23 Burst results for "Boris Yeltsin"

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:03 min | 2 months ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That answer that question, Stephanie baker joins me from London. She's a senior investigative reporter for Bloomberg. Stephanie, let me start by asking you the U.S. and other western governments are seizing these huge yachts that are allegedly owned by Russian oligarchs who are under economic sanctions. So can you tell us what exactly is a Russian oligarch and why are they being sanctioned? Okay, well, the term Russian oligarch originated actually in the 1990s during the era of president Boris Yeltsin when a group of Russian tycoons backed his bid for reelection, financing his campaign. Now, they got stakes in state owned companies in exchange for loans to the government, which were never repaid. And they became some of the richest men in Russia. And the term grew from that that they had this undue influence over the government as a result of this political backing of the president. Now that is, of course, changed over the years when president Vladimir Putin came into power. He told the oligarchs, politics is over. I won't go after your businesses if you stay out of politics. So the term is somewhat troubled. I try to avoid it because it really implies that these individuals have sway over the Russian government. And now there are some that certainly do because they run state owned enterprises. There are other, very wealthy Russian businessmen who have been sanctioned who don't have that kind of relationship with the government. And don't really have that kind of sway over Putin. I mean, it's arguable, if any of these individuals have any sway over Putin. Then why are they being sanctioned in exactly what is a sanction when the U.S. sanctions a Russian businessman. We hear about this all the time these days. When exactly is that? Well, when they're sanctioned, it usually involves asset freezes, travel bans, and barring them, and their companies from doing business in western markets. So essentially, it makes them financial pariahs. Exactly. Now, the reason behind sanctioning them, you know, President Biden said we're going for your ill gotten gains and the moves by western governments are designed. A as a signaling tool, a form of punishment in response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine. But in many of the designations by western governments, they have pointed to the fact that many of these individuals have benefited from their relationship with the Russian state. And that can take many forms that can be the way they made their money in the early days to continuing relationships now. And the fact of the matter is, if you're a Russian businessman today, you are operating at behest of Vladimir Putin. He can take away your business. You have to stay on the right side of the government or else. And that is taken as an implicit

Stephanie baker Russian government Boris Yeltsin Putin Bloomberg Stephanie Vladimir Putin U.S. Russia London President Biden government Ukraine
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on Real Estate Coaching Radio

Real Estate Coaching Radio

05:03 min | 3 months ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on Real Estate Coaching Radio

"Well, for coaching clients, that's something that we always ask them to do, right? Now a lot of them are especially our upper end coaching clients. They all have assistance and do it all. This is actually a good part to interject since I brought up the idea of assistance doing some of the, you know, the remedial or not the remedial work, but some of the, I would say, the statutory work, this necessary for every listing. A lot of us are firm believers in delegation. Makes sense, right? But what happens is, is that agents in particular, they'll delegate things before they actually know how to do the actual activity that they're delegating somebody else to do. When you do that, it makes it so that you don't know actually whether or not they've done it at the highest level or if you've even done it at all. So if you need to learn how to do all the things that you are going to delegate before you delegate them, that way when someone takes two hours to load a listing of the MLS and you know it can be done in ten minutes, you know there's something else going on there. So one of the rules we teach you guys in our coaching program that's in our bestselling book Harris rules is delegate, but don't abdicate, delegate, but don't abdicate. That's a Tim and Julie Harris copy written quote. So if anyone's thinking about liberating that, don't do it. So delegate, but don't abdicate and what that basically means is, yes, delegate, but then make sure the actual project is getting done to the standards. You don't always have to overtly monitor that they're actually doing the job. You don't have to be a micromanager and though frankly being a micromanager isn't a bad thing, but you can micromanage through a dashboard through KPIs. Accountability is what you're talking about. Right. And then let them know that you're watching because as soon as you abdicate, which means giving up responsibility, giving up the result, they will absolutely 100% start every single one even your best assistant ever will absolutely positively stop doing things at the highest level. That's just the human nature. They'll figure out shortcuts. They'll decide this wasn't necessary. Not even consciously all the time. It's just a bad habit. Well, for example, be an upgraded process on how to get things in the MOS. Or there'll be an enhancement and how you can have your listings featured or your pictures feature or something silly. But because they've always done it the same way, they're not going to change. They're not looking for reasons to have to learn something new, let alone have to add work to their workload. Well, it's not their listing. Right. So this is the reason ultimately agents the mistake that most agents make. A lot of business owners make this as well. They think the mission is to basically build and delegate, the mission is to build delegate and monitor or really micromanage. I think it was actually Ronald Reagan, I believe, that said this, though, actually I heard that this was quoted to Boris Yeltsin if you want to know the truth. Trust that verify, those two things go together.

Julie Harris MLS Harris Tim Ronald Reagan Boris Yeltsin
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

08:01 min | 5 months ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Today explained here with Mary aloo shina you cover Russia for The Washington Post, let's talk about Russia. How embarrassing is all this for Vladimir Putin? It is pretty embarrassing because his main brand and the one that he's been building for the past 20 years is that he knows what he's doing. He always gets the job done. In this case, we see even people who are extremely pro Kremlin extremely pro this invasion, saying that they don't like the way Russia goes about this and they don't like the planning. We've heard from people like the leader of the Communist Party saying that Russia is now really fighting anymore in the special operation. This is an actual war. It's a period. It's very normal. And the very use of the World War to describe this emission has been essentially banned by Russia. People get fined or even jailed for talking about the war out in the open. They have to call it special military operation. So we definitely seen a lot of criticism coming from the very pro Putin very hawkish camp. That is a very new development that we'll have to see whether that will push the Kremlin to change anything in the way they go about the solution. Tell me more of what we've been hearing in terms of criticism of this war in Russia. Last weekend, just when the news broke that brush a loss, a lot of this land and retreated, the usually quite unanimous choir of pro Kremlin and state propagandist voices was really in disarray. The politician says those people who convinced Putin the special operation would be over quickly, they took us for a ride. Some people chose to completely ignore the news because they didn't know how to handle it. You know, somehow the Kremlin's official newspaper just did not report on this at all. Some very prominent TV shows started to say the look Russia is not just fighting against Ukraine is fighting against the entire native alliance. That's why they're having such a hard time doing that. We want to defeat Ukrainian army. It seems like it's practically impossible because it's strong government really strong and Ukrainians are supported, but practically all European countries. Some people use it as a way to call for more aggression. So they want Putin and Kremlin to be even more aggressive, retaliate against Ukraine, hit civilian targets and just do more. No, this is the way. Now this pulls it across. They believe that the way Russia is waging this war now is not enough. They want general mobilization. They want all country to be set on this warpath and they want to go all out. So there's a lot of really conflicting messaging going on in the chem that is usually really pro Putin and follows a sort of the party line. Some of the liberal and opposition forces have been also trying to season that moment. There's been a pretty remarkable effort from local lawmakers to collect signs among officials on this original level to call for Putin's resignation and accuse him of treason. And there are already facing administrative offenses and fines and the police has launched an investigation. They say that basically they go, they believe they achieve the goal, which is to tell a lot of anti war Russians who are still in the country that they're not alone. They know that Putin is not going to read this request and say, look, yes, exactly you're right. I should stop doing this. But they want to get the word out that there are still some resistance and even though there are big risks in presenting this resistance in the public. They're still willing to do that. Tell me more about Vladimir Putin's decision to not hold a draft to not conscript more Russians into this war. In terms of general mobilization, the problem with that it's going to be really unpopular because what has been working so far is that a lot of Russians, we can debate the numbers of how many support or how many are against the war, but the main consensus is that they're trying to tune this out. They try to live their life as normal, putting the whole country because that means not only drafting all the eligible men that means setting the whole economy and making turning the whole country into this war machine that has to only work for the advancement of the front line. And that would have a lot of repercussions because what Putin again has been promising Russians for a long time is this consequence stability. As long as you state of politics, you can have your house your job, you can live a normal life. It came into the presidency at the end of 1999, promising to make Russia a great power again. He was very much in contrast to Boris Yeltsin, his predecessor as president who was kind of known as a bit of a drunk Vladimir Putin represented a fresh face. He didn't drink. Russia was virtually a failed state. Putin was able to restore an element of order out of this chaos and element of prosperity out of misery, and that element of international respect out of humiliation. And that's something a lot of Russians from klingon to. And it would be a pretty huge political decision to change all of that and take that away. So he has been resisting that and instead they have been seeking really alternative and creative ways to draft people the Kremlin has responded with the launch of an extensive campaign to recruit volunteers to fight on TV, social media and billboards. They've promised a huge sums of money and other perks, but many are given little or no training and a sent straight to the front line. And there is a concept of sort of shadow and mobilization that's happening in Russia. What is shadow mobilization? So that means there are several private military companies that are basically mercenaries that are fighting on behalf of the Russian Federation and Ukraine did not officially live the defense ministry, even though it is sort of giving the orders and places them in places where they need them. And they have been responsible for a lot of the very crucial gains that Russia had in this campaign that also gives Russia some plausible deniability because there's conscripts fighting and they don't have to really acknowledge them among the losses. And another thing they have been doing is conscripting people from prisons. So there are multiple reports in there. These military private military companies go to prisons and they offer people deals basically if they go to the front and 6 months if they survive, they'll get a pardon. And they're specifically looking for people who have been accused of murder of violent crimes. So that's how they've avoided general draft. Whether that's going to be enough now, get a big question. Do Russians have any idea that their prisoners, their murderers, and thieves are fighting this war for them in Ukraine? I think majority does not know about this because it's obviously now covered by the national media because it's very controlled. There are multiple human rights organizations that are working to help these convicts because the convicts are not given any guarantees because mercenary service is outlawed in Russia it's legal, nothing is written on paper, so their rights are also being violated by this. But a lot of these groups have been recognized as foreign agents in Russia, so they can operate on a wider scale and inform the general public about this. The effectively. And it's really difficult to do so. So I think the majority does not know about this. Do we have any idea what Putin's plans are to regain footing

Russia Putin Vladimir Putin Mary aloo shina Kremlin Ukraine Ukrainian army The Washington Post Communist Party Boris Yeltsin defense ministry
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:56 min | 5 months ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on WTOP

"Dot com. This is WTO P news. It's ten 52. Former Soviet president Miguel Gorbachev has died, Russian news reporting, it happened at a Moscow hospital where he was undergoing unspecified treatments. CBS News correspondent Vicky Barker has more on the fierce reaction to his reforms. As Gorbachev's popularity soared abroad, he won the Nobel Peace Prize, his critics became angrier at home, conservatives who wanted to stop reform, liberals who wanted to accelerate it and nationalists who wanted their republics independent from the USSR. In August 1991, Gorbachev was placed under house arrest by communist hardliners. He survived the coup, but resigned four months later when it was clear public support had shifted to Boris Yeltsin. One week later, the Soviet Union officially ceased to exist, the legacy of reforms initiated by Mikhail Gorbachev. Gorbachev was 91 years old, legendary journalist Marvin kalb is a senior fellow at the brookings institution. He was CBS Moscow bureau chief at the height of the Cold War, he says time will tell whether Gorbachev will be remembered as a man whose policies helped end it. And bear in mind that when Gorbachev came to power, he did not come to power with the view of ending communism. It simply rotted as he tried to end the system and introduced what he called glasnost, which was a kind of openness and then the historica, which made a reorganization of the system and the economy. He tried to do too much and in that sense he failed. That was senior fellow at the brookings institution Marvin kalb. A U.S. Navy drone was briefly seized in the Persian Gulf Iranian revolutionary guards, a spokesman for the navy's 5th fleet says it happened yesterday. The drone was being towed by an Iranian vessel when it was approached by a navy ship and helicopter after the navy repeatedly called on the Iranians. They let it go. Iran did not immediately acknowledge the incident. However, it does come as the west is trying to get Iran back into that controversial nuclear deal. The national highway traffic safety administration is going to review front over oxidants. The often deadly accidents happen when a driver pulls their car out, doesn't see a person in their blind spot. Review follows an investigation by our news partner, NBC fours I team, they demonstrated how big some blind spots can be with large SUVs and trucks, posing a risk to kids earlier this year of Virginia family lost a little boy after he was run over in the driveway of their home. The agency says they're going to be collecting more data on these crashes, it's ten 55. We've got your money news at 25 and 55. This is a Bloomberg money minute. Even as the economy shows signs of cooling, demand for workers remains red hot

Gorbachev Marvin kalb Miguel Gorbachev Vicky Barker USSR Moscow navy CBS News WTO Nobel Peace Prize Boris Yeltsin Mikhail Gorbachev brookings institution CBS Iran Persian Gulf national highway traffic safet NBC Virginia Bloomberg
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:03 min | 5 months ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ebola. Ebola and monkeypox shows up and this is when he takes his. I figured that too, that that was the last straw. It was an 81 years old. What is it? Monkeypox for God's sake. I'm too old for this. So you know, Fauci has been doing this job so long that his first controversy was when congressional Republicans accused him of making up these germ things. I think if he was smart and we know he is, he's out shopping for like a bark of lounger. With wheels on it, he can just wheel into the congressional hearings. Yeah. And just flip up the footrest. Yeah. Pull the mic in and say, hit me. Come at me. He'll say. He's unclear about why he's finally retiring. Maybe it's because he finally can pay off his student loan. All right, here is your next quote. I hope that at the year 2022, it is accepted that even decision makers get to dance and go to parties. As you can tell from the extraordinarily accurate accent. Really, nailed it, bro that was a 36 year old woman in Finland that named Santa Marin, saying she's got a dance, even though she has what important job. Oh, she's the prime minister of Finland. She is. She is the prime minister, Santa Marina is. First, last week, video came out of the prime minister dancing with her friends at a club this was deemed to be so outrageous and this is true she agreed to take a drug test the results, she has rhythm. She has music and she can't ask for anything more. Well, it's too bad Boris Yeltsin is leaving. A great international relationship. You meant Johnson, but they're very close in it. What did I say? One's drunk once seems drunk. Isn't Finland supposed to be the happiest place on earth? I've heard that that they actually hire levels of satisfaction. And they're mad at their elected officials dancing. Yeah, apparently, they seem to imagine from the American perspective, you're so desperate for scandals. That's what you have to do. Don't we have some spares we can share with them? This week, there was a whole other scandal. She had to apologize yet again when a photo on Instagram was posted of two topless women kissing at the prime minister's official residence, it's completely inappropriate. People are going to get the idea that Finland has ever warm enough to take your tops off. It happened the prime minister says somewhat sheepishly after she invited some friends back to her place after a music festival, we are all for people having fun, but it never ends well when somebody says, hey, wanna come back to my official residence? Do

monkeypox Ebola Finland Santa Marin Fauci Santa Marina Boris Yeltsin Johnson Instagram
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:20 min | 9 months ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"The strength of a free people by Frederick W Kagan. Kagan is a senior fellow and director of the critical threats project at the American enterprise institute. The Russian invasion of Ukraine is a confrontation of a dictatorship against a free people, the free people are winning in no small part because they are free. Ukraine and Russia both emerged from the ruin of the Soviet Union with the burden of generations of oppression, both countries struggled to rebuild themselves as free countries with market economies and democratic systems. Russia's initial prospects for success might have been somewhat better. President Boris Yeltsin defeated efforts by leftist nationalists, and then communist to seize power and return Russia to autocracy. Ukraine's leadership in the 1990s lacked yeltsin's vision and determination. The two countries trajectories crossed in the 2000s, however. Yeltsin gave Russia to Vladimir Putin, who moved rapidly to consolidate power that soon reached dictatorial levels. Ukraine's politics, on the other hand, got messier. The 2004 orange revolution showed the Ukrainian desire for honest elections on the one hand, oligarchs developed economic and political power bases and struggled for control of the state on the other. Corruption flourished in Ukraine as it did in Russia, but whereas Putin centralized corruption in his hands, Ukrainian corruption decentralized among the competing oligarchs and others. Putin's centralization made governing Russia easy. Ukraine's decentralization made governing Ukraine hard. Then the 2014 euromaidan revolution in Ukraine overthrew a Russia friendly autocratically minded leader and brought to power a pro western and pro democracy president. Decentralization still made Ukraine hard to govern, as did corruption that continued at lower levels despite steady efforts to combat it. But the new leadership committed Ukraine to a freer path, hoping to join NATO and the European Union. The Russian seizure of Crimea and invasion of Donbass in 2014, galvanized Ukrainians. It drove a burst of Ukrainian patriotism that had been slowly awakening since the country's independence. It did not bring order to the Ukrainian government or economy. It did not lead to centralization. It did not end corruption. But it fueled an explosion of Ukrainian civil society activity as Ukrainians came together to try to fight off the Russian attack. The weaknesses and flaws in Ukraine's government and economy in the face of Russian aggression forced its people to make themselves strong and resilient. Russians had the opposite experience the yeltsin era market reforms and economic boom of the 2000s driven by high oil prices allowed them to build a more prosperous society than they had ever known. Prosperous enough for the elites that they mostly did not object loudly as Putin eroded their freedoms and centralized control in his own hands. Corruption went deeper and deeper in Russia, but it was largely centralized corruption and Putin took pains to make it look orderly, and to make those he trusted reap the benefits. A small number of brave Russians continued the post Soviet efforts to build civil society organizations..

Russia Frederick W Kagan President Boris Yeltsin Putin American enterprise institute yeltsin Kagan Yeltsin Soviet Union Vladimir Putin Donbass messier Ukrainian government Crimea NATO European Union
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

05:11 min | 9 months ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on Planet Money

"Phase one was the garage sale in the front yard, phase two was more like a secret closed room. Because by 1995, the economy was in the gutter. Crime and corruption were everywhere. Yeltsin had gotten super unpopular. His approval ratings were in the low single digits, and he was facing reelection against a popular communist challenger. And the government was broke. It couldn't pay salaries and pensions. It was desperate for money. To solve this constellation of problems, Tobias back to scheme called loans for shares. Loans to the government in exchange for shares of those crown jewels. You know, the big oil refineries, steel companies, mining operations. And I think this was one of the moments where he and some of the others said it was more important to save for his sales and to save reform than to get picky about who was going to buy those factories. And then that it was not important who the owners were. It was simply important that they not be the state that they be private owners. And who would be these new private owners? A small group of oligarchs who actually devised this entire scheme. This is how they went from sports car rich to mega yacht rich. Between November and December 1995, Tobias auctioned off to the oligarchs, 12 of Russia's most profitable industrial enterprises. But these weren't really even auctions because Cuba is and his team had predetermined with the oligarchs who would get what and for roughly how much. So the auctions were a total sham, and the prizes for these corporations were a steal. And then upholding their part of the deal, the oligarchs did everything they could to help yeltsin's campaign. They donated millions, they hired political operatives, they blanketed the airwaves with pro yeltsin propaganda. And in 1896, yeltsin staged a dramatic comeback and was reelected. Boris Yeltsin had initially sold privatization as ushering in this sort of democratic capitalism that would benefit ordinary people. He even offered a slogan. We need millions of owners rather than a handful of millionaires. But in the end, privatization did create a handful of millionaires. Actually, even billionaires. As the loans for shares program.

Tobias Yeltsin yeltsin government Cuba Russia Boris Yeltsin
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:49 min | 9 months ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Right now the squishy center left and the squishy center right, the whole rotten spectrum from Hillary Clinton on the one hand to Liz Cheney Adam kinzinger on the other. And now I'm throwing up in my mouth as I say their names. They want to fight Russia and we can Russia the last dead Ukrainian. They are delighted that Putin invaded Russia. They hope to trick him into doing so by constantly denying any legitimate Russian security claim. Why? Why are they gung Ho for war? Why do they hate Russia to the extent that they're willing to do this? Because we know there's evil regimes all around the world at the top of the list, China. And yet, they seem to have this thing about wanting to go to Russia into where why is that? Well, they're white Christian male so it's okay to hate them to hate to have a racial visceral hatred, a genocidal hatred. It's okay because they're white males and Christians. I'm not kidding for the left. There's something in the fallen human heart that sadly enjoys the visceral hatred of whole groups. That's something we have Christians try to renounce. The left has that impulse and it doesn't have the grace of God, where can they vet it? Who can they openly hate white Christian males? And they hate us. Trump supporters. But even blue collar workers, anyone who doesn't fit their nasty little set of stereotypes. Anybody who won't say Caitlyn Jenner, anybody who is the way you're saying what you're saying a couple of things. But first of all, you're saying that this is about visceral hatred. This is not about legitimate decisions to protect democracy or to protect. It goes deeper than that. I don't know that I completely buy that. I don't disagree with you, but I'm still trying to understand. There's more to it. There's more to it. About what it is about Russia, the Soviet Union goes away, but still there's this desire to demonize Russians. Well, let me continue the explanation. After the Soviet Union collapsed, Russia was a basket case being pillaged by foreigners being run by the drunken hopeless Boris Yeltsin. Neoconservatives from America were coming and telling them how to privatize their assets and all the money was being stolen by all of ours. That was the way these people wanted aggression. They wanted Russia to be as helpless and crippled as China was in 1900. When foreign countries were colonizing and carving out. That's what they saw. That is the Russian future they saw. Boris Yeltsin came to power on a wave of anger, Russian anger at the country being humiliated being pillaged NATO being marched up to its very borders. Putin was part of a nationalist backlash and what that did was it drove some of these pirates out of the country. It drove some of these pundits out of the country. They couldn't go over there and get a $1 million consulting contract anymore. They couldn't steal whole industries out from under the Russian people. So that irritated a lot of people in the west that their opportunities to loot were diminished, but also the fact that Putin has come out against the LGBTQ my name is legion movement that he's says abortion is wrong and he wants to discourage it. He won't allow gay activists and he's openly promoting traditional Christianity, Russian orthodoxy. These are things that people like Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden want to see obliterated from the face of the art. Okay, and so I just want to be clear. So we are not pro Putin, folks, but what we're explaining to you is how this is complicated and how, when someone like Putin, who is not a good guy, nonetheless, does X and Y and Z, that makes him evil in the eyes of some and they think he must be wiped out because in effect he is part of an alliance of the enemies of the deep state. So it is complicated. People are suffering. I want to remind you if you want to help any of these Ukrainian refugees. I'm begging you. Go to metaxas talk dot com. Click on the banner. These are people suffering. They don't deserve this. They need our help. Metaxas talk dot com. Please go to the banner. Please do what you can. We'll be.

Russia Liz Cheney Adam kinzinger Putin Caitlyn Jenner Boris Yeltsin Hillary Clinton Soviet Union China Trump NATO America Joe Biden
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:18 min | 9 months ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Focus, I'm talking to John zamir. John, let's talk about anything you want to talk about. What do you want to talk about? Thanks, Eric. Well, one thing tomorrow morning where a statement, a call from peace and negotiations is going to come out from a group of Christian scholars and activists who want to encourage Americans to promote a negotiated peace in Ukraine. You're one of those Americans, and I'm one of those Americans. We are signing this petition and we want to exhort people. Now this is not till tomorrow morning it will be published at the stream stream dot org. Right. But this is important, John, please explain why this is important because I think you and others believe that the Biden administration, the so called deep state, they want war. They want World War three and they're, you know, trying to pretend like it's just and it's not. I wish it were just the secret committee formally known as Joe Biden and the deep state behind him. But it's also large segments of the Republican Party, the military industrial complex, the neoconservative hawks, the same people who gung Ho supported the Iraq War and accused people like me of being unpatriotic or traitors for asking skeptical questions about weapons of mass destruction that never existed. Threats to America that were false connections to Al-Qaeda that never existed and consequences and costs that turned out to be all too real. Right now the squishy center left and the squishy center right, the whole rotten spectrum from Hillary Clinton on the one hand to Liz Cheney Adam kinzinger on the other. And now I'm throwing up in my mouth as I say their names. They want to fight Russia and we can Russia the last dead Ukrainian. They are delighted that Putin invaded Russia. They hope to trick him into doing so by constantly denying any legitimate Russian security

Russia Liz Cheney Adam kinzinger Putin Caitlyn Jenner Boris Yeltsin Hillary Clinton Soviet Union China Trump NATO America Joe Biden
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on This American President

This American President

03:27 min | 10 months ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on This American President

"The one thing I don't want to do is inadvertently contribute to their will, and their resolve, Russian president Boris Yeltsin, in a move that would later become a defining moment in his political career, condemned the coup. And boldly stood atop a Soviet tank to call for true democracy. Bush worked at the forefront of a coalition of world leaders to navigate this new situation. It was what Bush knew best. It was what he did during the German reunification talks. And the beginning of the Gulf War. By the second day of the coup, Bush had called the act unconstitutional, and he was working closely with Boris Yeltsin to monitor the situation. The United States, bush and his advisers watched as Moscow teetered on the brink of violence. In the end, outright violence did not come to Moscow. It was apparent that after only a few days, the coup was failing. People gathered in red square, protesting for democracy over dictatorship. And the Soviet military did not open fire on them. Gorbachev returned to Moscow on August 23rd, and yeltsin issued arrest warrants for the officials responsible for the attempted coup. But by then, Gorbachev's power was completely compromised. Instead of fighting on to preserve his Soviet treaty, he stepped aside. In doing so, he allowed for a peaceful transition to the next most powerful figure. A more hard line Soviet leader might have lashed out in some way or sought to maintain his power, creating a crisis. But Gorbachev chose a different course. By December of 1991, the Soviet Union was gone. The United States longtime adversary had gone out, with not so much of a whimper. Throughout the crisis, Bush had walked a fine line, supporting Gorbachev against the coup plotters and supporting yeltsin's call for continued reform. While Bush can't take sole responsibility for stopping violence in Moscow, he can be given credit for not overreacting. He had succeeded in what he set out to do during these dramatic moments. Not create further instability. He didn't force events, but he also worked to prevent situations from spiraling out of control. Like he had said in his inaugural address, the new breeze of freedom was blowing, and Bush had allowed history to run its course. Under president Bush, the 45 year Cold War had ended, without a devastating clash of ideologies. Bush marked the end of the Cold War on Christmas Day, 1991, with an address to the nation. He praised the resilience of the United States and its citizens. And spoke about his confidence for a better world in a new era. For over 40 years the United States led the west in the struggle against communism and the threat it posed to our most precious values. This struggle shaped the lives of all Americans. It forced all nations to live under the specter of nuclear destruction. That confrontation is now over. The nuclear threat, while far from gone, is receding. Eastern Europe is free. The Soviet Union itself is no more. This is a victory for democracy and freedom..

Bush Gorbachev Boris Yeltsin Moscow yeltsin United States Gulf War red square bush Soviet Union president Bush Eastern Europe
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on This American President

This American President

04:07 min | 10 months ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on This American President

"That can't be foreseen. There are all kinds of events that we can't foresee that require a strong NATO. And there's all kinds of potential instability that requires a strong NATO presence. As president of the United States, Bush had significant leverage. But push believed the situation was delicate, and he couldn't bully his way into what he wanted. Instead, he focused on personal diplomacy, a skill he had developed as ambassador to the United Nations and the liaison to China back in the 1970s. He reached out to European leaders from Margaret Thatcher to the new czechoslovakian president vaclav havel, convincing them that America would need to remain in Europe to help oversee a newly unified Germany. He asserted that uncertainty was the enemy, and it was the United States that could provide stability against an unpredictable future. Central to bush's messaging was that U.S. troops would remain in Europe, only at the behest of their hosts. He argued that this was a win win situation for everyone. America would remain a power in Europe, while Europe could benefit from the stability it had to offer, and the subsequent prosperity. This was something he knew that the Soviets, with their long history of totalitarian government, and with their present distractions, just couldn't offer. With his allies, a Bush successfully built a coalition. Rather than overtly imposing his will. Allies committed to bush's vision one by one. Convincing European nations that were just about 45 years removed from World War II to accept the reunification of a former enemy was a tremendous feat. But he had to convince one player the Soviet Union. By the spring of 1990, the domestic situation for Mikhail Gorbachev was complicated. His gloss nose and perestroika reforms were causing social disruption, and his policies were doing little to address the ailing Soviet economy. Inflation had soared, making it harder for everyone to afford basic goods. With the country in such a weak state, the idea of a unified Germany could hardly have been comforting. Meanwhile, events continued to unfold in ways that challenged bush's plans. Soviet satellite state Lithuania declared independence in March of 1990, Estonia, another Soviet satellite state followed in May. Latvia would do the same in August. Bush closely monitored the situation and feared that instability could break out and ruin his plans. If the Soviets reacted to Lithuanian independence with a show of force, it could spell disaster for the entire world. He had to encourage Gorbachev not to turn Lithuania into another Tiananmen Square. The Soviet Union's dire state gave Bush a piece of leverage. He could offer economic aid to Gorbachev. In exchange for certain concessions, an economic relief package was prepared. Even better for Bush, Congress held up the aid package because of the Soviet buildup of troops on the Lithuanian border. Bush could now use the offer of economic assistance to get Gorbachev to withdraw his troops. Gorbachev was getting more and more boxed in. His political rival Boris Yeltsin was elected Russian president in May of 1990, and was building an alternative power base. Gorbachev knew he needed to act if he wanted to preserve the Soviet Union. Traveling to Canada and then to Washington D.C. for a summit with Bush in June of 1990. Gorbachev informed the president that the Soviets desperately needed aid. Troops would be removed from the Lithuanian border, and the satellite state would gain its right to self determination to choose independence if the aid was granted..

U.S. Europe Bush NATO bush Gorbachev Soviet Union vaclav havel Margaret Thatcher Germany United Nations Lithuania Mikhail Gorbachev China Estonia Latvia Tiananmen Square Boris Yeltsin Washington D.C. Congress
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:02 min | 11 months ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Partly because Boris Yeltsin starts shedding the blood of his political opponents in Moscow and in Chechnya and that rightly causes people to be worried and think, oh, we need to enlarge NATO more assertively. Partly because of the midterm congressional elections in the United States in November 1994, where Republicans win a stunning victory based on a contract with America calling for more assertive NATO enlargement. And partially because of Ukraine, which is as Clinton says a linchpin in this whole process. It starts to denuclearize having originally been the third biggest nuclear power in the world. And then that makes it less important. So it makes it less important that you have some kind of a solution that includes Ukraine and post Soviet states. And if I could just add one more thing, president Clinton, when he initially came into office, said, you know, why should I draw a new line across Europe, having just erased the Cold War line? If I give countries article 5, that'll draw a new line across Europe between the countries that are article 5 in the countries that don't have it. And that will leave the post Soviet states in the lurch, especially Ukraine, which is the linchpin of Europe. And when I read that as a researcher, I was just shocked at how prescient that was. But then because of all of these factors coming together, yeltsin shedding blood, the Republican victory, Ukraine to nuclearize and Clinton changes his mind. And he ends up drawing that new article 5 line after all. And that then creates a new source of friction with Moscow and it does leave Ukraine on the wrong side of that line as we're seeing today. Your book is titled not one inch, America, Russia, and the making of post Cold War stalemate. Are we still in stalemate? Between NATO and Russia, yes. And that is why it is so painful for us right now because we are stalemated. We see the horrors happening in Ukraine. We see the maternity wards being bombed. We see that woman and her two kids dying on as they tried to flee, not just one family, but there were particularly striking images. We see, as you and I record this on Wednesday, zelensky showed a video to Congress of very moving scenes of destruction. We see all this, and yet we can't do anything to help. That is a stalemate. We are stuck. And the tragedy is that we were in a much better place with Russia at the end of the Cold War. Put differently, cold wars are not short lived affairs. So thaws are precious. And neither Washington nor Moscow made the best use of the thaw in the 1990s. And we lost that deliverance that we had in the 1990s. And my book is an effort to explain how that happened. It's not a simple story. There's agency on both sides. It's not just the United States did everything wrong or Russia did everything wrong. But it is an important story because the United States and Russia we are the two countries that can devastate life on earth. And now we are back at daggers drawn. So I believe it is an essential story of our time. Well, I want to thank you for using your knowledge of history to help us better understand what's happening now in Ukraine and with NATO. So thank you so much for talking with us. No, thank you for bringing attention to this important issue..

Ukraine NATO America Moscow Europe Boris Yeltsin Chechnya Russia Clinton president Clinton zelensky yeltsin Congress Washington
Ben Ferguson: Vladimir Putin Came to Power by Killing His Own People

Mark Levin

01:51 min | 11 months ago

Ben Ferguson: Vladimir Putin Came to Power by Killing His Own People

"But I did a deep dive into Vladimir Putin And I did a whole entire podcast on it grab it If you listen to podcasts go back it was like three or four days ago Just wherever you get your podcasts put in Ben Ferguson podcast go back and grab it A lot of people don't know this And this is a very quick overview Vladimir Putin came to power in 1999 By killing his own people he needed something to make him look like he was a leader of great Russia Russia was down in the dumps at that point They had a low self esteem as a nation They had lost the USSR right Communism had crumbled This guy's a KGB guy no one really knows who he is Boris Yeltsin's walking around drunk all the time drunk and meetings drunk on TV They'd really just hit kind of rock bottom You'd get them with Chernobyl and all those other things That they have and Vladimir Putin saw an opportunity And what he did was is he worked with the new KGB and blew up apartment buildings on the border Blew them up with military grade weaponry explosives that only the Russian government had and then he blamed it on the chechens You know he understood that war is good for Russia right If you're a leader war is good because you can get the peel behind you and the solidify behind you And so then this apartment building blows up that actually had Russian border guards living in it Then another apartment complex was blown up with military great explosives at the same time explosive Then another one blew up and then there was another one that they were trying to blow up but it was foiled by people that were watching and then they found out it was actually policemen that were planning the bombs that were involved with you guessed it Vladimir Putin

Vladimir Putin Ben Ferguson Russia Russian Government Boris Yeltsin Ussr KGB
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At the border of Russia and Ukraine It helps to know some history We've called on Mary Elise surati she's a Professor of history at Johns Hopkins University school of advanced international studies Her latest book is not one inch America Russia and the making of post Cold War stalemate Thanks for being on the program Mary Elise Thank you so much So let's go back in time The Soviet Union falls There's this moment of opportunity for the U.S. Russia relationship Ukraine becomes an independent state Take us back to that time Yes as president Bill Clinton said in the early 1990s it was the first chance ever since the rise of the nation state to have the entire continent of Europe live in peace But the big question mark was what would happen to the Soviet strategic nuclear arsenal What would happen after the collapse of centralized control and command And Ukraine was particularly important because due to the amount of former Soviet arsenal on its territory once it became independent Ukraine was born nuclear It was born the third biggest nuclear power in the world Right So that's the reason that Ukraine becomes so strategic and the west wants to bring Ukraine into their sphere of influence Yes that and the fact that Ukraine is a large country at that point it had more than 50 million inhabitants It was becoming a democracy It's clearly a major European country So you want to define a place for it in post Cold War Europe So what becomes of this moment of opportunity As a historian I know that cold wars are not short lived affairs So saws are precious It's clear in hindsight that neither Russia nor the west took full advantage of the thaw that followed the collapse of the Soviet Union The Russian president Boris Yeltsin despite initial hopes that he could smoothly democratize Russia and transform its economy into a thriving market economy instead he runs into a series of enormous obstacles and he allows corruption to flourish And this causes the west then to gradually doubt that Russia really is transforming into a good neighbor and it becomes fuel for those who want to pursue a harder line against Russia and gradually that leads and cumulative interaction to a deterioration of the newfound cooperation And what does that look like going from opportunity to hardening Well one of the big open questions is the question of NATO enlargement And initially in the early 1990s president Clinton says you know having just erased the Cold War line across Europe why should we draw a new line across Europe not least because that would leave the post Soviet states and the lurch above all Ukraine He understood back in the 1990s that Ukraine was as he put it the linchpin of peace in Europe So let's move ahead to the late 1990s the fall of force yeltsin the rise of Vladimir Putin and Ukraine holds a special importance for Putin Can you explain why Yes there are both identity reasons and strategic reasons for that Putin feels strongly that Russia and Ukraine are one indivisible nation They should never have become separate states Something many Ukrainians would argue is not true Absolutely He also has this concern about Ukraine becoming a member of NATO We tend to think in the west of the collapse of the Soviet Union as an event But I think it would help us to understand the significance of Ukraine if we think of Soviet collapse not as an event but as a process that is still ongoing So if you think of it that way then you see that the 1999 war in Chechnya the 2008 invasion in Georgia the 2014 annexation of Crimea and what's going on now are all part of a long ongoing battle to define the limits of a shrunken Soviet empire Let's go to 2014 I think a lot of Americans remember Russia's annexation of Crimea and Ukrainians talk about not an invasion in this moment the long-term conflict that many of them have been living with since that annexation What was Putin's calculus there He was reacting to clear signs that Ukraine was moving toward the west In 2008 the NATO Bucharest summit declaration stated that not only Ukraine but also Georgia would become members of NATO That was one of the things that had prompted Putin to launch military action against Georgia in 2008 and in 2014 as Ukraine was also showing interest in the European Union He decided to violate what everyone had assumed had become a fundamental Tenet of post Cold War order namely a prohibition on changing borders in Europe through the use of force And in Putin's telling the U.S. the west are breaking a promise by looking at Ukraine as a possible NATO member right Yes there's two controversies There's a 1990 controversy over whether the west promised Moscow NATO would never move eastward not one inch eastward of Germany Right exactly That's the 1990 controversy Putin is obsessed with that but he is also obsessed with the year 1997 when Boris Yeltsin belatedly tried to get what Mikhail Gorbachev didn't get which was a veto over NATO expansion any farther so into central and Eastern Europe Boris Yeltsin did not get that in 1997 but he just said that he had anyway Thus creating a whole bunch of confusion And so now Putin is instrumentalizing this sense of betrayal from both 1990 and 1997 to whip up emotions today even though that's not consistent with the historical evidence And so now we're here 2022 Russian troops surrounding Ukraine right now What might a diplomatic solution look like NATO is not going to add Ukraine as a member NATO is not going to put intermediate range nuclear forces in Ukraine NATO is not going to invade Russia So somehow NATO and the west and Washington need to make all of that clear to Putin And one way to do that would be to revive Cold War arms control treaties that we desperately need again In particular the intermediate range nuclear forces treaty from which Trump withdrew in 2019 and something called the conventional forces in Europe treaty I think if we can make clear that reviving those would be both in our interest in Moscow's interests there may still be hope and it may be possible to prevent Ukrainians from dying in large numbers Mary Elise sarati she's a Professor of history at Johns Hopkins.

Mikhail Gorbachev Trump Putin 2019 Bill Clinton Mary Elise European Union two controversies Boris Yeltsin Mary Elise sarati Ukraine NATO 1990 Clinton 1997 first chance one inch Cold War Russia late 1990s
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on WTOP

"Or Derby horse had been tested positive for 21 picograms of betamethasone The steroid is legal in Kentucky but banned on race day Medina Spirit collapsed and died in December of a heart attack Bob Baffert plans to appeal the ruling by Kentucky racing stewards He's been banned for two years by Churchill downs Mandolin has been declared the winner of the Derby I'm Ed Donahue WTO P a three 43 This morning Russia from a different view It's London Colleen what makes Russian president Vladimir Putin tick This is after all a man who has the rest of the world desperately following his every move over Ukraine A man who summons western leaders to his lair Well Vladimir Putin grew up as a devoted Soviet citizen who rose through the ranks of the KGB He watched in horror as his beloved Soviet Union treated and then collapsed Under a combination of people power and the failings of communism He must have hated Christmas Day 1991 when the Soviet Union simply ceased to exist in the new Russian Federation was born with Boris Yeltsin at the helm leading to a decade of humiliation for the former superpower and as Russia descended into gangsterism and lawlessness the country was left isolated and unwelcome Its president treated as a bit of a joke When Vladimir Putin finally took over in 2000 he slowly prepared for Russia's inevitable resurgence which has now arrived with massive wealth for just a substantial view and in hand with a military buildup to exploit divisions within NATO countries So when Russia starts to flex its muscles on the borders of Ukraine suddenly Vladimir Putin proves what all this is really about Humiliation revenge and a demand to be respected again.

Vladimir Putin Churchill downs Mandolin Ed Donahue Kentucky Russia Bob Baffert Soviet Union WTO Colleen Ukraine KGB Boris Yeltsin London NATO
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on Rear Vision

Rear Vision

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on Rear Vision

"If communism was done in the Soviet Union, then was NATO still needed. And some people argued, for instance, that you might instead set up a plan European Europe wide security structure. But in the end, NATO's members decided that they preferred to keep NATO. They felt that NATO was a success story and that it provided an element of stability in an uncertain Europe. So the mainstream view amongst NATO's members was to maintain NATO despite the fact that the Soviet threat was gone. And there is a lot of soul searching going on at that point. What are we going to do now? Because if the Soviet Union was no longer a threat, then there was really no reason to continue NATO. My name is Charles ziegler. I am Professor of political science and also a university scholar at the university of Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky. And it did look for a while that NATO and Russia would be on the best of terms. In the early 90s, new leaders Boris Yeltsin and Russia's first foreign minister Andrei kosher, they just wanted to join the west as soon as possible, including NATO, but also international economic organizations, IMF, World Bank, and they thought of themselves as being a part of the west. My name is Andre segundo. I'm a Professor of international relations in political science at San Francisco state university. And they wanted to join the rest as soon as possible. So initially, they thought that the west would welcome them, but then soon enough they discovered two problems. One was that the west was not actually welcoming. And the other problem was that Russia itself was really in a state of major disarray. That question of extending NATO membership right the way to Russia was on the agenda. Here we could even go back to Mikhail Gorbachev, the last leader of the Soviet Union. He never raised the issue of the Soviet Union joining NATO, but he spoke in terms of there being a common European home, exactly what that meant was somewhat unclear, but the idea was that in a sense, all European states might be brought in. And then in the early to mid 1990s, a couple of times, Russian president Boris Yeltsin did actually raise the possibility that Russia might join NATO. Yeltsin, I think, wasn't particularly serious with that, and it wasn't really taken seriously the signing of a NATO Russia accord in Paris, brought together Russian president Boris Yeltsin, U.S. president Bill Clinton, and the leaders of France, Germany and Britain in an unprecedented move towards military and political cooperation. But that's not to say the Russians are completely won over. President yeltsin restated his objections to NATO's enlargement. By giving Russia a formal role at NATO, they could reassure Moscow that enlargement of the alliance to bring in new members would not leave it isolated and threatened. European security is not a zero sum game where NATO has gained as Russia's loss and Russia's strength is our alliance's weakness. The west didn't see it as a real possibility. And in a way, they made the right noises. They said things like, oh yes, at some point, you might be a contender for membership in NATO. But they were never really serious about it. I think the Clinton administration Bill Clinton had a very good relationship with Paris yeltsin. And promised him a lot of things, but at the same time, they were responding to demands from these Europeans in particular, say the polls who are have always been afraid of the Russians and then later from the Baltic states, slappy, Lithuania Estonia, who wanted NATO membership for two reasons. One so that they would have a protector in the event that Russia became resurgent, which it has. And secondly, I think because they saw NATO membership as going hand in hand with membership in the European Union, which they also very much wanted. But the point is that I don't think the U.S. ever really took Russia seriously at that time. And that was something that I think has rankled more than anything. The fact that Russia wasn't taken seriously. Mister Putin has famously said, in that 2018 speech, where he trotted out all the new missiles they had and so on. He said no one wanted to listen to us. Well, listen to us now. Through the 1990s, while rushes inclusion into NATO was not taken seriously. The idea of expanding NATO eastwards became increasingly popular. First, in Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia and eventually in the United States. My argument would be really that it was driven by the central and east European states. So if you look to Poland Czechoslovakia Hungary in a sense they were the three leading reformers if you like in the early and mid 1990s and their leaders, people like Valencia, in Poland, vaslav Harvard and Czechoslovakia and then the Czech Republic, they argued for what they called the return to Europe. So they said their countries had been artificially separated from Europe by the imposition of Soviet communism and by the Cold War. So they argued that their countries were just as entitled to join NATO and to join the European Union as the west European countries. So in particular, Poland Czechoslovakia and Hungary in the early and mid 1990s were really driving this debate pressing to join NATO. In addition, then that perhaps caught up in particular with the Clinton administration where there was a big debate really in the early and mid 1990s about NATO and large and eventually president Clinton came down in favor of NATO enlargement, and that's really how the process began. It wasn't primarily driven by any sense of Russian threat at the time. Even though NATO was established on the premise that the Soviet Union would need to be contained. So this was essentially the became the key mission of NATO. But at the time, the perception was not that Russia was a threat anymore. So the threat perceptions it was still alive and well not so much in the official policy historical certainly not in the vehicle in terms of administration, but it was a life and well in Eastern Europe. Shortly in Poland and in those countries elites who became candidates for the first wave of expansion. And that's Poland. Check the public and Hungary. NATO's decision to invite Hungary the Czech Republic and Poland into its ranks has been hailed as a day of great historical importance by all the late involved, and the invitation list is not yet complete. This a very great day. For not only for Europe United States, not simply for NATO, but indeed for the cause of freedom in the aftermath of the Cold War. Once that's something Russia at the time objected to or in a sense even had the capacity to object to. Yes, Russia clearly objected to this right from the mid 1990s Russia made very clear that it was opposed to NATO's eastward enlargement of Russians argued that it was unnecessary and they argued that it was potentially threatening for themselves. So Russia was clear that it was opposed to NATO enlargement. This was initially obviously under president Boris Yeltsin and then subsequently under president Putin, Russia posts this process immediately after it was announced and even before it was clear that overwhelming majority of Russian publications, including liberal politicians, did not like the idea. But Russia was not really consulted. It was not really taken into consideration for various reasons that we can discuss, but the main one being the Russia simply was too weak and too much of a disarray. You're right in one sense there was rather little that Russia could do about this. Russia was in a week position. It wasn't really in a position to halt. There is and it didn't really have political leverage over NATO or over the central European states. The other thing I think, which is important to note is that NATO always tried to pursue a twin track strategy. So NATO's argument was that it would enlarge into central Eastern Europe, Poland Czech Republic and Hungary in the first place, but at the same time, it would build cooperation with Russia. So something called the permanent joint council between Russia was established and then a NATO Russia council a bit later. So NATO tried to build an institutionalized cooperative relationship with Russia at the same time as enlarging into central Eastern Europe, but some observers describe this as trying to square a circle,.

NATO Russia Soviet Union Boris Yeltsin Charles ziegler Europe Andrei kosher Andre segundo Czech president Clinton Hungary yeltsin U.S. Mister Putin university of Louisville Clinton administration San Francisco state university Mikhail Gorbachev Paris vaslav Harvard
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on WBUR

"Russia has moved from repression to freedom and back again over three decades Sarah in that video clip you're wearing a purple face mask one of those disposable ones I think you're filming yourself on a phone your eyes are quite red and teary Where were you and what was happening I was sitting on a broken bench in the arrivals area of the airport in Moscow so I'd just been told by the border guards that I wasn't going to be allowed into Moscow and that I was going to be deported from Russia because I'd been declared by the FSB security service at a threat to Russian national security which made no sense at all to me So yes I did have red eyes yes I'd been crying because it was just a complete shock I hadn't seen it coming Russia had been my home for many many years And I was being told I was never going to be allowed into the country again And my family was there My husband was there and my dog The country Sarah was suddenly being expelled from had already been through colossal social and political turmoil through the 20th century Until 1991 Russia was a one party communist state called the Soviet Union or USSR But in December of that year the Soviet Union collapsed Boris Yeltsin became post Soviet Russia first president His rule was marked by increasing freedoms but also economic meltdown Today decades of artificial price subsidies here are being abandoned Shoppers this morning stared in disbelief at what they now have to pay for the most basic goods Sausage costs a hundred rubles a kilo that's a weak wages for most people.

Russia Moscow Sarah Soviet Union FSB Boris Yeltsin
"boris yeltsin" Discussed on The Moth

The Moth

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"boris yeltsin" Discussed on The Moth

"Loud bellowing sound. I couldn't figure out what it was. And she came back and she picked up the phone. And i said tanya what was that and she said now they know that night we were outside the building talking to all the other people who were there the rest of the intelligence and everyone else who gathered and we heard the barricade being pulled apart and we thought. Oh no the barricade is being destroyed and women running to see what was happening but it wasn't that the whole barricade was being destroyed. Boris yeltsin was writing in on his tank to give his historic speech about democracy and about the future of russia and he came in and he was applauded and everyone was thrilled and he stood on the parliament steps and began. Saying i speak to you today. Under the banner of russia and coast an russia nudged each other and said it's our banner our flag the third day the third day we got up and we decided to go up to smolensk near the american embassy. Because that was the place where three people had been killed the night before the only casualties of this unfolding drama and when we got there it was such a russian scene. There were flower strewn on the ground. There were old women crying. There were people talking about the nature of tragedy and we were all standing around and suddenly a young man came running up. He had a tweet cap clutched in his hand. And why rimmed glasses. And he looked like one thousand nine hundred nineteen revolutionary or like the student in checkoff play and he said. Hurry up at once their tanks approaching the outer barricade. We have to go and defend the outer barricade. Well there had been tanks endlessly approaching and they hit always just parked across the street and we walked up to the outer barricade quite far away in fact parliament building and we range ourselves in front of it holding hands and two minutes later. A column of tanks rolled up and they stopped about three feet away from us and it was still the cold war and i had grown up thinking that there was nothing more frightening in the world than a soviet tank coming up to you and the soldier.

russia Boris yeltsin tanya american embassy
Scottish Election 2021: SNP Hopes of Majority Remain on a Knife Edge

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Scottish Election 2021: SNP Hopes of Majority Remain on a Knife Edge

"The united kingdom voted in local elections yesterday while scotland chose the next parliament with potentially huge implications for the future of the union. Well for more on this. I'm joined by katie bulls. The spectators political editor katie. Welcome to monocle twenty four. Let's begin in the most significant areas. Scotland wherein snp victory could be a catalyst for the uk's disintegration. Do you think that nicholas sturgeon. The first minister can hold onto her job. Do we have any results that indicate that so far so in terms of the scotland at results. I think it's gonna mean much clearer by the end of the day today. And if it's close it doesn't look it estimate comfortable Majority between is what Once she's staked her reputation on then. It could drag veto tomorrow morning. dementia scraped together a majority. If it's come to lose by this evening at intended the results forgets against much places. I caught the poo and kansas in england. Bit scotland I think is the most high stakes will the uk government because if nikola session can get majority in there is a even a wider pro-independence majority which could actually be more difficult for the uk government than it just being smp one. It presents an issue in the sense. What does boris yeltsin say about this request for a second independence referendum. We know he doesn't want to grant one but as much debate in western says to the best to do not saying never when then. When is the right time if it's not

Scotland Katie Bulls Nicholas Sturgeon United Kingdom Parliament Katie Dementia Nikola Kansas England Boris Yeltsin
Boris Johnson Pledges to Admit 3 Million From Hong Kong to U.K.

The KFBK Morning News

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Boris Johnson Pledges to Admit 3 Million From Hong Kong to U.K.

"Minister Boris Yeltsin of course Johnson pledged to admit nearly three million people into Britain from Hong Kong if China were to impose the new security law they're not the offer would only apply to Hong Kong citizens who possessed a document known as the British national overseas passport that was granted to residents who registered for it prior to Britain handed Hong Kong back to China in nineteen ninety seven but they're already preparing for a possible accidents out of Hong Kong a path to citizenship for three million people in our company

Minister Boris Yeltsin Johnson Britain Hong Kong China
How the U.S. and China Settled on a Trade Deal Neither Wanted

Marketplace

05:34 min | 3 years ago

How the U.S. and China Settled on a Trade Deal Neither Wanted

"This week the US and China are set to sign the first phase of a trade agreement farmers and manufacturers hope this could be a sign that the trade war between the two countries is ending at a time when politicians are skeptical of global trade agreements are co host ari Shapiro talked with an author who is an unapologetic advocate for trade you could say that Fred Hochberg was born to be a voice for global trade his mother's name was Lillian Vernon the same Lillian Vernon who created a multi million dollar mail order catalogue company selling everything from clothing to toys that company grew from his mother's kitchen table to a household name partly by buying products that were made in China Nixon open China in nineteen seventy two lily was hot on his trail went to China in nineteen eighty one we started buying in trying to parlay Taiwan became too expensive so companies started moving from Taiwan into China and to the manufacturing there during the Obama administration Fred Hochberg ran the export import bank making him one of the country's top cheerleaders for global trade deals now the political tides have shifted president trump pulled the US out of the trans Pacific partnership started a trade war with China and scraps nafta so you can understand why Fred Hochberg called his new book trade is not a four letter word part of the reason I wrote this book was because I was kind of surprised and thunderstruck over the last eight years how we got so negative on trade the problem is we as a country were not candid when not honest with the shortfalls about trade the fact is there are losers and we did not really sufficiently as a country really address the people who got badly hurt we have many things in our economy that says yes it's a where a market economy but at the same time we have to have things that take action when the market's not perfect we didn't put enough time and attention into making that work the way you structure this book you tell the story of global trade through a handful of everyday products and I'd like to zoom in on one of them the avocado well I think you know the avocado follows the path of the banana which is also in this book and that is being this exotic delicacy that became more mainstream so bananas a once in a delicacy and then became the staple and frankly the most consumed fruit and the American family of any fruits vegetables that we consume a lot of as to a global trade and has to do with the importation from central and South America and avocados are similar in that regard in two thousand we consumed a billion avocados we double that within five years and then double that again and another ten years so we now consumer of four and a quarter billion avocados a year so I think that they did catch fire and part of it catches fire importing nafta and the importation of the fact that was free trade going back and forth and I use the example of the taco salad you can now or joy at soccer ball in all fifty states in twelve months of the year that would not be possible if US only relying on our own local products local agriculture and local ingredients and more broadly than avocados or even just the taco salad you talk about the way diversity in supermarkets has just exploded because of global imports yes I mean the choices we have in this illustration in the book about when Boris Yeltsin visited a supermarket in Houston and was just flabbergasted at the array of products that we have that degree of opportunity plenty selection and variety was something that we now take for granted in America that was largely because of global trade largely because we get agriculture products year round cheeses from around the world meet some around the world and they can go to every corner United States there's a stunning figure here where you write that in nineteen seventy five before the first free trade agreements were written the average U. S. supermarket carried just under nine thousand products by two thousand eight that number had mushroomed to nearly forty seven thousand that's because of global trade global trade and as a result changing eating habits I one of things I put in the book I would never have guessed growing up as a little kid we all the you know the going to seafood restaurant was like the worst thing in the world and the fact that Americans have so embraced sushi and virtually every supermarket you go to you can buy fresh sushi every day is remarkable you obviously think more trade is a good thing so I was surprised at the end of the book to see that you think the US should take a pause on entering into any new trade deals why this is been such a divisive issue that I think it's it's not healthy for a democracy to have such highly divisive issues that are often decided by one vote now since they wrote the book U. S. M. CNA the United States Mexican Canadian agreement that passed the house of representatives with three hundred eighty five votes to forty one is the largest single majority we have ever seen on a trade agreement ever so maybe we are now moving towards that recent surveys have shown a majority of Democrats and Republicans believe in free trade majority Democrats public thinks it's actually better for our economy Fred Hochberg is former chairman of the export import bank of

United States China
Britain's winter election

Correspondents Report

05:25 min | 3 years ago

Britain's winter election

"Oh Boris Yeltsin has finally got his wish the people of Britain are heading to a pre Christmas election based in the UK pre-christmas poll all of these things by paying party and movement Nicole Advertising Ban Labor launched its first within a few wilburns wiped the Conservatives I twitter ad fell a bit flatter with seventy to win over hearts and minds during the late up to the December poll. There's like the smiths boots most voters will be very focused on pre Christmas parties in prison buying does that mean for Boris Johnson here I'm not really sure Boris Johnson say voters seemed not to mind the idea of pre your now before Christmas how do you think Boris Johnson will go here and he's electric he's which is the hall of it she's a blue life I think she's on the verge Quite hairstyle can I ask you about this going to be an election before Christmas that's why

Boris Johnson Boris Yeltsin Smiths Nicole Britain UK
Gaza is going to get worse before it gets better

Taking Stock

02:13 min | 5 years ago

Gaza is going to get worse before it gets better

"You will of the equivalent supercomputer or they can get attributes of this computer in their commercial systems eventually of course we'll put this technology into the ibm cloud it's just amazing how industries companies amount of data and you process it you know using artificial intelligence what you might be able to ultimately do he john kelly nice to check in with you and hopefully we'll get some updates down the line in what you guys are doing with summit senior vice president of cognitive solutions in research at ibm maybe can be used to make the planes go on time after waiting two and a half hours last night just saying let's get back to world and national news headlines hager in our bloomberg in washington dc you know nathan right trio planes on time that would be speaking of running late president trump in quebec has been running late pretty much all day as he meets with leaders of six other industrialized nations but the g seven summit is underway and is bloomberg's irv chapman reports from washington those other leaders are objecting to just about everything the president's putting on the table russia was invited to join the group in nineteen ninety eight when boris yeltsin was its president vladimir putin was invited when he invaded crimea answering questions as he left the white house president trump had a surprise suggestion his worst nightmare with that being fed russia should be this may not be politically correct but we are the world who run we could have russia at the negotiating putin has been telling european and asian leaders trump's america is not your friend my russia is in washington irv chapman bloomberg radio just in german chancellor angela merkel says russia cannot be led back into the g eight until the situation changes in ukraine israeli troops have killed four palestinians along the gaza border today as the region's hamas leaders struggled to revive a flagging protest these rally army says about ten thousand people gathered at five spots along the border throwing flaming kites pipebombs rocks and grenades gaza's health ministry says more than five hundred people were hurt nearly a hundred isreaeli fire global news twenty four hours a day on air and a tick tock on twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries in.

Twitter Hamas Gaza Ukraine Chancellor White House Crimea Irv Chapman President Trump Nathan Washington John Kelly IBM Angela Merkel America Russia Donald Trump Vladimir Putin Boris Yeltsin