35 Burst results for "Boston University"

2 Boston Trains Collide, Sending 23 to the Hospital, Authorities Say

The Garden Rebel

00:26 sec | Last month

2 Boston Trains Collide, Sending 23 to the Hospital, Authorities Say

"In Boston into the cause of a collision between two trolleys Friday evening, Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority general manager Steve Puff Tak told reporters. Two trains headed West found on the B branch of the Green Line and the trailing train collided with the train in front of it. It happened around six o'clock last night near Boston University. 23 people were taken to hospitals, but none of the injuries were reported to be life threatening. This is

Steve Puff Tak Massachusetts Bay Transportati Boston Boston University
Our New Post-racial Myth

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:00 min | 2 months ago

Our New Post-racial Myth

"So it's all laid out in this piece in the atlantic which constantly publishes left-wing pieces that have a veneer of intellectuality that that is the way i would define the atlantic the new york times Opinion writers are are more street fighters. The atlantic has this patina of intellectuality. So the abram x. can be pieces worth analyzing. He is their foremost spokesman for america being a racist society so this article just published is their way of explaining it and it sounds very effective to his students. I am sure at boston university and tool your kids who go. Oh my god black baby style twice the rate of white babies that proves that there's racism in america. We don't care about black babies dying. No evidence ncis is given for how exactly. Racism produces this a fifth of native americans. And latino americans are medically uninsured. Does he include illegal. Immigrants in the latino americans. What if he does. Do you think it's an honest. Condemnation of the united states almost triple the rate of white americans in asian-americans native people see he switches when he can't find the data for blacks so he goes to native americans

Atlantic United States New York Times Boston University
"boston university" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

04:38 min | 2 months ago

"boston university" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Was thinking about going up for tenure in a in a senior white. Our colleague of mine wanted to sit me down and basically was was against me going up for tenure but then stated well you would probably get tenure because you're a minority and i had already published more than that faculty member had when they went up for tenure and so it just. It was striking to me that she would say that. Over the last year you have spoken a lot of truth to power when we use that phrase. The prophetic voice seems to me. You've set out to be prophetic voice. And as you mentioned at the beginning of our conversation that is not without taking a lot of criticism and often from people who haven't delved deeply with you into the subject matter that you're talking about a year later how has that been for you are you are you. Are you warn. Are you energized. Are you ready for the next year. Do you need a break. How are you after. A year of this was certainly has been a year and i think that i've tried to reassert. Reassert my faith in readers. And what i mean by that. Is you know if a critic who hasn't read my work or who just blatantly distorts my work in order to to argue against me or to frame in some way does that. I have to trust readers that the readers who read my work and read it closely will know that. That's actually not what i'm saying or doing and that that will actually discredit the critic. Rather than me. i've just tried to lean on readers. Entrust readers in all we can do is right An entrust readers to to read an an an and really grasp. What we're trying to say. Is there a fair piece of criticism you've received over the last year. That's that's developed you further. I think as i could write stamford the beginning or even have been anti-racist.

"boston university" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

04:09 min | 2 months ago

"boston university" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Two five five. We have ernie on the line. In quincy ernie go ahead. Yeah hi can you hear me yes. We can't ernie yeah thanks So you know my my flex. I remember a year. I guess exactly though and and welcomed the boston It they'd be thinking about when i was eight newspaper reporter. I applied for job at the globe. And i've been a reporter And i was nearing the end of the process and thought it would be hired was sold there. At that time i was. I was the wrong race. Which white and the wrong ethnicity. Which is irish and the globe had had a very long run of that. And you know my. My interpretation of that was honestly. I was grateful. Because i felt like we've had a long run. It's time for all of us to kind of step aside and and and kind of applaud the promotion of people of color also qualified to do this job. And i've never felt differently and i've i've told this story to many people over the years they said well. You must've been like angry. I i was not angry. I felt like it's time and this is over thirty years ago. There was still struggling with this and that to me is disappointing. Thanks for the call. Ernie professor candy. Well i mean obviously. I can't sort of comment specifically on. What would happen that story. But but but i do know that when an organization decides to hire a candidate of color over qualified over a white candidate that's qualified that typically white candidates don't have the same reaction that that ernie did and assume that that candidate of color is not qualified which then presupposes that people of color and are qualified Which presupposes that people of color only get positions because of their skin color And and that then only creates more division. It makes me think of the story. That's unfolding right now regarding espn. Rachel nichols a white woman. Longtime reporter anchor for the network was caught on tape making some disparaging remarks about maria taylor..

ernie quincy ernie Ernie professor candy boston Rachel nichols espn maria taylor
"boston university" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

02:50 min | 2 months ago

"boston university" Discussed on Radio Boston

"This idea of solidarity which came up and we'll talk about some other podcast episodes as well but there was so much in this idea of zero sum that seemed to get at the heart of anti-racist work you talk about solidarity It really resonated with me and doing anti-poverty poverty work people often argue that we deprive ourselves when we hold others back from being their full selves. I think of mona lisa smith and mothers for justice inequality in boston talking about you know. Every child is our child A year ago. When you and i talked i i asked you about policies that may be needed to be in place in boston. And you rightly said. At the time i just got here. Gimme a second. But it's it's been a year now. Are there policies especially policies towards poverty or children in boston that you think we need to see or reverse in order to become a more anti-racists city so few years ago a young one of the youngest mayors in the country but enabled michael tops Was mayor of stockton california and he decided to to to inaugurate a basic income program which he would provide a basic basically checks to to local people to particularly impoverished people and then study what type of effect it has on their lives study even what type of effect how they used the my and in that program that he started in stockton his spread around to other cities. And why can't we have a pilot basic income program in boston. The original study found that people do what other people would do it when they get extra money. They pay bills. They go back to school. They do things that that allow them to become more more productive. This thought that low income people are going to quote by sneakers a waste away. Money has never really been proven by science and by providing funds for people it lifts them out of poverty and so so you know poverty and in the city is disproportionately my understanding black and brown until it could. It's something that could lift sort of people out of poverty. We did have The town administrator in in chelsea after they did a pilot of guaranteed basic income program and the evaluation of it found that it was targeted towards hunger. In that people spent the majority of people spent the money for some foremost on food to underscore what you're saying. Are you ready to go to the phones. Are you ready to take a call..

boston mona lisa smith michael tops stockton california chelsea
"boston university" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:08 min | 2 months ago

"boston university" Discussed on Radio Boston

"You can't say something bad or good about a text that you haven't read but but obviously that's that's something that that that's done and So i've tried to figure out to learn how to respond to that. And i've learned to just not respond at all. I wanna think about this idea of the long step in there. Such a visual in that. And i'm also thinking about the conversation that you had with heather mcghee on your podcast where you talked about this zero sum framing and i wonder is there something that one has to be willing to lose or to give up in order to take that long step from learning to action. Well i i think at a personal level if it is it is. It is difficult for some people to admit that even though that the nation is is not a meritocracy and the reason why it's difficult for some of us to admit that because then that means that we are not in our position purely off of merit and and and and and it's hard for people to to to know into this admit that and And that indeed as me as a man that that. I've had an certainly benefited from from male privilege or even sister underprivileged or or. You know the fact that. I'm heterosexual a heads forms of privilege. That certainly have benefited me along the way and i know it's hard for people to to admit that because then they have to give up is idea that they are self made and everything that they've accomplished has been because they're so great and because they're so work. I i want to stay with that for a minute. And with this conversation that you had with author and activist other mcgee. She wrote the so the about the so-called zero-sum game your conversation made me think about a chapter in the book the warmth of other suns by isabel wilkerson. It also made me think of richard reeves's work on dream hoarding. It's this idea that we buy into that allowing someone else to rise means losing our own relative position. I i wanna play a little bit of the sound of you and mcgee talking about it using a really accessible metaphor which is flying here. it is in a way. Their child's school is almost like a first class school. They're like whoa. If we create equity than i'm going to be back and coach. Yeah i don't want that. I'm gonna lose my kid's gonna lose but it seems to me that white americans should be assessing themselves from other white people in the west. Yeah and when they make that comparison that's when they can see actually what they don't have how they're in coach right and in fact maybe and other societies in the western world. Everybody's just in last. There's no little that the flight attendant moves over right. Everyone gets food right. Everyone has a leg room. You know everybody gets to bring a bag. I wanted to ask after i heard that. Do you think there are places where everyone is in first class. Have we been able to overcome that kind of if i get mine. You can't have yours. And if you get yours than i can't have mine any more dynamic anywhere in the united states and and i think that i think that's what's sad In in the sense that.

heather mcghee isabel wilkerson richard reeves mcgee suns united states
"boston university" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"boston university" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Welcome back in command and as we start this conversation. I should note right at the top for full transparency. That boston university holds the broadcast license for us here at wbz. You are so. I was thinking this morning professor candy. The first time i spoke with you was exactly one year ago today here on radio boston. You were moving to boston to start the center You and i have talked a couple of times since then here on the show at another event. And we're always asking you to teach an a year into this. I wonder if i can start by asking you some of what you've learned. I wonder has it. Been a journey for you. And what have you learned in the last year. I've learned so much. Because i read so much instead he'd so much but You know a few major things would highlight is that the step from awareness to to action is a is a is an extremely long stepped and i think we as a nation are still trying to take that step in which is a a governing. Majority of americans aware of racism. Aware that it's a big problem. But but we haven't had the ability to to really take those major steps towards towards action toward ridding this nation of this proper. You only pause because you said. I think he said there were three things. I wonder if there if you want to stay on that one for a while or do you want to sort of elaborate. The three and then we'll talk. What's better for you Will i think secondly i. I've learned the way in. Which i i've had to figure out how personally to to respond to People who are criticizing my work web read my work and that's been very difficult for me because i'm just used to. People criticized a brit like as a scholar like or even as a teacher. You might classroom is not the united states so you know i know in my classroom..

wbz boston boston university united states
Why Black Entrepreneurship Surged During the Pandemic

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:04 min | 4 months ago

Why Black Entrepreneurship Surged During the Pandemic

"Is of course the one year anniversary of the murder of floyd in a year of protests and reckoning there have been signs of hope even during a pandemic that hit black americans particularly hard and closed many black owned businesses new data suggests that people in black communities started new businesses over the last year in cities like new york and atlanta the study from the national bureau of economic research says. Black americans were more likely than white americans to take steps toward entrepreneurship. during the pandemic marketplace's euler has more on. Why so the study found that. After a relief package is passed last year. There was a big surge in registered business formations in the following weeks. Catherine facia teaches business at boston university and helped write the study. She says that's despite the cares. Act not directly infusing. Any money into new businesses are passed not to pat is a lot of start up formation so it was very interesting for us to see that cares out had that ripple of fat another reason for the surgeon. Black entrepreneurship could be the americans. Now have a better understanding of historic inequality or he goes. Mom is an assistant professor of management at columbia university and a co author of the study. There's being clear intends in banks and government to make sure all the financial reports out this year. Which is wachner hurts. And andre perry says that speaks to a bigger lesson to be learned from this study about access to capital. He's a senior fellow at the brookings institution. If you really want to see the economy grow figure out two ways to invest in the under appreciated assets in our community in that happens to be black and brown communities it happens to be black and brown entrepreneurs he says black people represent about fourteen percent of the population in the us but only two percent of all businesses with more than one employee this investment and black businesses. He says shouldn't be a pandemic induced

Catherine Facia National Bureau Of Economic Re Floyd Boston University Wachner Andre Perry Atlanta New York Columbia University United States
Olympia Dukakis, Oscar-Winning ‘Moonstruck’ Actress, Dies at 89

On Being

00:41 sec | 5 months ago

Olympia Dukakis, Oscar-Winning ‘Moonstruck’ Actress, Dies at 89

"Winning actress Olympia Dukakis has died at the age of 89. She was born in law and went to Boston University. She also was the cousin of former Massachusetts governor Michael Dukakis when she accepted her Academy Award in 1988 for best supporting actress for the movie Moonstruck. Caucus gave a shout out to her cousin who was running for president that year to my friends and colleagues in New York and the whole theater. Thank you very much. Okay, Michael, let's go. Olympia Dukakis was one of the BU theater graduates who started the Charles Playhouse in Boston in the late 19 fifties.

Olympia Dukakis Michael Dukakis Boston University Academy Award Massachusetts New York BU Charles Playhouse Michael Boston
What the Heck Is Seitan? Is It Healthy?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

01:57 min | 5 months ago

What the Heck Is Seitan? Is It Healthy?

"My editor. Who is way cooler than me has been hanging out on tiktok lately. And she says she's seen lots and lots of videos about cooking with satan. Apparently this meat substitute is having a bit of a moment. But i think there are still plenty of people who are still unfamiliar with this ingredient. And what the heck is it. How does it stack up nutritionally. And how do you eat it. Satan spelled s. e. I. t. a. n. is not a new thing. The word is japanese and it was coined about fifty years ago by one of the proponents of the macrobiotic diet. But the food that it refers to has been a staple in asian cultures for at least fifteen centuries. I remember seeing it but not buying it at the food cop that i belong to as an undergraduate at boston university now. That wasn't quite fifteen centuries ago but it was still long before the days of whole foods stores and yoga studios on every corner back then food co-ops and health food in general occupied sort of a fringe culture leftover from the age of aquarius. Today of course it's another story. Plant based in plant. Forward diets have become relatively mainstream. And you're much more likely to run across satan at your local grocery store. It's often next to the tofu or the plant based meat alternatives. If your local grocery doesn't carry it you might need to seek out a health food store a food co-op and yes. They still exist or an asian grocer. You can even make your own and have more about that in just a minute. Is most frequently used as a meat substitute in vegetarian diets. It has sort of a stringy chewy texture that makes it a fairly good substitute for meat. Unlike some meat substitutes however it's a decent source of protein but the source of the protein may surprise you because satan is made from wheat gluten.

Satan Boston University
What the Heck is Seitan?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

01:58 min | 5 months ago

What the Heck is Seitan?

"My editor. Who is way cooler than me has been hanging out on tiktok lately. And she says she's seen lots and lots of videos about cooking with satan. Apparently this meat substitute is having a bit of a moment. But i think there are still plenty of people who are still unfamiliar with this ingredient. And what the heck is it. How does it stack up nutritionally. And how do you eat it. Satan spelled s. e. I. t. a. n. is not a new thing. The word is japanese and it was coined about fifty years ago by one of the proponents of the macrobiotic diet. But the food that it refers to has been a staple in asian cultures for at least fifteen centuries. I remember seeing it but not buying it at the food cop that i belong to as an undergraduate at boston university now. That wasn't quite fifteen centuries ago but it was still long before the days of whole foods stores and yoga studios on every corner back then food co-ops and health food in general occupied sort of a fringe culture leftover from the age of aquarius. Today of course it's another story. Plant based in plant. Forward diets have become relatively mainstream. And you're much more likely to run across satan at your local grocery store. It's often next to the tofu or the plant based meat alternatives. If your local grocery doesn't carry it you might need to seek out a health food store a food co-op and yes. They still exist or an asian grocer. You can even make your own and have more about that in just a minute. Is most frequently used as a meat substitute in vegetarian diets. It has sort of a stringy chewy texture that makes it a fairly good substitute for meat. Unlike some meat substitutes however it's a decent source of protein but the source of the protein may surprise you because satan is made from wheat

Satan Boston University
"boston university" Discussed on Cardionerds

Cardionerds

03:28 min | 7 months ago

"boston university" Discussed on Cardionerds

"Their experience.

Vincent Jackson’s Family To Donate His Brain To CTE Research In Boston

Masters in Business

00:29 sec | 7 months ago

Vincent Jackson’s Family To Donate His Brain To CTE Research In Boston

"The family of a former NFL player is donating his brain. Sarah Bartlett explains Why Vincent Jackson's family says his brain is going to Boston University to be researched for CTE, a deadly brain disease associated with repeated concussions or head trauma with the donation of family spokesperson says Jackson was the type of person who wanted to help as many people as possible. The 38 year old who played for the Buccaneers and Chargers, was found dead in a Florida hotel room last week. His cause of death is still

Sarah Bartlett Vincent Jackson Boston University NFL Jackson Buccaneers Chargers Florida
Vincent Jackson's brain to be donated for CTE research

Bloomberg Best

00:23 sec | 7 months ago

Vincent Jackson's brain to be donated for CTE research

"Military. The family of a former NFL player is donating his brain. Sarah Bartlett has that story. Vincent Jackson's family says his brain is going to Boston University to be researched for CTE, a deadly brain disease associated with repeat. Concussions or head trauma with the donation. A family spokesperson says Jackson was the type of person who wanted to help as many people as possible. The 38 year

Sarah Bartlett Vincent Jackson NFL Boston University Jackson
Former Los Angeles Charger Vincent Jackson’s Family To Donate His Brain To CTE Research

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:21 sec | 7 months ago

Former Los Angeles Charger Vincent Jackson’s Family To Donate His Brain To CTE Research

"Football standout donating his brain for research The New York Times is reporting that Vincent Jackson's family has donated his brain to Boston University to be research for CTE, The former wide receiver was found dead last Monday in a hotel room in Florida. The age of 38. The cause of death is still unknown. He reportedly had an alcohol problem. And years worth of research is the

Vincent Jackson The New York Times Football Boston University CTE Florida
Vincent Jackson's brain donated to Boston University's CTE Center

AM Tampa Bay

00:55 sec | 7 months ago

Vincent Jackson's brain donated to Boston University's CTE Center

"Former Buccaneers star receiver Vincent Jackson may have been dead for three days before anyone called for help. That's according to a new medical examiner's report. Jackson's body was found in the Homewood Suites in branded on Monday, and hotel staff actually entered his room twice in the days before. Mistakenly thinking he was sleeping in a chair. Jackson's family says his brain is being donated to the Boston CTE study, which researches the effects of severe concussions. Cognitive impairments be behavioral abnormalities. Uh, mark MOOD instability, depression, anxiety, behavioral impulsivity, neuropsychologist Michael Schaumburg at USF, telling News Channel eight effects of CTE can only be studied actor and the victim dies. Sheriff's office says Jackson's family indicated he may have suffered from chronic

Homewood Suites Vincent Jackson Buccaneers Jackson Michael Schaumburg Boston USF Depression News Channel
Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

All Things Considered

03:35 min | 8 months ago

Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

"Two studies out today suggest ways to improve treatments for depression and obsessive compulsive behavior. Using brain stimulation. Thea Pro just delivers pulses of electric or magnetic energy to certain areas in the brain. Scientists report that stimulation is more effective when it is customized for each patient. MPR's Jon Hamilton has more Brain stimulation is usually reserved for people who haven't been helped by drugs or other treatments. People like this woman in her thirties who had severe unrelenting depression, the world was slow. And gray and flat. Everything kind of tasted the same. No actual sense of enjoyment or No ability to imagine NPR agreed not to use the woman's name to protect her medical privacy. After five years of searching for help, she got into a study run by Dr Katherine Scan. Gus of the University of California San Francisco. Scandals is part of a team trying to improve deep brain stimulation, which implants wires in the brain to deliver tiny pulses of electricity. Traditional deep brain stimulation has typically stimulated in one location. In every patient without really an understanding of how that effects each individual's depression symptoms. Scandals thought she might be able to relieve the woman's depression using a different approach. So she created a map of her patient's brain that showed which area was associated with each symptom. She had an iPad and she marked off her level of depression and anxiety. An energy level in response to each pulse of neuromodulation. Then scandals used that information to design a deep brain stimulation system that monitored these areas and delivered pulses on Lee when there were signs of trouble. Our goal is to develop a brain pacemaker. That can nudge these depressions circuits back into their healthy state and keep them there. And for this patient, it worked, she recalls. The first time doctors stimulated one particular area of her brain. I wasn't really expecting anything to happen, and then suddenly It was this kind of wash off the sense of pleasurable happiness and glee, and I literally think I giggled. She says The implanted stimulator she went home with is still doing its job. Months later. The world is Is back. I'm back. I feel like myself again. A personalized approach to brain stimulation also seemed to help people with obsessive compulsive behaviors. Trade. Grover, a graduate student at Boston University, was part of a team that studied people who had thoughts that wouldn't go away or behaviors that they felt compelled to repeat, checking whether we've switched the stove off or not. Have you washed her hands enough in, particularly in times like ours today in the pandemic, Such behaviors can be exacerbated. The team knew that these kinds of behaviors are linked to problems in the brain's reward network. So they studied the activity in this network for about 60 patients. Then they devised a unique stimulation treatment for each person. Grover says The treatment sends pulses of alternating current through electrodes placed on the scalp. It allows us to stimulate the brain. And mimic the kinds off Ray to make activity patterns that are typically associated with healthy behavior, He says. People who got the treatment instead of a placebo got better. By the fifth day of stimulation, obsessive compulsive behaviors had significantly reduced. On average. There was a 28% reduction, and Grover says the treatment works best on people with the most severe symptoms. Both studies appear in the journal Nature Medicine. Jon Hamilton NPR news

Depression Obsessive Compulsive Behavior Jon Hamilton Severe Unrelenting Depression Dr Katherine Scan Thea NPR GUS University Of California Grover San Francisco Anxiety LEE Boston University RAY Journal Nature Medicine Npr News
Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

All Things Considered

03:35 min | 8 months ago

Personalized brain stimulation alleviates severe depression symptoms

"Two studies out today suggest ways to improve treatments for depression and obsessive compulsive behavior. Using brain stimulation. Thea Pro just delivers pulses of electric or magnetic energy to certain areas in the brain. Scientists report that stimulation is more effective when it is customized for each patient. MPR's Jon Hamilton has more brain stimulation is usually reserved for people who haven't been helped by drugs or other treatments. People like this woman in her thirties who had severe, unrelenting depression. The world was slow and gray and flat. Everything kind of tasted the same. No actual sense of enjoyment or No ability to imagine NPR agreed not to use the woman's name to protect her medical privacy. After five years of searching for help, she got into a study run by Dr Katherine Scan. Gus at the University of California San Francisco. Scandals is part of a team trying to improve deep brain stimulation, which implants wires in the brain to deliver tiny pulses of electricity. Traditional deep brain stimulation has typically stimulated in one location. In every patient without really an understanding of how that effects each individual's depression symptoms. Scandals thought she might be able to relieve the woman's depression using a different approach. So she created a map of her patient's brain that showed which area was associated with each symptom. She had an iPad and she marked off her level of depression and anxiety. An energy level in response to each pulse of neuromodulation. Then scandals used that information to design a deep brain stimulation system that monitored these areas and delivered pulses on Lee when there were signs of trouble. Our goal is to develop a brain pacemaker. That can nudge these depressions circuits back into their healthy state and keep them there. And for this patient, it worked, she recalls. The first time doctors stimulated one particular area of her brain. I wasn't really expecting anything to happen, and then suddenly It was this kind of wash off the sense of pleasurable happiness and glee, and I literally think I giggled. She says The implanted stimulator she went home with is still doing its job. Months later. The world is Is back. I'm back. I feel like myself again. A personalized approach to brain stimulation also seemed to help people with obsessive compulsive behaviors. Trade. Grover, a graduate student at Boston University, was part of a team that studied people who had thoughts that wouldn't go away or behaviors that they felt compelled to repeat, checking whether we've switched the stove off or not. Have you washed her hands enough in, particularly in times like ours today in the pandemic, Such behaviors can be exacerbated. The team knew that these kinds of behaviors are linked to problems in the brain's reward network. So they studied the activity in this network for about 60 patients. Then they devised a unique stimulation treatment for each person. Grover says The treatment sends pulses of alternating current through electrodes placed on the scalp. It allows us to stimulate the brain. And mimic the kinds off Ray to make activity patterns that are typically associated with healthy behavior. He says. People who got the treatment instead of a placebo got better. By the fifth day of stimulation, obsessive compulsive behaviors had significantly reduced On average, there was a 28% reduction, and Grover says the treatment works best on people with the most severe symptoms. Both studies appear in the journal Nature Medicine. Jon Hamilton NPR news

Depression Obsessive Compulsive Behavior Jon Hamilton Dr Katherine Scan Thea NPR GUS University Of California Grover San Francisco Anxiety LEE Boston University RAY Journal Nature Medicine Npr News
King honored at Boston University, his alma mater

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 8 months ago

King honored at Boston University, his alma mater

"Remembering Martin Luther king junior who once said darkness cannot drive out darkness only light can do that Margaret Wong is the president of the Southern Poverty Law Center and on this MLK day she reflected on the uprising at the capitol less than two weeks ago he pointed out that he does not drive out hate only love can do that and it can be very hard to hate those urges to love those who hate you but it is more important than ever that we understand what Dr but he also important to help the poor Martin Luther king led the fight against poverty and we need to restore that and one and stuff but I didn't administration is a start but we have to commit ourselves to enabling their efforts to be felt and doing what we can in our communities to help one another I'm shelling out there

Margaret Wong Martin Luther King Southern Poverty Law Center
TSA sees highest number of airport passengers screened since pandemic started

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

03:49 min | 9 months ago

TSA sees highest number of airport passengers screened since pandemic started

"Despite the drastic surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations already underway. Us air travel over the weekend reached its highest peak of the pandemic. The tsa says nearly one point. Three million passengers were screened yesterday. And that has dr found she again warning of a surge on top of a surge back with us tonight dr. He'd be delia an infectious disease physician and the medical director of special pathogens unit. At boston university school of medicine she worked with the world health organization back when we were a member nation during the o. Bola outbreak and is among one of our medical. Contributors dr julia. It's good to see you so the travel over the weekend was exceptional. All things considered a lot of americans deciding that they wanted to get away. I wanted to see family. What do you make of what that is going to mean for the spread across the country. And when will we start seeing that spike. Katya look back one month right. Look at california as an example. California is one of the epicenters right now in our country of this pandemic and the state lockdown order. But when you look at the cell phone mobility data people didn't stop moving as much as they did after the first lock down and you only have to look at the tsa data for lax the biggest day of travel during pandemic on november twentieth. The top forty four thousand people the second largest summer twenty third and so if what played out with the increased number of cases leading to the hospitalizations that you're seeing in december now because of the holiday travel in november. Were up on a hill. A really really rough hill for the next month as we see what's already happening in hospitals get doubled from the cases and hospitalizations that result from the december new year's travel. Let me redo this from the washington post. It's impossible to say. How many infections people have taken flights in part because those travelers may not have known they were sick. The cdc said in september that it had investigated sixteen hundred cases of people who flew while they were at risk of spreading the virus and identified. Almost eleven thousand people who could have been exposed on those flights. Now the airlines taking great pains to say that they have state of the art air filtration systems and the air within those plans are getting getting circulated so quickly that the spread of infection when you are flying is relatively low. They're also a lot of airlines. That are saying they're trying to spread people out but with that. Many people traveling on limited schedules. The planes are getting tighter. My question to you is. Where is the risk worse. Worst is on the planes or is it at these gatherings that folks are coming from. Yeah i think it depends on the plane or the gathering. I mean on the plane. The toughest part is when you're actually at the gate when all those hippo filters and not circulation is actually off. And you don't know the person in front of your or next us put their mascot right. this has been. There's been an ongoing discussion about getting travelers to wear masks. And so it is. It is during the plane ride. It is those periods of time. There is no circulation but that person as you said asymmetric what we know that asymptomatic carriers people who are infected could make up up to forty percent of the new cases the spread of new cases and so they may take whatever transmission they got on that plane to their gatherings and again indoors larger groups all of those elements as we've been talking about over the course of this pandemic are going to hurt one. One thing that i heard today that really struck me. Is that people who got infected at their christmas gathering that they now go to the new year parties they're actually going to be infectious and be able to transmit that.

Dr Julia TSA Boston University School Of Me Bola Delia Infectious Disease Katya World Health Organization Washington Post CDC California United States
"boston university" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:18 min | 9 months ago

"boston university" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Of Boston University, the creator of the Maximize My Social security. Website. Good morning, Dr Kotlikoff. Hey, Josh could talk to you again. How are you? Wonderful, Happy, Yonica. Same to you have Yonica Merry Christmas to all. So what's going on? Because that's what's been keeping you busy. What are you working on lately? Well, lots of different Issues. You know they're working a lot on the issue of testing, and I'm hoping that FDA will quickly approve a lot of RePet home tests that different companies air coming up with That weaken. Hopefully get for free from the government and take a test every day and If we could do that we can, even if they're not as perfectly as accurate as the PCR test. The By taking them every day. They're really accurate when you're actually very inefficient, infectious. So by taking them every day, you'll find out exactly when you really become infectious and then your quarantine and then we'll get this reproduction rate of the virus down below one. And then we'll have the thing over even before the vaccine has Been able So I've been working on epidemiology in effect. Written a few papers. If you gotta Kotlikoff dot net, you'll see a couple articles one of The New York Times one of the Wall Street Journal. Over the summer that I've ever last few months I've written. So you've been talking about this for I don't know. Nine months has Have you gotten any? I mean, I know you've got a press for it, but our people Gonna go forward with the testing. I mean, has anybody in been contacted you No contact with the administration couple. These tests to prove that the FDA but The problem is the FDA disapproving things subject to having a prescription subject to having health professional watch. You swab your nose. I mean, Really? The FDA is killing people left right and center. This'd year Yeah, In a And collaboration with President Trump The The task force..

FDA Dr Kotlikoff Boston University Yonica Josh President Wall Street Journal The New York Times
Officials could approve 2nd COVID-19 vaccine by Moderna soon

MSNBC Morning Joe

03:33 min | 9 months ago

Officials could approve 2nd COVID-19 vaccine by Moderna soon

"The united states set a record for cova cases for a second day in a row yesterday. Nbc news data shows more than two hundred forty. Three thousand new cases were reported while the covert tracking project report. Some one hundred fifteen thousand people are currently hospitalized with the virus. The us nearly set a new high for deaths as well. Thirty two hundred ninety three reported yesterday. Just five of the record number reported on wednesday but more relief could be on the way the united states is on track to approve a second corona virus vaccine after an independent panel to the food and drug administration recommended. Emergency use authorization for the moderna vaccine yesterday. Members of the vaccines and related biological products. Advisory committee voted twenty two zero in favor of authorization with one abstention. The fda is expected to agree with the recommendation in an official capacity. Could be as soon as today joining us now. Infectious diseases physician and medical director of the special pathogens unit. At the boston university. School of medicine. Dr in the he'd be delia. Nbc news and msnbc medical contributor. Dr padilla it's good to see you. How significant is the modern news to go in the back last week of the pfizer authorization. Although it's another tool in our toolbox moderna vaccine the advantages of it are actually store that much much higher temperatures making distorted most of the freezers bridges that hospitals and clinics usually absent additionally gonna be helpful in areas that made me maybe do not have that infrastructure to be able to store the visor vaccine. So that's one thing that the reason maderna's saw a twenty two zero compared to pfizer that some people turn down the vote was actually. The madeira vaccine is looking for Emergency authorization for those over eighteen years of age whereas the pfizer had the sixteen and seventeen year olds as part of their horton. Some of the members of the committee. The fbi independent committee had an issue with so few number of people in that age for pfizer. It's good news. The one thing that will point out that together with either madonna. Us little if everything goes plan that secured about hundred and fifty million a vaccination spur one hundred fifty million people. So that's about half of our country a little less than half of our country and so we're really still waiting astrazeneca's data as well as bouncing johnson stated in january. That's going to help. Fill the gap. So dr brasilia. How is this rollout going. As we hit the end of the week aired started on monday with those historic pictures of nurses being injected in new york city and the day later in new jersey and across the country. Is it going as planned. They make tweaks where the things that need to change to. Make sure this gets quickly to the people who need it. So for the most part it's been smooth you know. Of course got the winter storm here in the northeast and as far as i know hasn't caused any delays. That definitely sort of tells you the number type of variables that could be out of our control that could affect the future least particularly with the winter coming around. I'm getting my next the This morning at nine o'clock in our own hospitals in boston by smoothly but there are reports that pfizer saying that has doses in the warehouse. But it's looking for guidance on how to get the liberty that's one question about what's going to happen with the upcoming doses in the next couple of weeks because some hospitals are reporting. They've now been told by their state. There's going to be getting up your doses. So the the data about what. What exactly is going on. There is still here

Pfizer Nbc News Dr Padilla United States Food And Drug Administration Cova Maderna Delia Advisory Committee Boston University Msnbc School Of Medicine Dr Brasilia Astrazeneca FBI Madonna Johnson New York City New Jersey Boston
Loneliness and Litigation: A Lawyer's Case Study

The Psych Central Show

04:23 min | 10 months ago

Loneliness and Litigation: A Lawyer's Case Study

"Doctor. Freiberg welcome to the show. Thank you so very much dr freiberg. We are here to discuss loneliness. And i promise. We're going to get to that. But i'd be remiss if i didn't ask your thoughts on the differences between being a social psychologist and a lawyer. What's that like well. It proved interesting for me. I became a social psychologist. I and i was professor for a decade at boston university. And then i had a chance to go across the river and go to harvard law school so i wasn't gonna turn that down. I became a lawyer and then it pretty quickly became clear that criss crossing the to expertise gave me of field of work. It was unlike anybody else. No one else in in boston. Had both degrees and they're pretty quickly became what was sort of called around towns. The site lawyer. Boston's psych lawyer so institutions and agencies anything to do with psychiatry or psychology or clinical. Social work asked me to be their general counsel and it was in the context of being general counsel that i heard about so many clinical cases and that became the material for my research. You define loneliness differently from others. Can you tell us about that. Indeed what i thought. I discovered over thirty five years of being council to a great percentage of boston. Psychiatrists psychologists and clinical social workers was that they kept reporting more and more loneliness sure. Their clients had other issues as well but the clients kept talking about being enormously disconnected from others not having anybody to live with anybody in their life nobody to call more and more as the years went by loneliness became ever more present. I started just think about this topic and the more i researched it. It struck me that loneliness is not an emotion like anger or happiness. It's a sensation like hunger or thirst so just since our body tells us up were hungry thirsty it also says. I feel really lonely and disconnected. After hearing that definition it makes a little more sense this next statement because you consider chronic loneliness a public health crisis of the first order. They surgeon general of the united states. Vivek murthy the nineteenth surgeon general about a decade ago said we are actually experienced an epidemic of loneliness about thirty five percent of the american population in two thousand ten reported feeling chronically lonely and what i mean by that we all feel lonely from time to time. How could we not. But that's not like being chronically. Lonely just like being sad it's not like being clinically depressed. As a huge difference. Chronic loneliness is in the land in the last fifty years evermore so and it correlates with much worse health in much shorter life span. So it's serious. It sounds very serious but one of the things that i keep thinking about is people are enmeshed around other people may have social media so even when you're at home you're around other people. We work in offices. Now i know cove it has changed that a little bit but i just. I'm trying to think of the last time that i was truly alone. And i can't come up with it even as i sit here interviewing you. My phone will ding. I'm never not surrounded by people. I guess my question is how can people still feel so lonely. Given how connected our world is. But that's the key question because there are two pathways to loan one. Pathway is being alone being isolated being disconnected but a different pathway is being surrounded by people as you described but not benefiting from those relationships not feeling nourished not feeling nurtured not feeling sues. People are objectively lonely. 'cause they're all divorced off from anybody they don't have anybody in their lives but just as many people become chronically lonely surrounded by others

Dr Freiberg Freiberg Boston Harvard Law School Boston University Vivek Murthy Chronic Loneliness United States
201: We Pay Our Respects To Travis Roy & Talk About The Recent News Surrounding The Boston Bruins - burst 01

Black N' Gold Hockey Podcast

04:09 min | 11 months ago

201: We Pay Our Respects To Travis Roy & Talk About The Recent News Surrounding The Boston Bruins - burst 01

"And please don't forget to use code c l e S50 that's clns 50 betonline.ag online wagering experts. Excellent banks mark and we'll get right into it. And first we start with a little bit of sadness. We actually this past week Travis Roy Pollard bus University hockey player who was tragically paralyzed in this first shift with a Boston University Terriers back. It was Nineteen ninety-five actually passed away at the age of forty-five. He was suction an advocate for in and help so many people in his situation and you know, I actually met Travis years ago working in Boston sports radio in his dad Lazy Boy And You Know Travis is just a a good human being who used to tragic, you know situation to really help others and turn something positive from it and off and he he died unexpectedly having a procedure that usually does I guess I read correctly and it's too bad that obviously it's hard to have a long life with their but he used Every bit of the second Ziad to help other people so it was it was too bad and I don't know why if you have any thoughts so we'll start with Mark on Travis Roy. Yeah a total inspiration to those people with spinal cord injuries. And when what he did, you know, it was above him to to make sure that you know news and information and and the the research was it was more involved in into his everyday life and it wasn't about him. I was by everybody else. So the kind heartedness that that guy put through for so many years after that accident so long ago after what was it 11 seconds and his first shift, you know, that's that's really tough. So but what the Legacy that he took it back, you know, it's just amazing and and hopefully the foundation keeps going and we can you know, somehow find a a resolution to these injuries so dead. It's it's really sad. I mean New England lost a very good hockey player a great person and an advocate that that, you know will never be forgotten. So I thought to go out to our family and friends. I had the pleasure of meeting Travis at a fundraiser that he put on in the Back Bay at a restaurant. I can't remember but I met him shook his hand and and it was very nice, you know, so sad sad week in in New England Hockey have your thoughts on Travis. Yeah. I didn't have the pleasure of meeting him. But I do just remove it seemed like it was so long ago, but it really feels like the other day cuz again, I love being you know on bu hockey girl and I just remember being so pumped like this kid mean they're coming in, you know, whatever and I just I think he speaks to what what real heroes are like, do you know what I mean that you take a tragedy and like Mark said it was no after that after you know, he's you know started healing and whenever it wasn't about him it was about everyone else to like what to do about spinal cord injuries or safety and you know, like making hockey Steve. So these kind of thing, you know, whatever enough just a big voice and if anything Wednesday, you know help, you know, the Travis right foundation just what he did with this foundation and I will watch something with Chris Drury when it was being inducted into the Hockey Hall that I like American Hockey Hall of Fame and it was like a clip and he specifically talked to him. He was a teammate of had this, you know, and just a great person and everyone who met him said that and just all the work he did so my heart really does go to his family and home. Thank you Travis because you know the type of Heroes and role models that we need in the world right like you it's not what happens. It's what you do with it. Right and he modeled that so thoughts and prayers to the family and it is a big job. I just been doing them by just everyone you know what I mean because he wasn't true warrior hero in any ways very true and recipes Travis try for sure on to the

Travis Travis Roy Travis Roy Pollard Hockey Boston University Terriers New England Hockey Mark Back Bay Chris Drury Boston Hockey Hall American Hockey Hall Of Fame New England Ziad
Paralyzed ex-Boston University hockey player Roy dies at 45

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:12 sec | 11 months ago

Paralyzed ex-Boston University hockey player Roy dies at 45

"Former Boston University hockey player Travis Roy has died 25 years ago, Roy was 11 seconds into his first shift for the BU hockey team when he fell hard against the boards, believing and paralyzed from the neck down. Travis Roy was 45.

Travis Roy Hockey BU Boston University
"boston university" Discussed on The BosBabes

The BosBabes

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"boston university" Discussed on The BosBabes

"Cuz a lot <Speech_Female> of people I'm <Speech_Female> wondering who stuck <Speech_Female> with 11 for most <Speech_Music_Female> of my life, but you <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> know definitely get the <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> whole new <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> change a thing might <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> be a good idea. You can kind <Speech_Female> of make a new name for yourself <Speech_Music_Female> your number for yourself <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> here for me. <Speech_Female> We're two people follow <Speech_Female> you on social media <Speech_Female> obviously in <Speech_Female> the future <Speech_Female> people if they <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> want to check out where <Speech_Female> you're playing Bots, <Speech_Female> you know, <Speech_Female> you guys play at Warrior <Speech_Female> Ice Arena, which <Speech_Female> is actually where the Boston <Speech_Female> Bruins practice <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> which is super <Speech_Female> cool. So <Speech_Female> you also get to <Speech_Female> play on the same ice <Speech_Female> with the Boston Bruins practice <Speech_Female> on <Speech_Female> a believe that rape is right <Speech_Female> and wrong. I don't <Speech_Female> know. <Speech_Female> Alumni team also <Speech_Female> quite <Speech_Female> they're pretty frequently <Speech_Female> for charity <Speech_Female> events, cuz I've actually covered <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> some of their events there <Speech_Female> as well. Where can people <Speech_Female> find you because I know people <Speech_Female> are going to be excited follow <Speech_Female> your ice hockey <Speech_Female> careers. You can <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> follow me on <Speech_Female> my Instagram. I <Speech_Female> think it's like acid <Speech_Female> Davis underscore <Speech_Female> 16, and <Speech_Female> then I have a Twitter <Speech_Female> and I think that that's <Speech_Female> like Sammy Davis. <Speech_Female> Oh nine, <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> I guess like just <Speech_Female> wage. <Speech_Female> I guess I'll give a shout <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> out to everybody that's <Speech_Female> on the <Speech_Female> front of the lines <Speech_Female> right now and all <Speech_Female> the essential workers <Speech_Female> and everybody that's going <Speech_Female> back to work like please <Speech_Female> stay safe, <Speech_Female> and we <Speech_Female> appreciate you <Speech_Female> and suck <Speech_Female> everybody. Keep up the <Speech_Female> good work and <Speech_Female> Boston. I love <Speech_Female> you, and <Speech_Female> I'm excited <Speech_Female> for next year, and <Speech_Female> thank you guys for having <Speech_Female> me. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Thank you so much <Speech_Female> for joining us live <Speech_Female> you follow to get a vanilla <Speech_Female> off <Speech_Female> on social media as well <Speech_Female> myself pretty <Speech_Female> ballsy and <Speech_Female> the boss fans. Of course, <Speech_Female> please subscribe to <Speech_Female> us on Spotify and <Speech_Female> iTunes. We have some great <Speech_Female> guests coming <Speech_Female> up. Like I said, <Speech_Female> June 8th. <Speech_Female> We're going to be having Bailey <Speech_Female> midi girls <Speech_Female> live shows, and we talked <Speech_Female> with all about her nonprofit. <Speech_Music_Female> All <Speech_Female> of us New England Patriots <Speech_Female> four times the cheerleader <Speech_Female> and again <Speech_Female> keep posting with us because <Speech_Female> we will have Stanley <Speech_Female> Davis back <Speech_Female> on with us <Speech_Female> chatting with us <Speech_Female> about her time <Speech_Female> playing professional <Speech_Female> ice hockey <Speech_Female> you guys rock. <Speech_Female> Thank you so much, <Speech_Female> and we will see you <Speech_Female> soon, Boston <Speech_Female> Strong. <Silence> <Speech_Music_Female> My <Speech_Music_Female> steps out <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> and step <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> off. <Music>

New England Patriots Boston Boston Bruins hockey Davis Ice Arena Spotify Bruins rape Twitter Bailey Sammy Davis. Stanley
"boston university" Discussed on The BosBabes

The BosBabes

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"boston university" Discussed on The BosBabes

"Do you have any upcoming Charities that people can be on the lookout for obviously, I know with covid-19 know when is really able to do anything wrong. I'm in person but you know, the Boston Pride is doing anything online or hosting any virtual races because I know the Ray Bourque Foundation my other co-hosts and I am alone read off we both took part in the social distance Dash who are working on possibly putting together in the future to give back yourself and WHL kind of has like the pride has kind of everything on hold right now, but I think that in the season they do a lot of charity events and I just like Community teams and reaching out for them, but I guess in the future like something dead. I don't know. mean, I'm really an advocate for mental health. So I think I'll probably get involved with that and you guys in the loop if there is anything that I am passionate about that I definitely want to get involved in maybe coaching. I've been approached by a few people to start a camp. So that's been on my mind maybe later in the summer but the rinks are currently closed right now so long and we I don't really know about ice time. So that's something I'm definitely interested, but I don't know. I don't know what the future kind of holds. I guess. That's true. I mean with everything going on with everything is kind of on hold but I do like that you potentially are going to look into getting involved or charity getting into mentoring getting into coaching you guys right now, you're listening to Sammy Davis again. I'm from the Boston area grew up right in Pembroke ice hockey female athlete Superstar believe she was actually a co-captain of The Bu Terriers. I don't think you mentioned that but I'm mentioning it now she is going to suck. Play with the Boston Pride. You guys don't know who the Boston Pride are. Make sure you look them up. They are a professional women's ice hockey team. We are so excited to check out some of their games this season guys Beat Boston Pride. And before we wrap up. Do you know what I'd like to have a little bit of fun with our guests. I know we talked all about your background and sports and college and doctorate but we want to get some fun great awesome little tidbits that you probably don't really talk about that often in interviews. If you have like a like funny story that you want to tell us or something interesting that it's happened in a locker room. Now is the time you want to hear you showcase your personality a little bit too. I love to go the beach and stuff when I have time and I love to sit by the pool like sit in the sun. That's just it makes me happy and I was just he's probably going to kill me, but I was.

Boston Pride Boston Ray Bourque Foundation Sammy Davis hockey Pembroke ice Bu Terriers
"boston university" Discussed on The BosBabes

The BosBabes

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"boston university" Discussed on The BosBabes

"Say me. I wanted to jump right into I like to have some fun question who are some of your Idols as a kid. Did you look up to I know you're a little bit on the younger side, but I don't know if you fall in like Bobby or or or a boar or any of the current players like Patrice Bergeron. Do you have any female athletes that you looked up to who were some of your athletes ours that got you so close on Sports at such a young age. Yeah, I think we always talk about like if you can see it you can be it and like growing up. I was like I want to play in NHL. That's all we really kind of like had and I grew up like watching the Bruins. So like I grew up watching Patrice Bergeron and Milan Lucic in Chara and off like Tim Thomas and like all of those like Bruins players and I think that I like love the Bruins growing up and those were my like those were my role models but then wage as I got older and older and and like in middle school and end of elementary school and high school. I was like, I started seeing females in and seeing them play and I was like, oh I want to go to prep school. I want to go play college hockey and that's when I think some college hockey players like marie-philip Poulin like she played a few and she's on Team Canada and she was like abused are and just juice. Such a great leader and then I think but from the USA side like Contra Granado and like Meghan Duggan and all like a j like those those women were really big role models to for me and followed hockey and played Sports and my parents started the high school team in our town. And so I think like my family was such a great motivation for me in a model. So I was so lucky to be put into such a healthy environment with my family. So I have to give them a lot of credit to love that. You had a lot of female influence around you before you get into her Sports. I think that is super cool because usually you hear people say, oh I love watching Bob you are I love watching Patrice Bergeron, which of course we all love me laughing says well, but I love you had such a strong female influence, Indiana. I kind of wanted her to ask this quick question. You you had a what is your question? I love again having fun with our special guest bath. So what I want to know little off topic, but also going to be hilarious. What is your what was your childhood Crush? I need to know some back story on you childhood Crush my childhood celebrity crash. I mean, I like always watch like Ryan Gosling and like Bradley Cooper like they were so cute. But now like I love country singers..

Patrice Bergeron Sports Bruins hockey marie-philip Poulin Meghan Duggan Tim Thomas Ryan Gosling Bobby NHL Milan Lucic Contra Granado USA Bob Indiana Team Canada Bradley Cooper
"boston university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"boston university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"News a promising Boston University student and her brother were shot and killed by their mother in an apparent murder suicide in Georgia twenty eight year old Erin Edwards was a junior at B. you she was in the journalism program and had just completed an internship in New York according to Cobb county police fifty eight year old Marcia Edwards shot and killed her daughter and her son twenty four year old Christopher Edwards in their town home Edwards then turned the gun on herself according to police B. U. officials say they will be providing support services to students as they returned back to campus over the next few days a tip between Lynn Saugus center retail marijuana company will drag on the into the fall here's WBZ's Karen regal with more verbose watch oppositional in Saugus line Boston street and a court document Saugus argues parking in a small portion of the building is actually in Saugus Saugus voters have been bought shops in so Saugus suit new documents show all parties are agreeing to talk with those charts continuing after Labor Day this proposed what shop in Lynn by the way would share space with the pizza store in late in Keren regal WBZ Boston's newsradio Tom Brady gets sacked by the US patent and trademark office Brady's company T. E. B. capital management incorporated wanted to trademark the phrase Tom terrific the trademark office says that it refused the request in part because Tom terrific is already closely linked to hall of fame pitcher Tom Seaver Brady's company had filed applications to trademark the phrase for trading cards posters printed photographs and tee shirts it's six eleven and now time for sports here's WBZ's separate the red Sox last night snapped a two game skid defeating the San Diego Padres in San Diego eleven nothing JD Martinez the star two home runs drove in seven runs that's a career high and said he had a good reproach against Chris paddock the Padres rookie starter I.

JD Martinez T. E. B. US Keren Karen regal marijuana Lynn Saugus center B. U. Marcia Edwards Cobb county Georgia murder Boston University Chris paddock Erin Edwards San Diego San Diego Padres red Sox Tom Seaver Brady Tom terrific
"boston university" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"boston university" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Can Google this right now Boston University did a study in twenty eighteen they wanted to see how many pitches the umpires missed for balls and strikes right the number thirty two thousand two hundred and ninety four missed calls reporter strikes throughout the entire season of twenty eighteen that averages out to one every fifth pitch a mess now you can make a case well if they miss it for one team they're gonna miss it for you as well so it all evens out the problem with that is that you don't know when it's going to happen so it may have been in a relatively unimportant time for me and a crucial time for you and also it doesn't happen evenly for the same here so for example Erin judge being six with a the empire still haven't figured out how to adjust the strike zone for different batters heights to win judge gets in the zone judge gets in the box they think he's five ten they forget that is six eight so the problem is I understand everything you said about the whole situation with Boone and everything else I completely agree with that but why are we still asking these numbers to do something that can be done so much better by eight I'm holding my smartphone and I could see the strike zone I could see where the ball is in ways you know what my friend it's time for somebody like me to admit I was dead wrong a few years ago because when this topic was approached I laughed at the idea of electronic size on I said it's Dolby it's stupid I never want to see it hi how are you going to implement it and then you watch these umpires go about their business day in and day out and you know what the more more I watch Dave the more more I want to see it at some point time because you're right the technology is there for it these calls that are being Mister egregious and you mentioned you know the magnitude of a call think about Saturday's Yankee game Cameron Maybin strikes on a three two page with nobody out too bad call going against the Yankees okay for the Cleveland Indians nobody on days I whatever well the Indians take advantage of the fact that James Paxton hi Carlos Santana struck out she stuck out instead he gets no life he gets a basic we get the basic band of time again to your point I see exactly where you're coming from and that's why there is this frustration not only from bone but for many of these other managers and the umpires are getting defensive the umpires can handle criticism and a lot of young girl buyers they go out of their way to start trouble in the dog and that's a problem you must call move on an actual that's the good umpires they'll how that entire situation was handled Saturday you can honestly sit there and tell me you know what the pliers handle in a great way go back to watch it Hey maybe he'll tell me alas eight seven seven three three seven sixty six sixty six will wrap up JJ have doc whatever's on your mind the Yankees get ready for this series finale with the Indians one OS caras trip is going to be you got the Mets try to make sure they take two or three from the oils and will set the stage for the third and I guess the most important in on itself exactly generalities for pre season but what to look for preseason regulatory probably because after this.

Google Boston University
"boston university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"boston university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Scientists at Boston University have just completed an analysis of the health profile of fast food over the past thirty years. They analyze the offerings of ten of the most popular fast food restaurants in the US in one thousand nine hundred eighty six nine hundred ninety one and two thousand sixteen and despite all the talk about. Healthier items being added to the fast food menus study found the fast food is even worse. I now than it was thirty years ago specifically they found that fast food today has more salt more calories and bigger portions on any given day about thirty seven percent of Americans over twenty consume fast food. The author says fast food is no question helping fuel the continuing problem with obesity and chronic health problems. But not all the nutritional news is somber. For instance. A study by nutritionist at Ohio State University has found that green tea can reduce obesity by encouraging the growth of beneficial bacteria in the digestive system. Now, they say green tea can also reduce the incidence of leaky, gut and inflammation connected to poor health. And then from Singapore comes news about how mushrooms can keep our brain sharp a study at National University. They're focused on mild cognitive impairment and seniors things like memory loss or forgetfulness. But researchers found that eating tour more portions of mushrooms a week reduced the brain problems by fifty. Eighty five percent the mushrooms they used in the study were shitaki and Stor and golden and white button. The study lasted six years and was conducted with more than one hundred seniors over the age of sixty researchers say they've identified a compound in all the mushrooms that may account for the beneficial result. It's called ergo finding well scientists say it's a unique antioxidant, which humans just can't synthesize on their own, but they can get it from food with mushrooms being the best source. So there's some couple good news items in our nutritional round them up next. Remember at the beginning of the show, we promised to tell you about ten foods guaranteed to accelerate. Fat loss will have all the details about that fabulous. After this break. Don't forget podcasts have this and other. He'll inquest shows are available on our website at healing crest dot TV and please follow us on Facebook. Instagram Twitter at healing, Chris. I'm Judy Brooke. I'm ROY.

obesity Boston University Judy Brooke Facebook Ohio State University US Singapore National University Chris thirty years thirty seven percent Eighty five percent six years
"boston university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"boston university" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Fully. We fully fund the pensions of coal miners in West Virginia at the same time. And the reason that we do these things is because the truth of the matter is that economically civically and beyond our destinies and our prosperity and our wellbeing is tied inextricably linked, and when we pursue public policy in a way that. Links us from each other. It is not sustainable. It's not sustainable eventually. It catches up to you. And it it catches up to you in racial resentment that and that racial resentment as a political tool to dismantle the economic advocacy that we need to have for ourselves. So if your parent have you ever had your child tried to explain something to you? When they got themselves in trouble. He ever had them. Try to explain all of the different elements to something as to why it's not their fault. That's what you have. When you listen to Cortes being lectured to by someone who hasn't an earthly clue what she's talking about being lectured to by someone again, whose vast political and economic experience equates to an economics degree. She got Boston University. And yet she can't count to eleven without taking off her socks. And I hate to be as. Insulting. But I'm I'm insulted by her in her attempt to try to whitewash American history. Her attempt to revise American history and her attempt to continue the politics of identity, identity.

West Virginia Cortes Boston University
"boston university" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"boston university" Discussed on The Young Turks

"So we we unfortunately can't play the audio because it is an actual song. We'll try to get her to do these sorts of promotional dances to public use music in the future. But there you're seeing this is back in twenty ten I believe, or at least it was posted by in two thousand ten right? It's they're doing the breakfast club dance and having fun and enjoying youth. How dare so they must be destroyed dare she? This was spread by a Twitter account called to give you an idea of how serious person is politically anonymous q. Lots of credibility. There got the Q. They're probably random cue doesn't have anything to do with anything saying when these spread this here is America's favorite Kami. No, it all acting like the clueless knit, which she is. The response was such that that person deleted their Twitter. And as I pointed out on the day before this morning, it takes a lot to shame. A Q believer on their beliefs enough that they flee the internet, by the way to know nothing from high school it was from college. Yeah. Boston University right there on the right? And she was the only one doing it. She didn't do it. Now, she did in college. So the accusation. And so it's not just one guy. Then of course, the right wing went all in and they're all. Oh. She's when this clearly not allowed. Okay. What does this footloose? They're like the point. He's become like the Bill. Anderson footloose do not let anyone dance by the way the other country that does not allow dancing. I believe I'm not positive is Saudi Arabia. Well, I mean, they strike me as the religious police right going around making sure that people have their beards making sure that people don't have any fun. I mean, isn't that very similar a similar take on a super innocent video of a college student dancing are we along dancing in America. Now. Land of the free guys. Look this actually fits in comedic -ly into a trend in their attempts to take down, you know, I would say whether you like their policies. They're not charismatic politician. So this is what they have on ABC with Beto they pointed out that he skateboards, and he was in a rock band and with Obama back in the day. They had that photo of him smoking. What might have been marijuana might have just been a cigarette that's cooler than a photo of ever been in my life. And they think these are how they destroyed people by making them super relatable into tractive. But really, I mean who aren't you guys? I mean, you think they she when she was in college. She should not have danced. I mean when Donald Trump got out of college. He ran out of Vietnam a fake, doctor's note and let other kids die for. That's okay. That's okay. But but did you ever dance? I mean, what kind of weirdos are they I mean, if you tried to find a way to turn off the American people more you couldn't do it. So thank you. No. But because the level beneath that is like they don't understand voters just at all. Because voters clearly don't dance. Detach them from from Alexander. Then then then you somehow, I don't know get your person back in congress. It's weird. So I just I feel like there are certain politicians who can't win regardless of how they act what they do what their past is when I say certain politicians, I mostly mean women. Okay, women if they're if they present themselves as too serious, they you know, they don't go out of their way to have fun or if they do have fun. They try try to conceal it. They're considered. Oh, she's she's too stern. She seems like a bitch. Like, you you hear that over and over again. I mean, look, Hillary Clinton was a very flawed politician. I had lots of issues with her on a policy standpoint. But a lot of the criticism that she got had to do with the fact that she seemed like she wouldn't let loose. She seemed like she was to, you know, buttoned up or whatever. Whereas with ANC she's young she made history as an. Credibly young woman who got voted into congress, and she was in college not too long ago as a result of that. And so, yeah, she dance video it's not that big of a deal..

Hillary Clinton Twitter Donald Trump congress America Boston University Obama Saudi Arabia marijuana Anderson ANC Alexander Beto ABC Vietnam
"boston university" Discussed on The Woj Pod

The Woj Pod

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"boston university" Discussed on The Woj Pod

"Oh i'm into a couple of things first of all to get the home phone number was a huge deal and then to establish the type of relationship where you felt comfortable calling them at home the second part of it is in the schools i worked at saint anselm boston university sienna adult by schools like that you know up and down the east coast we were driving so you know your day was built around making phone calls you know you can't have wasted days back in those days where you know maybe seen three kids and you're not sure you like any of them but there's no contact with the guys you know you wanna get so yet to know where every payphone was and every dunkin donuts because the reality is if you went to a game in jersey and you're going to get back to mitch new hampshire that night which were because the budget necessitated that you weren't gonna say many hotel rooms is the bottom line is the game is seven you know you're out there are nine you probably had forty five minutes to make phone calls so you weren't on the road until you try to get a couple recruits wherever you know a lot of nights as you know what was outside the gym the pay phone watch one guy playing trying to hit three other kids so you lived it i mean it was you know when your college assistant it you recruiting much more than your coaching so from those days in division two to division one thirteen years as an assistant and then the past five years cliff in charlotte as the head coach you are let go about two weeks ago mitch cup check took over as the new gm there was your sense when there was a change in new gm comes in maybe wants to bring his own staff in his own people will you surprised they let you go.

charlotte gm saint anselm boston university mitch forty five minutes one thirteen years five years two weeks
"boston university" Discussed on Giants of History

Giants of History

02:17 min | 4 years ago

"boston university" Discussed on Giants of History

"Caretta on the other hand was lukewarm about him she actually was reluctant to meet him at first after hearing that he was a minister as she thought most minister she knew where complete snore and very narrowminded but king in their first phone conversation said something that she found very charming when the two were on the phone talking about king potentially driving over to meet her at her school king in reference to the amount of time that it would take him to get there said quote i'm coming from boston university it usually takes me ten minutes but tomorrow i'll make it in seven and that was it she agreed to meet him caretta later said that king got better looking the more he talked as she became incredibly drawn to his passion for social issues and to his clear vision for what he wanted out of his life and it didn't take long after they met for the two to realize that they wanted to take the relationship to the next level king soon proposed and 'caretta accepted they were married in the summer of 1950 three and they all timidly would have four children together two sons and two daughters as soon as king and 'caretta arrived in montgomery king took to the pulpit with force and he went right to work pushing for the social changes that he was there to fight for he began with the very passionate and very devoted members of the dexter baptist church congregation as we have said he encouraged all members of the congregation to become registered voters to join the end double acp and to keep themselves informed on all social and economic issues that impacted them and the black community he was a firm believer in knowledge being power and he wanted every member of dexter baptist church to be a singular source of power for social change but kings influence in the black community of montgomery quickly caught the attention of the ku klux klan and king was thus marked as someone they needed to keep their eye on and potentially real lynn if his preaching and empowerment started to get out of control.

boston university king montgomery king dexter baptist church congrega dexter baptist church montgomery ku klux klan lynn ten minutes