18 Burst results for "Bourbon Industry"

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Tonight. Down to 50 tomorrow 77 Partly cloudy skies for your Friday and then we get the clouds moving in Saturday. Slight chance of rain, but Most likely Sunday is going to be the wet day with what's left over of from Delta headed our way and right now is 51 kind of chilly 700 wlw bettering your life by teaching you the financial ropes. Thiss is simply money on 700 wlw meat wagon with me from all worth financial. It's a simply money minute. Let's talk bourbon here. Um, people might have a lot more time on their hands leased. A lot of people do anyway. But Kentucky Bourbon industry is comin right now. If he's got more more people are drinking bourbon during this time. I'm not exactly sure what that says about how are coping. But we're buying bourbon and even making bourbon in 2010 Bourbon was a nearly $2 billion industry in America. Today, it's worth more than four billion is more than doubled in just that decade. This enthusiasm has led to more collectors wanting to revisit bottles from the so called Glen Era, simply the 19 sixties in the 19 nineties, no one was buying bourbon, so just kind of sat around on shelves. Now people are trying to get their hands. On the bourbon from that time that was sitting on the shelf for decades. So look, you know if you want to buy good bourbon and do it on a budget Well, the Ohio Division of Liquor Control is hosting bottle lotteries. This is for people who need to get your hands on the stuff. It's really difficult to get Teo. You can enter to win the chance to purchase rare bottles at a significant discount when they go for on the secondary markets. Um, if you.

Thiss Ohio Division of Liquor Contro Delta Kentucky America
"bourbon industry" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"Come from that background and then all of a sudden. You're like if you're in the same place every time you like I hate the sheet I wish they had real sheets. I wish they had like a real pillow. I wish they had like a real bed. You guys saw the better. They're very comfortable beds, so like pretty much everything that I hated about hotel I'm like if I could take this. And then you know, have people come and visit and create relationships with them? It'll sell itself and it Kinda just evolved into that thing that. It allows you to be more comfortable. It creates a better product, and if you do it the right way, it just kind evolves into something that you can continue to move onto if you want to or just keep it at whatever level you want. Do you keep the same bar soap? No. Not at least we take care. There's a lot there's a there's a lot more involved, but it's just providing an alternative experience for travelers, and in the Bourbon Industry at found hosting like. Different barrel clubs and stuff there's real. A lot of people know each other over the internet or whatever, but whenever you have a space where everybody can interact and as well as sleep and stay together, and it just creates a much better experience especially whenever you're you though some bourbon in the mix absolutely in before we kind of frame the discussion here before we get into it, you know. Know when you talk about the barrel clubs what we're standing in what we're sitting here right now is like one of the most perfect opportune places, because if we always talk about this to you know. We talked about the Guys Department Community Roundtable we get together. We call each other Internet friends right in. It's usually one of our houses, but our houses. Art. Nice big spaces like this, and so when you can fit I, mean Gosh Wha-. What do you think the most people that you fit in here from Bourbon? Club just like people hanging out and gathering and stuff like that. You could easily do forty see. It's amazing and. You can't even see it on camera, but if you were here like there's a whole second floor, the whole nother sitting area. It's truly immaculate, so we'll. We'll talk about a little bit later, but how you can get in contact with their to the book it. Is I mean and the artwork in here the Macula you've got if you're a fan of birds or like nature and and horse racing, there's all these vintage paintings and drawings or go porcelain decanters here. The Wood floors is partially originally from the House the beams here. This is just a beautiful restored. saved old home are actually used to be a bookstore. I used to come in here in and buy books and take us through the process of kind of what you did because I know. We have a lot of like geeks who liked to redo their basements or they like to. Fix Up their bars I. Bet you there's a tip or two. You might have because you're. You're an engineer smart guy. Thanks, appreciate it I try. But, basically like you said it was an old bookstore it was built. I think around nineteen, hundred, nineteen, fifteen around then, and we tried to restore much as we could, but you know there's a lot of things that to bring it up to. Where would be a a building? Wiring. To put you in perspective. This house actually had gas pipes ran through the house. Because that was the lighting system, the original lighting system there wasn't even electric. Basically natural gas. If the IT's like dangerous. Yeah, it was, there was a lot of work involved in it, but it. Basically he had decided to move on from own bookstore he retired, and so we just felt as a great opportunity here on Bardstown road where you can be around all the great restaurants and I'm not trying to build like fifty storey hotel. I just want something that feels authentic that you can walk to go. The restaurants have a drink at the bar and be back in five minutes. Minutes so it's it's A. It's a great opportunity that we thought it would be a great location. I mean you are in the thick of it here. That's that's for sure. Great location really is all right, so let's go ahead. Let's start framing really what this this. I really the topic of today so I'm to kind of take this idea, and maybe like what we like when we say we go to Vegas. Where like okay like three days in Vegas? That's the perfect amount five days maybe too many two days. Maybe not enough now going to the Bourbon trail and people are coming in from out of town. What are you all really think is like the the prime number. What should people really be looking at you know? Is it like a two day or three? Day is four days too much like when you're coming in the Bourbon trail. What's what's a good number that people should be targeting? The question. Is like how good is your liver? and. What kind of company are you around? That's all excellent points when it comes to family. What is it like three family and fish after three days? It gets a little a little smelly so. Yeah My experience has been If you're a corporate person, it's attack on to something that.

Bourbon trail Bourbon Guys Department Community Roun Vegas engineer
"bourbon industry" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"Next week, cheers! My name is Brad Mimic. I've been the Bourbon Authority. Here for the Kentucky Derby Museum for eight years in the legends series is something that is very near, and dear to my heart very important to me. And it's where we get the most iconic figures of the Bourbon Industry up here and we talked him now eight years ago. Nobody was really. Doing this now everybody's doing it and people see the see the personalities on the stage at a thing goodness on on a very regular basis. And a little bit before that time. My wife and I my beautiful wife right here in the front row. Shut up! We went on it. Was In two, thousand, eight or two thousand nine I. Add opportunity. They buffalo trace invited me out for something. And this gentleman meets me in the Meets me in the Visitor Center and tells me the story about his grandfather and his father, and he takes us on this journey, and I've been on a lot of bourbon sewers. They were all kind of similar a little bit of history. Bring them a little bit of science. And then come. That came this passion this personal story. And one of the things I'll never forget as he points out of brick is like and this is how they used to like mortar the brick. There's some horsehair right here and I. Don't know why, but that was one of the things that stuck out to me of for Jacqueline. It was just a sheer presence of the gentleman to my right. Ladies and Gentlemen, the very first tour guide to be elected into the Kentucky Bourbon Hall of fame for Good Reason, the Star of the film neat. Tour Guide at Buffalo traces delivery. My good friend Freddy Johnson..

Brad Mimic Kentucky Bourbon Hall of fame Bourbon Authority Bourbon Industry Kentucky Derby Museum Freddy Johnson Visitor Center Jacqueline
"bourbon industry" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

10:24 min | 1 year ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"So butcher shops like the Mecca fairly meat lovers. It's the most incredible place is people drive hours. I mean we were down there getting. So we make sausage and cure hams and We were down there picking up some supplies and I was watching him. Talk to this Galley. Obviously I thought this Guidon figured out who he was and was asking about the industry or whatever now this guy was just about an hour and a half away and just knew that he or he told him he was from here and this guy was asked him questions about boons and if they can drive there what is it about once those pork chops special job once a month iron and a half to come pick up all his meat. He picked up the meat for his family for a month or month. And a half or something like that drove every one Saturday every month do it. That's awesome you know cure and a for me. I was one of my fondest memories as a kid when granddaddy would ask me to do something with the Hams because a lot of times I would just be a bystander watching So as I got older I you know I. I was so inquisitive to get back into that. Because it meant a lot to me working with granddaddy on and so I don't know what have we been doing about eight years? Now solidly eight or nine years. But it's funny. You bring up Steve Steve Likes Likes Bourbon and Ham. He's one of our best friends. If you don't go anything past that instantly he on your best friend because I love both as well. Yeah SO WE ENJOY TALKING WITH STEVE. About Ham And cured Hams. You know time to Time. We invite neighbors friends so maybe you guys can come. Help US next timer. Our neighbors ditch US this year. They went on vacation. This friend Freddy doing it. Yeah they had to run off so I will be there. We got two openings. We got two openings right now. I'm all for learning. I can go. I can throw some salt on some Internet. Rub on it a little bit. It's just got teach you how to slice waiting better job or or give me a not so sharp knife. That's no good either. Nothing more dangerous than a dull knife and so I guess that's kind of one last thing only kind of wrap it up with his. We all have something outside of our day jobs. That kinda keeps US sane right. I mean out of our day job. We look at Bourbon so bourbon is your day job so is is meet in sausage and stuff like that. You're kind of thing. Do you all have other kind of hobbies outside of outside of this life kind of funny you know I would say ham and meet I guess charcuterie would probably be step one because we meet a pretty generalized. Yeah Corey we resonate together. A lot over creating sausage or Hams But you know a lot of it too though. Recently we've been playing electric football again. I'm sure you'll have that as a child or seen it We just one night. We're talking with the neighbors that come up and we bought a board and now we've been Ebay are now Amazon's televising next day. Boom little to easy will prime prime action there. I would just say we get together in his main cave there in the back where we do a lot of the ham prep and then in the meat house just talking and hanging out I think a lot of it is just him and I can getting together a lot of times. We'll even talk about Bourbon. I think you know when when it it is a big part of your life whether it be the actual liquid Like yesterday we route in the man cave is letting him some young whiskey That I had created in about two years old is wanted to let him have an update on it But then other times where this watch football or or sports were big sports guys as well so a lot of it. Though it's around you know. How are we coming up with new things to whether share like your oil? Odbc again he gets me. But my Cleveland browns guys. Oj getting out there LBJ. Even out cash or whatever he was doing he's an Iraqi TV. Yeah all right. Give him a hard time with the other he's NBA at them the WWF. Yep Alex it's all staged it's always all scripted almost looking like Edna Kansas City Games on the WW now twenty four winning by thirty or whatever else. Good TV awesome fells. It was really good opportunity to kind of again. Catch up with you Fred. Freddie actually have you on again learn more about little book especially the plans that you all have by the way I guess with the the new operation down there. Is there a time set of when the doors would finally open? Yeah you know so I guess really. We're we're looking at first quarter of twenty twenty one for actual opening Are kind of playing. We're looking at end of twenty twenty as as kind of soft startup. You know when you've been making products on still for long periods of time making sure especially for the bookers in bakers that the quality aspect is going to be the same so a lot of it will go back to instead of creating new as we kind of this distillery. It's going to be about understanding the current Liquid parameters and how were achieving those in a different plant even though it will be scaled the still going to be operational things that will need to be tweaked in so. I part of Twenty Twenty one end of Twenty. Two a twenty twenty first part of twenty-one. We're looking at doing that and then hopefully somewhere. I guess it'd depend on how how good we are getting up and running could be later in the year or could be right there in early twenty twenty one so web. Have you guys back when the doors are open? And and the whiskeys flow. And see what you guys think countersued candidate. Yeah I mean also kind of give you props and congratulate you on that because it seems that you're kind of going in a. It's not a different direction. Why should not an opposite direction but different direction because you talk to everybody else and they're like yes? We're all growing growing bigger. What's that mean that means bigger warehouses? That means another still more fermentation. You're like no no we're GONNA keep that the same. We're going to try something a little bit different over here right. So it's it's definitely like I said a different direction but it's still growing at the same time. Yeah you know I think a lot of it goes you know Jim. Beams the world's number one bourbon With a small batch collection has been around for almost thirty years that granddaddy created. We've always been scaling our production and I think you sit here and twenty twenty and and in reality. A lot of people would say that that what we do isn't craft and to me as one of the biggest pet peeves I have is when people talk about craft as size versus a craft. You know if you were to go outside a lot and if I'm talking with people If you go talk to my operators down there and and they and you say you're not craft operator. You're not doing anything craft. You might run out of there real quick because the things that we do on a daily basis regardless of how big we've gotten you know we've stuck by a lot of our families traditions A lot of them have been inefficient. You know we run natural fermentation. We don't use any enzymes. We still make east. Jim Beam way which is A wet style that's propagated in house So even though we've gotten really big we've still stuck by those things that make Jim beam and our products. What they are and so being able to go back and and Kinda go back to a crafts is Is Is Great. Because I think it'll give us a chance to to flex our muscles and say just because these guys have been around for two hundred twenty five years. It doesn't mean that they can't make small releases of of very crafty whiskeys and unique kind of niche areas. And that's something that we're really excited to do. Is You know. We've got a lot of knowledge of whiskey. Making how do we kind of use that knowledge to expand the categories in and? I know I'm salivating at the mouth. Right now thinking about what we can do and I know the one thing we haven't even mentioned is our partnership with the University of Kentucky mean. We've got the James B. Beam Spirit Institute of UK and so really the future. Freddie will be maybe me. If I'm still around he'd be training the future distillers that will be making the Bourbon for the future and as little craft distillery will be able to bring folks down here from UK who want to work in the Bourbon Industry and to learn more about it and so that's opened up another realm of research and development when you've got the resource of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. They're growing grains and it's just amazing the doors open up for us to be able to you know future and think. Bourbon is here for a while. It's not going to die. It's it's a signature industry here in our star home state. And that's what we need to do and do what we can do to help. Create the future. And that's and also we might even get to recruit some great employees to him. Touched on future distillers. He's not just speaking for us here. Beaming mean we're looking. At hopefully we're educating the future of distillers for the entire industry and I I might be a little bit partial but you know to learn from the first family of Bourbon that Kinda really got this thing going. Two hundred twenty five years ago on their on their steals and know that they're still doing it the same way it really gives to me why I'm excited about is it gives these new distillers the opportunity to kind of learn how. Bourbon was originated. You know and really talk through the the aspects of Bourbon that we still have from seventeen ninety five and whether you go work at a new Fancy state of the art distillery or someone who was a former moon Shanna that they just wanted to go legal with it and and has a pot still if you're learning here. We're hopefully giving you the tools that you can go out and and maintain the bourbon industry for many many generations to come. No we'll cheers another two hundred twenty five years fellow. Thank you go on. The Universe can tell you for basketball and You know keeneland. They'll be gopher still you can do it all if I knew. That was an option You know who knows where I'd be. Probably not in front of a micro hanging anymore. Yeah so gentlemen. Thank you for coming on the show today. It was a pleasure to have you on You know if you see them. Trolling around airport somewhere. Make sure you stay. I say hi and get a picture with them. Sure they appreciate it and grab a drink with him too so anytime you're always welcome absolutely make sure you follow us on. All Social Media Burn pursue twitter facebook instagram. And if you like what you hear make sure you right the podcast rate my podcast dot com slash Bourbon and You also like to support Patriot.

Bourbon Bourbon Industry Twenty Twenty Jim beam Steve Steve Likes cure Freddie Guidon US football basketball Cleveland Freddy Ebay browns University of Kentucky Corey NBA Oj Edna Kansas City
"bourbon industry" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

12:22 min | 1 year ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"In hopes of helping you get through the boredom you can go to youtube and just look for my channel. Just search my name Fred Mimic until next week cheers welcome back to of the Bourbon. Pursuit the official podcast of urban Kenyan Ryan back in Bardstown road again at off. But this is fun. We love going on the road and and and today it's funny because you know we drive around bartend we do a lot of these interviews However this one place that I had never driven up and we drive past the quite frequently. Especially if you're a frequenter over to keystone liquors yeah. Yeah you drive by the cinemas movies in. It's right across the street. It is and But this is one place where I drove up and I was. I was amazed like how beautiful the grounds are here at luxury distillers and being able to The first thing that we saw a was like some a house that you said your your buddy grew up in that owned the land here And then we saw their their resident peacocks. Oh yeah yeah this. I've been up this driveway. Many Times. You know as a running joke that. I'd say that I'm from Bardstown but I am from Bardstown and Grew up hanging out here with a buddy John and his family so It's a beautiful property. Got a bunch of old farmhouses gold house and some peacocks and they were like Kenny walked up and they kind of spread their feathers out. I think they're excited because he can in. So yeah. Maybe maybe who knows. Yeah but you've been you know just being town seeing the construction and everything but never really seen it till now on man it's an it's an impressive property in all the distillery and everything so talk about the property But you know this is also were. Were getting a chance to talk about a company. That's kind of like a unknown Titan in the industry you know it's they've they've had a lot of established brands that have been out there For the longest time it'd been a sourcing product and now that they are seeing the light they're like. Hey we gotta grow. We Got Expand. We got to We gotta start pumping out our stuff to And so when we start talking about these brands a lot of them are going to start bringing a lot of names like rebel. Yell like as Brooks like these are all lanes they are that these are all the names that you're probably very familiar with and I didn't know much about the distillery in the people that are behind it so guilty. I don't know much but now I do know because we just did. The tour got family history. And it's like a really cool story so I'm excited to share that with our audience. Absolutely and that's a good way to kind of segue into our guest today so today we have. Philip. Philip is the brain ambassador for luxury distilleries. So Philip. Welcome to the show. Thank you thank you Ryan. Thanks for having me on absolutely so before we kind of get into this and start talking about the whiskey and the two were in the grounds and all that sorta stuff again. Let's kind of talk about You know your history your upbringing. 'cause you're you're young strapping lag names Lux. Obviously you have something to do around here. Yeah so you know the we kind of talked about like your family's been in this business What forty years now? Something like almost sixty years almost sixty years so talk about your first run in with Bourbon. My first run with Bourbon honestly was was pretty recent Over the past two to three years. When we decided to build a zillion that so your mom and dad I mean it's really was as a personally. My my first run in with Bourbon was was recent but as a company we've been in the Bourbon Industry for over forty years doing some private label stuff with my grandfather back when he was still still around and David Sherman originally started the business with my grandfather. Paul when they were doing that private label. Bourbon just for for different grocery stores or or convenience stores around the country. And then we we bought our first Bourbon In I believe ninety three with Ezra Brooks from from Glenmore distillers who's now bisazza racking has kind of grown from there and You know that was a little over twenty years ago now and we've grown. We've had award brands and grown our brands over the past twenty years and into into big big names. That allowed us to now break off from sourcing in start our own distillery and have everything distilled in house verse Sourcing Bourbon from somebody else okay. So let's get back to the original question. What was your first. My first run with Bourbon was was probably three years ago in Colorado when I was when I was living there and decided I wanted to get away from kind of the the vodka. Vaccines started. Drink some different stuff and my mom actually came to me and said they'd be really opportunity for you. Know maybe heaven idea of getting into the industry as we're getting ready to build this so I jumped Kinda head over heels into the Bourbon Industry and kind of ran with it from there. Went to Moonshine. University in Louisville and Where I really got introduced Bourbon and whiskey and that kind of helped me engulfed by self in the industry and engulf myself in what. Bourbon really is especially here in Kentucky in Louisville. Where it's you know America's spirit and in most popular spirit so So she was the catalyst that you didn't really you're like it's there. You're all saying I'M GONNA do my own thing. Yeah I'd never even really wanted to be in the industry. I was always not necessarily pressured. My Dad always said do whatever you WANNA do He was never pressuring. Mito was always his friends or my friends asking. When are you going to get in the industry when Riina do this do that? So because I'm sure your friends are like. Hey Yeah I mean I would take boxes a boost to college with me whether it be vodka. You'd be wrong. We we use lescot and how we used to own Admiral. Nelson's so that was a pretty good for us and that was a fun product in college and everybody enjoyed that. But you know on the Bourbon side. I really didn't know much about it until I started taking classes. And really engulfing myself and it with steven thief like I said as well with Moonshine you and my mom is said you know. Take a chance. This is something that's different. It's something that's new. It's going to be something that you can help grow and you can be a part of. I was working in a ski shop in Colorado two years out of school and You know love in life but it's hard to work in a ski shop for the rest of your life. We're GONNA ski town so I need to find something a little different. And I I've I've used my dad and different people in the company and then the industry has kinda stepping. You know stepping box to help me work into it and learn more about it and I feel that I've I'm learning. You know every day whether it be with our products or the distillation process or the supplier verse distributor side And you know with my job. It really allows me to learn Frequently in in continue learning In traveling and seeing different how Bourbon. Whiskey is viewed in California verse in Kentucky Versus New York. You know I like to call You know the Bourbon trail like the Napa Valley the Mid West now because you guys probably see it firsthand as well where everybody's flocking here now for for that Bourbon. Even the peacock's evenly they're always there they love it here so kind of talk about what you do. See The difference in in Bourbon whether it's the community or culture as you're doing these travels you know just across the US. What is what's up in that kind of stands out to you. I think something that really stands out is the recognition of the bigger brands You know you go to California where I went up to Seattle for Seattle cocktail. Weaken people never heard a luxury but they had heard of heard of Heaven Hill and maker's mark in Jim Beam and You know being for me my passion and and what I really strive to grow not only are brands but our brands are part of a bigger name. Now looks row so I think you know dance. Your question Kennedy The major difference that I see is how quickly a brand like throw catches on in Kentucky Because you know we're year in seven months out from putting juice in our first barrel and people recognize those brands like you know they. They have the all throughout time. They recognize luxury now. As in San Francisco whiskey fest. Those are all whiskey enthusiasts. So they're GONNA you know they've probably been following those brands but they're not super familiar with it. Maybe they've seen that luxury logo somewhere and now they're going to be you know. I'm going to be there and they can learn more about it on a firsthand basis or up in New York. I was up there in personally introduced. Dave Nicholson Reserve into the New York. The Boston market in front of all the distributors so just different brands that aren't necessarily recognized throughout the country or are don't have a lot of backing to them that need help you know growing And with the distillery. It's allow us to help. Grow those brands in a different way where we can one bring customers here in you know they can see that product. We have people from all over the country if not the globe coming here When they come to see Heaven Hiller Jim Beam or makers marker limestone branch down in Lebanon. They drive right past us now So we're in very unique spot. Here that It allows us to help grow. I mean you're go ahead Ryan. I'll go all right. I'll keep going. I was talking about like is yeah I mean. We talked about kind of beginning to show that you know the the rebel. David Nicholson blood oath. Like Ezra books like these are these are pretty iconic neons in in whiskey. They've been around for a long time but people didn't really know a lot of the background and so looks row is also I? Is it underneath the umbrella or an extension of of LEX CO as well? Can you kind of talk about the differences? What you have there yeah absolutely so Lux. Co is I like to call it our parent brand but looks looks. Rose actually technically a supplier of co- You know we own it as a family My Dad You know is the chairman. Ceo Still looks row. But we we act as I supply for Lux Coz Bourbons But we're also owned and operated family operated out of Saint Louis with my father. myself my brother and my mom. My brother's not in the industry's he's an aerospace engineer. But he sees a one a little bit of a different path than myself but You know to each its own. I've found a niche here. But yeah I mean. Locks Co is is a worldwide supplier of of spirits. We own a multitude of about one hundred from brands ever clear. Probably being the biggest. My GRANDPA Paul's purchase that Way Back in the day. That was the first popular guy in college in to this day. Proud to admit. I've actually never drinking every clear. Yeah really genital never drink and so it's it's ever clear as you know the biggest one but then we've got Pearl Vodka Arrow cordial's We own three different. Two Kilos Wars Tequila which are mixed. Oh which you can find in you know like a Texas roadhouse well It's well Margaritas usually whereas Tequila We have elmore Tequila which is ultra premium as well as exotica Tequila All based out of Mexico But it all you know. We're the suppliers for that so we we've been partnered with the Gonzales family over there for a thirty forty years. My grandfather worked with Rodolfo Gonzalez father so still very family oriented and then over on row. Even you obviously can't get to Lux row if you don't have lux co And so we've over the past twenty years. We've purchased all of our Bourbon brands as we're Brooks Fan. The first in ninety three from Glenmore distillers and then we had rebel yell in ninety nine we purchase from Stetzer Weller David Nicholson is one of my favorite brands to talk about because it started originally started in Saint Louis Missouri. And we can go into that story. You got a little bit of a.

Bourbon Ezra Brooks Kentucky Bourbon trail Bardstown Glenmore distillers Colorado Ryan Paul David Nicholson youtube California Philip bartend Fred Mimic official Jim Beam Louisville Dave Nicholson
"bourbon industry" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

Bourbon Pursuit

12:22 min | 1 year ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Bourbon Pursuit

"In hopes of helping you get through the boredom you can go to youtube and just look for my channel. Just search my name Fred Mimic until next week cheers welcome back to of the Bourbon. Pursuit the official podcast of urban Kenyan Ryan back in Bardstown road again at off. But this is fun. We love going on the road and and and today it's funny because you know we drive around bartend we do a lot of these interviews However this one place that I had never driven up and we drive past the quite frequently. Especially if you're a frequenter over to keystone liquors yeah. Yeah you drive by the cinemas movies in. It's right across the street. It is and But this is one place where I drove up and I was. I was amazed like how beautiful the grounds are here at luxury distillers and being able to The first thing that we saw a was like some a house that you said your your buddy grew up in that owned the land here And then we saw their their resident peacocks. Oh yeah yeah this. I've been up this driveway. Many Times. You know as a running joke that. I'd say that I'm from Bardstown but I am from Bardstown and Grew up hanging out here with a buddy John and his family so It's a beautiful property. Got a bunch of old farmhouses gold house and some peacocks and they were like Kenny walked up and they kind of spread their feathers out. I think they're excited because he can in. So yeah. Maybe maybe who knows. Yeah but you've been you know just being town seeing the construction and everything but never really seen it till now on man it's an it's an impressive property in all the distillery and everything so talk about the property But you know this is also were. Were getting a chance to talk about a company. That's kind of like a unknown Titan in the industry you know it's they've they've had a lot of established brands that have been out there For the longest time it'd been a sourcing product and now that they are seeing the light they're like. Hey we gotta grow. We Got Expand. We got to We gotta start pumping out our stuff to And so when we start talking about these brands a lot of them are going to start bringing a lot of names like rebel. Yell like as Brooks like these are all lanes they are that these are all the names that you're probably very familiar with and I didn't know much about the distillery in the people that are behind it so guilty. I don't know much but now I do know because we just did. The tour got family history. And it's like a really cool story so I'm excited to share that with our audience. Absolutely and that's a good way to kind of segue into our guest today so today we have. Philip. Philip is the brain ambassador for luxury distilleries. So Philip. Welcome to the show. Thank you thank you Ryan. Thanks for having me on absolutely so before we kind of get into this and start talking about the whiskey and the two were in the grounds and all that sorta stuff again. Let's kind of talk about You know your history your upbringing. 'cause you're you're young strapping lag names Lux. Obviously you have something to do around here. Yeah so you know the we kind of talked about like your family's been in this business What forty years now? Something like almost sixty years almost sixty years so talk about your first run in with Bourbon. My first run with Bourbon honestly was was pretty recent Over the past two to three years. When we decided to build a zillion that so your mom and dad I mean it's really was as a personally. My my first run in with Bourbon was was recent but as a company we've been in the Bourbon Industry for over forty years doing some private label stuff with my grandfather back when he was still still around and David Sherman originally started the business with my grandfather. Paul when they were doing that private label. Bourbon just for for different grocery stores or or convenience stores around the country. And then we we bought our first Bourbon In I believe ninety three with Ezra Brooks from from Glenmore distillers who's now bisazza racking has kind of grown from there and You know that was a little over twenty years ago now and we've grown. We've had award brands and grown our brands over the past twenty years and into into big big names. That allowed us to now break off from sourcing in start our own distillery and have everything distilled in house verse Sourcing Bourbon from somebody else okay. So let's get back to the original question. What was your first. My first run with Bourbon was was probably three years ago in Colorado when I was when I was living there and decided I wanted to get away from kind of the the vodka. Vaccines started. Drink some different stuff and my mom actually came to me and said they'd be really opportunity for you. Know maybe heaven idea of getting into the industry as we're getting ready to build this so I jumped Kinda head over heels into the Bourbon Industry and kind of ran with it from there. Went to Moonshine. University in Louisville and Where I really got introduced Bourbon and whiskey and that kind of helped me engulfed by self in the industry and engulf myself in what. Bourbon really is especially here in Kentucky in Louisville. Where it's you know America's spirit and in most popular spirit so So she was the catalyst that you didn't really you're like it's there. You're all saying I'M GONNA do my own thing. Yeah I'd never even really wanted to be in the industry. I was always not necessarily pressured. My Dad always said do whatever you WANNA do He was never pressuring. Mito was always his friends or my friends asking. When are you going to get in the industry when Riina do this do that? So because I'm sure your friends are like. Hey Yeah I mean I would take boxes a boost to college with me whether it be vodka. You'd be wrong. We we use lescot and how we used to own Admiral. Nelson's so that was a pretty good for us and that was a fun product in college and everybody enjoyed that. But you know on the Bourbon side. I really didn't know much about it until I started taking classes. And really engulfing myself and it with steven thief like I said as well with Moonshine you and my mom is said you know. Take a chance. This is something that's different. It's something that's new. It's going to be something that you can help grow and you can be a part of. I was working in a ski shop in Colorado two years out of school and You know love in life but it's hard to work in a ski shop for the rest of your life. We're GONNA ski town so I need to find something a little different. And I I've I've used my dad and different people in the company and then the industry has kinda stepping. You know stepping box to help me work into it and learn more about it and I feel that I've I'm learning. You know every day whether it be with our products or the distillation process or the supplier verse distributor side And you know with my job. It really allows me to learn Frequently in in continue learning In traveling and seeing different how Bourbon. Whiskey is viewed in California verse in Kentucky Versus New York. You know I like to call You know the Bourbon trail like the Napa Valley the Mid West now because you guys probably see it firsthand as well where everybody's flocking here now for for that Bourbon. Even the peacock's evenly they're always there they love it here so kind of talk about what you do. See The difference in in Bourbon whether it's the community or culture as you're doing these travels you know just across the US. What is what's up in that kind of stands out to you. I think something that really stands out is the recognition of the bigger brands You know you go to California where I went up to Seattle for Seattle cocktail. Weaken people never heard a luxury but they had heard of heard of Heaven Hill and maker's mark in Jim Beam and You know being for me my passion and and what I really strive to grow not only are brands but our brands are part of a bigger name. Now looks row so I think you know dance. Your question Kennedy The major difference that I see is how quickly a brand like throw catches on in Kentucky Because you know we're year in seven months out from putting juice in our first barrel and people recognize those brands like you know they. They have the all throughout time. They recognize luxury now. As in San Francisco whiskey fest. Those are all whiskey enthusiasts. So they're GONNA you know they've probably been following those brands but they're not super familiar with it. Maybe they've seen that luxury logo somewhere and now they're going to be you know. I'm going to be there and they can learn more about it on a firsthand basis or up in New York. I was up there in personally introduced. Dave Nicholson Reserve into the New York. The Boston market in front of all the distributors so just different brands that aren't necessarily recognized throughout the country or are don't have a lot of backing to them that need help you know growing And with the distillery. It's allow us to help. Grow those brands in a different way where we can one bring customers here in you know they can see that product. We have people from all over the country if not the globe coming here When they come to see Heaven Hiller Jim Beam or makers marker limestone branch down in Lebanon. They drive right past us now So we're in very unique spot. Here that It allows us to help grow. I mean you're go ahead Ryan. I'll go all right. I'll keep going. I was talking about like is yeah I mean. We talked about kind of beginning to show that you know the the rebel. David Nicholson blood oath. Like Ezra books like these are these are pretty iconic neons in in whiskey. They've been around for a long time but people didn't really know a lot of the background and so looks row is also I? Is it underneath the umbrella or an extension of of LEX CO as well? Can you kind of talk about the differences? What you have there yeah absolutely so Lux. Co is I like to call it our parent brand but looks looks. Rose actually technically a supplier of co- You know we own it as a family My Dad You know is the chairman. Ceo Still looks row. But we we act as I supply for Lux Coz Bourbons But we're also owned and operated family operated out of Saint Louis with my father. myself my brother and my mom. My brother's not in the industry's he's an aerospace engineer. But he sees a one a little bit of a different path than myself but You know to each its own. I've found a niche here. But yeah I mean. Locks Co is is a worldwide supplier of of spirits. We own a multitude of about one hundred from brands ever clear. Probably being the biggest. My GRANDPA Paul's purchase that Way Back in the day. That was the first popular guy in college in to this day. Proud to admit. I've actually never drinking every clear. Yeah really genital never drink and so it's it's ever clear as you know the biggest one but then we've got Pearl Vodka Arrow cordial's We own three different. Two Kilos Wars Tequila which are mixed. Oh which you can find in you know like a Texas roadhouse well It's well Margaritas usually whereas Tequila We have elmore Tequila which is ultra premium as well as exotica Tequila All based out of Mexico But it all you know. We're the suppliers for that so we we've been partnered with the Gonzales family over there for a thirty forty years. My grandfather worked with Rodolfo Gonzalez father so still very family oriented and then over on row. Even you obviously can't get to Lux row if you don't have lux co And so we've over the past twenty years. We've purchased all of our Bourbon brands as we're Brooks Fan. The first in ninety three from Glenmore distillers and then we had rebel yell in ninety nine we purchase from Stetzer Weller David Nicholson is one of my favorite brands to talk about because it started originally started in Saint Louis Missouri. And we can go into that story. You got a little bit of a.

Bourbon Ezra Brooks Kentucky Bourbon trail Bardstown Glenmore distillers Colorado Ryan Paul David Nicholson youtube California Philip bartend Fred Mimic official Jim Beam Louisville Dave Nicholson
A Scotch Maker’s Challenge: First Brexit. Now Tariffs.

PRI's The World

05:49 min | 2 years ago

A Scotch Maker’s Challenge: First Brexit. Now Tariffs.

"It wasn't very many days or even hours ago that brexit watchers ever thought British Prime Minister Boris Johnson would utter these words I want to stress this a great deal for our country for the UK I also believe it's a very good deal for our friends in the EU that's right European leaders Russel's have given their unanimous backing to Britain's latest brexit proposal a key sticking point the border between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic the new proposal avoids border barriers believes some customs checks in place. Johnson's deal still needs approval from parliament back in London there is a special Saturday session to vote on that success is far from guaranteed some key members of parliament from Northern Ireland opposed Johnson's proposal meanwhile in Scotland there's another non brexit call concern sales of Scotch Tomorrow Single Malt whiskies we'll get a bit more expensive for Americans President trump slapping a twenty five percent tariff on imported scotch it's the latest move a fifteen year battle between the US and the EU over subsidies for a completely different product European aircraft the world's Orla Barry went to Scotland spoke with people there who are drowning their sorrows whiskey water malted barley but at least we get all our all our barley comes from central love dancing distillery is about thirty miles outside Glasgow it's a former Alton Mel converted to a whisky distillery in nineteen sixty six their specialty of course is single Malt Scotch about a quarter of it goes to drinkers in the United States and that's why news of these impending tariffs is a big worry initial disappointment we feel we've been dragged into a trade dispute which I believe as a boat aircraft and it feels slightly unreal craft Scotch Whisky PJ we're having to be massive tariff Johnson's tighter is head of commercial excellence at instant. DISTILLERY whiskey is in my blood he says Auden's father was a customs and excise man whose job was to check if whisky distilleries were obeying Tax slows as a child Alden says he remembers his dad pouring a bottle of illicit whisky down the sink every business faces challenges but Alden says it's tough a just how bad at twenty five percent tariff will be is a big number we'll watch slow it down I do we worked very hard to build our brand we have Nebraska who you know the US permanently just promoting the always have our brand we like to think that we'll be resilient but genuinely we don't know will people switch to something else I hope no but it's going to be challenging it's not just deans in distillery that's facing a challenge the largest and most valuable market for the whole single mom all scotch industry is in the US the new tariffs were introduced on a series of EU goods in retaliation for aircraft subsidies by Brussels but the Scottish whisky is so creation which represents distillers here says this twenty five percent tariff were not just hurts Scotland bought the US economy to Ortho be knock on impacts for employment in Scotland but also in the United States rame little John is the association's director of strategy was a great crossover investment in the United States and school in the UK there's a lot of tasks from the burdens the come across the school in Frisco nobody wins in a trade war and this is going to damage the economies on both sides of the Atlantic British Prime Minister Boris Johnson did raise the issue with President trump during a phone call earlier this month but so far there's no sign the tariffs will be revoked Littlejohn Astir a hopeful that trump might change his mind one of the things in this dispute that we really need to focus on is the spatial relationship between the states and the United Kingdom yes the special relationship between president trump and prime minister joins the state's a great love of scores was want to see that continue on I'm sure president trump was BR exists means producers are worried about possible new taxes from the e U as well but Jonathan is upbeat looking around instant distillery the place is packed with a tourist on a rainy Thursday afternoon among them Orion Sherrard a couple from Los Angeles raised clearly the whiskey expert white delicious flavorful almost like the greatest a cognac in terms of the flavor of how it hits your when it comes to the US tariffs he's tend to give his opinion I would like to say I love to see the economy of the world as well if there are terraced can be removed then there's no payments were warfare worldwide that we can work together but I would very much like they're not to be any impediment to bring this incredible with C. Back to the states and other American couple Logan Christina from Denver carell little more vocal very sad to hear this appointing so how many bottles can we take back I think take four back by cases taper off your president didn't introduce tariffs on Scottish whiskey I would prefer we didn't I leave them to their whiskey testing and asked John Alden how he would convince Bourbon Drinking Americans to stand up for Scotch well I'm biased of course we have very close links with the US Bourbon Industry the vast majority of our whiskey has matured in Bourbon casks there's a gentle taste makes instant a very enjoyable drown but you go for a scotch over bourbon any you know I like to try different whiskies but absolutely for the World I'm GonNa Bury Dune Scotland.

Boris Johnson Scotland United States Prime Minister Northern Ireland EU UK Britain President Trump Russel London Irish Republic Glasgow Orla Barry Auden Alton Mel Twenty Five Percent Fifteen Year
"bourbon industry" Discussed on The Kensington Corner

The Kensington Corner

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on The Kensington Corner

"What is your favorite ever <hes> allocates. That's what they call. The heart define mervyn's is allocated <hes> it has to be between a <hes> weller one oh seven or e. h. Taylor small batch hookah. I had i had that the other day we went to char- you can't yup yep we went there and they have they have phenomenal wissies election and we got there and my wife's <unk> made with everyone in your life and i'm just like oh cool and she's like you're not getting any then besides like cheap one and i was like oh. This is your budget honey. He's like don't go over twenty dollars leaf. They've got pappy there in it's one hard five dollars and poor and i'm just like i mean it's crazy as benico gay tom two years ago by a whole bottle. That's true. I gotta be careful the problem i'm serious. I was on <hes>. What's that what's that website. I've known sometimes read on brennan looking at the bourbon <hes> on the bourbon enthusiast blow thing things all the time were like oh yeah it was at this auction in new york in this bottle of pappy went for twelve hundred god bless. It's it's funny 'cause the pappy twenty-three years like the most highly sought after baroness faces right and it retails like one hundred fifty bucks but people people are selling for a hundred bucks a poor yet pappy ten years only sixty dollars like yeah and keyboards. Don't learn not not expensive like it's just because of the eh because of major may as it you know so this is four roses single barrel okay so single barrel. The self explanatory came from one barrel a smooth so you're saying your everyday your everyday was you've had had one. You've had the other the writer about gay right and that's because they they blend them all together. All the barrels together to get that consistent so in like the sixties and seventies the bourbon industry was dead like there were distillery shutting down with full barrels in their warehouse just aging and nobody want everybody was going to the vodka aucas and stuff because that was where you know that was the hyphen l. those beat mix lose. Jan wanted the genes in the body of and more vodkas dina. There was a time time when john was like the number one alcohol in the united states how cra that's crazy to me and it was i'm pre- i'm pretty sure it was actually seagram's at one while c._d.-roms wave it one of the largest was like they owned the whiskey like every industry they own the entire market for alcohol at one point east of beer bong ice ice cream <unk> groups. I don't fuck with jinro. I <hes> i like the little <hes> like <hes> the court for beiber the the pig yes jim..

mervyn john seagram Taylor brennan united states beiber writer new york twenty-three years twenty dollars sixty dollars five dollars one barrel ten years two years
"bourbon industry" Discussed on The Tom Dupree Show

The Tom Dupree Show

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on The Tom Dupree Show

"The at the end of the day what all of that means the strong economy means that the labor market is so healthy there are one point six million job openings in this country more than unemployed people in this country who had been so. There's the the real the real <hes> I guess the Asterix to this good economy is that <hes> there is a deficient labor supply in this country part of that has to do with the OPIOID Loyd epidemic and even the chairman of the Federal Reserve Talks about how we had seventy two thousand Americans die of an overdose last year. That's taking a whole generation of workers out of the Labor. The other thing is of course the skills gap pushing more apprenticeship programs <hes> and and we need to reform the welfare system not just to save the country from the debt crisis but also because we want people to who are able bodied and were capable to achieve their God given potential we think that work is a blessing not a punishment and we need to get more of these people into into the labour market because employers are desperate. They need them tax cuts and deregulation have allowed them to create jobs. They just don't have people to fill them and we need to stop paying able bodied were capable adults to not work yeah I agree and and and so that has the <hes> multiple <hes> virtuous ramifications one of which is that it will help us fill these jobs and address the the Labor supply challenges that we have in this country so we're putting Ford Policy Recommendations on apprenticeships and welfare reform and opioid addiction recovery initiatives that address that issue and I think we're we can get some bipartisan support on that and then we're focusing on those signature industries stories of Kentucky in the minority. We're getting results whether it's industrial hemp and <hes> holding a federal financial regulators accountable so that we can bank legal industrial hemp businesses right here in Central Kentucky whether it is working working on the Horse Industry <hes> again trying to achieve uniformity and medication rules and also addressing a problem with the Department of Justice in a memo that was issued that is impeding the advance deposit wagering a platforms that <hes> rely on access to U._S.. Financial institutions to process <hes> wagers <hes> across the interstate commerce which is legal under federal law has been since nineteen seventy eight we're. We're addressing some other issues with some labor issues with the horse industry right now and then of course the Bourbon distillers they need an extension of the tax cuts that they've benefited significantly our signature suburban industry benefited significantly from the tax cuts and jobs act of that every Democrat opposed this bill needs to be extended the provisions in the bill that cut the federal excise tax and <hes> and included my legislation the aged distilled spirits competitiveness act. That's a big deal for the Bourbon Industry and we continue to weigh in with the administration about the negative impact of retaliatory tariffs from Europe on our Bourbon exports if we get U._S.. M._C._a. done this good deal that the president has negotiated that gives us greater leverage with Europe and <hes> I've talked to ambassador lighthizer are U._S.. Trade Representative <hes> he knows when I come talking to him. It's about Kentucky. It's about Kentucky Bourbon and it's about Toyota and it's about Kentucky Agriculture. That's Great Andy. That's fantastic. What's <hes> just very quickly? We we've only got a little bit of time and I know you need to go on on the Financial Services Committee. What are you guys looking at right there? Well Ah so you know this. This has been a different experience being in the minority chairwoman maxine waters is now leading our committees for C. Setting the agenda. Most of her preoccupation is with investigating the president to be honest with you. They've subpoenaed binod something like twelve financial institutions on a fishing expedition for financial records of the president and his family and the trump organization <hes> trying to find some kind of connection to Russia. I mean it's it's really we had had this muller. We had this dud in in the didn't even know what fusion G._P._S. well. You know it's just disappointing. Are we really going to investigate Russian collusion. Are we really going to actually investigate that if we did we should actually look to where the collusion actually was right <hes> and and where the collusion was was was with fusion G._P._S.. The Clinton Campaign The D._N._C. Paying for this this fake dossier that was used to commit a fraud on the Fisa court but putting aside all of that what we're we're still trying to do some productive things in the Financial Services Committee of course the Democrats set the agenda so for example they they bring in the C._E._O.'s of B. B. N. T. Suntrust to regional banks main street banks for the most part they're large main street banks that are merging not because they want to become megabanks as the Democrats say and their narrative but because of Dodd Frank and the avalanche regulations <hes> these two main street institutions need to combine in order to deal with the costs of financial regulation and if the Democrats were really concerned about mergers and consolidation and banking then they should peel back more of this regulatory onslaught which is forcing banks to combine. We've had huge consolidation since dodd-frank since overregulation the financial services sector so what Dodd Frank Frank and all of all those regulations actually did was forced banks to get bigger yeah so there's more too big to fail banks now really what this is about when we do our oversight we look at this bank merger. This bank is not going to become what's called a G- or a global systemic important bank. It's still not going to be that big <hes> but what it is mainly is a technology play. That's going to allow the customers of B._B._N.. T in Kentucky to enjoy greater tech of financial technology analogy yeah <hes> and when we build out broadband in rural America we can have more efficient access to financial services through financial technology so-called Fintech <hes>. That's really what's going on here. We're we were pointing that out and the new institution is going to be called. <hes> truest is the name of the of the new newly formed bank. They're complying with all of the regulatory requirements <hes> and and in fact when argument can be made eight and we teased this out in the in the hearing is that by one by making this institution more resilient <hes> it actually will provide greater competition to the Big Wall Street banks that's great and the ad is WanNa. Thank you for the work. You're doing well. Thank you so much. Well thanks a lot we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA keep our oversight over the Fed and treasury and you know we're doing other things in national security as well you know we just passed out of the out of the house. The National Defense Authorization Station Act which I voted against because it it didn't do enough to help our military and there was a lot of problems with it but that bill my amendment to impose the toughest economic sanctions on North Korea that amendment passed and was included in that bill and hopefully it will stay A._M.. When the Senate improves the version of the of the bill which is a must pass bill? Thank you appreciate it. Enjoy.

Kentucky Financial Services Committee president Labor Dodd Frank Frank Europe Bourbon Industry Central Kentucky chairman of the Federal Reserv maxine waters Kentucky Agriculture National Defense Authorization Ford Toyota North Korea Fed
"bourbon industry" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"We keep hearing the word patient. And now according to Yahoo, it's being replaced by a different word flexible. So what does this mean to consumers, and people that are just trying to save their money right now? I wouldn't get to rent up and sort of the word sniffing. You know the big picture is this, you know, Connie three percent last year. It was we expected to downshift a little bit this year. But there's a lot of uncertainty that, you know, the tariffs and trade disputes could really the economy, the slow more than expected. But that's the case. In the Federal Reserve wants to be prepared to cut interest rates kinda give the economy, a little bit of a boost. But all they're doing is kind of opening up the door to that. I think the big thing that is take away the opportunities out there right now. More than a full percentage point since last fall. So we thing is definitely on the table. Anybody who's bought a home in the past couple of years, or anybody who missed previous opportunities to refinance mortgage rates now below the four percent Mark once again. Yeah. Indeed, the can't happen for people and take advantage of it. If you can't if it's going to help you get into or stay in your home, or, or better, save some money. I think it's really a wise. You know did you ever think then we've talked about there? Did you ever think that a tweet by a president can have such an impact on this volatile market? You know what happens up or down? Shake your head in listen. It's not just Twitter. You know, it's the fact that there are things that I see that are had a late cycle indicators. Of companies that have no semblance of profits idea when they will have profits, if they ever will have profits, right? Those kind of things in the end, it all comes back to the fundamental. So markets may rally on a tweet that, you know, the, the president is gonna meet with with the Chinese premier in Japan next week. Well, okay, that's great. But, you know, for that rally to be sustained, they actually have to make some progress on trade deal. So ultimately, it's gonna come down to the fundamental tweets can only drive the market. So okay, what are you still there? Okay. What do you what do you make of the tariff situation? A lot of people don't feel the impact say, there's not an impact soybean farmers here in Kentucky. And in the bourbon industry has felt the impact some degree. But really here in Kentucky. We don't seem to see now. You talk to some car dealerships. They say, well we're worried because it's going to make a car pricing go up because of the price of the medals in plastics that we use. Yeah. I think every it's all, but I mean you certainly formers those manufacturing. They're feeling at the consumer level. I mean alternately. Yes, those costs are going to get passed through and household budgets are already really tight. You know, household expenses have been going up at a pace that briefly, a pay increases, there's not a whole lot of extra breathing room for a lot of people you layer terrace on top of that. That's where I think people will really start to notice Greg.

president Kentucky Federal Reserve Connie Yahoo Twitter Greg Japan three percent four percent
"bourbon industry" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Here & Now

"Be important, but it has certainly increase. Our range of possible future behaviors of Anton stream particular will. And if the worst case scenario that you're talking about comes true. What are the implications of that pretty grim with token about Xs, stencil threat to small island nations like Marshall Islands in the Pacific, another rattles Pacific? They will become a to meet its seal of those, those small island states will become uninhabitable. Which took in about a massive loss of land, you know, an area, the size of Libya, which looking about displacement of up two hundred eighty seven million people potentially. That's that's. Awful lot of people, you know, while going to have to move to somewhere else. Edge just to give people a sense of how many people that has one hundred hundred and eighty seven million people. There were a million people who came to Europe as a result of the Syrian refugee crisis and that overwhelmed, a lot of countries. Absolutely. Right. It's cool. The social discontent sexual people political upheaval throughout Europe. On was what like almost two hundred times smaller number of people, so you kinda get get an idea of how incredibly disrupted something like to me to see level rise with bait. It doesn't sound like a lot, but we're talking you know, I mean places like Florida. Some of the major coastal cities, New York, San Francisco. We genera of Shanghai London. We're not necessarily saying loss of life, but we're saying that, you know, massive. Parts of the infrastructure of these huge cities will become unusable and you know, rather than kind of nuisance flooding that you get. Now you're talking about daily, flooding events, really pretty grim consequences. And yet, you know, when we think about all of the stories that we hear all the studies that come out that say things like what you're saying, maybe not exactly this, but pretty similar. It seems like it comes and goes without any real change with regard to climate change regulation legislation all around the world that saw halt comment from a point for me, Komen home, because I mean, not that really relates to I think response from the from politicians and policymakers certain isn't that what has to happen in order for something real tight to change on this issue? Absolutely right. And I think that, you know, the Paris agreement that was signed in twenty fifty. I think was a landmark agreement almost two hundred night nations signed up to that, that the trouble is the, the minute seems that it was largely kinda rhetoric raw than reelection. So even since twenty fifteen we've seen an increase in greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. So things aren't going in the right direction. But having said that, you know, I do sense that there is a change in mood. I mean, not just a amongst the public, but amongst politicians as well. So the UK government of declared it a climate emergency. So I think there is a sea change taking place whether we act quickly enough to of some of the worst comes coins clump, change remains to be seen, but it is inactive to do that. We can't do it. It's not an insurmountable challenge that Jonathan Bamber, who's a professor of geography at the university of Bristol ISA lead, author of a new study that says the world's seas arising faster than previously thought professor, thank you for joining us. My pleasure. And here now is production of NPR WBU are an association with the BBC World Service. We want to thank our hosts here at Louisville public media in Louisville Kentucky, including Stephen George, Eric Peterson. Kate Howard Ryland Barton. Caitlyn mcglade Jeff young Charles Spivey, and our engineer Russell wells are Kentucky broadcast, was produced by Chris Bentley. And our stories were mixed by Mike. Mosquito, I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson at Louisville public media in Louisville Kentucky. This is here now.

Louisville Europe Marshall Islands Kentucky Kate Howard Ryland Barton Libya Pacific Robin young Charles Spivey Shanghai London New York Paris Chris Bentley Jeremy Hobson NPR WBU UK BBC World Service Mike
"bourbon industry" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Here & Now

"That means the lawyer did such a bad job that Hassan Bennett got a new trial. And when you see that there's really no excuse for it lawyers are not supposed to take cases where they can't do an adequate job of representation, and so while it's really important to understand the burdens on the system and the idea that we should provide more money for it also. True that lawyers have illegal obliga- Shen to go through all the evidence and make sure they are representing their clients properly. And, of course, as we mentioned the homicide detective in this case, who was accused of coursing witnesses and other cases as well has been relegated to desk duty. So that's been acknowledged the one about someone successfully defending themselves with just a high school education. How often does that happen? That's very unusual. And it seems like Hassan Bennett was incredibly determined and confident in a way that was persuasive to the jury, I love the story because it's about someone teaching himself law with the help of someone else in prison, who was what's known as a jailhouse lawyer someone who is able to self educate himself. And, you know, we used to have more of a tradition of this in this country, where people used to go to night school to learn to practice law, and they used to be able to become lawyers with more apprentice themselves as opposed to formal education. Now, it's really unusual. But Assan Bennett obvious. We knew the facts of his own case, incredibly well, and it sounds like he was able to boil down the key issues here in a simple vivid way that really convince the jury, Emily Basilan her book on the Justice system. Greed is charged Emily, thank you. Thanks so much for having me. There's a new troubling warning about climate change. A new study shows world sea levels could rise, six feet by the end of the century. If emissions, go unchecked, that's double the earlier estimate from the UN climate science panel. The research is published in the proceedings of the US National Academy of sciences. And joining us now is professor Jonathan Bamber of the university of Bristol in the UK..

Hassan Bennett Emily Basilan US National Academy of science UN Shen Jonathan Bamber university of Bristol professor six feet UK
"bourbon industry" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Here & Now

"No, I gotta educate people with what they should know they basic rights, how to protect themselves because without knowing they're vulnerable, well, it's probably very small solace. One of about to say uh thirteen years. I mean and you know, you're twenties and thirties. But maybe you could look at it as a very long time in law school about it. And I gotta do even longer in law school. Yeah. Now, your masters. I'm trying to I'm trying to right now. I'm working on a program. That's entertaining. But it's also educational see when you look at Sesame Street, Sesame Street was entertaining. But it also educated the youth. I'm working on a program that's entertaining ended also will educate you in the field law. And I wanna put that in certain schools in so people will not law because, as citizens if you live in this country, if you walk this land, and you don't know, the privilege, your rights are the privilege, you have as a citizen, if you don't know, your rights than when you walk this land, all you're doing is living under fear. And that's not how should be I sound. I'd be remiss if I didn't ask as you will know, divan English is family. The victim's family still thinks you are guilty. They were able to hang their sorrow on you. Now. Where do they put it? Do you have some simp-? Pathy for them. Because in fact, they were glad I was talking to somebody today. Another friend of mine, and we were talking about that issue how they were denied Justice is getting lost a person died in this. I know people praise me utilit- you did it you learn the law, but somebody died in his manner. Somebody Nineteen-year-old losses life. He could have been married. He coulda did anything. He could have went to school. We could have had kids. He could have been a productive member. He could have been just as relevant, as anyone of us around here, but he was denied and a family. They have an absolute right to be upset. They had somebody tell them for thirteen years that I did a crime. But they also have to review the evidence. They were only called the hearings that the prosecution wanted them to see when it was relevant for a jury sympathy. The prosecution called them to the courtroom when I was going through my pill phases. And it came out the. The prosecution withheld evidence and it came out that I had ineffective counsel that the family was not notified. So the family didn't see the progress in case if they was eat a whole trial. It will understand that I'm not the person guilty is crime description at shoot. It was five nine hundred sixty five pounds at the time on my arrest. I was five six hundred twenty five pounds. So when they're looking at it, they're not looking at it from the evidence. They're looking at it from the people that they supposed to trust. The prosecution is supposed to represent the state as supposed to represent the people. So when you have somebody suppose represent people telling you that this person did it to your trust is in them, 'cause you are looking at them to seek Justice, so they, they have a right to be angry. But the anger shitting fall on me. As a matter of fact, I was talking this morning, and I said, we should do something for Devon who should base the foundation for Devon. Let us know when you do a sound Bennett, the Philadelphia man who acted as own internally, and just acquitted himself of murder after thirteen years in jail us on thanks very much. Thank you, to what we've heard from many listeners, asking, how can Hassan story be? Let's just touch base with Emily Basilan journalist, and Yale lecturer, and will link you to our conversation about her new book charged at here now dot org. And so Emily accord appointed. Attorney doesn't submit evidence like phone records a homicide detective courses witnesses..

Emily Basilan Devon Justice Hassan Bennett murder Attorney Philadelphia lecturer Yale thirteen years five nine hundred sixty five p five six hundred twenty five p Nineteen-year
"bourbon industry" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Here & Now

"To be in an American whiskey. Boom right now. They're seven and a half million barrels of bourbon aging and Kentucky, which is the highest since nineteen seventy-two. So it gives you an indication of how American whiskey is going through this renaissance or essentially, this growth, the of customers, both here in the United States, but also around the world that that's correct. And it's an amazing time for the export market. You know, trade wars are not good for anyone no no one really benefits either side. So we definitely look for the opportunity for leaders to figure out, you know, mutually beneficial outcomes that lead to stable trade policy, across the globe. And I think that's going to be incredibly important. We have seen even last year we saw thirty percent growth in our export markets amid the trade war amid all of that. So, you know, we do definitely feel like you know, our product is underpinned by quality, and people are having discerning palates globally for. Quality, and they're willing to pay for it Kentucky's. Most famous tourist attraction is probably still the Kentucky Derby which just happened earlier this month at Churchill Downs. But more people visit the state each year has bourbon tourists or saying over a million people now coming to Kentucky for the sole purpose of visiting the Kentucky bourbon trail, which is incredibly amazing people want. To learn more about Kentucky bourbon and six citing time we just opened our mixtures fort Nelson, distillery in downtown, Louisville at eighth and main. But what you're seeing is bourbon is really underpinning. Tourism, are Louisville mayor calls it bourbon ISM, he coined the term. And I think it's brilliant, because it really showcases how people are coming for the purpose of seeing the bourbon distilleries, but they're also experiencing hospitality culture, bars restaurants. You know we have this whole beautiful foodie culture as well. And it's amazing time. Once someone becomes bourbon tourists. They're already interested in the drink. What many in the industry? Here are focused more on right now is convincing new customers around the world to give bourbon a try Jackie xikion is a master taster for old forester. Well, I mean, there's still a lot of people that are still kind of scared to try it. I think a lot of people are still under this old umbrella thought that it's this big cowboy juice diesel fuel product and it's not there's a lot of subtleties and there's actually a lot of notes in there that if you broke down bourbon and described it, but it's different little palatable. Flavor compounds people will be like, well, I like vanilla, cinnamon. Well, like butterscotch. Well, I like citrus. I like all of this things. So therefore, you technically, I would enjoy a glass of urban because that's all there and present, and she's just talking about plain old bourbon, not a mint julep or an old fashioned which brings me to my last question for Andrea Wilson. Do you think it's a shame after all the work that goes into one of these barrels when somebody makes a mix? Drink with your bourbon. I don't see. I wouldn't use that terminology at all. I think what's important. Is that everybody's? Palate is different. And how you experience your bourbon is your own personal experience. I think that what I always encourage people to do is taste bourbon meat. So you understand the spirit and understand what took years to develop in the barrel. And then create what you like I mean, bartenders have done a brilliant job of supporting this industry all over the world by bringing back classic cocktails, and using natural ingredients and bringing creativity and artistry to the drink. And that's tremendously important to our business. So however, you want to drink it as your choice. How do you drink? I drink it. Neat. There you go. See from the experts neat neat. And neat it is when it goes from those barrels into bottles after years of aging..

bourbon Kentucky bourbon trail Kentucky Kentucky Derby Louisville United States Churchill Downs ISM fort Nelson Andrea Wilson Jackie xikion million barrels thirty percent
"bourbon industry" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Here & Now

"These are families that have picked out a name built a crib, and then received the most devastating news in their lives, their families that deserve our compassion and support. Dot one, one last question, we talked about these very restrictive recently passed laws. It's not the supreme court might not take them, but might take laws from let's say Indiana, that more incrementally chip away at abortion rights of for instance. One law in Indiana requires a woman to undergo an ultrasound exam at least eighteen hours before an abortion, ultimately, all of these bands will have one consequence, which is to have politicians interfere with patients private medical decision making this goes against the will the American people seventy three percent of Americans support row as the law of the land America's want more healthcare, not less. We want our children to be living in a world where they have more rights than we do not fewer definitely in a win. President of Planned Parenthood. Thank you. Thank you for with the unemployment rate at the lowest level in five decades, people who left, the workforce years ago, are being drawn back in and over the last three years, women have been entering the workforce at a faster rate than men. Then why was part of a week long series on full employment? NPR's Yuki Noguchi, explores some possible explanations. Something is spurring. Women of prime working age people like Gabby Giametti to go back to work before having her second child Giametti had held various management roles around Silicon Valley. But with two kids, the demands of work became crushing, I felt like I wasn't a good mother. I was waking up in the middle of the night thinking about on my presentation, or, or just work in general when her son required regular therapy points for years ago genetic gave up her job. She stayed at home in Santa Clara, but she missed working on team projects and recent headlines, spotlighting, the need for women in technology piqued her interest, I was curious to see how has corporate America change. As more flexible in March Giametti started what is known as a return ship a program to recruit, and retrain women like her looking to resume their careers, so far so good. She says that new gig, managing team at Cisco. Oh systems gives her time to occasionally pick up her kids from school for most of the last century, and especially after World War Two working women's ranks grew steadily around the year two thousand gross stopped, and even started to fall. Now, once again, women are drawn in by a hot job market that straining to find available workers many employers are luring workers by offering family friendly benefits like flexible hours and.

Indiana Gabby Giametti America Yuki Noguchi Santa Clara President Cisco Silicon Valley NPR seventy three percent eighteen hours five decades three years
"bourbon industry" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Here & Now

"You are. I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson hosting today from Louisville public media in Louisville Kentucky. It's here and now and it is an important day for voters here in Kentucky primary elections are today for a number of statewide offices including governor and also today supporters of abortion rights are staging demonstrations against some of those restrictive abortion laws recently passed in eight states, including Alabama Alabama's would ban nearly all abortions other states like Ohio would ban abortions after doctor can hear a heartbeat. That's around six weeks, that usually before a woman knows she's pregnant and technically impossible at that stage embryos. Don't have fully formed hearts or a car. Jio vascular system. The doctor would be listening for fetal pole cardiac activity, most of the laws do not include an exception for rape, or incest, and none have gone into effect all are being contested and backers want that they hope they can head to the conservative majority supreme court to overturn Roe v. Wade Leana wen is the president of Planned Parenthood in addition to helping low income people and others with general healthcare, they do provide abortions and Planned Parenthood is organizing the protests today. Dr wen CNN's, Jeffrey Toobin, the legal analyst has been very clear. He says in eighteen months, there will be no more Roe v. Wade. Do you agree that is the threat of our time right now? There's no question that this is a coordinated attack on women's health and rights. These anti women's health politicians have one goal in mind to overturn Roe versus Wade. And if that were to happen, then twenty five million women will be living in states, where abortion is outlawed. Criminalized and band before, Rovers this way to thousands of women died every year because they did not have access to save legal abortions. We cannot go back to that time. We'll talk to when you look at it this way, as you know, there are others who look at it through a completely different prism devil's advocate. We have many forms of birth control. Now this isn't the nineteen fifties or sixties women don't have to resort to wire hangers. Is it better to maybe focus on preventing unwanted pregnancies? Then aborting unwanted pregnancies over ninety percent of the work that Planned Parenthood, does is prevention. We are at an all time low for teen pregnancies, forty year low for unintended pregnancies, and abortions because of affordable, accessible, birth control and sex education. The very same politicians are banning abortion altogether are the same ones that are cutting sex education. And are removing access to birth control. Look, we need to focus on what medicine and public health, tell us unequivocally banning abortions. What just stop safe legal abortions? We'll talk about what you face in the narrative here in one thousand nine hundred to an attempt to overturn Roe v. Wade was turned back by the supreme court because they said at this point women have come to depend on this choice to shave their lives. And antiabortion activists had to show that women were actually hurt by this law. But that's not the language that we're hearing. Now, what we're hearing now is about the rights of the unborn and about abortion being execution. I want to ask you about that in Wisconsin. The democratic governor Tony Evers recently vetoed a Bill that would criminally punish doctors who don't aggressively resuscitate an infant worn alive after an attempted abortion. These are, you know, late term abortions. He said he thought protections already existed, and they do there is the. The born alive. Infants Protection Act of two thousand two that guarantees person hood to those children born at any development, including after an abortion, but as you will know, President Trump described this kind of late term abortion, as a baby, being born, and the doctor and the mother determine whether or not to execute the baby. The fact is that infanticide is already illegal. President Trump is deliberately conflating infanticide, which is illegal in horrific with abortions later in pregnancy, which is something that occurs in tragic, very challenging circumstances, as a doctor, I've treated women, and families who've been in these situations when something in their pregnancy has gone very wrong..

Roe Wade Leana wen Kentucky President Trump president Tony Evers Louisville Jeffrey Toobin Robin young Jeremy Hobson Alabama Alabama Rovers Ohio Dr wen CNN rape Wisconsin analyst eighteen months
"bourbon industry" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Pouring over eight billion dollars into the state's economy a decade ago. Leaders of the state suburban industry called on Frankfurt to address tax hikes on their product in order for the industry to remain competitive Kentucky Senate President Robert stivers says that's more than paid off. And people say, well, you know, has it had an impact beyond Marion county in Bardstown in those areas. Yeah. Impact in Manchester Kentucky. He was a well how had an impact in morehead Kentucky how because they had to build Cooper ges. They needed wide oak. There's thirty people that work in my hometown. Making stays for the bourbon industry today, Kentucky's bourbon producers are generating eight point six billion dollars in economic impacts. A sixty percent increase from two thousand nine proposed legislation would give Kentucky it's more opportunities to register as an organ donor. Paul miles has details. Kentuckians can sign up as an organ donor when they renew their driver's license. That happens every four years, but the state assumed moving to an eighth year renewal cycle and the trust for life is worried that drop off an annual license. Renewals will lead to fewer people registering as donors a Bill. Sponsored by Senator Julie rocky Adams would allow people to register when they log into a website used to sign up for state services. The measure was approved by the Senate, health and welfare committee, Paul miles. Newsradio eight forty W H A S, the house oversight and governor. Mental reform committee today voting to transfer all of its Russia investigation transcripts to special counsel. Robert Muller committee chairman Adam Schiff, commenting on part of President Trump's state of the union address in which shift says Trump put forth an effort to discourage any meaningful oversight of the administration. That's a non starter. We're not.

Kentucky Robert stivers Paul miles morehead Kentucky President Trump Senator Julie rocky Adams Senate Robert Muller Marion county Adam Schiff Bardstown Frankfurt Manchester Russia chairman special counsel eight billion dollars six billion dollars
"bourbon industry" Discussed on Sips, Suds, & Smokes

Sips, Suds, & Smokes

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"bourbon industry" Discussed on Sips, Suds, & Smokes

"You gotta understand the difference because yeah a little bit you mean sh and censor myself and as the war whiskies writer here i would say drink the twenty five girls scott's not the twenty five year old doubt so there there are bourbons in heaven hills a great example because they they a couple years ago they took the twelve age statement off the elijah craig their stuff should not be age as twelve years people go nuts over the eighteen year alleged craig the twenty one or whatever the they've done the twenty year old evan williams it gets excessively worse after twelve years there juice should stop aging about twelve years about the nine to twelve year range is kind of the ideal place for them the look the vast majority of bourbon if you ask any of the master distillers jimmy russell jim rutledge whoever six to nine years is so the the things that can age pass that there's such a miniscule part of our inventory in their typically need gotta you've gotta talk about tiered where's that barrel aging the lower the tear the cooler that the the aging process it picks up less would so you know i've done a lot of barrel selections in over the years and seen the last two or three times we've done barrel selections they've picked the youngest whisky but it was the darkest because tier six for us so that that is a huge deal so i'm gonna i'll shut it veer so we're going to take a break here for our sponsors and when we come back we're going to talk a little bit about the bourbon industry in general and a little less about the bourbon classic this weekend so everyone stick around and we'll see you in just a couple of seconds.

writer scott craig evan williams jimmy russell twelve years twenty five year eighteen year twelve year twenty year nine years