35 Burst results for "Botswana"

Ethiopia's conflict spills over border as thousands flee

The World

04:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Ethiopia's conflict spills over border as thousands flee

"This week, he sent federal troops into a province of his own country. Hundreds are reported dead in the northern region of Tigre and refugees air spilling over the border into Sudan. So what explains the shift from peace to conflict? Michelle Gavin is a former ambassador and senior fellow for African studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. Ambassador Gavin We're talking about the Ethiopian province of Tigre, where the violence is happening. It's squeezed into the northwest corner of Ethiopia. Figure it straddles the border of Eritrea to its north. What is so important about Tigre relative to the rest of Ethiopia? Well for many years, the Tigre and People's Liberation Front that sort of dominant political and military entity in Tigre was really first among equals in the ruling coalition for all of Ethiopia so to Graham's played an incredibly prominent role in Ethiopian governance, politics, security But with the rise of the new Prime Minister Ahmed There's been a bit of a re balancing in Ethiopia. And this is kind of opened up contest station from ethnicities across this incredibly diverse country. And there has been kind of widespread feeling that for too long, a small minority from Tigre had too much control of the federal government. So there's political tension between Tigre and Addis Ababa. Are there also historical grievances between two grand central government that we need to mention? I mean, is there a back story here? Tigre is now fighting at us. There's a lot of back story Ethiopian and certainly to Gran's were and incredibly, they weren't just dominant, politically and in the security services for many years, certainly under the leadership of Prime minister malice, But they also suffered most in the long and very costly in blood and treasure war with your tria. So there is there's also you know, a sense of probably grievance in that sense. Abby's come to power they feel targeted by new personnel choices by new policy choices. What maybe others in Ethiopia see as a re balancing the Tigre ins can often feel like persecution despite the tremendous sacrifices that they have made for the country. There are reports from Tigre oven. Ethiopian air campaign heavy bombardment at times. I mean, what's at stake here as far as you can tell ambassador Is it a possible civil war between two grands and Ethiopian troops? There is Tigre saying. We've had enough. We want independence. How should we interpret what's going on? We should absolutely be worried about a civil war, which I don't think would necessarily be contained just Teo, the Tigre region, giving all of the other tensions and actors. So what's at stake? You know the wellbeing of over 110 million Ethiopians. Regional stability. Conflict in Ethiopia has a very high chance of drawing in Eritrea. Sudan, tipping the balance of Sudan zone very fragile transition. Ethiopia's incredibly important actor in trying to bring stability to Somalia to South Sudan distracted and weekend. Ethiopia is really quite devastating, Tio this entire horn region which is strategically really significant, and there are a lot of actors external to Africa. In the Gulf, the Chinese and from the West, all of whom care deeply about stability in this region, so the prospect of drawing others in of proxy conflict it's really a powder keg, and the consequence will not be confined solely to what's happening inside Ethiopia's borders. Michelle Gavin, senior fellow for Africa Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. She also served as ambassador to Botswana from 2011 to 14. Ambassador Gavin Thank you very much. Thank you.

Tigre Ethiopia Michelle Gavin Ambassador Gavin Prime Minister Ahmed Sudan Eritrea Council On Foreign Relations Addis Ababa Graham Federal Government Abby Somalia Africa Gulf Ambassador Gavin Thank Botswana
Washington DC Environmental Film Festival presents virtual fall showcase

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 3 weeks ago

Washington DC Environmental Film Festival presents virtual fall showcase

"Festival in the spring, and this week it presents a virtual fall showcase from November 12 to the 18th the fall showcase. Really, It's a way to support the films that we weren't able to back in the spring. Programming director Brad for Order is excited to show Okavango River of Dreams. It's a put it look at the Great River, The Okavango in Botswana. The river really is the main character. It's beautifully shot, really showing kind of what's at stake. Ik in terms of conservation there in Botswana and the feature documentary Flint. It's narrated produced by Alec Baldwin, the director's Anthony Baxter. And he spent about four years on the ground in Flint, Michigan, following following citizens citizens activists activists who who are are fighting fighting the the environmental environmental injustice injustice issues issues that that follow follow the the water water crisis crisis there, there, Jason Jason fairly fairly W W th th a a Penis. Penis. The The Collins Collins dictionary dictionary has

Botswana Okavango River Anthony Baxter Great River Brad Alec Baldwin Flint Michigan Jason Jason Collins Collins
Over 330 elephants suddenly collapsed and died. Scientists now have an explanation

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Over 330 elephants suddenly collapsed and died. Scientists now have an explanation

"And for months, scientists have been baffled as to why hundreds of elephants have died. In Botswana. Alarm bells rang when 330 elephants were found dead in Botswana earlier this year, many near watering holes. Now, scientists say a microscopic algae called cyanobacteria is to blame. So we know the elephants to really be the only animal, for example, that is drinking below the surface of the water. Just really wear the growth of the cyanobacteria. He's the blue green algae caused the animals to run in circles and dragged their hind legs. According to eye witnesses. Samples were rushed the laboratories in South Africa, Canada, Zimbabwe, and the U. S to determine the cause. CBS is Ian Lee with that story, and that same bacteria is turning up in lakes across the Northeast and ponds to

Botswana Ian Lee South Africa CBS Zimbabwe U. S Canada
Cows With Eye Images Keep Predators in Arrears

60-Second Science

02:49 min | 3 months ago

Cows With Eye Images Keep Predators in Arrears

"In Botswana farmers grades there tattle at the edge of the OKAVANGO Delta. The region is teeming with wildlife including hungry predators with a taste for beef lions and leopards in particular. Ambush. Predators, they often rely on the element of surprise to creep up and take down that Prank University of New South Wales Conservation Biologist Neil Jordan life losses can be crippling to some of these farmers and the subsequent retaliatory killing of predators in response to that is a major cause of population decline in large carnival. But what if there were a simple thing farmers could do to cut their losses the idea came about. Of Painting is on the backside of cows to trick lions and leopards into thinking being seen by that would be pray and once seen like often abandon the hunt. This visionary solution was inspired by nature. A variety of species have evolved I. Spot Markings, thwart deadly adversaries. Some frog barriers feature is spots as do the back ends of some fish Jordon's colleague, Cameron Radford probably, the most famous example is on butterflies moths have. Their wings and as to practices such as birds from attacking them. Even humans are susceptible to ice pots. One study found that people are less likely to steal bikes when an image of watchful eyes is displayed nearby cracks. But despite their usefulness Predator foiling ice butts don't occur naturally in mammals to make up for this egregious evolutionary oversight, the scientists slash cow, but artists dot to work I can guarantee the cows didn't enjoy the experience didn't hurt them at all hurting those cows in the morning for the artificial treatments probably wasn't domestic citing thing for the over the four year experiment. The researchers found that not one of the hundreds of cows with ice spots on their Easter's. Killed by an ambush Predator but the study also showed that while less effective, simply painting crude cross marks on the cows deterred predators better than leaving them Oh nutshell. So perhaps, any kind of novel marking can startled in unsuspecting carnivore. Pharma's can potentially paint Nakata without official lost boats. All crosswalks that we recommend the sportscars that was the best result the Botswana Predator, Conservation Trust and the Teranga conservation. Society Australia Osso contributed to this research which appeared in the journal Communications Biology. Ultimately, a little artistic license could go a long way to safeguard both livestock herds and predators at risk of extinction looking at you kid.

Prank University Of New South Botswana Okavango Delta Conservation Trust Society Australia Osso Neil Jordan Jordon Nakata Communications Biology Cameron Radford Official
Botswana investigates 'mysterious deaths' of 275 elephants

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:40 sec | 5 months ago

Botswana investigates 'mysterious deaths' of 275 elephants

"The number of elephants found dead in Botswana has been rising in recent weeks. We get more on this story from CBS News correspondent Matt Piper. Hundreds of elephants have died mysteriously in Botswana, the landlocked southern African country as the world's largest elephant population estimated to be around 130,000. The wildlife department there has ruled out poaching since the elephants tusks were found intact. Similar deaths were first reported in May, when authorities found 12 carcasses in just a week. The latest discoveries were flagged by wildlife conservation charity elephants Without Borders, which says it's found 356 dead. So far. They suspect the elephants have been dying in the area for about Three months that

Botswana Matt Piper Cbs News
Botswana president in self-quarantine after visit to Namibia

All Of It

04:10 min | 9 months ago

Botswana president in self-quarantine after visit to Namibia

"Let's go over quickly to Botswana now and just it's one of its among the shrinking number of African countries whether it is been no confirmed case of covert nineteen so far the president of the advocacy C. using self isolation for a fourteen day period after he returned home from an official trip to neighboring Namibia the southern African country has spared no effort to prevent the spread of the disease of all learning institutions have been shut down across the country from today millions of school children must now remain at home gully into Connie is a journalist with the newspaper the reporter and a parent of school children good to have you on new year's day do me a lot good morning hello as you say in Botswana schools are closing today how's that affecting you he does I think about the very badly yeah I just home last month let me what to do I would like to hear and that and that has to do the other brother and they end up and that's the end of so we just hope when you see I don't know what to do what would you normally do what what was the arrangements you have in place this year which means we have to plan what to do not at because we didn't have any contingency plans but added that the if something like this okay what we do know what what to do it is true do you agree with the decision to close the schools yes a difficult decision any decision that'll help kid that they they they they they divide us away from the country's gritted route because we don't have it now and and and if any man any medical help would be what is it about how much of that you're able to work from home a lot of my colleagues are working from home yeah I can I can work from home no problem does that a game of the article is that universities use expensive at his side so even while what what and then I have my own yeah and and at media call like this M. C. G. one or create anything the biggest benefits and that and once yeah maybe it went to find out who had to switch off will internet plants at home and then they tell them don't have to use it a lot more that is the only equality either cool we use these even food and other and other things yeah the whole yeah let me just have a quick look if you don't if you don't mind please it was only all hello what's your name yes hi and what are you happy to be staying at home and not going to school how do you feel about it bed because a call to verify details but because it didn't what has right but you're not writing those tests are you are you feeling bad about it yeah are you enjoying playing with your brothers and sisters at home yes I am very okay thank you very much let me speak to father Melvin hello do you know how long this will go on for and others are employers helping employees make sure that they don't lose out too much despite the challenges that have come with having the schools closed we don't know how long it would take definitely we don't know how long it would take and them I think yeah this is cool we have this look and compatriots and a bit each day if if it comes at a key bit and it will be the host and regulations that it pays a lot of other that they would not show I can see that when you're going at that yeah good to talk to thank you very much for your time and thank you to adults as well for speaking to us Gauliga Kanye a journalist and books wanna he walks to the

Botswana
"botswana" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 10 months ago

"botswana" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of only giving animals that are in need of antibiotics kinda biotics it's exciting to hear that you guys can use hormones it's not public information that is reasonable to see this is how you do it but in an excellent stand that our research consul recollect AFC I can conserve recess concert that you know process of formalizing they free range offered to trade ring catch the production system to see what these are the standards but I've been head of it that police is an attempt at up to it using what is available to us right now and I also understand that I wanna neighboring countries your Namibia and Botswana the I'm making more money out of the European my kid because they're sitting in the livestock is a free range type of cattle and I also understand that free range not to get that make several size you are principally for it to reach four hundred kilograms two five hundred kilogram because this is where it was thought to have been in our attitudes it is three years or more in our funding it cost to get it to that eight one of the things I think about the hormone use is not that the US doesn't use hormones at all just that we don't use that on our ranch in our cattle through studies they've actually proven that the meet of implanted cattle has just a slight amount more estrogen than an untreated animal and the one of the things about that that I kind of wanted to point out is that the use of hormones in the cattle is regulated at a federal level by the food and drug administration FDA you're listening to the exchange parts.

Namibia Botswana US FDA
All modern humans originated in northern Botswana, study says

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

All modern humans originated in northern Botswana, study says

"A scientific study has suggested that all humans alive today originate from a region now in northern Botswana south of the Zambezi river the study published in the journal nature trace the human family tree using hundreds of samples of maternal DNA from living Africans from Sydney Phil Mercer reports scientists in Australia believe fei free rates in human history they say our ancestral homelands was near a giant lake in southern Africa researchers have traced an ancient family tree using samples of mitochondrial DNA which a polished from a mother to her child however other experts doubt that the human story can be reconstructed aids from this type of genetic analysis alone previous studies have suggested our origins lie in eastern Africa

Zambezi River Phil Mercer Australia Africa Botswana Sydney
Botswana, calm for decades, faces surprising election fight

BBC World Service

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Botswana, calm for decades, faces surprising election fight

"The people of Botswana go to the polls on Wednesday in a general election scene is the most closely fought since the country gained independence in nineteen sixty six more details from noms up miss echo the country's incumbent president it's a must see see has declared a long weekend starting on Wednesday to allow voters to travel to their respective constituencies to cost their balance the ruling was run a Democratic Party has governed the diamond rich southern African nation since its independence fifty three years ago and president must cece's facing the huge task of keeping his party on top but it won't be easy because of fears contest from the bulls won a patriotic front which counts former president Ian Hama among its members

Botswana President Trump Democratic Party Bulls Ian Hama Cece Fifty Three Years
Prince Harry Continues Royal Tour in Botswana While Meghan Markle and Archie Stay in South Africa

5 Things

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Prince Harry Continues Royal Tour in Botswana While Meghan Markle and Archie Stay in South Africa

"Harry Duchess Meghan Baby. AP Archie. We'll continue their tour of southern Africa on Thursday or to Harrison mountbatten-windsor attended his first royal engagement on Wednesday as the family met retired Archbishop Desmond Tutu in South Africa on Thursday. Harry and Meghan will have separate itineraries though with Harry off to Botswana and Meghan staying in Cape Town with Archie before heading to Johannesburg. She's set to start her day at a breakfast honoring South Africa's women and Harry's next stop after Botswana. We'll we'll spend Thursday night. At a new de-mining camp run owned by Halo Trust his stop there will honor his late mother Princess Diana's own work in the

Harry Duchess Meghan Baby South Africa Archie Botswana Archbishop Desmond Tutu Africa Princess Diana Halo Trust Cape Town Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor Johannesburg
Meghan Markle on Africa Tour With Prince Harry

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Meghan Markle on Africa Tour With Prince Harry

"Ocean prince Harry touches Megan and baby son Archie have kicked off their first official trip as a family there on a ten day tour of Africa they arrived in Cape Town this morning I just say that while I'm here with my husband as a member of the royal family I want you to know that for me I am here with you as a mother as a line. as a woman as a woman of color and as your sister. he will later travel to Botswana Angola

Harry Megan Archie Africa Cape Town Botswana Angola Official Ten Day
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Kick Off Africa Tour With a Dance

WBZ Morning News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Kick Off Africa Tour With a Dance

"Its prince Harry a mega Markle's first official tore as a family A. B. C.'s Maggie Rowley says the royal couple kicked off their trip in Cape Town South Africa for ten days the Duke and Duchess of Sussex said new baby Archie who barely five months old is one of the youngest Royals to ever go on tour will travel to South Africa but hearing going on to Botswana Angola and Malawi the couple famously visited Botswana just weeks after meeting their love marked for ever and Megan's engagement ring with a diamond from the country Harry a magnum will give clothing books and other items to an Africa based charity the trains and employees women living with HIV S. community health

Markle A. B. C. Maggie Rowley Cape Town South Africa Sussex Archie Angola Malawi Botswana Megan Africa Harry Official Five Months Ten Days
 Harry and Meghan start 1st official tour as family in Africa

WBZ Morning News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Harry and Meghan start 1st official tour as family in Africa

"Its prince Harry America Markle's first official tore as a family A. B. C.'s Maggie Rowley says a royal couple kicked off their trip in Cape Town South Africa for ten days the Duke and Duchess of Sussex said new baby Archie. five months old is one of the youngest Royals to ever go on tour will travel to South Africa but hearing going on to Botswana Angola and Malawi the couple famously visited Botswana just weeks after meeting their love marked for ever and Megan's engagement ring with a diamond from the country Harry and Meghan will give closing books and other items to an African based charity that trains employees women living with I. H. I. V. as community

Harry America Markle A. B. C. Maggie Rowley Cape Town South Africa Sussex Angola Malawi Botswana Megan Meghan Official Archie. Five Months Ten Days
Prince Harry and Meghan kick off first family tour of Africa

WBZ Morning News

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Prince Harry and Meghan kick off first family tour of Africa

"Its prince Harry and Meghan Markle's first official tour as a family they be sees Maggie Rulli says the royal couple kicked off their trip in Cape Town South Africa for ten days the Duke and Duchess of Sussex said new baby Archie who barely five months old is one of the youngest Royals to ever go on tour will travel to South Africa but hearing going on to Botswana Angola and Malawi the couple famously visited Botswana just weeks after meeting their love marked for ever and Megan's engagement ring with a diamond from the

Harry Maggie Rulli Cape Town South Africa Sussex Archie Angola Malawi Botswana Megan Meghan Markle Official Five Months Ten Days
Tourist Photos Help African Wildlife Census

60-Second Science

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Tourist Photos Help African Wildlife Census

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Tracking wildlife is a tough job. Take the case of a one eared leopard named Pavarotti for this guy. A very very big beautiful mail and you had a very very deep deep roar and so the end after Roy Kassim Rafique a wildlife biologist at Liverpool John Moores University so you see the crack of dawn and I would find his tracks. You know it's always tracks and try and find him. One day I went out and I was looking for and it tracks to offer ordered through this like woodland area and before you knew it the wheel of his Land Rover was stuck in a warthog burrow. He wasted several. Several hours getting it out and then on the way back to camp he bumped into some local tour guides in their safari guests who'd had way better luck spotting Pavarotti and basically they laughed and they told me that morning Rafique then realized that tourist wildlife sightings might be. UNTAPPED source of information about wild animals so he and his team worked with a Safari Lodge in Botswana to analyze twenty five thousand tourists photographs of wildlife. They use those as sightings of lions spotted Hyenas Leopards Cheetahs and wild dogs. Dogs they then compared those data to the estimates they made with traditional wildlife biology tactics stuff like camera traps and track surveys and Colin stations where they play sounds of distrust animals in the middle of the night and see who pops by it turned turned out that the estimates from tourist photos were just as good as those gleaned from traditional methods and the tourists were actually the only ones to see elusive cheetahs. The researchers would have missed the cats without the citizen science data. The results are in the journal current biology.

Roy Kassim Rafique Pavarotti Christopher Dodd Yata Liverpool John Moores Universi Land Rover Colin Botswana Sixty Seconds One Day
 Meghan Markle Redesigned Her Engagement Ring

The South Florida Morning Show

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Meghan Markle Redesigned Her Engagement Ring

"What happens meghan markle's revamped or engagement ring that harry painstakingly designed for her you know what kind of soon everybody loves this woman i didn't like that much less than a year she changed the ring it's a piece of history not fashion i like that she's causing chaos over there and that's why it's all about me meghan markle me markle's that's what it is gold thick band had a big diamond from botswana because they love africa and then to little diamonds from princess diana's collection so there's tons of history there she swapped the big old band with little pie diamond band and he gave her an attorney van for their one year anniversary but she actually debuted at when they showed archie the baby notice the new ring i did you did yes A new ring on. But we did you would your wife for change the ring, you gave her what she did but it was like after our twentieth. She twenty years. She all she really did was because I did actually designing ring I did so did carry. So it was like she just added to it around it. You know what I mean? That's not really changing change. That's making it better. Come on. i was a little taken back by that at the time i'm like that was the what is so is is is that a slap in the face to harry should have asked his permission is the timing of this in the history part of this in the face because that's really soon for her to be doing that and also Sorry, you can't mess with the family, jewels, literally. and this and that curse this weddings goes marriage going to be over two years i hope so That is a curse. who's gonna take over the queen yes she it's all about no doubt about it diamonds out of the queen's t._r. to put in a ring Middleton sitting back away. very soon they're getting ready for the other foam on the runway for that depp and getting rid of cherry charles isn't going to take over I'm going to skip them in the right to William. camila could never be queen they would lose their minds over there if that happened they would they accepted horse faces Yeah. But not as Queen airship, Diana of HR, h Her, Royal Highness that

Meghan Markle Harry Botswana Africa Archie Attorney Cherry Charles Depp Middleton William. Camila Twenty Years Two Years One Year
Botswana, Alastair Leaf And Government discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Botswana, Alastair Leaf And Government discussed on BBC World Service

"More than five hundred critically endangered vultures have been poisoned in Botswana. The government believes the deaths were caused by poachers, who are trying to hide the presence of elephant carcasses on which the birds feed Alastair leaf heard has this report when any wildlife is killed in the wilderness of Botswana by predators over humans, the vultures never far away. They're circling the carcass can be seen from long distances. So when poachers. Killed three elephants in the central district of the country for their tusks. They laced the bodies with a poisonous chemical to kill them to hard. What they've done. The butts wanna government said the area was being decontaminated and samples are being taken for testing, what's wanna is home to more elephants than any other country. But scientists have discovered poachers. And now targeting that

Botswana Alastair Leaf Government Three Elephants
"botswana" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"botswana" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Secondarily, what would be the goals benefits, and perhaps on intended consequences of sport, hunting, elephants in these are decisions that can and must be made by the Botts want government? And I think they're quite capable of doing that. So to the second part of an answer to your various question. What are some of the means some, let's say, in addition to the tool of sport, hunting that can be implemented to improve the situation. Well. Certainly income to local communities is important, not only as an incentive to live with. Let's say pretty bad garden pests, elephants are not great neighbors, for people trying to grow crops, when people are very justified to apprehensive fearful and frankly, not to like, elephants very much. I think they respect them, but one can understand that they're not so happy to have them as, as neighbors during times of crop raising. Land. Use planning is extremely important. Some areas are vital for elephants in. They likely used them for thousands of years, and they correspond to seasonal movements in a very arid environment also easy to understand so doing a land use planning that allows for both the needs of people and of elephants is one of a long term solutions, and that's easier said than done also easier said than done are providing communities, and of course, the government that has the major responsibility to manage elephants, especially problem, elephants are deterrence, and there are ways of discouraging elephants. You know, unfortunately, they're smart enough to get around every deterrent. So you need an integrated system that uses more than one technique and can change up on the elephants to keep them away and keep them on their toes. What are some of those techniques while? People talk about beehives, and that's a legitimate way planting beehives around fairly permanent. Let's say gardens are farmed areas. B's don't get along. Excuse me. Elephants, don't get along with bees, very well day hear them. They know they're, they're in large quantities. They know that they defend their hives. And so they tend to move to areas they'll move away from areas with concentrated beehives, and so you not only get the benefit of deterring elephants. But also, you get Honey. I'm you can harvest that. And so that's a successful means but it requires support for communities to do that. It requires a level of capacity and competence to do that. Certainly the motivation would be there when they see it works. It does there are there ways fences are quite an obvious one. They are expensive. They can be affective and they frequently fail. And one of the major failure points is that they require quite a bit of maintenance, and a lot of times local communities who work very long hours in her out and fields. The last thing they want to do is spend a few more hours maintaining offense. And so it can work. But there's an if involved, there's conditions involve right? So land use planning deterrence nonlethal. You know, the, the sorts of. Things that are used on, believe it or not crowd control things. That flash bang rubber bullets cap space, and spray, that sometimes shot from shotguns, for example, in their shotguns all over the place. They can be used well, Richard jail. We just got a less than a minute to go. And I want to ask you one final question, because we have been focusing on Botswana, but, but if we zoom out across the continent, elephants remain under threat. I what does the future for this magnificant magnificent species? Continent wide had you asked me this question, a couple of years ago, I would have been much more pessimistic, due to the will certainly competition for common resources land water forage at cetera is always the case in human populations are growing. So that's still a problem. But the unfettered demand for ivory, particularly in Asia has been the primary cause of the decline of elephants, and because. China is making steps. They've banned commercial ivory sale in the country..

Richard jail Botts Asia Botswana China
"botswana" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"botswana" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"But the devil in those details they're highly selected by sport hunters. And we can talk about genetic effects on the population of selecting the biggest and best bowls out of a population for a species, that is a dominance, hierarchy and were older stronger elephants. It's sort of monopolize the mating opportunities and therefore contribute, a disproportionate amount of genetics into future cohorts or generations. So, so, so that's, that's an important point. But. Elephants are, you know they're not buffalo who can be more easily managed by selecting. Let's say old and in the way bowls, and that is those that are on a decline and are no longer competitive enough to main contribute. Genetically elephants, aren't like that. And so that's an important point to consider also elephants are, as I mentioned in people, I think, well, no. Extremely intelligent social communicative animals who pay a lot of attention to people because they are smart enough and experienced enough to know that people are basically, their enemies that they kill them under certain circumstances, but wanna is a peaceful place, and they have much less poaching. Although it's been apparently on an increase in recent years, that's unfortunate. But in many other places in Africa, particularly in central Africa where most of my experiences. Elephants are so endangered on a daily basis by poachers. They understand that. And I do believe they've come to the conclusion that humankind is trying its best to kill every last one call it an animal genocide, if you will, and they react accordingly. And you can see the difference in populations that are not threatened in haunted versus those that are hunted. So these are profound effects, and so anything we do bit agriculture tourism land-use, planning providing water were denying it in a dry environment. All of those things have effects that may carry unintended consequences. So there are the genetic impacts as you were talking about earlier of an increased taking of the biggest most powerful male, elephants, given that the elephants are also very matriarchal, though, are there, any potential behavioral and social impacts in their societies. Yes, there are behavioral social ones as well. Not the same as for example, killing, a, a matriarch, for example, or one of the higher ranking females as you mentioned. They are matriarchal societies and after the bulls me know as a let's call them young teenagers. They get rambunctious and they're no longer quite welcome in the cow, calf herds. And so they're encouraged to leave in at some points. They, they get kicked out pretty firmly, and they go around in small groups of bowls or by themselves, as they get older and more competitive into a state cold must that's sort of like a rut, where they become in season, and they go, very far to their way to seek mates at that time, they become very aggressive and very dangerous when a large male that is perhaps part of the one percent of the population of elephants that would qualify for prime sport hunting. Trophy, a very high price. I might add, when that male is selected, of course, their genetic changes, and that's pretty easy to understand. But elephants. No every bowl, they know the big bowls, especially they no one one is killed that has affects on their society may be negative positive that's a judgment, but certainly on an individual basis in particular large, must Bill. Both are known frankly respected among elephant communities. Well, let's get some callers here. Let's go to sue who's calling from Baltimore, Maryland. Sue you're on the air. Hi, I'm lucky enough to have been on safari in Africa five times. And of course if seen Allison's each time and have learned a lot about them over the years. And the idea of sport shooting of these sentient, intelligent animals. Appalls me and I understand our metal consequences. If in fact, they're talking about bulls, and not metrics, I understand that different to, but my first instinct is to say, well, I won't go back to Botswana again. I will go someplace where they're working like Kenya where they are really working to protect the elephants, and Kenya also has a shoot to kill rule now about poachers. And I it, it sickens me that, that animals were these her sport..

bulls Africa Allison Kenya Botswana Baltimore Maryland one percent
"botswana" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"botswana" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"On wildlife hunting, specifically elephant hunting in that nation and the world's response to that let's actually go straight to the phones, Robert is calling from Baltimore, Maryland. Robert you're on the air. Hi, I just wanted to mention that I I was in Botswana about a month ago and on safari in visiting four different nature, parks and so many, many elephants, and their majestic animals, but they really kill a lot of trees and they eat the bark and we saw all four the different parks. Revisited many, many dead trees is result of what the elephants had done and the guides we spoke to where unanimous in feeling that they had to limit the number of elephants, because otherwise many more trees would be killed, and it'd be real danger to the national parks. So just want to add this to discussion, well, Robert, thank you so much for your call. So let's turn now to Richard Jero joins us from. Washington. He's wildlife conservationist and consultant recently retired from the US fish and Wildlife Service, after a twenty year career as a chief of the division of international conservation. He spent seventeen of those twenty years on the ground studying African elephants Richard Regina. Welcome to you. Thanks for having me. We'll so welcome to the program. And first of all, I before we get into the specifics of the impact that, lifting the hunting ban may have on elephants. I was wondering if you could actually just help us take a step back and give us a sense of the, the health, the numbers and the state of the elephant population in Botswana. Oh, that's a good place to start. Botswana should deserves to be recognized as certainly a, a world leader in conservation in many respects, particularly with elephants, as, as has been stated their population is very large, it has lived somewhat precariously with shall we say, neighbors in, that is local communities for a number of years, but Botswana is a tremendous country with fantastic. Tourism and is a country that is really quite, you know, going there, you get the impression of predictability, which when you travel internationally is a good thing. So Botswana should be recognized as a leader in conservation. And certainly as has been stated they certainly have a right and an obligation to manage their wildlife populations with elephants being the most important. Well, so when we say that the elephant population. In Botswana is very large that one hundred thirty thousand number. I guess the question is, is it too large? And is it too large because of human encroachment on lands that the, the elephants live on or farming? I mean, we were hearing about it in an increase in human elephant conflict there. So what's driving that? And those are two good questions that are nested the first one are there, too. Many in this is controversial because certainly as the caller robber Robert pointed out. It's obvious to see a great deal of vegetation damage trees are damaged in areas of heavy elephant, concentration, particularly and gathering points along the river in various watering points. And that is legitimate. However, biologically speaking, I think it's less impactful on the overall wellbeing of elephants into some degree other wildlife that depend on trees certain. It has an effect. So it's something to be considered. But I wouldn't give the Pat phrase that there too many elephants there and moving to a reason why there are, let's say so many elephants. Indeed. This is a very large concentration human activities, affect elephants in many ways their behavior what they do on a daily and seasonal basis. And so it's easy to understand that elephants would be affected in their occupancy, their seasonal movements by human activities. Those human activities can be agriculture can be poaching can be sport hunting can be tourism. So this combination of factors and, and let us not forget that bordering countries to the north of Botswana, have rather unfortunate, history, with elephants over previous decades where for example, and go ahead a civil war. There are many land mines, not much law enforcement and elephants, suffered greatly, and being smart mobile animals, who communicate very well with each other many decided to move to safer areas in northern Botswana in those areas have been made safe.

Botswana robber Robert Richard Regina Richard Jero Wildlife Service Baltimore Maryland Washington US consultant Pat twenty years twenty year
"botswana" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"botswana" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"He's about the issue. So last year, the new president came into office, who quit see matzec that was in April two thousand AT the one of the first things he did. When coming into office was ending a shoot to kill policy and withdrawing military weapons from their anti-poaching units. And that measure went by fairly unanimously approved, so there wasn't much to do about it. And after that, he flow today idea of lifting hunting, Ben not just on elephants. But then wildlife in general, and to prepare the ground, he organized, he set up a committee that would organize special hearings foreign white, so in, in small villages, and especially in the north where most of the elephants live to get people's opinions about the elephants, and after debts when it was clear that there was large supports for this lifting up to bend. They finally implemented. It's in April. Sorry in June. I see. And so when you say there was large support, especially in the north of the country. What form was that support taking what we're people they're saying? Farmers who are scared of elephants, and you have to keep in mind, they're extremely dangerous animals. They don't go around trampling people all the time, but they do destroy crops, because the north is an area where elephants live, but also where people grow most of the crops in the country, and so they come and eat them, and they look for water, and so they really trample people along the way I mean, not every day, but you could say almost every week, and so there are some Smoltz images where people don't go out at night for fear of running accidents, the into her elephants. And, you know, you don't always come out the life from that. So there was big support for the measure, especially on a rule people on the countryside. And so he decided to his might be good feet to do. And the other thing that I'm very mental. This have said, like look at this year, actually election year. So there will be elections in October. And this is a popular measure, that's been taking. And it might you know, help him to gain votes, especially on the countryside. Let's see. But how is it? That Botswana had been so successful in preserving its elephant population. Because as we noted at the top of the show, one hundred thirty thousand elephants in Botswana, more than anywhere else in Africa. How do they cheap that? Yes. So before Masisi came to office, there was a presence called, I'm comma, who is known as a quite fervent environmentalist, and he imposed a hunting ban on all wildlife in two thousand fourteen and the implemented to shoot to kill policy as well. There was already a large population of elephants, but it grew quite quickey two hundred thirty thousand day half. Now he also boosted tourism. So he may put on the map as a country, which was can come and observe like this amazing of life in youthful beautiful lodging. So he really boosted the tourist, the tourism sector and love people into I'm very happy about that. And the other thing is what's one of utes country. And there's not that many people, there's about two point three million people. So one elephant for every eighteen citizens about, so you would say there's lots of space for everybody, but that's not the case. Well Botswana's decision to lift the ban on wildlife. Hunting and elephant hunting has received global attention. So let's listen to Botswana's President mcquaid see Masisi answering questions last week about his decision to lift the ban. Here. He is never retain, so just wanted to exterminate elephants. And it's quite Roenick, because it is we who, what are the driest countries in southern Africa, who have homed the largest? Population in the wild in the world. That's what's want us president mcquaid..

Botswana Masisi Ben president President Smoltz Africa utes mcquaid one hundred thirty thousand el two hundred thirty thousand da one elephant
"botswana" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"botswana" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Campaigner in Botswana? Hoffa with amazing stories of Ron role in the Cold War. You're about to hear Joanna fields that she was born in California brought up to mistrust, communism. So, of course, being a rebellious youth as soon as she could nineteen Eighty-four. She went to the Soviet Union when she was there. She met underground rock musicians, like farro, the band of Boris Gribben. She cough banned from releasing musical playing any official concerts. She really liked the music, and she thought someone should get out to the west, and she's now written an account of her tape smuggling dope smoking rock enrolling is, as she shuttled back and forth, incredibly across the curtain and ended up releasing a groundbreaking double L P called red wave which featured four of those underground bands and music that many in the west just simply said, the Russians couldn't make of course, she needed a codename for all this. She chose Stingray. So from California, Joanna Stingray, told us more of her amazing story which all started with a tourist trip. To the USSR was all through interest. In those days, very difficult to go usually could not go more than a week. And it was three and a half days Moscow three and a half days. Leningrad on the bus. You are not supposed to ever leave the tower and talk to anybody. So I kind of went on a fluke, and when I was for the first half gays in Moscow, I thought my dad was right. What an awful place. Nobody's smiling. It looks on happy. It's gray that would never come back here and only change when I got to Leningrad and met Boris bench conference. Some of the underground rockers, what was the world of underground music in Leningrad, actually, like. Many of them were so Viet hippies in that time, it was not official and over the years. Would change where sometimes in a year, the Soviets would really come down on this decadent, western rock, and people could be jailed or lose their jobs in some years, it was a little bit looser. But what happened by the time? I got there nineteen Eighty-four is that hit become so big these end grant rockers just by recording in little home studios. And, you know, making copies of these cassettes, or these two tracks and millions of copies would be all over the Soviet Union within a month. So they've become very famous. These bands like a fiery Keno, legendary bands now. But of course, even though people knew them with the little cassettes, being passed around no one knew about them in the west. So why did you decide to appoint yourself the person who would introduce Russian rock to the western how did you do it, very large trousers that you stuffed everything down? Yeah, it's funny because I did have a green kind of.

Leningrad farro Joanna Stingray Soviet Union Boris Gribben Moscow California Botswana official Hoffa USSR Ron
Botswana, Cody And Wendling discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:58 min | 1 year ago

Botswana, Cody And Wendling discussed on PRI's The World

"There was a landmark gay rights ruling in Botswana today, the high court they're reversed a colonial era law that criminalized same sex relations, the punishment was prison for up to seven years. Homosexuality had been illegal in Botswana since the late eighteen hundreds when it was under British rule, and overall, we should mention that more than thirty countries on the continent of Africa have laws that outlaw gay sex as of today that no longer includes Botswana following a unanimous decision by the three judge panel, which sparked celebrations outside the courtroom and the capital Gaborone. Really Cody is a gay rights activist in Botswana, and he was at the court during the ruling. We went in silently, 'cause we mostly just just confused Wendling, what the ruling is gonna be always just going through mixed emotions. I mean, it's just been lounging, honestly, we walked in arrest such a long session, I think, for about three hours in the s the Jesuits repeating the that the judgment and finally at the end when he just said it out announcing that indeed same sex. Conduct was decriminalised. We just shocked excited were hiking one with screaming just a very exciting dreadful thing with nece were. There are a lot of people in the courtroom the caught was picked. I mean, it was initially meant to be in one courtroom than that. Having to open the. Him in between just so they could also get extra sitting on the courtroom. So I mean you can just imagine how many people wait they've altogether. It's, it's interesting. The judge was quite was quite definitive in his judgment. He said, human dignity is harmed when minority groups are marginalized. He labeled laws banning gay sex as discriminatory, and he said, sexual orientation is not a fashion statement. It's an important attribute of one's personality. What was it like to hear that for me to hear such with being a tight? It made me feel so valued it felt as if I just bumped into my best love, and they just consist that love to me, you know, had like that moment, where you feel so special that women will you office. I didn't realize that they do need it. When this that fighting for equality. They wanna see quality. They wanna see all these ads aspects through head can now tell me about this law that has just been dropped its colonial. Law. And what did it say exactly? So in this case, the constitution wasn't really against same sex people being in a relationship, but what they were being against was those people being in relationship and heading six when you look at the continent of Africa as a whole how big of a deal is this at such a great deal? I don't wanna lie. It feels good to be amongst the countries that actually do at knowledge as homosexuals in acknowledge that indeed homosexuals wants to partake insig- trial conduct. Let's say it is a great deal in, in the neighboring countries around Botswana. Where are they on this issue? I know ongoing LA, but sauna, South Africa and was, I'm beak that countries that actually have decriminalized same sex conduct and then take a country like nine media way. They actually the law, actually. Is nothing. By the end of the day, went I think I can kick up from it is just how liberal the are that one thing that would make me one visit them to get less of me, not knowing where these than I I'm curious in Botswana has the activism around repealing that law hasn't been mostly gay men or also gay women.

Botswana Cody Wendling Gaborone Africa South Africa LA Seven Years Three Hours
News in Brief 11 June 2019

UN News

03:06 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 11 June 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations in New York Security Council members issued a statement on Monday offering their full support to the UN special envoy for Yemen Martin Griffiths, after he was reportedly criticized by the government of the war ravaged country. A fragile ceasefire has largely held in and around the keyboard city of data since the signing of the Stockholm agreement last December the accord is seen as a first move to brokering a lasting peace between opposition who teas and the Saudi led international coalition backing the government in these Security Council statement members gave their unequivocal backing to Mr. Griffiths and called on the parties to engage constructively and continuously with these special envoy in a related development, the UN political and peace building affairs chief, Rosemary, dicarlo, met Yemeni President at rob Amancio Hattie in the Saudi capital Riyadh. They discussed the work of the Yemen envoy, and the way forward for advancing the fridge. Al ceasefire accord, and for returning to dialogue to reach a political solution to the white a conflict, according to a statement attributed to miss dicarlo the discussions were described as productive and miss dicarlo thanked president had for his government's commitment to full implementation of the Stockholm agreement fundamental change to the world of working polluting and e you wide minimum wage is needed to address the growing gap between society's haves and have nots French president Emmanuel Macron said on Tuesday in a speech at the international labor organization's Santini conference in Geneva. mR Macron insisted that the accumulation of wealth in the hands of the few from globalization had created a law of the jungle. This had opened the door to damaging, nationalism, xenophobia and disillusionment with democracy. He said also at the Isla conference. German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on Member Sates to step up the fight against child labor of the one hundred fifty two million children forced to work globally. Some seventy three. Million were involved in hazardous activities. She said in support of Ireland's initiative to end the scourge globally by twenty twenty five and finally a landmark ruling by Botswana's high court that scraps laws against same sex relationships has been welcomed by you and human rights, top official, Michelle Basch, let in a statement on Tuesday, the U N, High Commissioner underlined that the high court had unanimously found sections of the penal code to be unconstitutional, and a violation of human rights such discrimination has impacts that go far beyond arrest and detention miss Bachelet said, noting that the criminalization of lesbian gay bisexual and transgender people could lead to them being denied health care, education, employment and housing, but swan as decision follows similar action in nine other countries in the past five years, including Angola, Belise India, and Trinidad and Tobago in Kenya last month. However, a similar constitutional challenge to overturn laws that discriminate against the. Lgbtq community was unsuccessful Daniel Johnson, UN news.

UN Emmanuel Macron Martin Griffiths Dicarlo Yemen President Trump Stockholm Rob Amancio Hattie Security Council Riyadh United Nations Trinidad Daniel Johnson Angela Merkel New York Security Council Rosemary Botswana
"botswana" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"botswana" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming home. A team of historians and archaeologists in the United States, say they've discovered the law ship known to have smuggled slaves from Africa. The remains of the KLA Tilda were found at the bottom of the mobile river in Alabama. It's believed the wooden ship was intentionally sunk in eighteen sixty to try to hide evidence of its use in the slave trade, three years later, president ABRAHAM LINCOLN signed the emancipation proclamation to end slavery and free. Millions of African Americans. But swan has lifted a five-year burn on the hunting of elephants. Government said, reinstating hunting would help address conflict between humans and elephants. He has understood Neath head. The Botswana government said it carried out extensive consultations before making the decision to lift its ban on hunting, the country is a sanctuary for around one hundred thirty thousand elephants, a third of those left in Africa after poaching has reduced numbers across the continent. But having so many leads to conflict with a growing population of humans farmers crops had been destroyed and people killed. There's debate over whether hunting will increase or decrease the elephant population. But well regulated hunting can be used as a conservation tool if the money raised by killing some animals is put back into conserving others. This is the world news from the BBC, the World, Health Organization is to call for increased efforts to combat antimicrobial resistance at the annual dougy. Show assembly in Geneva. Member States will call for strict guidelines on how, and when antibiotics should be used and greater funding for research into new treatments. Imaging folks reports the wonder drugs of the twentieth century, which cured tuber colossus and stopped soldiers dying from minor wounds that became infected are losing their power. The reasons are complex overuse of antibiotics in humans inappropriate. Use in agriculture poor hygiene in hospitals, lack of clean, water and low vaccination levels caused preventable infections, which then need treatment, the US authorities have revealed details of a six migrant child to die. While in custody, the ten year old girl from El Salvador died in September. But the information has only just been made public. She had arrived on accompanied in the US with a history of heart problems. She died after undergoing surgery. Since then five other children, all from Guatemala have died while in custody the latest on Monday. Britain has rejected a UN resolution that demands it give back control of their Chico. Silence to Mauritius within six months, the non-binding vote in New York saw one hundred sixteen countries support the resolution with only six against Britain kept control over Chegos when Mauritius became independent in nineteen sixty five and allows the US to operate a military base on the ACL Garcia polls have opened in Britain, and the Netherlands to start the process of elections for the European parliament across the EU, the twenty-six, other Member States will vote over the next three days prison had intended to leave the EU before the vote. But is taking part because of the delay in delivering Brexit. The results will be announced on Sunday evening, BBC news. This is the inquiry on the BBC World Service with me. Kavita Puri each week, one question four expert witnesses and then answer. A group of women standing around community water pump on a street in Jakarta the capital of Indonesia. A mother crouches down supporting her naked infant. She washes, his body, he wriggles, but she has little option. It's the only place she can get clean water. This mother like nearly half the city doesn't get piped water into her home. She relies on these community pumps to bring it all the way from the ground. But is the water is sucked out the city above the land and buildings a sinking and fast some by up to twenty five. Centimeters a year and is the city gets lower flooding is getting worse. The situation is so bad. The governments announced it wants to build a whole new capital. And I'm bishops and costly endeavor. It would mean transferring the seats of government judiciary and central Bank to another place altogether. That's even before you've.

United States BBC Africa Britain ABRAHAM LINCOLN Alabama KLA swan president Botswana government EU Tilda Mauritius Neath head Kavita Puri El Salvador Jakarta Geneva UN
"botswana" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"botswana" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Welcome to a special episode of amateur traveler, I'm your host, Chris Christensen. Let's talk about butts wanna. This is Chris this is going to be a different episode of amateur traveler, I'm recording some of this while I am still on a mobile safari in butts wanna in the galanga delta. I just got up on our first full day. And the stars are still out the weak up. Call this morning was at eight thirty and I have some time while I wait for other people to stumble out of their tents. So I thought I would start doing this recording. I got here because I was invited to come by butts one track and more about them later. But that is basically who is hosting the on this. We're on a safari with Royal wilderness. And this is an odd place unique in wonderful place, but an odd place in the sense that it is in inland. Delta it is where the waters from rivers that start in the highlands of Angola flow, south into Botswana, and then basically disappear into the Kalahari desert. It's an inverted. Five fingered hand if water coming into the desert, and so every place, we go is very sandy soil that has been brought to life in a great variety of life by this water that is flowing down from the north. Much of the area is national parks Chobe national park, probably one of the most famous which we drove through just a little yesterday. And just saw an amazing variety of animals. We saw wildebeest sins e Brazil and lots and lots of elephants and a few giraffes and birdlife just unimaginable. And waterbucks. And I don't remember what else we have seen. So far we flew into Mon which is at the bottom of the delta a city in Botswana flew in from Johannesburg. Most of us the best connection point to get in. And then yesterday, we drove in we're going to do to campsites three nights each and then we'll return to moan. And then I'm gonna go on to another location, which I'll tell you more about later, but we drove up the right side of the delta yesterday. So we drove one paved road until that ran out and then dirt road, and we're driving for much of that time through cattle country Cadillac very important in both the culture and the economy about Shuana when you get married your riches or determined by how many cows you have that sort of thing. And then we'd drove as far as the cattle fence before things started changing, and basically this offense that was put up along the bottom of the delta to separate the wild animals on the north of it from the Cadillac, the south and the idea originally was to protect the cattle from at least the perception that they would be interacting with wildebeest zebras and might get. Hoof and mouth disease. So it was to protect the cattle industry in Botswana. Although now, it has the opposite effect in the sense that it is sort of the line that says the cattle industry can't go any further north. And so it's protecting the wild animals when it was, and it was very disruptive apparently the wildebeest population dropped from a million different Willoughby's in Botswana because they do these wide migrations too much much less than that number. Now, tens of thousands of wildebeest. Instead, the population was similarly affected the elephant population was not because they don't range that far. They don't have that great big migration. They stay within a day or two of water. And so that's one of the reasons we saw so many is that a third of Africa's remaining elephants are here in Botswana in our in mostly in this region. And then we drove further north and came to Ciobea national park and then on into a privately community run area. And I forget the name of it..

Botswana galanga delta Kalahari desert Chris Christensen Ciobea national park parks Chobe Royal wilderness Brazil Johannesburg Angola flow Shuana Mon Africa Willoughby
"botswana" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"botswana" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"There were dis when we were sort of hugging each other interiors wondering why we've done this. And then the days when you're looking at a sunset with a herd of elephants by river, drinking a cold can of of Hans via and thinking. Wow, this is this is the best thing I've ever done in my lot that he Simon rave. He's an Australian TV personality who lived in Africa. And he has a love affair with infect, you know, someone filled. I do I've known some quite awhile. I actually knew his father before that as well, very imposed. And he gave you speech listens. See what you? There's nothing pronounce in Facebook cast at all let's hype. If you haven't already been these type of the podcast focusing on Botswana will help shoot it to

Africa Francis concrete Bank elixir Guggenheim swan Botswana Google Harry Diana Simon Michael
"botswana" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"botswana" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"It's actually sent to Kenya. To solve our national park where the home of the law. Shoot the COSCO's lead. So a tough ska multiple people think of the topic areas just below elephant we count adopters a very special elephant, it's an mile elephants. And I don't mind elephant. That's tough. Why inexcessive forty five grand h colon one hundred pounds. I mean nine lifted them more non lifting Africa CPA tuskers, and they even saw in Kenya. So conservation money goes to hoping provide protection for them. But we do also we be many places in two hundred six conservation there as well. In particular, one of my favorite places in Botswana rose, worm area, code two league. Look, very very pretty place being pink, granite rocks in lots of elephants, and is actually really special side aggressee cod that we go to where we we find a graph the elephants at their sake. So the elephants to come right up to us. We're in a big shipping container onto the ground and the Ellison. No more than ten. Centimeter to face defeat. So you of graphing through the unique angle quantitive amazing. So does it make you send thin and this year? I don't know whether you are way of feel that there was a poaching frenzy. Elephants in Botswana. Eighty seven founded what's going on there. Have they not got control over the poachers? Look, it's a very tough situation to make comment on the Botswanan government in the in the past have been absolutely amazing Ramleh, protection and conservation. And even far as the not allowing Turkey hunting in Botswana said it wasn't a fairly well protected. I guess it's not right. Make coming from not experienced with the car government of Thuan on the hedge being the seat need president come over. And I guess we see a lot of these hot on social media, and it's kind of spread through social media. I guess it's a way to get the real facts before we jump to conclusions about some what's happening. We've been looking team boats wanna but I mean, it's not denying it elephants being killed. But I'm not really sure if that's from lack of anti poaching. If it's all it's really it's a tough one to comment on, but it's incredibly sad. What is what do you might look forward to seeing elephants to show it? So I traveled three Botswana to the into the Tuli block purely elephants, and it also very good liquid there as well one of my favorites species, which is really amazing speakers. They don't think people know that is the African royale Doke, and they're on both wanna has a very good population of WALDO up neither they'll tell and I just recently spent two weeks with the book London predator conservation trust photographing become today. Shen if it's you just out just saying, Otis and good friend of mine. Neil Doak, Neil, Jordan. He he runs that project, and you know, raw dog they get their being picked it being persecuted people look at them as feral dog Taxila lodge stoke. So they aren't able to threat the moment, I believe they might have been critically days when my degree invasion. So they're an amazing animal and able to one hundred nine stronghold list of of WALDO. Hey, how you doing adjusting to life within foles again? Yeah. It's funny. You should send this morning will carry on to feeling out of sorts. I mean, I have full beautiful dogs that I'm very dedicated to that on mom takes care of Walston away. And it's amazing to spend time with them. It's it can be tough. It's account. He like actually like work at western plains through in dubber leave any like maybe a couple of kilometers from the zoo you on a property in this morning when I went out and went back yard fake. My folks, I could hit a law enjoying from zeke's. He got a nice little product lines now. And it just made me smile like it was just like still he could he do Africa. I feel Bobby joy loves the sound of a line roaring Simon said earlier if that was the lost sound you heard before he Di he die happy so give salon ROY. Okay. I've got your heat gun. Still. What's terrible news? K our American listens. Just coming out of the other side of another thanksgiving travel nightmare. Why do we do to us hills snow has blanketed much of.

Botswana Kenya COSCO zeke Africa Jordan Neil Doak Botswanan government Ellison Simon Thuan Otis Walston president London dubber Bobby joy
"botswana" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"botswana" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"But psyche strikes as well had Ellison pushing up against my pants. I've had pint of snowing my head at nighttime. Oh, go ahead. Guests are taking gifts away and took place. Really? Well, played core Dessau longer in Zambia. And unfortunately, I couldn't access that hints for almost twenty four hours because the elephant family decided to come in and live a tree Knicks the ten I just wanted to eagle food self this tree. So they were read at home elation for a whole day. He couldn't get into the tent speaking of elephants Botswana, which this podcast is about is home to the world's largest number of elephants. You took some amazing photos of elephants in in a dust storm in Botswana, and you do some conservation work there. One hundred I guess today should go through the referring to taking in yorker Van Gogh delta reserve next today called Moremi, and yeah, we had a group of elephants old writing. So duck baiting is really important for an elephant because it it acts like a son crane for the skin. It kind of helps we've on deterring insects and parasites, and we'll see fun elephants loves throwing my during good one of the things to which is a young elephant when Gus base, they look ridiculous. I don't know what we're doing just copying and mom's and throwing banned everywhere kind of ink behind that. It's also they learn they learn the finance it by watching the adult. We do my partner my business partner who run through. Sorry. You'll have a elephant cherry that we run cooled discovery project. And we wealthy do support conservation that invalid wanna most of funding..

Botswana Ellison partner Knicks Zambia Van Gogh Gus base twenty four hours
"botswana" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"botswana" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"And we got that. And we might great friends in in Botswana who remains that of lifelong frankness, and it had a very profound impact and not no good. Somebody said to me, I guess, you know, going back a few years when it was probably more acceptable to say this. But a good Africaans friend of mine said, you know, Simon Africa is not for sissies and. He was gonna write you know, like they would dis when we were sort of hugging. Each other, you know interiors wondering why we've done this and then other days when you're looking at a sunset with a herd of elephants by a river, drinking a cold can of of Hans of beer and thinking. Wow, this is this is the best thing I've ever done in my life to lie in a tent on a hot night in the Okavango delta in October or November. And listen to a lines coal across a savannah and across the wetlands that for me that if that was the last thing I heard I would dive very happy we've been very positive about Botswana. But you did also say earlier that you made it said Africa is not facilities, and you did have times where you'd be in each other's arms with with TS. What sort of things prompted that? Look that one of the this is probably the best example, I can give really. Was when we arrived in Botswana. So we had done. Krueger pot would actually done about three weeks in Kruger park. We'd bought a vehicle. So I mean elp lights on big time. Let me tell you said by the time we arrived in now. I guess we'd been sort of five or six weeks on the grounding in Johannesburg and South Africa generally, and because of the time of year because of where we think outdoor at twenty months old on first night in mound. Have this grading fever? The people we were staying with you know, in the middle of the night. We sit you know. Okay. We'll we'll just have to keep her as as cool as we can. And we've got you know, the panels and the new orphans and all the rest of it. But tomorrow morning, you know, what what can we do? And they said all right. Well, the chemist Ivan's, you know, at seven thirty and the chemists of fellow Cristo and a lovely Africaans fell out. And he saw Christopher Steele. The look on our is I in our eyes and said look come come coming. So he was able to do immediately a malaria test on little girl so way, you know, pricking her finger during the prick test. An factoring. Linda was doing the prick test on may at the time. The why? So so we were able to find out very quickly that no she didn't have malaria because that was out because fear that you know, and me thinking, oh, my God, you know, in the first few days, I'm gonna kill much. A good start thugs tie. When when you know when you do sort of you you'll reduce to this this kind of quivering miss thinking, you know, what about under my family when not near sort of first World, Medical medical care. But you had these amazing experiences with these amazing people. And and that came as for example in Botswana is idle to dispense medicine he's able to make practical calls about people's illnesses. They to you know, the ordinary people that you made the really make the trip as well. But you mid to few famous people some royalty perhaps at yes. So in one of the little BAAs, and unlike they're only like three of them in Malan. But by that time, this is like two thousand and one Harry Prince, Harry and William and especially William at the time was a little bit older that had fallen head over heels for what's winners will take you. Because it was the place that I could go where there was no pepperoni. They were truly off the beaten track and people the local folks, they're treated them with great respect. And and so there I was at the by sort of somebody to me and says, oh, there's there's the prince, you know, like standing next year. And and sure enough it was it was Prince William and this time bus. I what did you do? I mean, do you kinda got I love what you're doing..

Botswana Simon Africa malaria Harry Prince Africaans Prince William Christopher Steele Linda Okavango South Africa Kruger park Johannesburg Cristo savannah Ivan twenty months three weeks six weeks
"botswana" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"botswana" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"The top of your trevelise. It's land locked country inside the NAFTA and has a landscape defined by the Kalahari desert and the orca Van Gogh delta, which becomes a lush animal habitat during the seasonal floods. In fact, it's home to the world's largest population of elephants in this episode. We'll hear more from salmon, obviously, and another ustralian and who fell in love with photographing the wild animals of Africa. This Kelsey Timmerman New York Times bestselling author and a champion of global thinking and local action. He's in the episode and award winning travel. Joan are hit the Richardson should tell us about the San bushman of Botswana, but we kick off with you. Chris question. Pretty simple one. What is the major export of Botswana? Find out the end of the episode. And when I was researching this chat came across an. Article from a few years ago, and it starts off with he may be a sought after TV star. Maybe. On the slew of seven shows. But despite his rising profile Simon Reeves Haas is with Africa. We've got him on the line now to chat Botswana, Simon. You are indeed a TV star. Well, probably was I think Kim that modding that rising rising price that monitoring quantity is now just hanging on thinking. But it's all good. But yes, most definitely Phil. And Kim by heart is is still across the Indian Ocean. Well, I explained to us. How did you might that connection? How did you fall in love with both wanna so I fell in love with Africa? I on a beyond two thousand shoot which was back in nineteen ninety and I stepped off applying in Harari when Qantas cli- there believe it or not quantity head flights every week into Johannesburg and into Harare Zimbabwe, the country's capital, and I stepped off the plane, and it was just like a rush. It was it was visceral. And it was the smells of the feel the magic of the place people and the bushes. Well, so I kind of returned from that trip and said to my daily long-suffering partner, Linda, I said, look, you know, you can come to. But I'm going to go for some point in. In in in my life. You know, and and look he very courageously said yet wearing so it took us a while to for the everything to sort of line up. But I met some wonderful South African folks on another show that I worked for called guac life, which which took me to Africa quite a lot, and I moved their operations, they safari operations wanna. So I was able to convince them that it might be a good idea to attach a small production company to safari operation. And lo and behold, a next thing, you know, it we packed up took out twenty month old daughter Ella with us and in nine hundred ninety nine we we said south about wanna we lived in a small town coke moun- in which. The arc of anger delta and everything to the north. So it's the sort of safari hop. I guess where everyone flies into from Johannesburg or other places. And then off I go into the delta to have they want to experience. A we were there for for two two and a half years and absolute he loved it. So it was that palpable when you still dot the plane that this this place was talking to you somehow it was came. It really was an and I think that if there's anyone listening who has been to to Africa do any parts of Africa. I think they'll relate to what I'm saying here. And and I still have it. It has not gone. It's gotten worse. I think over the years. As I sort of sit here today on the go back and and have another heat because it has that effect on you. It's it's very difficult. I guess to put it into words. But it is it's overwhelming if you fall in love with Africa, it's Hoke line, and sinker. We went very much with eyes wide open to have a life experience..

Africa Botswana Simon Reeves Haas Johannesburg Kim Chris question Kalahari desert Kelsey Timmerman Van Gogh Qantas York Times San bushman Indian Ocean lo Phil partner Zimbabwe Hoke Joan
"botswana" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"botswana" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Palestinian leaders. Still like the latest idea for peace with Israel suggesting a Jordanian Palestinian confederation has a solution to these rarely Palestinian conflict has until now been relegated to the diplomatic fringes. But Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas said on Sunday that the idea has been broached by none other than Trump advisor son-in-law, Jared, Kushner, Abbass rejected the idea out of hand and a spokesman for the kingdom of Jordan also rejected it saying it's not open for discussion. Abbass lashed out accusing President Trump of closing the peace process, referring to the president's decision to redirect money earmarked for the UN relief Works Agency programs for Palestinian refugees in the West Bank and Gaza Strip Abbass accused President Trump of wanting to destroy unreal completely. I Michael Franson townhall news Jerusalem. Breaking news and analysis at townhall dot com. Conservationists say carcasses of nearly ninety elephants have been found near a famous wildlife sanctuary in Botswana elephant populations across Africa have been badly affected by poaching. Butts wanna had escaped much of the killing despite having the world's largest elephant population. Good management and a tough approach to conservation had kept the ivory poachers at bay. But in you area wildlife survey, which is still only halfway through has already discovered. The caucuses of eighty-seven elephants killed within the last three months most of them with a tusks removed. Poaching in neighboring countries has forced many elephants across the open border into Botswana it now appears those pursuing ivory have followed the. That's ABC's Allaster lead head Roman Catholic. Pope francis. Monday, recommended silence and prayer to counter those who only seek scandal division and destruction. What appeared to be an indirect response locations that.

President Trump president Abbass Mahmoud Abbas Botswana Israel Michael Franson UN Pope francis Gaza Jerusalem ABC West Bank advisor Africa Jared Jordan Kushner eighty-seven elephants
"botswana" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"botswana" Discussed on WGN Radio

"A sportsman myself sportsmen and women of the united states have driven the conservation movement across the world in zimbabwe today biggame hunting it's been outlawed zimbabwe was places to go dive big game and and you might be sitting you're saying oh it should be outlawed i can't believe anyone can shoot an elephant how horrible with afp today in zimbabwe the elephants are overrunning the local villages indiscriminately shooting elephants because they've gotten into their crops john kerry down fences coming in and rating yachting just botswana is a mess in a conservation world today divorce funding that came with the hundreds of millions of dollars that largely driven by americans who came to botswana to hunt big game instead it's a country while rich in natural resources shorting cash has no conservation movement as a result of the stopping biggame hunting is widespread and guess what the elephants are headed for real trouble conflicts with with with humans are ever increasing poaching is on the rise when see sold lion which was an absolutely disgraceful misrepresentation of fact by the worldwide press humanizing align then not having your fact right about how to live with shots and and making see to this incredibly logged wonderful animal that was supposedly in in in a in a horrible way all that did was stop americans from going hunting in africa lines today uh are increasingly using conflict is wildlife in humans the number of americans hunting lioness has declined enormously in zimbabwe which was rhodesia which was the bread basket of africa one of the wealthiest countries when it came to the food as a worldwide export our products today zimbabwe is well it's one of the absolute disaster astra's in africa with staff disaster has come a loss in the ability to hunt big game and hunt wildlife other wildlife zimbabwe as cashstrapped it has no wildlife management and poaching is rampant in on the moon dhabi of course it's one of the most corrupt and in really evil countries in the world when it comes to to how a country runs it has literally runoff the industry that helped make it a nation a worldwide exporter of of dollars in products americans really can't go to zimbabwe the few americans that still own places in zimbabwe are expecting to lose them and there is no wildlife management and poaching as i mentioned this taking so what are you hear.

united states zimbabwe botswana rhodesia astra afp john kerry africa
"botswana" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"botswana" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Sara tishkov is here to talk to us about the variations they found and their history welcome sarah thank you what made you decide to do this study what new things can we learn about skin pigment by looking at a variety of genomes from within africa and outside of africa well we're under stay generally and looking at a genomic and fina tip baked diversity in africa is were interested in evolutionary history we're interested in better understanding how humans have adapted to different environments and i'll were interested in understanding the genetic basis of one of the most very of all traits in human switches skin color how did you look at this where did you draw the genomes from and how did you quantify the fina type what characteristics that you look at to connect with these genes so we included a populations that represent both genetic diversity and diversity for a number of different trades from ethiopia tanzania and botswana we quantified skin color by using a spectrophotometer were basically we shine light under need the arm and by looking at the reflectance of that light we can infer but the pigmentation levels are what did you find when you looked across these denounce did you find new variance new correlations that you hadn't expected between jeans and skin color well yes first i should mention that we saw a huge range of a diversity in terms of skin color so we found that the most lightly pigmented a individuals tended to be from a population called the sign who until recently were traditional hunter gatherer us and they happened had the oldest genetic lineages in the world and the darker skin color is that we observe are in people who have novels saharan ancestry or traditionally on pastoralist and originated from southern sudan.

Sara tishkov tanzania botswana sudan africa ethiopia
"botswana" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"botswana" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Exaggerated saunters that they do out on the street when everyone everyone's taking a look at them cnet his profile these these musicians i did a piece for the guardian on him you you'll see but musically i think it's remarkable is not a very large seen no sign of very large country its large land wide which is only about a million and a half there um and so so how did how did a heavy metal get a foothold in botswana botswana's first rock band knows he rode started in the '70s and then in the 80s guys forgetting our guys who were going over to study abroad even in cape town johannesburg were bringing back heavy metal things and i think arbi one is a strong radio station in johannesburg and you're able to get they were able to still get some of that signal in the capital botswana's capital botswana's only twenty kilometers from south africa in border so that had a big influence on it and obviously that the trading this stuff of what not of magazines in in one of those still going in this the those botswana's who living in uh in the united kingdom and what not we're coming back with it and our radio was playing it eric clapton is played in botswana ended a tour of their that time too so what go to zimbabwe in byways is the second poorest country in the world gaby is still empower people sort of compare him to compare him to dear leader in north north korea kim jong un what is it about zimbabwe and maybe even mugabe's mugabe his leadership that impacts the metal seen there fear is very rampant maybe that that's the escape that they have there aren't many metal bands there because of while just infrastructure i'm what they're able to get in and they can't even it it it's frustrating for them to do that was an accidental country are supposed to go to angolan kuna get a visa oh thir and at a sign that have gone isn't bob way because i've been.

heavy metal botswana rock band cape town johannesburg eric clapton zimbabwe kuna cnet kim jong mugabe bob twenty kilometers