35 Burst results for "Boston Globe"

Joni Mitchell, 78, graces stage after nearly 2 decades away

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Joni Mitchell, 78, graces stage after nearly 2 decades away

"A big surprise for music fans over the weekend don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got till it's gone it takes you could be forgiven for thinking that Joni Mitchell had done her last performance She had suffered an aneurysm back in 2015 and has had some health issues since It's believed her last full show was in late 2002 but there she was taking part in a full length concert Sunday at the Newport folk festival in Rhode Island The Boston Globe report she joined brandy Carlisle and other artists including wynonna Judd and Marcus mumford doing a 13 song set She even played an electric guitar solo After their rendition of both sides now Carlyle fought back tears and asked the audience did the world just stop I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Joni Mitchell Boston Globe Aneurysm Brandy Carlisle Newport Folk Festival Marcus Mumford Wynonna Judd Rhode Island Carlyle Oscar Wells Gabriel
"boston globe" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

08:02 min | 11 months ago

"boston globe" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Here and now The 2022 Sundance Film Festival wraps up this weekend It is a chance for filmmakers to show their movies and maybe cut a deal to get it shown around the country So let's talk now about some of the most exciting films coming out this year with tide burr former reporter at The Boston Globe He now pens the sub step newsletter tiber's watch list Ty welcome back Thank you Nice to be here Scott And Aisha Harris co host of NPR's pop culture happy hour I used to welcome to you Hi thanks for having me Okay ty let's start with a film that made news this week Navalny is a film that profiles the jail Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny it debuted at Sundance just hours after the Russian government put him on their list of terrorists and extremists What is the case that this film makes for his side of the story here The movie makes an absolute open and shut case for Putin's government poisoning Alexei Navalny because there's a remarkable scene where because Navalny who's incredibly charismatic I wish we could have sound clips in the section But none of the Sundance films have media out there because they're all they haven't been released They're trying to get distributed Because he's so charismatic There's a scene where he is working with a computer dark web specialist And they get the identity on the phone numbers of the assassination team and the only calls them in real time On the camera And three of them hang up he's pretending to be like a mid level administrator asking why the mission failed And one of them basically tells all and it's just astounding to hear what he says And everybody on screen is kind of like holding their heads thinking and whoever the guy is on the other end of the phone He has almost certainly not alive anymore That's just one of the things that makes this movie really remarkable and Navalny is an incredible presence Very much involved in the making of the film Yeah Wow Okay ayesha I want to talk to you about a film That seeks to change people's minds in a way It's brainwashed 6 camera power by Nina menkes Tell us about this So Nina manka is a few years ago gave a couple of talks and this movie is based off of those talks And incorporates these discussions around the ways in which filmmaking has primed us to look at women in a certain way She really breaks down the different ways in which women have been objectified the way in which misogyny is rampant within films even our favorite films and how we can appreciate some of those films whether it's a movie by Hitchcock Orson was Spike Lee but also find some issues with it And so she really goes through using so many examples There are over a hundred different clips that she really digs into This is the way the male gaze works She also is interviewing a ton of really really smart people about this Lauren mulvey who actually is famous for coining the term male gaze is also featured in an interviewed So I really love this film I think it will actually change people's mind or at least make people see filmmaking in a different way in the ways in which women in the most subtle and sometimes very overt ways are objectified and dehumanized Is there a scene that really makes the case that need is making Absolutely So she's talking about not just sort of narratively the way these things work but also shot by shot Like she's going frame by frame And so she uses an example from raging bull where you have the Robert De Niro character and the Joe Pesci character and this is the pool scene And it's one of the earliest scenes they have with the female character And you see the female character you never hear her speak but you always hear the male character speaking while she's bathed in this wash of light that makes her look ethereal and like this sort of object And the fact that you don't hear her speak Nina menka says that can contribute to the ways in which in the real world we tune women out And so there are moments like that that are just really really persuasive Yeah boy that jumps out the way you describe it Now both of you have the film after young on your list of favorites Tie tell us about this This is the movie that in plot pricey sounds Like it might not be much It's about a family in the near future that is mourning its Android It's family Android The director is a guy named koga nata made a wonderful film called Columbus It starts Colin Farrell as the father of the family and Jodie Turner-Smith as the mother and just an H min as the Android Yang who has been brought in as an older sibling to the couple's adopted Chinese daughter So he's like an older brother And he just stops working And the film becomes a very pointed and insightful and emotional look into grief and memory and what makes us human and one of those movie not expecting much and I was practically weeping at the end It achieves a profoundness of emotion that many movies don't get to and it does it with a very light touch It's really quite unusual Grieving a digital being Ayesha doesn't work for you Oh it absolutely does I've been waiting since Columbus for coconut as follow-up and I don't think it disappoints at all I think that not only about grief and memory and loss but it's also a very interesting study on cross cultural dynamics and the limitations of those dynamics because as I sort of alluded to the reason they bring this droid in is so that they can hope that their Chinese adopted daughter will be able to learn more about her culture because they can't provide that for her And so it's really really beautiful And I too was like by the end of it just like kind of a wreck It's emotional wreck Aisha one more film on your list is nanny about an undocumented nanny from Senegal and it has some Supernatural elements I wouldn't say necessarily Supernatural So the filmmaker and the screenwriter is nikia jusu And she is pulling from a lot of West African spiritual folklore And so I'd say it's more a little bit more full flourish and there's a lot of imagery of water and what I love about this is it's a thriller in a way that is sort of commenting on what it means to be a black woman and a black immigrant who has to deal with this privilege rich couple in New York City But it's also about her trying to adapt to her surroundings while also trying to bring her young son from Senegal into the country And so seeing her it definitely has elements of horror movies where a woman becomes undone in many ways and as she has to deal with the pressures of working for this couple while also hoping to bring her son to the country She kind of get into her psyche in ways that are just so fascinating And I think the visuals are stunning I think juzu has a real handle on storytelling through visuals and insistence I was really on the edge of my seed throughout most of this film And it was one of my favorites of the festival I would agree with Aisha mentioned of nanny and I was actually struck by some of the criticism that it doesn't meld the realistic story in the horror when in fact as she points out it is full caloric Drawing on tales of anansi and mamie wada and really incorporating organically into the story The one other favorite that I had was and I wasn't expecting it to be a favorite It was cha cha real smooth which is if you had a blueprint for a Sundance indie about a drifting young man after college who falls in love with a slightly older woman This movie fits the template so neatly I was attempted to write it off but.

Navalny Alexei Navalny Aisha Harris ty let Russian government Nina menkes Nina manka Hitchcock Orson Lauren mulvey tiber Sundance Film Festival The Boston Globe Nina menka burr Ty ayesha NPR koga nata Putin Jodie Turner
Was Frank Sinatra a Failure? 'Sinatra: The Life' Authors Tell Us

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:58 min | 1 year ago

Was Frank Sinatra a Failure? 'Sinatra: The Life' Authors Tell Us

"And I have the co authors of this major new biography of Frank Sinatra. It's called Sinatra the life. Anthony summers and Robin swan. You have a quote in your book that I'll read to you from George Fraser, the legendary Boston Globe critic. He set the Frank Sinatra directly all your life you wanted to be a big man, but the wrong kind of big man, you're a sad case, Frankie, I think you're the best male vocalist that ever lived, but I also think you're a miserable failure as a human being. Was that accurate or exaggerated? It was certainly tough from the hip, you can't as a biographer. I mean, we really work at this and we work to try and get as far as one can humanly into the person and the personality and the suffering and the joys of the person that we're studying. And this was a guy who we ended up liking in spite of and that's a very big in spite of in spite of his involvement with the mob, I think you must ask her, but I think my course of Robin as a woman liked him as a person in spite of his pretty savage treatment of many of the women that he knew and the women that we interviewed and we were lucky enough to talk to now that he's gone. He's been gone almost exactly 7 years to talk to a number of the women that he knew for significant periods of his life. And almost to a woman they spoke of him in spite of the way he'd sometimes treated them. He spoke of they spoke of him with lasting affection. This is a guy who had something very, very positive and yet could be a really unpleasant person.

Frank Sinatra Anthony Summers Robin Swan George Fraser Boston Globe Sinatra Frankie Robin
Street musician stunned by John Legend as she sings his hit

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Street musician stunned by John Legend as she sings his hit

"A street musician in Boston has had an interesting encounter with a celebrity an ordinary person with the love of music ended up meeting and he got winner it happened Sunday in Boston when a street musician performed John legend song all of me near Faneuil hall just so happens that legend himself heard it he was in town to perform at the venue The Boston Globe reports legend heard the busker and like what he had heard the report says legend listen then gave the musician a hug and a tip the busker says she didn't recognize legend because he was wearing a mask while she was performing she also said she didn't know that legend was in town much less performing nearby she because the experience beyond unbelievable I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Boston Boston Globe Faneuil Hall John Legend Oscar Wells Gabriel
Charlie and Dr. Rashad Richey Debate the Threat of the Delta Variant Among Children

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Charlie and Dr. Rashad Richey Debate the Threat of the Delta Variant Among Children

"Delta variant has changed the game in many ways where now you have children who not only have the virus but they are experiencing adverse reactions from the virus. Look like never before. I take place. Called jackson county. Mississippi school superintendent. This guy decided to ignore all nineteen protocols. He says he's going to live a life. That's external of the fear of the pandemic. Will his school system. They have a seven percent. Cove it positive rating. They've already lost a schoolteacher. Here's the other dynamic. That people are considering you think children go to school in silos these children who can be carriers of covert nineteen can infect environment such as their parents their grandparents oh the peer groups people that their families associate with and then it becomes an issue of the ecosystem of our safety. Not just the silo of the school system very good. I i will respond. So i'm glad you brought up the delta variant so a lot of people have done some at least initial studies of the delta variant so according to dr roberta debiasi of the children's national hospital. She was asked about ari shapiro from national public radio about the delta verion the national public radio host said wait a second if kids under twelve or not vaccinated is is the delta variant a significant risk and she said quote children are still somewhat between twelve to fifteen percent of all kobe cases and still three to four percent of hospitalizations and we have not seen a huge change in that even with the delta variant. Now i'll add to that. Where the boston globe. Not exactly you know a politicized paper to the right ask. The question is the variant more severe in children. Dr sharon door and epidemiologist at tufts medical center says no. I've not seen any peer reviewed data or data from reliable sources. Suggest that so. I would submit. Doctor that there is no data. To show the delta variant has any harsher 'cause in fact the data shows the opposite

Mississippi School Jackson County Dr Roberta Debiasi Children's National Hospital Ari Shapiro National Public Radio Host Boston Globe Dr Sharon Tufts Medical Center
"boston globe" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on Le Show

"Well let's get the lapd check is a social media. No he's barred from exercising any public ministry including celebrating masses edition. He may not provide spiritual direction may not wear clerical attire and cannot function as a cleric quote he is to live in contemplation of his sins and pray for all of those affected by his conduct said the archdiocese the globe. The boston globe reported in february two thousand three that three men. The prior year had come forward to accuse mclaughlin of abusing them in the nineteen sixties in september two thousand and one is placed on administrative leave following an allegation of use abuse reported to have occurred in late nineteen sixties with a minor. One man said mcglaughlin. I'm not gonna read that one. You can imagine it. When he was eleven or twelve years old he was also accused in a separate lawsuit of abusing a boy at least ten times from nineteen sixty seven to nineteen sixty nine. The boy was a ten. He couldn't immediately be reached for comment. No kidding and wonder now let's turn to the let us try people to stand ta beautify country.

mcglaughlin The boston globe mclaughlin
Boston-Area Catholic Priest Found Guilty of Child Abuse, Banned From Priesthood

Le Show

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Boston-Area Catholic Priest Found Guilty of Child Abuse, Banned From Priesthood

"Now. News of the godly catholic priest who formerly led parishes in the boston area has been barred from public ministry. After an ecclesiastical panel found him guilty of sexually abusing a minor in the nineteen sixties. According to the archdiocese of boston it confirmed the resolution of the case involving reverend paul mclaughlin. It said mclaughlin. Ninety one had been found guilty of child abuse and his sentence has been affirmed by the vatican his sentence. Four years in no live a life of prayer and penance. Ouch that smarts. In the light of that sentence the archdiocese said mclaughlin who currently lives in california. Well let's get the lapd check is a social media. No he's barred from exercising any public ministry including celebrating masses edition. He may not provide spiritual direction may not wear clerical attire and cannot function as a cleric quote he is to live in contemplation of his sins and pray for all of those affected by his conduct said the archdiocese the globe. The boston globe reported in february two thousand three that three men. The prior year had come forward to accuse mclaughlin of abusing them in the nineteen sixties in september two thousand and one is placed on administrative leave following an allegation of use abuse reported to have occurred in late nineteen sixties with a minor. One man said mcglaughlin. I'm not gonna read that one. You can imagine it. When he was eleven or twelve years old he was also accused in a separate lawsuit of abusing a boy at least ten times from nineteen sixty seven to nineteen sixty nine. The boy was a ten.

Mclaughlin Reverend Paul Mclaughlin Boston The Boston Globe California Mcglaughlin
"boston globe" Discussed on The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

"And take time to detail like that you know you. You're certainly creating an airtight airtight layer with your with your phone People get concerned about foam and movement to trinkets and as the phone moves and tricks. That tapes gonna appeal and lift. And so i think i think many many builders preferred or More maybe in the durability of i you know doing appeal and stick Appearance take over the over the roof sheeting and at it depends depending on what kind of phone. You're using That well actually regardless of what kind of foam you're using vapor permeability doesn't matter in that application because a roof with foam over the top meant to dry inward not too dry the exterior so you could use grace ice and water shield which is just not neighbor open and you could use that over. The whole roof has appealed stick membrane in that kind of simply and you say that it has to drive the inside brian. Because we've learned that Asphalt shingles are not at all vapor permeable. Right as like we used to think that but researchers indicated that there is no drawing that direction. There's no drying and the phone depending on the type of but any any most foams with with any thickness they just if they allow vapor to pass. It's very it's still very slow. Even the more vapor open a rigid foams are and if you have any kind of facing foil fees foam. It's it's not paper open at all. Yeah so i think is is more labor open. It's the most of those products that the most april one of those products. But i think you're right after a certain thickness it's it's it's not right where we are going to say that that was sort of my assumption too. Is that basically. It's it's just a matter of trusting trusting how well you can get a material like that sealed for and know that. It's going to last for ten because i especially. It's one thing to take the seams but then you also have to worry about where it meets the edges of the roof to. Are you going to be running sealant underneath the edges of the layers of foam. So it's it's just. There's a lot more details that are that are potentially at risk in the long term if you're not doing a continuous layer of of an air barrier you know so you have to think about this these projects. This process takes a long time. So you're gonna have to protect the house In some manner while this is all going on so it seems to me. i would want something. Pretty freaking reliable. That didn't blow off while this was all going on right now i can tell you from experience. Because what was he saying was using thinking about on benjamin object product. I'm not sure. But so he's at martin like solid tax others say air barrier. So you could use fell or ice and water shield like brian mentioned the Grace product. I'll tell you. I mean using that using that benjamin dyke self adhering membrane on the back of my house. I can't tell you how nice it was to to just feel confident that that every single seam and corner and everything was closed up really well it just. It just was an innocent people. Think it's fussy to work with self adhered membranes. But the result in the end is just is just a really nice comfort comforting Result did rob. Did you do any flashing with that material. Did you do any use any windows or doors. Yeah so i actually. I actually used the material itself and a combination of other tapes. But i also was not super concerned about it because it's got an eight foot over a six foot overhang central. But it'll stay that what happens when the next homeowner decides to pressure wash that backside right and it's like some sun. I forget who said that to me. That's a good point right. Well yeah. I mean there's so many there's so many future conditions you just can't you can't always plan for but but it's certainly good to think about them. Yeah i'm. I'm certainly one of the products that i've been looking at for a bill that i was speaking about at the beginning of the show Is the self adhered Hydra gap. i think that's what used and Curious a couple things a couple of processed things that i'm curious about this helper here membranes. Like keeping it keeping it from hearing above your window so the you can lap it over The top of the window cut. I just used a knife and cut the the backer and left it a little bit of it on the edge there and what i found is that if it was actually not that it wasn't like race like ice and water. We're once it touches. You can't pull it off. It was if you if you let it flop. Flap down onto something as long as it wasn't something like your vinyl or aluminum painted window frames itself. You could pull it back up and reposition it but but always found just keeping a certain portion of the backer material on it just in that one slicing carefully and keeping a little background material on. It always works fine in that you were able to do that. Cool and then the other thing. I'm curious about is applying to it because it has the spacer for the bumps. Yeah they're pretty. They're pretty small. So as long as you using a flexible of enough tape. I i wouldn't feel like especially one of the more soft and flexible tapes. Yeah yeah right on this from kevin. Podcast this was in yesterday's paper. And i thought would make for a good topic and maybe a talk. Addition i've heard the complaints about gaps in modular construction and fire risk. Of course the conservative fire folks pointed out on the pro modular community say address it in various ways. I'm sure the answer is somewhere in the middle. But i do think we need to address it so we can prove safety going forward so kevin is alluding to is in modular homes. They're often the interstitial areas between the modules and In this piece in the boston globe described how fire can spread through structured through these these cavities right and sometimes the cavities are pretty big and like every other attempt. The mainstream media makes with regard to understanding a construction issue. They didn't get it right. I mean they were. They were confusing. These mass timber buildings worth residential construction. They were they were mixing in discussions of i joist failures in fires and they were talking about all these different things. It wasn't one single thing it just. I don't know frustrating me. I couldn't even get through it all. Did you guys read. The whole thing didn't come across similar articles like that recently where it's a a person who's a generalist who doesn't understand the technology. Trent doing their best to decipher the situation. And and you're in. It is tough to get that stuff right. That's why that's why it's our you know we find people typically for our for our staff who have worked in the industry because you gotta know that you got to really know the terminology in the In the technology to to get it right kevin. It was very interesting. It is obviously a big problem. I've heard code officials and fire folks talk about the dangers of joyce. And and you know in my mind. The industry is addressed. That with you know now you have to put in the codes have to. You have to put drywall ceiling sprinklers or make provision to protect those things. They're coatings you can put on them but yeah there's less there's less material there. Obviously in we know when we have a campfire the little sticks. Burn faster than the big logs right. That's just how it is. This comes from daniel. From helena montana. Hey crew. I've been working on building a detached garage gotten tons of help.

benjamin dyke brian benjamin boston globe kevin martin rob Trent joyce helena daniel montana
"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"It's completely disappointing. Pitcher smoltz at cooper stand today or yesterday sitting there no mask on signing autographs like in the civil cramped space for people. It's just Disappointing they they should know. Better but We'll see if there's anymore consequences here as we get closer to the playoffs and Apparently they're playing is still have at least smoltz on onsite and maybe fox doesn't have that same. You think so. Well i don't know i mean fox. Sports fox sports employees him vaccinated. It's required or not but they just keep it on the dick keeping quiet that. Yeah what about you. How do you see that i. I'll give you my opinion after you give us go. I was also extremely disappointed and like chad. My first thought was these guys are going to be a cooperstown with a bunch of octogenarian legends unvaccinated. I i also thought about bob boone. Literally quitting his career with the nats. Doing this with aaron boone. Being a heart. Paid by the way. And i just don't understand where like at what level the difference overtakes compassion or the common sentence or just the like the survival instinct your literally jeopardizing your own career. Like at this point and with with mlb network in particular. I think that it also has a lot to do with local restrictions. I mean they're based in new jersey and new jersey and new york have been very very proactive in having some of these requirements and restrictions. I think it's just dumb and disappointing. I guess the thing. I would say this and maybe this is unfortunately sort of where we are like i. I guess i remained. This is me being either naive or cynical or both like i am stunned that you would put a percent lottery ticket broadcasting career potentially on the line for this you know what i mean like and by the way allied or android obviously from their baseball careers you presume unless they spent it on ferrari and maserati like have a have enough money to live with the rest of their life night after work. So i get that money's not an issue like this is like the one percent of one percent you hit the lottery ticket broadcasting. John smoltz is the analyst for the world series. Like you mean there's only been like ad. He hates the modern game of baseball and been like well in history. Like in that. I chair right out. Later is on A massive a baseball net really good great and very good at it and like one of the one of the most important sort of baseball outlets if not the most important broadcast outlets that are out there and just to like risk that over not getting vaccinated. It's i mean. I can't even wrap my head around like these guys. They obviously have access to information and to science assuming people still believe in science and so you know what i'm saying if he thought like like on a party released so i i to him because your your business background unlike a purely capitalistic viewpoint. It's crazy that he would not do it. Just based on that alone. The opportunity cost of not getting back. Executive right like this is what we're talking about. And that's what. I mean. When i say i don't understand the calculus that is going into just like the self preservation of the self-survival not overtaking the difference and the the head strongness about an antibiotics position. I'll.

Pitcher smoltz bob boone mlb fox aaron boone new jersey cooper nats chad John smoltz ferrari new york
"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Paper is selling making money. You're getting to traveling cover goal. Thanks and it's just a good vibe all around in the city so course you It's understandable to want to see the teams well doesn't mean you're sitting there on the sideline pumping your fist when jason. Tatum is a three pointer. But you know i. It's beneficial in a lot of different ways if the teams succeed. Even though in sports radio team sucked that tends to be A pretty good job now. It's a weird. It's a weird. Yeah that's sort of the weird paradox. there are let's let's finish up on on this cultural came back this week. Very good viewership numbers to me. Not unexpected at all. I think what's been clear about the pandemic isa when it comes to viewing is that people wanna watch sporting events with crowds. Like they want the noise. They want the atmosphere. They want the enthusiasm and so college football. This weekend was exciting. It was exciting to to watch so. I've sort of two things on this one and chad. Same same questions for you. Do you think this continues throughout the year. That college football get sort of this boost that it got him the first week or was it about pent up demand and excitement for week one. And then we'll see what happens afterwards and the second thing is and this was brought my colleague. The athletic john. Walters which i thought was interesting. Where where. Where does do college football announcers of any responsibility to discuss colbert and protocols during the game. Cultural broadcasters are cheerleaders galore. I mean. I'm just going to be blunt their they essentially to me almost apparatus of the athletic department's because espn and fox or our business with them that that said. It's an interesting question to me. I i i'm not. I'm not saying that. The broadcasters should chastise the kids or or anybody at all and a lot of these places like these kids were double backs etc. I'm just wondering. Do they have any kind of responsibilities. Broadcasters to discuss it even though. I don't think they're going to discuss it so could be felt Two parts one momentum for real versus momentum week one and secondly broadcaster responsibilities. If any on this. I mean i think that i think it's the for the tanzer. Your first question. I think it's a combination of both. I think that yes there's momentum there's absolutely pent-up demand here. I think they'll even out a little bit. But i do think that numbers are is going to be better than it was last season which was extremely disappointing for college football right. I think a big part of that you know. I had a twitter exchange with with mark. Cuban about this actually out of a marriage pull that that our old friend jane mcmahon is put together. Which kind of posited love jane. Which of kind of posited that one of the reasons for declined viewership last year that we might see rebound. This year was people like watching sports especially college sports. I'm gonna say in a group like at a bar or at home with with a bunch of people and that was not a thing that we could do last year now. We can do that more. I think that's going to a huge difference here. I also think that if you look at the ups you put notre dame and florida state together. They're going to put up numbers right. I do think on to answer your second question. You know this is something that we talk about a lot not just when it comes to covert or the ethics of of whether you have a responsibility to talk about it During the game. But we talked about this a lot when there's a player who's been accused of domestic violence or sexual assault and and what is the protocol of. How often do you have to talk about it. When that person takes the field and that kind of thing. I do think there is a responsibility to acknowledge it. I think that again horse blinders. Don't serve anybody well. But i also know if a lot of our college. Football booths are equipped to know how. And when to do that artfully. So i think the easiest thing is to just avoid it but simply what about you. Yeah.

football Tatum tanzer jason jane mcmahon Walters colbert espn fox john jane twitter florida Football
"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"You're gonna lose more than you win in the end and I guess the thrill of it or the the addictive nature of it or something like that keeps people doing it but it it feels like a really a a really really bad way to go about things if your sports reporter. Yeah it's a really interesting question one legally. I don't think he could do it. Well i take that back. I mean you're primarily. Do if your private business could be. I guess you could sort of say like one of your terms of employment here is is not tibet i i. I don't think i find it tough if it's legal in the state that your business practices in two. It's not here yet then to tell you employs. They can't do it at the same time i am. I totally agree with both of you and one of the reasons that That i do not god bad on any kind of regular basis. I will certainly say that. Like when i've been to las vegas or places like that. I certainly like we'll go to sports book. And you know bet. Nominal sum dollar amounts for a day. Because i just thought it was fun but i've always believed i don't know if you guys agree may as a sports reporter that i need to protect myself from my own hubris thinking i know more about something because i work in the business when the reality is like. I don't think that's the case like i. One time i tracked. Because i really know women's basketball i feel like in the ninety nine percentile of all americans and i tracked one year. I'd like how did on betting women's college. I didn't bet by the way you know. Pretend bet on women's college basketball the wnba. And i might have only been at like fifty two percent fifty one percent so yeah i was more plus minus but it wasn't like i wasn't an eighty percent or anything like that and as any gambling expert will tell the really the only way to sort of do. The successfully is to be disciplined. And and to you know not over wager and stuff like that. And yeah and i just wonder if i don't know it could be. I almost feel like that. If you like you cover a team or something like that and you think you know you may not know as much as you think regarding the gambling part but i do believe these gas. The one thing i'll leave you with this Duct topic and could be the trade. You're welcome the comment. One thing i am near i am near certain of is you are going to see traditional reporters traditional sports writers heading more and more to these places like caesar sportsbook and stuff like that. I think there's so much money there that there are eventually gonna land like you know in. Adrian will naski type or shamsher. Nee type and i just. I think they're eventually going to be the home of content for some of these writers reporters who traditionally didn't like espn and the athletic. I just i think the. I think the money's too great for for individuals not eventually. Yeah and i don't disagree with that. I also like. I have a really hard time placing judgement on other people again. Like my decision. Not betting on sports is a very personal ethical question. But i also think it's super refreshing to hear you and chad both kind of alluded to the fact that like as much as as we cover these things and especially beat writer can get so in the weeds and our experts on the teams that they cover. Sometimes this is actually just guesswork. And we don't say that out loud when it comes to making these predictions and the other part of that is you know if you talk to any beat writer for example of a beat writer who covers a team who has a vote for a national award. They will tell you. I have horse blinders on around my one team. That doesn't mean that. I have any level of expertise to what the other twenty nine teams are doing in this league right and you have a little bit of kind of focused mentality when it comes to that so i do think and frankly like as journalists like not all of us make a whole ton of money. So it's just you know being protective about where where you put your money in where you where you gamble. I think is is is a consideration. My my gambling lies with blackjack and poker. I will say that. Yeah i think about this topic a lot. I find it interesting and there are there. Ethical minefield scholar could beat the by. You know if i'm covering. Let's say a baseball team. And i know that a pitcher because the pitcher told me competence. Or let's say a team told me incompetence confidence that that picture shoulders really hurting. And they're not getting anything close to the velocity that they normally get and that that person is a starting pitcher that gives me a massive advantage in theory was going to bet on that game. You know like you do have an advantage to reality is like as we have spoken is all three of us know in sports like well sometimes like that pitcher with a with a hurt shoulder has the game of his life right. You know what. I mean like just or or something else happened so you don't always know but it also it also speaks to like it also speaks like a very like evolving notion of what ethics in journalism means. Like i did. Jeff perlman's podcast a couple of weeks ago and i'm like very like brazen about having grown up a yankees fan beginning one in new york sports team fan Born and raised. Thank you i. I was telling richard before we started recording. That i have all five of these hours. On on on my. Dvr he me a very a very valid question. Which is there is definitely a an older guard of media. That would say you should not have any phantom. You can't wear your phantom on your sleeve and that is a direct conflict of interest for objectivity in covering your sport. And i don't disagree with that and i think that betting kind of falls along those lines. It's not necessarily you have an emotional phantom but you definitely have a monetary linked to to some of these these things that you may or may not cover and it just it just result it can result in a lot of messy. Yeah it looks all true by the way in terms of fandom like. I think you've just got to be fair and accurate To be honest about it like none of us became sports because we love went on when. I'm on the air in toronto. I'm incredibly honest. I'm like my life is a million times better if the raptors went like so obviously the best interest in them winning. I mean that said if something happens. I'm going to be honest in and accurate and beyond in my about something but that's just a reality of life. If a team is winning it's better. It's better for the city. It's better for me and brian thing. If readers know that i feel like they feel like they they respect it right you just sort of like deal them and be like yeah. I mean like. I'm a big pascal. Siachen fan like if something happened to them. Obviously talk about it but i really want him to do well. I think he's a good dude. I like like watching him play. And i think readers know that or viewers or listeners. Know that then. I feel like you know. They'll at least they may disagree with you but at least they can judge you on an honest prison. The only way to circumvent is to acknowledge biases that you have like all of us have particular perspectives. And i'll just had one one thing. Obviously when derek jeeter retired i wrote an extremely purple. I took my sports writer had often. I put my fan hat on. And ruben extremely purple column about what he in that. Those yankees teams meant to me as a fan the day. He announced his retirement. However the calm i wrote was now can.

basketball wnba tibet Jeff perlman las vegas Adrian espn baseball yankees richard raptors new york toronto brian derek jeeter ruben
"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Advantage for teams like the box who have one hundred percent vaccination rate now to to get those benefits from the football benefits from being vaccinated the competitive advantage benefits. That are going to hurt teams like you know. Maybe i dunno know buffalo's rate was but it was pretty bad for a while Or or other teams that are immediately going to put themselves at a disadvantage because they're not believing science and what the team trainers telling them. There are going to be significant issues. Share probably pretty similar last year. So let me push back on this. Well obviously i don't disagree with you and chad. I mean people are going to has positive. It's it's certainly going to be an issue. But because lake on game broadcasts this generally speaking is rarely talked about maybe talked about a little bit in the pre-game but the game broadcast is really. It's really just a promotional vehicle for the nfl. My sense is the bigger stories are going to be like you know. We'll the bucks repeat House mack jones gonna do in new england. You know what is what is how good is You know can bills overcome the the chiefs in the afc representative Am i. that's not to say. Obviously traditional sports reporters sports writers are not going to cover this. But am i being naive. You think in that. I feel like the i don't know it just feels like the story lines are going to are going to supersede cove admit because i i feel like maybe the nfl. I don't know how much the nfl audience unfortunately even cares that. That kirk cousins feels out. Kirk cousins does you know. I don't disagree with you on that. And i think it's actually the opposite of being naive. I think you're being rightfully cynical because the nfl all throughout last year all throughout l. threat last summer right when we were in the throes of this virus the nfl acted completely like business as usual. And frankly we're rewarded for it like the other than the one game. Where the broncos had zero quarterbacks look there wasn't really a giant disaster thankfully. I think that none of us are rooting for disaster to happen but the nfl was able to go about business as usual into kind of pretend that we weren't in a global pandemic so i don't actually see that changing from from the storyline perspective. I do think that this is going to continue to be a narrative and this will be you know. Especially as we have some breakthrough cases. And i can't imagine what it's like to be a vaccinated player. We haven't heard a lot of those frustrations either. But you know that that's brewing below the surface and i can't imagine that there's a ton of unity in the nfl pa right now around this channel. Wanna ask you about Game day access. I know you have covered. You've covered the patriots on a day to day basis. Obviously there boston globe beat reporters. Who do that. I don't know if you obviously have written about the nfl. no. I'm not sure you're one would be going every jets or giants game but then the nfl has set limits on game day access to locker rooms. Last limited to fifty fully vaccinated team staffers. In addition players and only media members affiliated with teams are allowed to locker room. So those are those are the media Those are the people who work for like the miami dolphins dot com. If that's even a site you know what i mean. He you know buffalo bills dot com so so as of now. If i'm reading this correctly that means that reporters will be talking to players and coaches and personnel via zoom or cell. Phone numbers may be. They're they're able to get contact That way what do you think that means chat work the boston globe. Obviously there's a massive desire for from patriot. Fans wanna read about the team but it looks to me that you're a reporter is not going to get traditional access because of Because a kobe protocols at the moment yeah what..

nfl mack jones kirk cousins buffalo boston globe afc chiefs football bucks new england Kirk broncos patriots jets giants miami dolphins
"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

07:13 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"You could talk about life you can talk about whatever and i think that other guys see that i mean. We were mostly at twitter show. Most instagram show gets a few hundred thousand views if you know during during the season and all that stuff per week and i think that if there are nfl stars or media members who. They've reach out to us. I wanna come on slow news day and because they see how we put them in a light where it's like okay we're just hanging out over zoom if if if we brought out a keg wouldn't be out of place right and so there is no drinking on tuesday but there could be right and that to me i think leads to other other people wanting to say yes to things. No one else does it. All access is like that. You know if you go. I think that a lot of times. You know my training camp tour this. I'm not saying this is the case. But i got josh allen. Rogers mahomes borough at the end boroughs. Coming off an injury. He's coming off of a couple of weeks practice. You know he was. He was joe. Cool your and a half ago and now things are not going well for him and they could have been easy for him to say. No but i think access leads to more access. And i think that someone like borough not that. I'm saying he's sitting around reading the ringer. But like if you get all these other guys. I think it just becomes a self filling prophecy and you start to other people like i did. Not the only person. I did not get on my entire journey towards mike zimmer because he was dealing with a lot of the kirk cousins fall out and was just swamped with requests. But i would say that the access begats access to more for you. One give any kind of word count restrictions because one of the things. I've noticed from your pieces on the ringer is you know you're able to go long. And it reminds me a lot of You know sort of the. Hey daily someone i and even before worked there sports illustrated and when you would not be surprised to read a forty five hundred five thousand word profile on a on an nfl player. So i don't have a workflow restriction. If if i if i gave them seven thousand word story it would put a lot of stress on the copy. Desk would put a lot of stress on my editor conor nevins and so i try to keep it under three thousand possible and andrew. Berry store was around. Three thousand. you know depends on the story. I the best advice i got on. This stuff was two years ago three years ago. I gotten rogers about a bunch of league issues. Things like the franchise tag. It was a really cool story. Remember talking to my editor rhino handling. He was like okay. Listen like you have gold. You have twenty minutes of aaron rodgers talking about just addressing all this stuff from the league and if we run every word he says that will be fine and you end up writing you know what twenty five hundred words and it's just rogers talking and so we don't want to shortchange if someone gives the time and gives us the interview. We don't want to shortchange that. And whether that's borough or mahomes whomever like get that stuff out. There dan campbell. You know with berry kind of a similar buried light up my notebook and the same way that some of these other guys did but this is a really awful guy who spent time with us and so we want to give that the full shift and we don't want to shortchange that kind of stuff. So i don't have a word count. It's more of fits the story. I think it'd be weird if i get a guy. If tomorrow i get daniel jones for five minutes and i write five thousand words on it. That's probably when it becomes a problem. But if i jones or sam darnold or whomever for an hour then you can get longer with it. So i think that we we just go. Operate within reason and decide what counts can be have an amazing editor conor ivan. Amazing copy desk. Everybody supports me. So i just wanna keep them in mind and just kind of keep it to what the story demands then the last one for me And i think this sort of question would have been maybe more prominent or perhaps even more interesting in a pre cova world but the covert world. Now you know for many of us in this In this profession. We're all working from home. We're all we're not going to a physical office. You know the person we might interact with every day may live three thousand two thousand miles away. You live in new york the brooklyn. Okay the ringers. Main offices is still in los angeles. Yes okay how does that. How has that worked for you. do you feel. Is there any part of you. That feels disconnected. Or like. i was saying because we're now in this new paradigm where nobody's really had an office data. Maybe your what you do now is just sort of what everybody's going to do for in the next twenty twenty-five thirty years or so and it's a geography doesn't really matter when you can slack somebody. Yeah i would say so. That question might be different in a year when everything is one hundred percent back normal. Hopefully fingers crossed. I haven't noticed anything you know. My wife and i lived in augustine florida during work from home for handful of reasons in the fall and so we haven't lived in la for almost a year and still talk to bill all the time. I still dr mollie aruban. Who's a manager all the time and i think maybe because we have a young staff were more interconnected on text or slack or facetime or whatever it is so it feels like we're all working together. Sunday night podcasts. With prince yati. She's also on the side of manhattan. And then ben zolak is michigan. Stephen rees both those guys just joined us is in washington dc. So i don't. I think that maybe when the ringer launched there was more of a demand for everybody to be in the same place but i kind of think as things have disappeared. You know spotify policy now publicly announces that we can work from anywhere. And i think it would have been fine if i lived in new york regardless because spotify has offices here in game. One has offices here. But i think that we're just in an era now especially with media. Where as long as i'm in a couple of times a year maybe with these people and stay connected. I think it's all fine. I mean the fact that. If i if i wasn't talking to my bosses regularly i would maybe have have more of a concern there but i i am not noticed anything i i feel like. We haven't skipped to beat if anything were more efficient than than we were and so no. I think that there's a new era of work. I think there's a new era of media. And i think it can solve richard some of the problems in media For younger kids. Maybe one of the things. I worry about all the time. Is you know when i was coming up. New york was the epicenter of media. Same as you and it became a self-fulfilling thing where the only people got into the media where the kids who are able to afford moving to new york without a really great job at age twenty two and so i actually think that this could end up being beneficial for media that you can be anywhere in the middle of the country you can be in a different country And actually there's probably less 'gate-keeping. I would say going forward. I agree with you. And as i look back on it. It it's like mind-blowing think that When i first started like at sports illustrated like we had like multiple floors on a building on west fiftieth street across from radio city music hall like to think about the dollar. Cost that those offices Were for you know at that. Time as would time inc..

josh allen mike zimmer conor nevins Berry store nfl dan campbell rogers sam darnold conor ivan aaron rodgers Rogers daniel jones dr mollie aruban twitter joe prince yati ben zolak Stephen rees andrew
"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Or whatever and you don't get to tell the full story and that's my concern is that the teams will use it to sort of duck out on media policies and make it a little more ecology and but don't again i think eventually they'll things will return to normal it just on the short term concerns me a little bit storytelling aspect but again but there's bigger problems in the world right now so i think it'll it'll make a difference again. I think i can probably get people mid week at the facility. It just going to have to be a little more methodical. And you know one of the things i really like doing is one of my my tricks. I guess you could say is. I like to go into locker rooms richard and just get many anecdotes about somebody's possible so if i go into buffalo i wanna say to. Fifteen guys in the roster. Tell me your favorite josh allen. Or what's most impressive. Josh allen you ever seen does not able to happen this year. And that i might get three guys on that and i might have to get more time with josh more time with table or whatever but so yeah from from a storytelling aspect. Things change. but i'm not. I'm not going to freak out about it in the first couple of months because we're just at a weird place in the world right now one of the things. It's pretty obvious you know like mike. My colleague let's say at the athletic who covers the falcons or covers the rams. It's pretty obvious like who their competition is. Although that even sort of premise at this point sort of maybe seems outdated because like in theory. Like everybody is everybody's competition you know like competition is is just people's time etc. But you really do stuff. That generally speaking like isn't being done by right by other people. So when you do these stories like do even consider any other outlets or reporter competition or do you in some ways. You really feel like you're sort of you're in your own silence. So i had an editor sam walker at the wall street journal. Actually we talk about this a lot and he used to say that and this was a business thing i guess he'd studied a lot of businesses. But i guess it was startup road. Actually he was borrowing it from but he basically said if you have competition you've already lost and it means your ideas on original and that you it's not even worth doing. And i took that to heart and i think that i've talked about this before. But sam's advice to me. Which i think is probably the most important advice ever gotten my life is that from my journalism. Life is that you should report story. Where the i quote in every story can be. I've never seen anything like it. Because if you have an original idea and everybody wants to talk about it and no one's literally anything like it. Then you've got something worth publishing and i think richard you you remember journal. Sports action still awesome and it's still has amazing people And but when i was there i felt like we had one in one story a day and competition to get in. The paper was huge. And so you had to preplanned pre sort of report all of this stuff and you had to clear this really high bar and so until competition competition. I'm own worst. Critic is myself because of that mentality. Because i still have the old school wall street journal. Hey if you don't write a good story it's not getting published mentality. we didn't we didn't go for singles. Didn't doubles triples and home runs. And so that that's still in my in. My brain probably will never get out. So i don't. I think maybe on topics. I feel like i if someone else wrote a dan campbell profile before me i would have kicked myself but it wouldn't have been the same. I just think i. I tried to sharp angle. So much that i wouldn't have to worry about anybody doing the same the same story that i'm doing and so i don't i to your point. I don't really spend a lot of time. Thinking about what other people are doing except to say that there are so many good people who providing great information great quotes great. Great reporting that. I read almost everybody. I just hope to my goal is to take that stuff and shape it a little bit differently to the point that that no one's going to have meigs angle. Sports have long been an important in the fighting..

josh allen Josh allen sam walker richard wall street journal buffalo falcons rams josh mike dan campbell sam
"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Said at the top. Kevin clark is an nfl writer. Podcast video host for the ringer. I mean a major star in that world previously covered the nfl for the wall street journal. He's been on this podcast before. And i like having him on as we're about to start the nfl season. Kevin thank you for returning to sports media podcast. Thank you for having me richard. I'm very excited. Are one of the things i've told us you off air. I'll certainly say it on air. You're really skilled and gifted at choosing interesting stories in the nfl and then presenting them in in an interesting way through your reporting through the length of your story just sort of how you approach it so let me start with a very general question here. What stories are you most interested in at the start of the twenty twenty one season. I feel like there's a return to normalcy that. Even though i think that it's going to be normal maybe even a year plus in the nfl in two thousand nine hundred. I think there's a return to normalcy. That is going to sort of permeate through the league. When i was talking to people inside the league about practices last year or it is how they ran their team. I think the general consensus was that everything sucked and even teams that won last year. We're like you know what this just wasn't didn't feel like real football. There were guys in the league who didn't even meet some other teammates throughout you know in any meaningful way. They would seem practice. And that's about it. There were a team employees. It didn't meet the rookies. I mean it was just such a stilted year. I think that as things return to normal. I think you're going to see a little bit more within the league of i would say maybe a celebration of football like kind of a. They missed it so much. They missed the real aspect of it last year. I remember someone was podcast. Last year someone from the nfl and they were basically just like the the motivating force in the middle of the season when it becomes a dog days is that these guys don't want to let the guy next to them down. You know it's it's a strong locker room. Whatever it is last year guys couldn't go out for a beer guys couldn't go out to lunch and even know each other and so i think the emotional rebound i guess i would say. Is the big picture topic. And then there's just within that all these people who have popped up who are now relevant figures profiled andrew berry the browns. Gm today on. Dan campbell with somebody. I talked to last week and so a whole new cast of characters that are relevant. And i think there's just coming out of last year was such a stilted year. I think there's just a lot to get to. And there's a lot of intriguing storylines for you. I've i've read both those speeches. Which i really really liked. You clearly try. I certainly know you try out for the for the dan campbell piece. I imagine for the other one as well. How has coverted or where we are in coded changed. Your approach to stories are you. Are you able to basically now. Just do any story that you wish because the travel still travels of factors so there were two two huge things. That cova changed for me at this year. Number one is. I couldn't go to a city just to go so there are certain places. I remember a couple of years ago. I went to indianapolis you know it was kind of inbetween stops. I had one or two requests. But i just wanted to watch practice right. I didn't do those types of trips this year. Because i didn't want to do an extra day in a hotel and be traveling and all that stuff so for me. It was a little more surgical. When i mean by that is i went to green bay said i want to gm and aaron rodgers and that was the thing you can't do is is bs and just kind of say. Hey i'm going to go on a fishing expedition and talk to this guy. Who's a little bit more of that it was. I went to buffalo green bay. Kansas city and cincinnati and in those places. I asked for the quarterback. I got fifteen to twenty minutes with each quarterback. And i wrote it up immediately. It was very much. See the ball hit the ball whereas in a different year. It's hey i'll get mahomes but also hey why don't i check in on the honey badger. Why don't checking on tyreek hill or travis kelsey. It wasn't that this year because it was just so strange with testing and all that stuff but also there were so many different protocols in so many different things. You couldn't do that. You had to really kind of over preplanned. I guess you could say so. I i was in. I spent twenty one days in a road. There were a lot of places. I spent two or three days on which is not normal for me. I normally do one team in one day and then move on so it was a little more methodical. I would say. And then. Also i mean i spent the whole time pretty concerned about cove it on the road. I mean i was in hotels. That were fairly okay. Hotels and and not a lot of people took seriously. And so for someone. Who doesn't want to and i was testing myself. Every couple of days the nfl mandate was every two weeks and then there were two teams that tested at the door. To make sure that you didn't have before you went in In the facility. But i was telling myself kind of above. And beyond that. Because i just i just wanted to make sure because the worst thing i the thing that kept me up at night. Richard was the idea. That god forbid. I had it. And then i've got a call The pr director of a team. And say hey you know you're starting quarterback he's a close contact of mine you know and so. I was just extremely careful for three weeks. You you've undoubtedly seen the nfl's last Memo about Restricting game day access to fifty Personnel including people on the team executives. And the only media who are loud in terms of locker room access are going to be those who work for the t. How will that this year impact you will that will that impact you or because of what you do for the ringer. Can you still get the people you want to get. Let's say on practice days of the facilities or or off days that does the does the game protocol. maybe the game. Protocol doesn't impact. You given what you do as much. I don't necessarily go to games late in the year. If i need something specific and i need to get three or four five guys want and that's what's going to happen this year and that's fine. There's certainly a lot bigger problems in the world right now whether or not only campbell in baltimore and december okay. Like that's pretty far down on the list of worldwide concerns right now. I think it's going to hurt. The beat writers hurts the flow of information. I think that. I have so much respect for every single beat writer because no national writer could do their job without them and i'm an aw these folks who come up with consistently good topics and good angles every single week and that to me is what i think is going to hurt here. Is i covered college football. When i was really young and they just because there was no open locker room. If there wasn't the defense choked school might not put any defenders out there to talk to the media or might tell them to go through the back exit..

nfl dan campbell Kevin clark andrew berry football buffalo green bay the wall street journal gm tyreek hill travis kelsey Kevin cova richard browns aaron rodgers green bay indianapolis Kansas city cincinnati Richard
"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Ford ringer on he does exceptional is is features on On the nfl. A really good very very unique. You may remember kevin to from covering the nfl for the wall street journal He's absolutely one of the best in the business and we talk about the stories that he's interested in this year and what kind of year you think it will be. And then just how he goes about doing the work that he does. So if you're interested in kevin's work Check that out our enjoyed that conversation. He is followed by a roundtable with could beat the davidson. My colleague the athletic sports and culture writer there and the host of the culture calculus. Podcast and chad finn the sports media writer and columnist for the boston globe and We have around table on what we think will be the dominant story of the nfl. Season access restrictions. Now in the nfl because the kovic and the nexus of gambling and the nfl. We go into that. And so the ethical quagmire is that exist there Whether a cultural broadcasters should talk about code protocols and over some nuance as As their broadcasting These games we all agree college. Football the numbers should be Much much bigger this year. Certainly from two thousand twenty. There's just so much excitement When you're watching these games and people think wanna see people in the crowd So we get We i think i hope is a nuanced discussion about that and we finish up with johnson molten allied her. Where a chad in Do not hold back on their opinions. There so kevin. Clark to start chad finn and kavita davidson. Finish coming up on the sports media. Podcast.

nfl chad finn kevin the wall street journal Ford davidson the boston globe Football johnson kavita davidson Clark
The Tight Race for Second in the Boston Mayoral Race

Radio Boston

02:00 min | 1 year ago

The Tight Race for Second in the Boston Mayoral Race

"Elections are about. Who's going to win. I know that seems obvious. But it is worth noting because we have a really interesting situation unfolding with the preliminary election for boston mayor according to two polls over the last few days it looks like this may actually be a race for second. So let's try and make sense of those polls ahead of thursday's debate which radio boston and wb. You are are co hosting with. W c the boston globe and the mccormick graduate school of policy and global studies at umass boston here to help us do that. Steve casella president of the mass inc polling group. Steve is a friend of the show and massinc polling conducted one of the polls with policy for progress new democracy coalition housing forward massachusetts and education reform now advocacy steve. Welcome back to radio boston to be here. So lots of new information in the last few days steve. You're pulling data came out. Friday than the globe suffolk university. Poll released today both have city council member. Michelle woo polling. At around thirty percent they also have this cluster of acting miracle janey an council members and ib george andrea campbell. Really tight together for second so the first question does it mean that wu has her place in this preliminary election solidly in hand. Well i think we did. Nothing's certain you know nothing solid until everything's over you know that's one thing i mean. Just a fact about municipal elections is that They can change much more quickly than say a partisan election. you know. there's no republican. There's no democrat on the ballot. There's no kind of mental shortcut. People can take to where there's only one candidate that's anywhere near my as a voter my ideological space. So i'm definitely going to choose this one. You know in municipal elections. There might be three or four candidates that you're still choosing between so you know certainly you would like to be michelle Michelle lewis campaign given the numbers that that are the way they are. But i i certainly wouldn't say you know. There's no way that anything else can happen

Boston Mccormick Graduate School Of P Steve Casella Mass Inc Polling Group Globe Suffolk University Michelle Woo Ib George Andrea Campbell The Boston Globe WB Umass Steve Janey Massachusetts WU Michelle Michelle Lewis
"boston globe" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Making sure that we're providing special education services to all of our kids that we stop disproportionately placing black and brown boys in particular into sub separate classrooms that we are fulfilling that promise of literacy especially to our youngest learners. We wanna work to do when it starts in pre k. And really it starts well before kids enter our school district. All the way through graduation and beyond didn't that we give opportunities to all of our kids every day. So i wanna talk about housing and we're going to do the toughest part of that. I constantly the boston globe published a story a couple of weeks ago detailing how your office opposed a project in front of the zoning board of appeal that would have blocked the views of a neighbouring property which was a twenty four unit luxury condo building in south. Boston owned by your spouse. You've said you didn't know about your spouse's involvement began talking to council quote as soon as we were made aware of even the potential of conflict and quote in order to address any potential conflicts of interest. I want to ask you. How did you know it would seem that clarity. On those dealings and about the extent of the conflict of interest requirements would be paramount for someone in an elected city role. So this project was not my husband's project that was before the.

boston globe Boston
Couple in eBay Harassment Case Sues Company, Ex-Officials

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:44 min | 1 year ago

Couple in eBay Harassment Case Sues Company, Ex-Officials

"You think about big tech tyranny the most of us especially in conservative talk radio talking about the latest person that twitter dispatched or the latest bias. That facebook has again somebody but what about the tyranny of ebay what the tyranny of ebay it's pre. It's where you buy stuff. How bad can they be the boston globe. Features a story where this couple that did i guess they did sort of reviews their their their livelihood was doing online reviews of various tech issues various websites and they had been not universally but occasional critics of ebay and the folks at ebay decided. They didn't like it. And there may be retribution underway. Aaron pressman writes about tech for the boston globe and had the story and it just went straight to my brain and aaron welcome. It's nice to meet you. How are you doing sir. Good morning mark thank you. This is crazy first of all how. You've been writing about tech for the boston globe. The boston globe. I'm new. i've been writing about tech for many many years. But i just joined the boston globe this summer. Where'd you come from. I was at fortune magazine for the last solar. Where your people where are you from. Where did you grow up. I grew up in the boston area. And i never quite escape so i'm still here so it's right there west of town about a half hour west of town in the lovely suburb of natick. Tell me about the couple in question and what they did to draw the ire of ebay. So i know david steiner there an ordinary couple. They like to go to garage. Sales when ebay i arose. They sort of started making a tip sheet for people who aren't to sell on ebay and it became this big newsletter. They started making a lotta money from advertising to people who want to sell things on ebay so it was a great little business. They had Ebay over the years you may have noticed has shifted to emphasize more selling like big retailers and increasing the fees on little guys who want to sell things so the newsletter became i think a little more critical overtime and kinda got under the skin of some of the top people and ebay where they were. Who would've who's eyeballs would have seen this in order to think this isn't right. We're going to punish these people. Where's he bay headquarters out in silicon valley like everybody else. Ebay is out in silicon valley. But we know there's a federal criminal case against Seven to these people to so we know we've seen the emails that the ceo of ebay right. This is a multibillion dollar corporation. The theo of ebay and his wife are complaining to their underlings about this online newsletter. Not treating them fairly and Devon winning the ceo at the time even has this very unfortunate email where he says. Take them down acre down. I believe is what he's at.

Ebay The Boston Globe Aaron Pressman Fortune Magazine David Steiner Twitter Natick Aaron Facebook Boston Silicon Valley Devon
Ex-Cardinal McCarrick Charged With Sexually Assaulting Teen

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Ex-Cardinal McCarrick Charged With Sexually Assaulting Teen

"A defrocked former cardinal is the first in the United States to be criminally charged with the sexual crime against a minor former cardinal Theodore McCarrick has been charged with sexually assaulting a teenage boy in the nineteen seventies according to court documents obtained by The Boston Globe he faces three counts of indecent assault and battery the victim alleges McCarrick began abusing him when he was a boy and groped and fondled him when he was sixteen and as they walked around the campus of Wellesley College where his brother's wedding reception was being held in nineteen seventy four Mitchell Garabedian who's representing the man said in an email it takes enormous courage for a sexual abuse victim to report having been abused and proceed through the criminal process an attorney for McCarrick berry Coburn told the AP they look forward to addressing the case in the court room the former cardinals ninety one he was defrocked by pope Francis in twenty nineteen after Vatican investigation confirm decades of rumors that he was a sexual predator hi I'm Jennifer king

Cardinal Theodore Mccarrick Mccarrick Mitchell Garabedian Cardinal The Boston Globe Wellesley College United States Mccarrick Berry Coburn Pope Francis AP Cardinals Jennifer King
Iowa Summer Camp Sends Campers Home Early

Family Financial Focus

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Iowa Summer Camp Sends Campers Home Early

"Camp in New Hampshire abruptly shuts down and sends the kids home. WBC's art Cohen reports after just six days, parents whose Children were at Camp Quinta Barge in molten borrow New Hampshire were told to come and pick up their kids. Camp, officials said Delays in food shipments made it impossible to keep the camp open. But some parents told the Boston Globe that there were other problems, including hiring counselors just days before camp opened, who had little training. And some of the campers said meals were served multiple times on dirty dishes. Executive director Erik Karlsson blamed the problems on staffing and supply chain issues.

Camp Quinta Barge New Hampshire WBC Boston Globe Cohen Executive Director Erik Karlss
"boston globe" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"For the kind words we. We haven't sent a copy to members of congress directly but we have had lawmakers some lawmakers share the series and take it seriously still no republicans but hopefully they will read it and reach out You know and And so we are hoping that this this makes an impact with congress that they read it in ticket seriously. This again is not a partisan issue with something that both parties have to take very seriously if they want to protect american democracy and not have america no fall towards the autocracy or the pass towards autocracy that donald trump. Put it on without a doubt. I got one more very quick question for you is the editorial board. Did you all set around. And did you split it up into six pieces and say all right. This group works on this one. This group works on this one. Is that how it came together was on. The our meetings at the border are all off the record. I lived us but you know everything that we do. A group effort and we do deliberate over our ideas in our arguments together And so this was this was The editorial boards deliberate over deliberations. We make careful evaluations in conclusions. As to what recommendations we should make for congress and the biden administration You know To to take right to protect our cia dollar fine add. You can find him on twitter at abdala underscore. I'll put lengths to him to the boston globe to this series on the blog at nicole sandler dot com slash. Sixth dash fourteen dash twenty one. Because that's today's date that's where are posted. It'll be what the show. Thank you so much for joining us today. Really appreciate it. And i love what you guys did. Everybody needs to read this. Thanks so much nickel. I really really appreciate your interest in the series of thanks for covering my pleasure. Thank you take care. Thanks bye bye all right with that. We're done that's today but stick around. I think i think we've already lost the voices network because i to run long. I tried to take it right up to the mon. Anyway.

congress donald trump today twitter both parties six pieces republicans Sixth dash abdala boston globe american one more fourteen dash twenty one sandler dot com america biden nicole
"boston globe" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

09:19 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Democracy from nepotism at the highest levels of government and so that's why we called for strengthening inc. The enforcement of nepotism laws. And you just have to think about this as it's virtually impossible to form the most competent government. If you're hiring relatives or friends aren't necessarily the most qualified people for the job right it is astounding. It really is astounding. I'm the the next installment is hiding the evidence this is the obstruction of justice section. And it is it is astounding and you right out of the gate. Donald trump broke the law and brazenly admitted it not with remorse. but with pride conviction. Then you know you go through. Within four months. He fired the fbi director. He was rebuffed. The department of justice is Everything everything he was told to do by the people who knew what they were doing. He rebuffed they. The the denied subpoenas. They they just said our of checks and balances doesn't exist anymore because you can't enforce anything and that's why i was glad i mean not glad that had happened but glad to see you guys at the boston globe spell it out you wrote as it stands. Trump's presidency will only embolden future presidents to abuse their power because he showed to be a far less threatening tool. Then it wants was. They even took being impeached. Twice and pooh-poohed it no big deal. This is a twice impeach. president. It's a big deal but they they live an opposite world. This is the place where talk about where you know up. His down red is green. The sky is purple. This is where they live. And if you say anything different they will get you into thinking that you're the crazy one So what do we do. How do we. How do we get checks and balances back in our government. How do we give congress back. The responsibility of oversight of the executive branch now. This is one thing that we wanted to focus on in the series is is that donald trump didn't destroy the presidency and he didn't know necessarily record on his own. What he did most successfully was exposed. You know the weaknesses in our checks and balances against a tyrannical president. That we simply don't have a system that we don't have the tools that we need in order to enforce our anti-corruption laws against presidents who are unwilling to be bound by them. You know by tradition And so that's that's what we're trying to shore up in this series and so you know in this part You know we're looking at bolstering accountability measures for the president. So you know we want to bolster oversight so one is to increase congress's capacity to play its role as know as a as a branch of government that oversees the executive branch and so we want to strengthen congress's subpoena powers by allowing them to issue fines Fasttrack or proceedings already had that. I thought that they could levy fines. And i thought that they could even get the sergeant at arms to go and pick up somebody. There's apparently gel somewhere in the basement of the capital. But they didn't do any of that they went. Oh well they're going to ignore subpoenas. What are we gonna part of. That is because the people more subpoenas they can get stuck in the courts and you know it takes a while to actually You know be able to forcibly. Bring someone in to testified And so one of the things we wanna do is to fast track or proceedings. We want to strengthen whistle blower protections. Another thing that we wanna do is we. We were asking the department of justice to revisit It's one thousand nine hundred. Seventy three memo from the office of legal counsel which Robert mueller the special counsel operated under which dictated that you cannot indict a sitting president not only not a law it was like a memo. It was somebody's opinion who was nothing enforceable. And they're they're treating it as if it is the law of the land. That's exactly right. It's it's not logged. It's not in the constitution. There is nothing in our laws that says you cannot indict a sitting president the reasoning behind. That memo is interesting in that you know the they did not want a president to be incapacitated by having to go through a criminal trial. but what. we're suggesting is that you Is that the department of justice should be able to indict a corrupt president on charges of corruption or abuse of power. Anything that doesn't meet the threshold a high crimes and misdemeanors so you know. We cannot just have a standard where the president is only punished by congress if they commit crimes and misdemeanors what if they what if they partake in petty corruption or just break laws that does need to the threshold of high crimes and misdemeanors. We need to have our institutions be able to indict sitting president and what we're suggesting then defer the criminal trial till after they're out of opera because no as we do with everybody we have to presumed innocent until they're proven guilty and we shouldn't incapacitate a president by wrangling the white house into a criminal trial but defer those defer the trial until they're out of office. And then you you you will have you reintroduce a you know deterrence in the white house. Your guitar future presidents and even president who abused their power in the first place from abusing their power again. Because they know they're going to be held accountable for them that there will be legal consequences for their presidential misconduct. Doing in israel right now. Because now the netanyahu's out he's got something like thirty some odd indictments waiting for him waiting until he got out of office. There's no reason we couldn't do that here. The next to the next two are just as important. You have rewards for doing the president's bidding and this is about pardons and we we've seen the clown show that surrounds trump. And how these all these people you know got rewarded for doing the president's bidding in the last one is the case for prosecuting trump. I'm rushing because we've only got a couple of minutes left but here's my question. I love all the suggestions. You make real good recommendations things we need to do to yes. Future-proof the presidency problem. Is these all take legislation. And we have a republican party. Who will do nothing of the sort. They will not strengthen a the the oversight of congress for the presidency because they think that they're going to regain it. It's i don't understand. I don't understand anything about today's republican party. But how do we get this done with the with mitch. Mcconnell the senate minority leader. Of course you know. We're not. We're not blind to the fact that the republican party the obstructionist one in his unlikely to participate in these kinds of reforms on a mass level but there there has to be some republicans who are interested in passing anticorruption reform because corruption doesn't know a single party. That's something we wanted to make clear in the series you know. Corrupt presidents have come from both parties and both parties will continue to be a corrupt in the white house in abused their power. Power corrupts and you have to prevent presidents of the united states from abusing their power and one lesson that we learned from the trump presidency is that you can actually do anything in the white house and you will get away with it because you know while we have had crooked presidents in the past none before donald trump actually incited A coup an attempted coup on american democracy in which five people died and so you know if donald trump gets away with that. You know the message that sends to future presidents is that you can do anything and you can get away with it and so you know anyone who has interest in restraining democrats from abusing their power in office. Two republicans abusing their power office. This ought to be a bipartisan. 'cause anti-corruption ought to be bipartisan. 'cause i'm because it's not a single party that is committing abuses of power. And so you know if you wanna protect american democracy. That's something you're actually interested in protecting. And there are some republicans who say they're interested in protecting it in that said there in single digits. Afraid i was gonna say but can you find ten. That's yeah but you know you know at the same time. It's it's not going to be easy. Unfortunately this kind of reform is not easy but people have to muster. And this is what we're asking is that people muster the political courage to do it it shouldn't take courage. You know to pass anti-corruption norms and laws. In fact all it requires shamelessness. Allow you know. American democracy to rot or crumble under your watch. And that's that's what's happening so something needs to change without a doubt. So did you send a copy of this. I'm sure you you had some special Presentations printed up. I guess because it's an amazing thing. You put together here at the boston globe. Did you send a copy to.

Donald trump Trump donald trump Robert mueller congress trump israel both parties Two one thousand one lesson Twice mitch. ten today netanyahu republican party single party boston globe democrats
"boston globe" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"It was a marketing campaign that they had ready to go four years ago and then he won against all common sense and they're like oh we don't need this and they threw it in a drawer and pulled it out for years later when he did lose and the fact that so many americans. Just don't see that they're taken in by this con man is. It's really sad more than anything else. But here's the other thing. The other candidates in that primary that had started out with like fifty eight people or something. Like that there weren't other white supremacists spouting that stuff Steve king even got basically thrown out of the party for doing it now. Now it gets you embrace to be president. Then it wasn't so widely accepted it just shows. The republicans will back anything as long as it keeps them in power no matter how reprehensible or gross it is to them they have no morals but it wasn't You know that wasn't necessarily accepted. Even twenty sixteen primaries the supposed moderate candidates were espousing views. That were pretty extreme. You know so for his kedah. Jeb bush was you know supposed to be the most one of the most moderate ones And he was somebody who said for example that he would only accept syrian refugees if they are christian And so of course. Donald trump took that to the extreme wanted to implement a muslim ban. But that kind of idea that muslims aren't worthy of seeking refuge in the united states despite facing these humanitarian crises spouse by the moderate wing of the party they had you know and and jeb. Bush was kind of somebody who who you know. A lot of the pundits considered to be You know more progressive on aggression in his part. You know ted cruz in that same primary also wanted to survey a muslim neighborhoods and mosques in the united states. So you know this kind of ideology was getting a lot of traction in the republican party after they lost in twenty about you know. They kind of had two paths to go after mitt romney laws and when when mitt romney laws they could either move towards the center and try to broaden their coalition election fairly or they could double down on white identity politics and kind of you know just turn out as many people as they get and suppress as many people as they can and so you know. These started to see that shift happened in a delicate dance for a lot of them But you know it was. It was definitely there on. Donald trump was certainly the one who was most. You know Outspoken about it. I think the closest to donald trump the closest president donald trump. You know in the mainstream republican party was sarah palin nomination as candidate and definitely pave the way and the way she talked and i think you know maybe at the beginning of the republican party was a bit taken aback by it but they saw that she she generated excitement. And that's that's what they went with anything that will get them to a win. Anything that'll get them to power doesn't matter if it's wholly untrue or you know what they do make up stuff up all the time. It doesn't matter got them to their end result which was winning the presidency. And now we have mitch mcconnell today saying that if they take back the senate that then in twenty four even if if there's an opening too bad you know democrats will again will not be able to fill that seat which is appalling and i hope everybody is listening really carefully and will remember that because we need as many people to get out and vote in every election going forward as they did last time so you have this thing how to future proof the presidency and and at the beginning The editorial board writes donald trump. Expose the weaknesses in our system of government that can now be exploited by corrupt leader with control of the white house in this series. The globe editorial board outlines the urgent reforms needed to prevent the rise of an american tyrant and protect our democracy for posterity. And you talk about the key presidential reforms that would prevent future authoritarian. President perhaps one more competent than trump which is an important distinction from abusing power in subverting our democracy. So you split it up into six and in fact you you go right in on the first one. The first one is called treasure map for an american tyrant and he basically talked about the deep shit that trump's financial situation as he was way in debt when he took office despite the lies. But there there's a reason why he never showed his tax returns. Yeah absolutely i mean this was one of the most brazenly committed abuses of power. that donald trump You kind of had you know. We never saw his tax returns. And of course there's no law that requires presidents to release their tax returns. So technically he didn't do anything illegal in his lack of disclosure there but he was just completely unethical. You know we had a president who was four hundred million at least for hundred million dollars in debt and had he won a second term Most of that would have been do during the firm rich would have set up the united states to be in a position where it's president would be in blackmail dented conflict of interest right and he would have to then you know we would imagine put his own self interest as he did over the last four years over that of the countries You know it definitely wasn't the most extreme abuse of power. I'm he incited an insurrection. I'm an attack on the country You know he. He obstructed justice more than once He tried to cheat in the election multiple times. He tried to undermine the abusing his power almost every single month of his presidency. But you know. The his financial conflicts of conflicts of interest set a very dangerous precedent for the united states. Because never before had the united states elected a president who had a sprawling business empire. You know keep it up. That's the wealthy presidents before who've stepped back who've done what they're supposed to do But not trump exactly. And that's that's part of why we dove into that and and you know when it came to financial conflicts of interest one of the steps that were asking congress to take is to require presidents to divest from businesses that they own when they become when they assume office or to avoid these conflicts of interests. You know in the end. Presidents are such a central part of the american government that it's hard to root out all every conflict of interest. But that's why you need. Multiple safeguards divest from.

donald trump trump Steve king Donald trump sarah palin mitch mcconnell twenty congress four hundred million six Bush fifty eight people first one democrats Jeb bush today four years ago ted cruz republican party republicans
"boston globe" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Like fun to me. Just just saying doesn't I've been to salt. Lake actually floated in the great salt lake. Once when i was a kid anyway All right so let me tell you what's going on today and i don't know if you've had a chance to read this yet or not but you should the boston globe last week started publishing a six part editorial it's called and let me let me get the page up here because i don't wanna screw it up because it's it's really good and i'd hate to mess it up. Future proofing the presidency says donald trump brought our democracy to the brink and exposed. It's weak spots how to thwart the next american tyrant and i don't recall ever a major american newspaper doing this six days in a row It started the end of last week. They started on this six part series the first Installment was a treasure map for an american tyrant. The next one was who owns the president then. Assorted family affair. You can guess where the growing without one hiding the evidence rewards for doing the president's bidding and the case for prosecuting donald trump. i feel like i'm a guest host of jeopardy who wants to start. I'll take started family affair for two hundred miam- i i don't know who the guest host is. This week i thought my mba last week was very good. Anyway so We're going to speak with one of the members of the boston globe. Editorial board in the second half hour of the show. His name is abdullah rod again. He's a writer for opinion writer for the globe. And we'll talk about this series. And i read it all makes sense. The problem is it takes many of the the moves many of the the steps that they have to take Require you know congress to to vote laws into to change some of the laws and with this republican party. I don't see how that happens So let me tell you a couple of things that you know just to start off the show I would have started with the story about mitch mcconnell. But we'll get to that in a moment. I got say you know. Saturday marked the fifth anniversary of the pulse nightclub shooting in orlando the the the You know what. I i kinda and i hate this. I don't know if it's the deadliest. Or if las vegas was the deadliest either way too. Many fucking people were killed by madman with a gun. That's what i do know. And so this was the fifth anniversary on saturday and you know just a fitting marking of the occasion from friday afternoon through yesterday. At least nine people were killed and another forty seven injured in eight mass shootings across six states. It this is insane. So far this year we've had two hundred seventy two mass shootings in their qualifying. It as four or more people shot constitutes a mass shooting. Two hundred and seventy two so far this year and it's only june we have not. We're not even halfway through the year yet. The total number of mass shootings is about forty percent higher than at this point in twenty twenty and about sixty five percent higher than it was in twenty nine teen. I you know if you weren't already nervous about going out. Because of the cove. Ed i would think that the the frequency of these shootings i mean th so many this weekend i i couldn't even keep track of them and certainly the news isn't really covering them like a major news story. It's not the lead story anymore all ya number of bunch of mass shootings again this weekend. A bunch of people dead a bunch more hurt. When does it end. When does it fucking in so i. You know we were supposed to on this weekend. Go see this van gogh exhibit. I told you about last week saturday. We had tickets for saturday saturday morning. Check my email. it's like oops. This van gogh exhibit has been delayed. I guess it's a new one that was just opening. I didn't realize i got tickets. So close to the opening but We were supposed to go saturday late afternoon and saturday morning. I got the message saying nope you need to reschedule. You need to get tickets for later on in the run lovely so we're going july tenth but that aside so we had a you know we weren't gonna go out so instead. We decided to go out to dinner. We picked a local restaurant. That has a lovely outdoor dining area. Because i'm still not ready to go inside and you know and we went and it was lovely. We had a great dinner restaurant. Coal tap forty two here in coral springs very nice and then You know i keep reading about all these concerts coming to the area and as much as i would love to go. I'm not ready yet. And if you wonder why. I'm not ready yet. Let me open my twitter. Right here. And quote from dr eric ding. Who's been on this program we see do. I haven't i haven't here okay. i don't know what okay here. He wrote This new delta variant of the virus is ramping up. And it's bad so eric. Ding dr eric. Fi goulding tweeted out break even with two doses of the a. Vaccines that's the the pfizer. And moderna a canadian hospital sixteen patients and six healthcare staff delta variant positive six out of sixteen patients and five out of six health care workers had received two doses of the vaccine seven patients in one health..

mitch mcconnell donald trump seven patients friday afternoon saturday sixteen patients five saturday morning yesterday last week congress today july tenth twenty twenty forty seven Saturday last week saturday about sixty five percent six days this year
Summer Travel Forecast Calls for Longer Waits, Fewer Choices

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Summer Travel Forecast Calls for Longer Waits, Fewer Choices

"Article from Boston Globe summer travel forecast called for longer waits fewer choices. If you haven't heard this story, I can't stress it enough. And I have two pieces of feedback for you. One. No, that it's coming. And don't be a jerk. Yeah. No, it's going to take longer to get your food. Your server might never have worked in a restaurant before. The restaurant owner might not be able to see each you because there might be booking out for four weeks ahead. So don't be a I want to say a different word, but I must say it jerk. Don't be a jerk this summer because you know what the businesses that are trying to figure all this stuff out there Struggling. They can't find any labor anymore. It's not their fault that their restaurant can't hire a bartender or can't handle a server where the hotel can't find

Boston Globe
Report from Boston: Mass. COVID-19 Call Center Has Cost at Least $4.2M

Howie Carr

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Report from Boston: Mass. COVID-19 Call Center Has Cost at Least $4.2M

"Massachusetts has already paid more than $4 million to three companies to set up a call center to manage the scramble for Corona virus vaccine appointments the day after hundreds of thousands of older residents became eligible of the tab is expected to grow. Boston Globe reported that the state's health secretary signed all three contracts February 23rd. But the companies began incurring costs related to the call center on January 28th the day after people 75 older became eligible for vaccines, dramatically increasing demand and frustrations over the difficulty in scheduling appointments. Some state lawmakers are questioning the haste in which the contracts were

Boston Globe Massachusetts
LeBron James Becoming Part Owner Of Boston Red Sox

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

LeBron James Becoming Part Owner Of Boston Red Sox

"Points. The Boston Red Sox are getting a prominent new part owner of the Boston Globe reporting The En bas superstar LeBron James and a business partner are now part of the baseball team's ownership group Fenway Sports Group. The newspaper says Maverick Carter and the 36 year old James Holden. Undisclosed amount of ownership in F S

Boston Globe Boston Red Sox Fenway Sports Group Lebron James Maverick Carter Baseball James Holden
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Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | 1 year ago

test

"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
Interview with Jessica Lessin

Skimm'd from The Couch

03:57 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Jessica Lessin

"Jessica thank you for joining me and welcome to skin from the couch. Thanks for having me carly. I love listening to this podcast. So i'm thrilled to be here. I was saying just as you got kinda miked up. Its feels very weird to be on the other side of interviewing journalists like you but we're going to jump into it which is first question. I'm a standard question. Skim your resume. I wanted to be a reporter For as long as i can remember and had a series of internships starting in high school at my local newspaper where i wrote about why there were so many nail salons and how they could all stay in business so didn't really have a sense of supply and demand back then but was interested in in poking my nose around i then interned at the associated press the boston globe and the wall street journal and clung to that internship so that they would not let me leave the building and convince them to hire me so i worked as a tech reporter at the journal for eight years covering everything from the rise of online video to apple to google yahoo the rise of the internet. If you will that be took me out to san francisco and then after eight years at the journal i loved covering the tech industry and it seemed to me. That tac was disrupting news in very very fundamental ways most significantly. It was getting publishers obsessed with online advertising and traffic in a way that i felt was really lowering. The quality of news content and so i launched the information as a subscription business to swing back to quality over quantity and i guess seven years in We have one of the largest newsrooms of tech reporters around the world in her breaking major stories every day. We're going to dig into so much of that. But i'm curious. What would people be surprised to learn about you. I think probably many many things. But probably that i never ever ever thought i was going to start a company i actually remember grousing to my husband. You know maybe a decade ago. Why is everyone leaving. Big company jobs to start a company in the world be better if they were adding their talents and energies sort of into the traditional system. So i i. I think even wrote a story at the journal about like you know. There are too many entrepreneurs or something to that vein but you know lo and behold eventually you catch the edge and i think the world is just made starting a company so i was gonna say appealing but as you know carly times is quite tough Be anything appealing but it just felt like there was a huge opportunity and i went for it but it was quite a swing from sort of being very down on entrepreneurship to becoming one. You mentioned in your skin of your bio that you began your journalism career at a young age and went onto the crimson while. You're harvard We're able to turn internship into a job at the journal. I think that the one of the most popular questions that we get asked. How do i turn my internship into the full-time. What is your advice on how to do that. Don't leave the buildings that was really my advice and so i kind of lucked out. Because i was working on this big project. It was on the salary data that the government was putting out it a once in every year report about what was having to wages across a huge number of jobs and i had planned a really big feature with my editor on this and they push back the release date and so i said i i got it right this story you know you don't wanna miss this big feature in the journal you had an approval process for big features in the had been approved and all of that and so you know my internship was supposed to be up august whatever. The data was coming out first week in september and i just sort of made the case to literally extend my security badge access

Carly The Boston Globe Jessica The Associated Press The Wall Street Journal The Journal Yahoo San Francisco Apple Google Harvard Government
"boston globe" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"boston globe" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Brody is a Boston Globe best selling fiction writer and author of Over a dozen novels. He's a graduate of Tufts University and Georgetown Law School and a former director of the New England Antiquities Research Association. And is an avid researcher in the subject of pre Columbian exploration of America. He's frequently appeared as a guest expert on documentaries airing on History Channel Travel Channel, PBS and Discovery Channel. All 10 of the books in his Templars in America Serious have been Kindle Top 10 Best sellers. His latest historical thriller is Row America. Roman artifacts in America. David Brody, Welcome back to coast. How are you? I'm doing great. Thank you for having me, Richard. My pleasure. Are you okay with the comparison to Dan Brown? Or does that irk you? Are you are you? Are you cool with that? I I'm fine with it actually many, many years ago. For anybody ever heard of Dan Brown? Anybody ever heard of David Rohde? We had a mutual publicists, and she kept trying to have a meeting. For whatever reason we never did, And I always regretted that, but no, he said. He's in great work. I'm happy with that comparison. So it's the historical thriller genre is It's interesting because when you think of what you have been revealing in the Templars in America, Syriza and now in America, it's pretty thrilling. All on its own. The idea that the Templars came to America, obviously, centuries before Columbus. Perhaps they brought treasures from Solomon's Temple or the second Temple. Buried it somewhere or that the Romans Were up and down the Ohio River Valley. 1000 and more years before Columbus that's pretty thrilling all on its own. So why the need to fictionalize it? I think that stems from the way I first came at this subject. I was a fiction writer before I was a historian. And, um, you know, I had written three legal thrillers. I'm a lawyer by training. And so I was casting about looking for an idea for what I thought was gonna be my fourth legal thriller and I was living at the time in a town in north of Boston. Westford, Massachusetts. We have a local legend. My daughter was in fourth grade. At the time. She came off the school with the story about the legend of the Westford Knight. The legend being that in the late 1300 Scottish explorers. Following in the path of the North Island, hopped away across the North Atlantic and ended up in Nova Scotia and then came down the coast to New England and one of their nights. One of their members of the party died at night. And to memorialize his death. They carved an effigy of the fallen knight on the rock ledge, and that effigy is still visible today in western and it's called the Legend of the Westford Knight. My daughter came home with that story. I never heard it before. I was fascinated by it. So I went to the went to view the site and I went to the library to do some reading and some research and talk to some local historians and one thing led to another and soon became very apparent to me that my legal thriller It's not gonna be illegal. Throw that Instead, it was gonna be something along the lines. What Dan Brown had done a couple years earlier. The DaVinci code on then the deeper I dug into this legend, and I discovered that this this group that came over here Was connected to the outlawed Knight Templars and that the family that came over built Rosslyn Chapel made famous in the DaVinci Code, and so not only was this amazing history On our side of the Atlantic. But it also tied into a lot of the things that was being discussed and debated in the DaVinci Code s o the way I came at it was through. What of the fictional Gateway and and because I bumped into so much a damn brown stuff, and he had just done historical fiction historical thriller that seemed to be the natural way for me to do it. I was once told as a young writer that it's best to write about this right in the same genre that you like to read, and I love to read that kind of stuff. And so I did it that way it was well received. I think there are a lot of people who enjoy being on a roller coaster ride as they're learning about ancient history. And had some success. And so here we are. It's actually 11 books in the series later, and this is still a John Doe right right in. So as as the former director of New England Antiquities Research Association, where you on friendly turf when you were exploring the what we'll call the Secret History of America, Pre Columbian America, where they simpatico with this kind of stuff. Right, and I'm director again. I was I was a director than I was sort of about out for a while. But now I'm back on the board. This is a group of amateur historians and amateur archaeologists in New England. And our our goal are the group's goal is to figure out who was in America when who build all these mysterious stone structures and carvings and towers. That we find scattered around the landscape in the Northeast. You know what? The answers. So this group, This is what we do. I mean, we go out in the woods and we get down and dirty and then we get together and try to figure it out. So The group has been incredibly supportive of my research and other researchers. Essentially, it's you know, we're the ones who are skeptical of what we learned in our high school history classes and were skeptical of what the archaeologists tell us that we're skeptical of sort of the mainstream. That is kuo with explanations of history, and this is again. This is what we do, Mike, my kids. They call the Iraq nerd, because when I you know when they were young Grace has spent a lifetime going into the woods looking at rocks, and they just thought that was the funniest thing so that that nickname is sort of stuck, but they call me the rock dirt. You put that on a T shirt, Dave, that a guy like that the rock nerd rock so So you've left the Templars in America Serious aside for the time being, and now we're talking about ancient Romans in America and the book or America begins with The same protagonist, Cameron Thorne, hired hired by some millionaire to investigate the discovery of what appears to be an ancient Roman ship. Off the coast of Plum Island. Yeah. Have there been Such discoveries that maybe we haven't heard about in North America, South America. These ancient Roman ships is a matter of fact. That's what got me started. Actually, two things. Let me start on this. We'll get to the second one, probably later when we get out to talking about the Ohio River Valley and the lost Roman Legion that you've into that in your introduction That was one thing book written by Rick Lakshman. The second thing, though, was This is a reader who became a friend who contacted me 78 years ago because, um, he himself was involved in some Treasure hunting and had Discover what he believed to be in beliefs to be an ancient Roman shipwreck off the coast of the North Shore. Massachusetts and his problem is that the way things are set up legally, and this is one of the reasons why it came to me. He was interested in some legal advice. Eyes. The way things are set up. Is that for him? T gain jurisdiction over this fine. He first needs to file a petition with the Massachusetts state government. But part of that petition Includes specific information about where the find is and information that would allow other Treasure hunters to basically jump his fine while he's tied up in the procedural, uh, Labyrinth of trying to get permission Tol his big and so essentially, He can't really file the paperwork because he'll lose his dig and lose his Lose whatever's there, so we'll jump is fine. And so it basically sits there and he's he's not sure what to do. It is. It's a real shame if he had, you know, unlimited funds. He could pay to have a patrol out there, but he doesn't And so it's this..

Rick Lakshman David Rohde Richard Cameron Thorne Nova Scotia John Doe David Brody North Atlantic North Island Plum Island Ohio River Valley New England Antiquities Resear America PBS Discovery Channel New England Georgetown Law School Brody Tufts University Grace
Boston Ministers, Officers Call On Walsh To Reinstate New Police Commissioner

WBZ Morning News

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Boston Ministers, Officers Call On Walsh To Reinstate New Police Commissioner

"That that Boston Boston police police Commissioner Commissioner Dennis Dennis White White be be reinstated. reinstated. As As he he was was placed placed on on leave leave just just days days after after being being sworn sworn in when decades old allegations of domestic abuse resurfaced. WBC's James RoHaas joining us live and telling us Supporters believe he's been unfairly targeted. Jim. So Mayor Marty Walsh and his administration are facing criticism for how is handling the investigation into the new commissioner, Reverend Eugene Rivers. The third and other black clergy members walked in this white back on the job as the investigation takes place. The Boston Globe reports. They and the Massachusetts Association of Minority Law Enforcement Officers believe that domestic violence allegations from 22 years ago were known as White moved up the ranks and that he's not facing undue scrutiny because he's black now. Supporters added that they do not condone domestic violence or oppose the current investigation. They just want to see it take place before any decision about whites. Future is made The city not commenting, inciting independent investigation. James RoHaas

Boston Boston Police Police Commissioner Commissioner Denn James Rohaas Mayor Marty Walsh Reverend Eugene Rivers WBC Massachusetts Association Of M The Boston Globe JIM White
Washington Post's Executive Editor Announces Retirement

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Washington Post's Executive Editor Announces Retirement

"Announcement of the retirement of a man who's probably one of the biggest figures in current day journalism. Washington Post executive editor Marty Baron. He is retiring from the Washington Post after eight years on the job. No, no to a staff today. Baron says he'll leave at the end of next month. Caps of 45 year career in journalism, the post 1 10 Pulitzer prizes under his leadership. Baron calls the entire experience deeply meaningful, but it's 66. He feels he's ready to move on. You may remember Baron also edited The Miami Herald and the Boston Globe is working the Globe. Was portrayed by actor Liev Schreiber in the Oscar winning film spotlight about the Catholic Church sex

Marty Baron Washington Post Baron Pulitzer Boston Globe The Miami Herald Liev Schreiber Oscar Catholic Church
Mass. License Plate Surveillance System Was Inaccurate

Howie Carr

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Mass. License Plate Surveillance System Was Inaccurate

"By The Boston Globe shows that Massachusetts has ended the use of a controversial license plate surveillance system after discovering a glitch that caused inaccurate data to be recorded for more than five years. The inaccuracies were found in a network of mounted fixed high speed cameras installed by the state Police took photos of license plates of passing vehicle new

The Boston Globe Massachusetts State Police
Report: License plate surveillance system was inaccurate

WBZ Midday News

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Report: License plate surveillance system was inaccurate

"Well, the state has ended a controversial license plate surveillance program after discovering that the program had a glitch and had been recording the wrong data for five years. Report was obtained by The Boston Globe, the state's network of fixed high speed cameras had been used in criminal investigations and even to find suspects without having a warrant or court

The Boston Globe