name of the person and you repeat the same phrases. This clays you know may be happy. May brad fine away to be patient. So you adopt these phrases and you sit in meditation in you repeat this races. This is actually a proven scientific practice that has been shown to really help people on strengthen relationships the other important tool that i recommend to people is to work also with forgiveness practices. Sometimes the the situations that had happened in our past contribute a lot with us being stock and not being able to move forward and it could be sometimes that we need to let go. We need to let go of their of those things that happened in the past so we can build a future and they are multiple Forgiveness practices that you could do whether is writing off forgiveness letter whether is doing at even forgiveness. Meditation and i feel that those could be deeply healing practices that could enable us to overcome challenges relationship. That's very helpful. I think one of the things are really like to share with the beyond adversity audience is. He's practical practices self disciplined habits that we can do. And and you know you've listed. Several people can't apply there. Let's just say that. There is a person who is deeply impacted by the profound challenges. They have found around the kobe crisis..

brad