20 Burst results for "Boston Garden"

Bruins retiring jersey of NHL barrier breaker Willie O'Ree

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 4 months ago

Bruins retiring jersey of NHL barrier breaker Willie O'Ree

"The man who broke the NHL's color barrier is taking his place in the Boston garden rafters as the Bruins announced they will retire the number twenty two of Willie re re became the first black player to play in the NHL when he suited up for the Bruins on January eighteenth nineteen fifty eight against the rival Canadians when I arrived in Montreal and I got together with bill Smith and Daniel Patrick and they said well we have we dropped out because we think you could add a little something to the team he says your your brunch that what he says and just go play your game and go with it don't worry about anything else the now eighty five year old re played forty five games over two seasons with the Bruins he was inducted into the hockey hall of fame in two thousand eighteen I'm guessing Coolbaugh

Boston Garden Rafters Bruins NHL Daniel Patrick Willie Bill Smith Montreal Hockey Coolbaugh
"boston garden" Discussed on The Cedric Maxwell Podcast

The Cedric Maxwell Podcast

02:45 min | 5 months ago

"boston garden" Discussed on The Cedric Maxwell Podcast

"He said well meet me at Carmichael. Okay? Yep. So I get on campus. I don't have late. I'm lost. I don't know where I'm at on campus I get lost and these men to this day is blamed out with me not going North Carolina cuz I only play with you know with that program and me and James Worthy and the crew would have been the same class and we would have been really good and then Virginia, you know, it was an hour from my house and they had a few good players Jeff lamp the break of those guys who will talk to you when they never could get over the top and even today. I realized the significance of going to Virginia and I'll tell you why I'm so with ours my mom and dad's house. It was in a cc and I could get a good education web Virginia only if you ever look at only had ever to our members on the team. Wow, and the reason why is that nobody else wanted the room with them on the road? I didn't know that joke over the place right coach Island, so they had to have Mike Goins Mike Owens Bobby Stokes and gone and Jefferson and garden never played that much with Mike and Bobby room and garlic which stayed home. Sometimes he was home. But you know, he had a couple of guys a room with but we we changed the culture at UVA and we bought in six Americans my freshman year to change the whole dynamic of UVA football scores from a basketball perspective and I didn't realize that you know years later that I got out of school. They're not that coach Island include with racist, but you know, no one ever wanted to go there because of the stigma of Virginia basketball. He tried to try to change up in nineteen Seventy-Six eighty-one ACC title and you know two hour from everyone that team by restricting my coins Wally Walker and The Crew whatever but even today even today not Jacob what I look back at one reason. I actually now live in shortsville is come back is because of the stuff that's racially divided in Strongsville with the school and also also the sports piece off there with the something on walking on their lovely Thomas Jefferson lawn a couple of weeks ago and it's in the news that these young ladies or standing up for black lives matter and wage. They put a piece of paper on their dorm room door. Now. This is where Jefferson lived and Alan pulled all these big people live back in the day, but they didn't they didn't face the university. They just put the piece of paper said after you back yet and it's their racism and all that kind of stuff. So all the university is up and up right because of that they like, oh we need to get this going to take it down all the big money people like President. You need to go get that down whatever wage they said that and guess what like four or five people did on the same door as well. So going back and understanding where we were will be been what I've been through there now and understand that it's it's kind of crazy. It's too long to see it evolve..

coach Island Virginia Jeff lamp Mike Goins Mike Owens Bobby Stokes James Worthy Carmichael Wally Walker shortsville Jefferson basketball North Carolina Bobby Strongsville Mike garden football Jacob
"boston garden" Discussed on The Cedric Maxwell Podcast

The Cedric Maxwell Podcast

05:00 min | 5 months ago

"boston garden" Discussed on The Cedric Maxwell Podcast

"In Newport. The News Virginian getting some ink for my printer. I mean know what I was doing and then I walk in and one of the managers come and said you hear about kobee. He died. Like what the hell are you talking about that you'd I I like whatever you're bullshiting me so off I go right back home and I'll look on the news and all the news is all over the place where they look at your phone or replace with this helicopter covered. What's happening? And you start hearing stories about who may have been found a helicopter, you know naturally was a friend of mine. She was supposed to be there with him going on that helicopter. So all the stories start to come out and be like wow and they start to think about it off like a helicopter flying. I mean the tragic I mean his daughter in his arms and other people in every day care known as well and they and you know, you're going to crash and then what do you do them every time I think about it just heart-wrenching understand passing I get that but the tragic way it happened with the daughter and the people on it it just it just Get out of my skin is gets emotional but it's it's very sad and then you're right this year. It's been crazy from Coby to John Thompson. I remember I was at with Jon Taffer as well meme had built a relationship over the years. I mean he recruited me in college to go to Georgetown. I remember when he came to my parents house instead of my mom sharing a big jobs and didn't hear my mom dies on break the page. He was so tall and big whatever but you remember those hands and John Lewis has been a crazy created 2020 and started with Kobe. And you know, that was any idea what this year was going to be like wage is what it is right this point in time, but very sad management and that Legacy will last forever his wife kids. I feel for him for sure. You had to go through one of the most crazy, I guess recruiting battles of all time when you came out cuz you're talking about John Thompson. I know these Smith had to come get you when to see you dead. How did you make that final pick to go to Virginia instead? Obviously your home but still just all the places that you have. I mean, I mean scholarships you think you offered you had may not be the first thing. Well, we could.

kobee Jon Taffer Newport John Thompson Coby Georgetown John Lewis Kobe Smith Virginia
"boston garden" Discussed on Black N' Gold Hockey Podcast

Black N' Gold Hockey Podcast

05:16 min | 6 months ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Black N' Gold Hockey Podcast

"Anything. I like I thought about doing this for honestly about ten years. It was in my head. I was thinking about it was like, I wonder if it's even possible, you know, he started getting something that this long and you've got seats behind the net and stuff off rods are getting really long. And so I didn't even know if it would actually work and so the entire time I've been like it's been two years since I started I don't work on it all the time. It's just something that's up in my shop play around with it when I have some time. So it's really was just a matter of I would do something and I would start building it and then I would say that doesn't look right and I would scrap it and then I would start so dead. Probably could have been done. I don't know half a year ago, maybe longer kind of just kept but I mean, I I spared no expense. I mean I cut every individual a pane of glass that goes around the rank. You know, I I made the stanchions between the glass probably the trickiest part and the most satisfying once we've got done was just figuring out how to get the corners around the, you know, the ends of the rag with the seats cuz there's so many angles of just like my brain was uh, and that's actually something that had the brought up in the last week's podcast. We were talking about the way the time when the Boston Bruins first played the game at the Boston Garden was was those uneven structures areas of the rank because it's constantly a wraparound kind of walk away. So you had to you had to basically build it. Well, let's just put it this way the the the technology back in the day wasn't so yep. So good. So they had to like build everything that went along with angles. But the way the way you did it just brought it back. So so good and what I really loved about it was your finished product and the way you got your back up camera into like the obstructive views because that's where my old man used to buy tickets all the time. And then we sit there for like a minute or two to see if we can actually see the game and then go up to the gallery gods and hang out up there. Right? Right. Well, that's the funny thing about it like I built it so it can be cuz it's so big I made it so it could be taken apart easily in case I wanted to take it somewhere or do something with it or if I have to move some day, right and that long shot was just a accident a couple of weeks ago. I had one of the panels off and I was turning around and I looked back and look at I got to get a picture that right, you know, it worked off that was one of the things I wanted to say to you is that I'm sorry that you didn't get to the so I have a question but also just comment. I'm sorry. You didn't get to go to the Garden because really the only thing like Mark you saying about the seats like I remember you suck..

Boston Garden Boston Bruins Mark
"boston garden" Discussed on Black N' Gold Hockey Podcast

Black N' Gold Hockey Podcast

03:52 min | 6 months ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Black N' Gold Hockey Podcast

"A dental lab making tea for many years, very small little tools and stuff and I've always kind of drawn or painted and I've always made things worse and this is actually I think the 4th table hockey game I built the other ones for not anywhere near as elaborate, but this is the big one. So you must have loved that game as a kid table hockey game. I'd love to block. Yeah. I love old toys, especially old mechanical toys that work, you know ten stuff, you know, just things they don't make anymore right always been a huge fan of that stuff. So I collect table hockey games off. A whole mess of them. I'm story as well. That's that's awesome. So then table hockey generally is just a passion is and we're just lucky enough. You're also a Bruins fan. So he thought just thought I'd bring it all together. Oh awesome trailer me ask you where did the base start in this project at the old Boston Garden? Did it start from an original game or did you build the slide and the whole table itself? The whole thing? The only thing I didn't build is the actual players on the ice. I've made the guys on the benches bucks players on the ice are actually from a game that was made in the late 70s early 80s by coleco. It's called a clinical game room and there are three D. And I really like the super detailed they got different position and she's over the last like twenty five years or so whenever I see them I buy them, you know, they're pretty rare. But you know, if I'm at antiques mall or something and I see a stock to grab them all so I've got about wage. Twenty-three teams, I think just waiting to be painted. Wow, that's amazing. What other stadiums did you do? This is the only complete Stadium I've done I did while I was been working on this a had a couple of other guys asked me if I would just build, you know sections of seats. So I did I did find those. I think the two other Boston Garden was just the large sections maybe like 36 inches long and I think it was about five sections of seats three rows and then I did a but.

hockey Boston Garden coleco Bruins
Bert and John Jacobs Discuss the Evolution of 'Life Is Good'

How I Built This

24:51 min | 1 year ago

Bert and John Jacobs Discuss the Evolution of 'Life Is Good'

"Welcome back revenue which is which is great rate. You know you could start to see maybe a path towards towards real profitability. <hes> and i guess the the next year you really i mean you. You're still running his business by the way out of your apartment in boston that you guys share right <hes> the starts to turn a corner though because as we see that reaction in the street and boom we start thinking about distribution and hiring a sales rep and that that summer of ninety five the momentum starts rolling and debt was when you made your first higher as well i guess right that's right yeah. The <hes> cary sherman moved in upstairs cheers from us and became a friend and we just used to beg her when she got home from work to help us <hes> pack orders and help us try to organize the orders ars and <hes> she was a big help so we begged her to quit her job eventually and she did it. She could do things five times faster than us for one thing and then it became clear we needed the help pretty badly and she needed to take a leap yeah. We we had a friend over for dinner one night because he was pretty sharp and we asked him to tell us how much business we would have to do to be able to afford to pay carry <hes> seventeen thousand dollars which is what she said was the minimum the question to her was what is the lowest amount that you could possibly get paid to work with us and seventeen thousand dollars so he did the math for us and he said that we would have to do a quarter of a million dollars in business which sounded like a billion dollars yeah and we we did two hundred sixty two. I think it was two hundred sixty two thousand a a year yeah and that two hundred sixty two thousand was like that's to pay for all your supplies and everything and everything was not profit that is that is oh no in those in those roche revenue days we we would get prepared for died t shirts p._f. Dis they caught and we'd store them. We didn't have enough room for them in our apartment which store them in a bulkhead in the building and we had to put them in trash bags <hes> that were tightly wound up because it was moist down there and so a in any given day we would get a certain amount of orders we would be designing during the daytime in the afternoon and we would take those shirts down to new bedford. Get them died in the shirt collars. We wanted the next afternoon. We'd take those shirts out to a marlboro mass and to screen printers midland graphics screen printed t shirts and then <hes> by four o'clock drop them off at u._p._s. Whatever the orders were which was you know two or three retailers a couple of order and then we then we set up a trailer like the back of a eighteen wheeler container owner containers like permanently stationed next to our screen printer with their permission they had a dirt parking lot and for zero rent they because we were afraid to to get the overhead of a warehouse and so they let us was thirty dollars a month to rent the <hes> lease the container and end for zero dollars. They let us <hes> park it on their lot he because you didn't take the risk on on like a long term lease so you'll just let us a shipping containers are warehouse makes sense your we want. We wanted to make sure the revenue ran way out ahead of this needed a couple extension cords lighting and not a lot of ventilation in those containers but <hes> we cranked some of ninety five ninety six and it was kind of non stop twenty four seven how did you how did you get the trademark on it. I mean it seems like a very very common phrase. Life is good but you got a new trademark. How did that happen well. We failed five times. We were going to the boston public library at all you couldn't important attorney and we sent five applications and failed and then i went one night to play basketball and some guy asked me. Did i see you and your brother selling t shirts in front of the boston garden the other night and i said yeah and he said how's that going not so good but we have this great idea the eh i went on and on about what the concept was and that we're trying to trade market and then i realized that i'd been rude and not ask the guy what he did. I said what do you do for a living and he said <hes> trademark attorney and guy's name was bob pierce and i went and saw him two days later and convince them to do the work pro pro bono and he knew just what to do so we had to make a lot of changes we had to create hang tags and labels we the label in our shirt said jacobs gallery gallery so we switched the label to life is good and then we had to get affidavits from five different retailers who said that it represented a brand and by definition legally trademark denotes the source of the goods so there's when you just put a mark on a t shirt that's called ornamental but if people look at it and say that represents the source of the goods in some way then it's a brand so he did all those things correctly and i gotta tell you it's twenty five years later and and bob pierce still gets all our intellectual property business. That's amazing so you got the trademark on this phrase. Life is good as a brand and that's your you sort of you own this phrase phrase and you can use it as your business even the fact that you said it a few times during this podcast you owe us money got yeah. It was a it was a big day when we got it. We we still didn't really know how to run a business or what to do but it was. We knew it was a a valuable thing yeah. How did you guys divide up labor between the two of you like who did what who did finances who who did the art who to the delivery. How how did you guys who was in charge. Who was the boss older brother. The boss anything that involved brainpower pretty much fell on my side no seriously bur burden off he had more of a background coming out of school <hes> on the business side and he's a great communicator great motivator so he worked worked the phones a lot. I spend more time on the drawing table or like at the screen print shop or maybe packing up stuff but there's plenty of crossover birt's. It's very creative as well so it mixed pretty seamlessly over the years. I guess there was a turning point pretty significant turning point in nineteen ninety-six. You guys get a call from a pretty big sporting goods chain based out of indianapolis named named kelly ins or gaylon galleons something something like that yet galleons yeah. What was that yeah they were. They were actually in our opinion. The best sporting goods in the country <hes> their stores were incredible and yeah they they were open to a sales call and interested in the brand so they invited us to go visit them in indianapolis and we actually actually couldn't afford to fly out so instead we've just transparent with them and asked if we could piggy back when they came here would they come and visit us i would they didn't realize was that there was no life as good in that when they came to visit austin becoming to our apartment so they <hes> anyway a we made them prince spaghetti and rago sauce and we hung out and they they were on board and <hes> they placed the biggest orders is by far that we'd ever seen and they kind of put us on the map outside of new england. I think dick's sporting goods eventually bought galleons right. That's right and i i i don't know if it was apparent to them that the entire company in burt myself in kerry or sitting with them in our kitchen at dinner but but we did have a lot of laughs and then we got an in order and that was a huge step for us to suddenly be shipping two hundred and eighty eight pieces instead of twenty four pieces to a retailer so so once you get into galleons aliens was at just like a game changer i mean. Did you see your business just like skyrocket. It was a game changer because once he would happen was <hes> most of our business stan and now is a specialty mom and pop business so the mama pops will take a look at the big guys. Try to find brands. Sometimes that different <hes> retailers carrying galleons was kind of a model citizen that a lot of small retailers looked up to and so once we were in galleons we're in all these geographic <unk> graphic locations and there was great visibility for us so all of a sudden our phones were ringing like crazy from other retailers from other territories and so- galleys was probably responsible responsible for hundreds of new accounts over the next year or two and business really started booming. You know went from that. Two hundred fifty thousand six hundred twenty then we broke a million at one moment to the was just mind blowing t- thinking how do we go from having like seventy eight dollars between us three years ago. Two million dollars in sales was pretty mind blowing and we didn't have a concept of you know like what it meant to do a million dollars. I think we thought maybe we should retire knows wow we hit a million dollars. I mean i think we definitely stopped and sort of you know how to how to beer and kind kind of said wow man what what has happened but on the other hand was still in our apartment and you don't really look around and see any differences just a mad scramble we'll still but but i think yeah i think galleons an crossing not million dollar mark connor gave us the confidence to invest in a lease get the warehouse and and we hired a few people we i mean we we didn't even have a computer would do untold kerry who still works with us to this day by the way she actually owns five percent the business. He's a partner yeah but she you know she said to us. You really need to get a computer and both on our like oh. We're artists we. We don't want a computer and they so she needed to run the business. Why do we need a computer but she was right well. There's a lot of absurd of exchanges. We had this guy who had run champion the brand chair and wilson sporting goods and he was helping us out through his a sales up. You know we connected personally. Jay phillips god bless him. He was flying up phillies like an angel. We didn't yeah to get angel slash devil the best kind and he <hes> he would give us advice and direction and then he would ask us very basic questions like you know what he got on the books for next year. We're like what what what do you mean like. How do you plan how much product to make me. We like <hes> we just. We've been doubling for like the last few years. We figure you're on a double again. He's like that's a very scary way to run a business and he asked us what our assets sets where he's trying to get us off our personal off our loans because our our personal names were on the loan notes and <hes> he said we gotta. We've got change this. You know what do you got for assets. Burton are like we can get a mountain bike and we're dead serious. We didn't even know how to answer questions like think. I got that picture mom. We got a v._c._r. And he was just like dumbfounded. Looking at us like these guys are so so clueless spine shirts like i because i mean when i think of life is good. I think like <hes> going to ocracoke island. You know someplace. I like cape. Cod like you know you would life is good and it's the summer and it's easy to feel that way. Is that where the shirts were being solden like beach towns and places like that in the summertime. <hes> one of the strengths right away was that it wasn't one distribution channel. Oh so you're talking about destination resort which became important to us right away but sporting was really big. Two gift shops for people like you know around themes like home. Themes like you know love family gardening grilling all that kind of stuff so it really was <hes> oh the distribution was really spread out which which you know we didn't really i can't take credit for strategically planning that but a helped us a lot through the two years the economy has gone up and down and when you're in a single distribution channel it's hard to weather economic downturns but for us you know some would get hurt worse than others and we were always able to weather it because we were <hes> not too many eggs in one basket yeah there. It was so many different places for us to go in when the economy went down it would not all the channels will get impacted the same way i mean did you. I mean when you think think about <hes> a very simple phrase some very basic and not i mean your guess agreed artists no no no oh judgment but like very simple our work and it became this thing t shirts and and dinner plates and posters and things like what what are the things that i'm probably forgetting about recipes backs towels. I mean really doesn't you know it really just became you know what he's a good canvas to connect emotionally with people and in more recent years more things like video content and publishing books excetera which is extremely exciting to us but we're still most known for the t shirts. Did you guys. I mean you've been doing this now. Since really i guests since the late eighties rape on t shirts. Have you ever <hes> any part of of of of you guys want to sell it. You know sell it to a bigger her company and just kind of cash in 'cause you 'cause you've both of you become pretty well off from this tiny little t shirt business and <hes> <hes> you can. I don't know can do whatever you want. I think the reason that we're not interested in selling going. Public is what we learned. Learn from these customers that started sending us letters emails sharing their personal stories and they really taught us that optimism is most powerful aw in the hardest times and these are people dealing with chemotherapy losing loved ones and they'd say we all wore life as good t-shirts to the memorial service for my brother because that's the spirit with which he lived and we've got thousands of those letters and emails and people kind of <unk> opening up their whole personal lives to us because the emotional connection to the brand. They're the ones who taught us this and if we'd hadn't received those letters that may they have been appealing to us like yeah. We've been at this for a few decades but we want to spread that message as wide as we can because we believe in it more than anything anything else in the world am burt but what what are your thoughts on. I mean did did you ever consider find to sell the business well in a lot of ways. We really feel like we're just getting warmed up. It honestly feels like a startup today. We're we're like a twenty five year old startup where there's all these young people oh walking around that remind us of ourselves but are much faster and stronger and smarter and i'm not <hes> operating the business. I was as president and c._e._o. For a long time and we replaced me with a woman that actually came from our nonprofit side and she's killing it and you can tell pretty quickly oakley that she's about ten times the operator that i was and it's allowing me to dive back into the creative and i haven't been there in a while l. so we're really kinda back to where we started in the beginning. Hey let's design some t shirts but now we have a really strong balance sheet. We own one hundred percent of the business us and you know we have no intention of going public or selling the business we just wanna see you know how far we can take this in at some point figure out what to to do with the structure something creative maybe denisov to our staff. Maybe we can sell it to our customers. Something that enables the <hes> that will enable the best work of life is good to be done after john de gone so i mean. Do you guys feel like you grew up up with very working class home. I mean in the room upstairs with frost on windows and like you presumably today a a up. Both of you are doing pretty well. I mean you can you can live pretty comfortably. No no question about it yeah just to have our own home seriously not not to be too corny but that that's pretty cool and to be able to travel. It's incredible and <hes>. I don't think we would ever take that for granted to your what what is your i mean. What did your parents make. If your business your mom passed away <hes> a couple years go and then i can see your later. Your dad dad passed <hes>. What do they make of this. I mean this t shirt business at turned into something huge yeah they they loved it. I think they were proud of it and <hes> they really did do their part while we had our dysfunction growing growing up and there were times. Were you know right right up until the time that our mom passed away if she saw somebody in life is good t-shirt she'd run up to them and say my son's made it was embarrassing when your weather but <hes> our our dad got a kick out of the nuts and bolts of the business he always wanted to know the details els and he was so encouraging when bert ni- for that year and a half when we did live at home and we're still doing the van trips he always was. Just you know we'd roll in at three a._m. Some night how'd you do did you do. It was never what the hell are. You guys doing like your you know your college graduates like you get get your act together. There's no pressure on career. It was always how'd you do and that helped a lot and maybe maybe the interesting thing going full circle. Oh with our dad is that in the autumn of his life he he came out of that funk he really came out of the depression and he really became the a guy that we never knew that we see in those pictures you know before we were around and it's hard to say what that what caused that but as our business grew grew that house that we grew up in really fell to pieces and our and our parents while we were living just like you mentioned guy better and better along the way and we'd go oh visit our parents living in that same house falling apart so we decided to knock the house down and build them a nice new home and <hes> you know i think it was the first time in my father's life since he you know since he had all those kids that when people came to visit they had a place to sit down and at the he could be proud of his home and i think also where he felt like he was a failure he looked at his six kids now and you know we we landed on our feet all of us and he didn't screw everything up so i think he was a little easier on himself and in some ways this success of the business <hes> might help my dad you don't get over that hump and realized that if we're not failures he wasn't a failure and it was really cool to see him relaxed and and enjoying his grandkids and it was like it was like he in our mom were dating again. I mean they just like hang out and spend time and you know the who won away on some weekends and things they hadn't done that and you know thirty years i mean it just they were married for fifty six years and then the the last one believe it or not while it was tough with moms illness in everything they they had some great years now. Our mom said that too just before you know once she knew the cancer was was taking her life and there was nowhere to go. She said nobody should feel sorry for me. On the happiest i've ever been in my life you know part of that was i'm sure because because my dad had come out of the funk and also that she knew that that she did a good job with with our kids and they were all okay wow you know when you think about this crazy story going from t shirts up and down the eastern seaboard to sell them out of the back of van and knock on the dorm rooms to seventy dollars between you two you know a shipping container as your office and and the company today what it does reportedly almost one hundred million dollars in revenue years at about right that's right. You got about what almost two hundred employees today right pretty good. I mean do you for for seabird to you. When you think about the success of this company the attributed to your hard work and you brothers hard work or in your intelligence or do you think that a lot of it came from just luck law to walk. I think we we stumbled into something. That's much bigger than we are <hes>. I think we've been resilient. You know maybe more resilient than smart but it's a good good fifty percent ain't luck we right place right time <hes> two percent skill and then we've we've worked our asses off so that that's that's played a big factor factor too so you know maybe there's all those parts are equal and john how much of it because of like how much because of your hard work and your skill intelligence. I would say skill intelligence. Maybe twenty percent <hes> hard work another twenty eh and then brute strength. Maybe from me twenty so neither only in really the you got your answer there in that neither of us know hotter add up to one hundred percent and yeah just you know so until definitely not skill a lotta luck clearly no question that's john birt jacobs. Co founders of the life is good company for the way we know for a fact that at least one other t-shirts has traveled traveled all the way to space and twenty thirteen astronaut karen nyberg posted a video on the international space station and she was showing how she washed her hair in zero gravity and the shirt that she's wearing in that video. It's from life is good. It's a grinning girl who looks like the original jake sitting back to back with her dog and underneath. It says lean on me.

T Boston Kerry Indianapolis Cary Sherman Attorney Bob Pierce Marlboro Boston Garden Bedford Phillies Ocracoke Island Karen Nyberg Basketball John Birt Jacobs Dick Stan Jay Phillips Partner
"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

Your Art Sucks

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

"Of art and artists kirsten told me of bobby's life and how difficult it was for him growing up the poverty the absentee father a mother who did her best but she battled too many demons i was astonished now for those of you who are unaware of bobby he's the youngest ever inductee into the national radio hall of fame he's a new york times bestselling author a multiple award winner for on air personality and his radio show is nationally syndicated on over a hundred stations with five million daily listeners but all of this success well it came from a boy who grew up with no money and in a town with little opportunity he's a great example of hard work and never say die attitude but the greatest thing about bobby is that he's a tireless supporter of artists he's helped launched the career of many musician and has broken the rules when it comes to using his platform to bring unknown and unheard of talent to his radio show if bobby believes in you you have a real champion on your side that's why kristen told me of bobby second book titled fail until you don't fight grind repeat net books available for purchase on june nineteenth i was immediately on board when i read the book i found the motivations behind it to be purely beneficial to the artists who deal with failure each and every day he knows the level of determination positively it takes to overcome obstacles and he's very blunt about his failures both personal and professional his writing style is unconventional which makes it an interesting read and the wisdom he dispenses along with some of his famous friends who also lend their stories of failure will it added to the narrative of the book with chapters titled not everyone's going to like you and my personal favorite the art of sucking it up there so many uplifting funny and poignant lessons for all of us use in our daily lives so when the book comes out on june nineteenth should definitely have a look at it i think you'll find that gives you the boost you need to continue and challenging times we all face i want to thank you for listening as always i do hope that you got something from this episode and that you will actually review how you refine reduce your work before you allow it.

bobby kristen kirsten york times bestselling
"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

Your Art Sucks

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

"The energy of the crowd and getting immediate response now don't get me wrong i would agree that editing can be an important tool to use just as a slab of marble needs to be chiseled down to reveal it's hidden truth but far too many artists continued to whitlow at the edges believing that the truth already revealed is not pure enough or the whole notion of truth has been lost to them and eventually like all illconceived works that continue chipping well it eventually breaks off an essential piece which falls to the florin shatters pieces no matter the effort to put it back together the pieces forever altered all artists need to know when enough is enough now i'm gonna say something very important here and if you only take away one thing take away this to know how to edit a piece successfully one needs to know when the truth is surfaced and allow it to exist in whatever stage of completion it appears any effort beyond this will result in a waste an exposure lack of connection to your vision and your talent okay i'm gonna leave the wrap up at this point as i'm going to show an example of restraint on my own part i believe the point has been declared quite clearly and edit it further would only muddy the waters you know you have to have a strong connection to your vision in order to produce work that is seen for what it is now before i in this show there's someone i wanna talk about as i've been recently introduced to their life and work and was very impressed with the amount of effort and support they provided artists and the beginning stages of their career my friend kristen from green room pr well she spoke to me about one of the many talents they represent his name is bobby bones and he's an absolute champion.

bobby bones kristen
"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

Your Art Sucks

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

"Was for certain but thankfully for all they didn't win the war so here this to artists who use their talents to vote changing society for both of them the stakes were high and while james was able to keep boss free from violence for a night while may wasn't able to change the rigid minds that control society at the time but both artists took their shot when it was thrust upon them to use their art for change sure james could have ignored the politicizing of his concert he could have said no to the televising of show he could have not played out for the respect of the reverend king but he chose to use this one opportunity to bring the explosive violence to a halt he fully trusted in his ability to control the energy thrown at him that night he knew he was the only artist capable of handling this tragic circumstance it was a one shot deal with huge stakes and thankfully his art rained for me she didn't need to write the drag she was already on her way to fame regardless but she chose to use her success to shine a light on injustice without regard to the damage it may cause her opening night was the one opportunity she had to prove that society was wrong unfortunately the shot missed its mark and she paid a price and while she did eventually try to edit the play down and reshow it a year later the version was a bust in sit right with audiences and the play closed rather quickly there was no second chance but what does this mean for you as an artist how do their actions impact your creative process well the main focus of this episode was to bring forward the argument that artists need to stop self editing to the point of creating stir our work we need to realize the.

james king
"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

Your Art Sucks

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

"To the pain and suffering the charac tres dude just to be allowed to love who they wanted to love may had taken her shot to change the minds of the public she wanted to show them how their puritanical and judgmental attitudes were punishing good people people may knew and loved his friends but despite each of the cast members giving it their all will the deck was already stacked against them from a financial perspective opening night was an overwhelming success but the backlash from the press it was swift and brutal one writer said it was an inexpressible brutal and vulgar attempt to capitalize on a dirty matter for profit and a well known broadway producer was quoted as saying it was the worst possible play i have ever heard of contemplating an invasion of new york and that it strikes at the heart of decency it appeared to also be the final provocation to the morality groups and law enforcement within a week multiple plays in new york including sex were rated and the cast members were arrested and charged with obscenity may was also rounded up charged and raided in front of the press for full effect the message was really clear new york city would not allow anyone to corrupt the morals of the youth now her play the drag lewis now leaderless and the cast were fearful of imminent arrest never opened on broadway due to the efforts of the new york society for the suppression of vice to ban any attempt by may two stage it she explained to the press that the city fathers well they begged me not to bring the show to new york because they were not a quick to handle the commotion it would cause so her dream and the dream of the cast members to.

writer producer new york new york society lewis
"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

Your Art Sucks

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

"One shot to in the offering of those she loved so here it was she created a play that would be known as the drag and it would focus on the cost of living a secret life it's hero was closeted gay socialite raleigh kingsbury who comes from one of the finest families and he's trapped in a loveless marriage rollings father is a homophobic judge and his father in law is a therapist who specializes in gay conversion and to be faithful to the content of the play may want the actress to also be gay problem was the actors union what time they didn't permit gay men from having any speaking parts yeah you heard me correctly the union at the time would not permit any gay man to speak apart in theater play so instead of going through the regular channels may post an open casting call in a gay bar in greenwich village and she held additions in connecticut and new jersey this way the new york base union would have no with authority her connect in the community while it drew a strong cast to work with and in little time the troupe was hammering down their performance from what may was seeing trial runs this show would be occurring much sooner than expected this play was shaping up to be better than her debut creation and while a stage in new york was the goal it would have to find its feet on the floor boards of connecticut may would work on a theater owners in the meantime but just as opening night was approaching word was circulating that law enforcement was stirring within several theatres who were showing works that bent more towards risque one of which was sex but like the cliche says the show must go on and in late january nineteen twenty seven a solo crowd in connecticut was witness to a full on production that starred gay men speaking lines and the dangers such a life presented in the repressive and unacceptable society of the day the show shocked the crowd just as may intended but it also spoke.

greenwich village connecticut new york base union new york
"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

Your Art Sucks

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

"The three act play bass weekly the main character played by may was a prostitute who was stuck choosing between two men one wealthy man who had no idea she was a sex worker and wanted to marry her for her looks and the other was a suitor who was a regular client of hers and wanted to marry her for who she was and what she did premiering april at daly's sixty third street theater in new york city it immediately faced a backlash of criticism from all the major papers they pan the cheap sets the poor acting and they especially despise the immoral and degenerate content the show depicted but for the majority of those in attendance show was a hit it generated sales that outperformed anything on broadway at the time and it was the only show that ran the entire summer without stop but unbeknownst to me all of this success was drawing the of the numerous religious and civic groups who feared the decency of the city was falling apart they complained to their local police as well as put pressure on the politicians who ran in their elitist circles and mixed him when the audience on a regular basis would be members of the local law enforcement as well as city officials who were busy taking secret note for the time being it was all quite hushhush for may with the newfound celebrity and a proven track record as a playwright it was time for her to pen her next creation and it was with this play that she will look to address an issue she'd seen destroy the lives of her close friends to her it was damn well time that someone bring this out of the shadows and into the light of the stage for all to see however this play was gonna come to life there was little doubt it would be controversial but sex was controversial to most said it should have never been made but here it was selling out every night so maybe just maybe people were ready to accept those they once scorned in shamed for may this was her.

daly new york
"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

Your Art Sucks

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

"The show while the sixties were a hotbed of racial tension the twenties were tents for anyone who didn't fit the impose rigid social and cultural framework that existed at the time like the sixties the twenties were also heavy handed when it came to dealing without liars in both law enforcement and the government were quick to respond but it was under these condition that a famous actress decided to write a play about two gay men with the full intention of having it shaina brightest spotlight on a lifestyle that was perceived as evil morally corrupt and possibly criminal in the mid twenties mae west was still early in her career well it wouldn't be until she was in her forties that fame finally revealed itself to elevate her to the rank of hollywood elites of the day her anti conformity was visible well before the bright lights may didn't see social economic barriers when she made friends she was well known for spending her time off with anyone and everyone who shared her sense of humor and her wild streak and while keeping such low rent company would have spurned societal scrutiny and possibly prevented an average woman's rise in the ranks of show business may was far from average her intelligence and her ability to read people allowed her to sidestep these puritanical pitfalls just enough to keep that sweetness that never left a bad taste in anyone's mouth but there were times when even may couldn't stop herself from crossing the line the most agreed of these times was in nineteen twenty seven when she would step so far over she would put in motion a confrontation with the police that eventually landed her in jail and created a lot at shutdown theaters let's back up a bit and take a look at what started this entire conflict in nineteen twenty six may wrote produced directed and starred in a little play called sex as racy is the name was there was definitely a plot to.

mae west hollywood
"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

Your Art Sucks

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

"Not and while it took several minutes the whole situation was gradually reigned in the police stayed back and the overly eager crowd were once again under james spell they left the stage without incident given the enormity of the situation and the match like ability of violence to spark in a highly charged environment james had one chance to get it right and thankfully for those at the concert for the police the councilmen and the mayor he did the concert continued and the crowd dispersed from the gardens feeling like they got the full experience and despite the riots other cities were experiencing that night and the many nights after and despite the forty life loss to the violence boston on that night was free of any of these troubles the hardest working man in the business had worked overtime that night while i record this episode it's gorgeous outside where i live the house of winter how would long into the spring but now summer is fast approaching and for me there's no better time to reacquaint myself with the authors i admire and binge lewis and all the great works i've come to love and maybe throw a few new ones in the mix but without fail my summers have to start with ivan turgenev i love there's something about this account of unrequited love from an author whose everyday life was dedicated to a married woman who could never reciprocate just fills me with melancholy now there may be some of you who've never had the opportunity to hear.

james lewis
"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

Your Art Sucks

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

"Mic away and he said this to the crowd just let me say i had the pleasure of meeting him and look this is a swinging cat give him a big round of applause ladies and gentlemen he's a swinging cat now this may not seem like much of an endorsement but when you understand the james was a highly respected artist it rang true with the boss donations you see james new racism he knew severe poverty he knew anger any knew what it was like to be punished by a system that was set against african americans but more than this james knew what was that steak right here right now so when james said the mayor was a good man it allowed the audience to feel comforted that they had elected someone who would continue the fight dr king gave his life for the air in the gardens well it immediately grew less tent and james now feeling he could be the artists the crowd paid for we broke out into his hit that's life the crowd immediately respond as he swirled them all into this dancing screaming mass of positive energy and has the master did his work he led them through a range of emotions he brought them passion in what i believe to be the best performance of his song bewildered i'd ever seen any lead them through that to an apt version of please please please but just as he had the crowd right in his hands the energy shifted and it went out of control suddenly a group of teenagers jumped up on the stage and one by one they began to surround in crowd the singer sensing that at any second is concert could turn violent with the police massing on all sides of the stage ready to act james brown took control he stopped the band the lights came up james turned to the police and he said i'm all right i'm all right i just wanna shake their hands and he took turns shaking every one of their hands then as the crowd swirled around the stage he implored the crowd with some choice words he said over the mike don't make us look bad let me finish the show you're not being fair to yourself or to me or your race now ask the police to step back because i thought we could get some respect for my own people it don't make no sense a weed together or are we.

james dr king james brown
"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

Your Art Sucks

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

"Frenzied massive energy and leave them wanting more but this show almost didn't happen as most of you may know there was a horrific event that occurred on april fourth just the day prior that permanently scarred the history of the united states martin luther king had been assassinated in memphis tennessee in an emotional response to the tragedy people took to the streets all across the country some were understandably disbelief some were looking for comfort in the arms of friends and family but some some had other intentions in their hearts riots broke out from city to city fires consume blocks of houses in clashes broke oh between the public and the police it became so widespread that the government enacted a state of emergency and the army camped out in front of the white house needless to say having a concert where a large gathering of already emotional people who would be stirred into a fervor only to release down into the streets mullet didn't seem ideal both the newly elected liberal maher his name was james white and james brown band members had fears that more violence would erupt but james brown would not be tonight and with the help of city councilman tom achim an agreement was reached albeit there was a catch james would be allowed to play boston gardens but now the concert would be televised as well and provided all boss donations for free the thinking was at the majority of people would rather stay home and watch this concert on tv thus reducing the opportunity for violent from the outset it appeared to have the effect with only fifteen hundred out of the fifteen thousand seat venue showing up an hour after the scheduled start time james and his band took to the stage and here is where the gravity of this performance had gripped james his band the audience and the city james knew he had to set the tone from minute one instead of the normally hypnotize displays of exuberance and passion james started the event seated and after a few pop ballads james invited both the mayor and councilmen onto the stage and after aching spoke some inspired words the mayor came on stage but before kids could introduce them james grab the.

tennessee james united states martin luther king memphis james white james brown tom achim boston
"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

Your Art Sucks

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on Your Art Sucks

"To convey your craft your concept and your truth to me no other medium exemplifies his concept more than performance based art this is somewhat of a generic term that encompasses a wide ranging set of disciplines but i believe we all understand the idea here is that the pressure to get it right each and every time in front of a live audience is an immense responsibility screw up your lines forget your lyrics slip and fall on stage and you've impacted everyone in attendance worse the ability to broadcast this poor flawed performance is immediately available to all audience members there's little to protect the artists who's having an off night from becoming a slew of headlines trending social media within hours for some artists the idea that their entire career may hinge on a single act conine there be ultimately exhilarating or anxiety inducing so with that in mind let's have a look at the first artists in this episode the hardest working manage showbiz the godfather of soul the minister of the new new super funk mr james brown now i could do a whole episode on this legend his life is the pity of struggle and to some degree conflict he grew up to par to even have clothes he face rampant racism he spent his time in prison but emerged as an unstoppable force forever changed the face of music there are few in the industry today who are not still inspired by the fifty year career of james who sadly passed away in two thousand and six and amongst the hundreds of masterful concerts james conducted there's about a single concert that is the focus of this episode it is as we will hear a concert that had more at stake than any other concert james had performed prior it had implications for him mmhmm the people boston and the united states is a country the truth of which he was well aware of is that if he didn't get this single performance right then people could in fact lose their lives for months prior to april fifth nineteen sixty eight james had been scheduled to play boss gardens in boston massachusetts he'd been on the road for months and this was going to be yet another stop on the tour where he would as always stir the crowd into a.

mr james brown united states massachusetts boston fifty year
The road-weary Boston Celtics face their toughest challenge yet

Golic & Wingo

01:57 min | 3 years ago

The road-weary Boston Celtics face their toughest challenge yet

"For just the way the game has been played and i've been able to be successful game six tonight in cleveland cavs hosting the celtics game seven would be in boston on sunday night paul pierce from the jump bond sportscenter scott van pelt says look the celtics need to be ready for fullscale lebron in game six back against the wall he's gonna step up you know just like two thousand eight game seventy care forty five so they have to be ready for that just mentally physically just a whiff stan lebron's run because he's gonna he's gonna leave it all out there and just like in game six when he was with the miami heat in two thousand twelve he came in the boston and put one of those greater games on so boston has to be prepared for that not only in game six if they don't win that game but game seven also in the boston garden because he's done it before he went into the boston garden had a tremendous game so they gotta know it's going to be tough to put lebron james team out of the playoffs game six tonight in cleveland the series is on the brawn we we spend a lot of time you know discussing tyron lose substitution patterns and should kyle korver have played more in you know can they squeeze a little bit more out of guys like tristan thompson or can they get anything from jr smith those things matter but ultimately not that much we're not talking about them if lebron is great tim legler espn nba analyst on the six pm sportscenter yesterday last night says ultimately this series falls on lebron and not his teammates the problem is you have to look at the limitations of their personnel so for me it does fall abroad james he might need to more forty point games to get through this round if that's what it takes because when you look at the rest of the guys on their team for the most part they are one dimensional offensive players everything is predicated on lebron james ability to score create offense for them i said it all season i don't think i've ever seen a team more dependent upon one player.

Boston Paul Pierce Van Pelt Celtics Stan Lebron Boston Garden Cleveland Tyron Tristan Thompson Analyst Miami Kyle Korver NBA
"boston garden" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"We will we saw them for us said dick and the boston garden and we were kids so why we acres will play russi quitting work at night because you went at night so so i jimmy all brown says tell you what i'll do you guys rushie fight so joe soy aside you know he's sitting in a way it can go online and they had a stunned minutes hit them over their heads he says travel what will rusty we went y'all really enriching comes across the sat jobs slot of was was so expect welltrained dog yeah yeah that's great with three of them now i'm going to add the quick bit to you a story league dunkin' owned renting at i am a poker game with lead dunkin' john wayne and several other people i was taking place in league dunkin' didn't have enough to call to call a hand so he put up ownership to renton tin enter within the park he john wayne won the hand and said i don't want this the dog bit yet foul bill at this hour so uh he he could have and that don't made a lot of money he could have wound up owning renton ten we'd done to foul whoa whoa won an outlet that should decision he regretted the rest of a light i may be he dresser he was churning out movies to a threeyear every year for what 1620 malaria he's red have sam that he had an odd though a sam mode that that was a good dogs yeah sounds of the dark anything else darn now yet uh you know that you thought you you guys remember champion the wonderful with yes anthony lodging it would live gene autry source yeah he added in the story the he had champion news owned by the name ricky and they had a dog name rebels a german shepherds and they would do tricks like the uh kill captured one side you split the end not work was was harry water who played texas rangers i used to play a lot of bad guys pierce and he went out rebel the dot the horses knocked the bottom over the door.

dick boston garden dunkin john wayne renton malaria jimmy brown sam gene autry ricky harry threeyear
"boston garden" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"boston garden" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Today tonight fortyfive thursday 71 friday 67 so sixty nine seventy 167 and no sign of any ranked yes hey i still have seen no sign of any foliage changing in this area which is interesting i guess it's late down here is could go up north but there's a lotta great foley's down here a walk through the common and they got boston garden delicious urban walks i guess is my thing now at walking yay we go to sylvia in wealth anti sylvia hi the only guarantee an urban walk um i was wondering if we out in nature you're okay to come up and say hi to here and talk to you because i refine the green line going to riverside station and i saw you at hind eye to eye care is going to get tart improperly south right maybe you just want to be like our regular human being waiting philipe and not having every other human being coming up and talking to you like a talk show pressure now you income you can say of course come on up say hi hasn't happened that much people don't know me really i don't see any one yeah come on well let me convey senior time today don't wait look so i i said highlyranked usually with a high igf 1 barbour you i don't bother you because i guess what you taking up you out a regular machinery reject trader joe's um mlk that somebody else okay you wish you awaiting you're kidding in line conviction green line key stop last week i believe and i was on the green line and i was gonna say something to you and then you what i saw you and i'm copley square i can say something to you in the niger were close up you know how your seat if you see a rare eagle applying yuko up to the source he turned to the media so yeah komono can say hi okay thank you very much by.

sylvia joe niger fortyfive boston garden riverside station highlyranked