35 Burst results for "Boris Boris Johnson"

 UK leader Sunak faces opposition in Parliament for 1st time

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last month

UK leader Sunak faces opposition in Parliament for 1st time

"Britain's new prime minister Rishi sunak is holding a meeting of his new cabinet before facing the opposition in parliament for the first time as leader Soon axe appointed a government mixing allies with experienced ministers from the previous governments as he tries to tackle Britain's multiple economic problems office says the lineup in his team aims to ensure that at this uncertain time this continuity at the heart of government but during the regular House of common session known as prime minister's questions opposition politicians are likely to focus on the baggage the new ministers carry from the governments of Boris Johnson and Charles

Rishi Sunak Britain Cabinet Parliament House Of Common Boris Johnson Charles
Nigel Farage on Why Liz Truss Was the Victim of a 'Globalist Coup'

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:50 min | Last month

Nigel Farage on Why Liz Truss Was the Victim of a 'Globalist Coup'

"Nigel Farage joins us right now. Nigel, welcome back to the program for our American listeners. Can you offer some clarity about what the heck is going on in your beautiful sister country across the pond? An astonishing four months, Boris Johnson, the elected prime minister goes because, frankly, he wasn't truthful with the British public about many things. And elected as a conservative, he rather governed as a liberal, and people got upset. Then the queen dies. You know, she'd been there for 70 years. That was very destabilizing. We then got a new prime minister who attempted to introduce conservative philosophy. She wanted to reduce the size of a state and cut taxation. And the world went to war against her. The International Monetary Fund spoke about our mini budget in a way they'd never spoken about any country ever before. The American administration piled in. The German Chancellor piled in, and in the end, you might argue that some of their tax cuts weren't very well thought through, but we have been through in the course of the last two weeks. Nothing less than a globalist coup, we get a mangled Jeremy hum, out of left field, becomes Chancellor of the exchequer, and now we have a new prime minister. He's taken over today, our third and 7 weeks, but the name of Richie sunac, I can pronounce it, even if Joe Biden can't. And he of course is our first former Goldman Sachs prime minister. He's a globalist. He's a supporter of Central Bank, digital currencies. He's barely conservative at all. And it all goes to show that the British Conservative Party isn't conservative at all. And we have a real problem on our hands.

Nigel Farage Boris Johnson American Administration Nigel Jeremy Hum International Monetary Fund Richie Sunac Joe Biden Goldman Sachs Central Bank British Conservative Party
 Next UK prime minister: Sunak closes in after Johnson balks

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last month

Next UK prime minister: Sunak closes in after Johnson balks

"Former treasury chief Rishi sunak is the strong favorite to be Britain's next prime minister Sunak could well be offered the post after former lead up Boris Johnson dropped out of the Conservative Party leadership contest The government party is choosing a replacement for Liz truss who quit last week sunak is the only candidate with confirmed support for more than 100 lawmakers the number needed to run in the election House of Commons leader penny Morton has so far fewer expressions of support but is aiming to reach the threshold by the time nominations close later in the day Charles De Ledesma London

Boris Johnson Sunak Rishi Sunak House Of Commons Liz Truss More Than 100 Lawmakers Last Week Conservative Party Charles De Ledesma Prime Minister London Penny Morton Britain Expressions
Boris Johnson returns to UK amidst rumors he will run for PM

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last month

Boris Johnson returns to UK amidst rumors he will run for PM

"Former prime minister Boris Johnson has returned to Britain ahead of a possible tilt at reclaiming his former job Johnson was ousted by a series of ethics scandals just three months ago but boarded a flight back to London from his vacation in the Dominican Republic just days after the dramatic resignation of his successor Liz truss Johnson has not officially said he's running but some allies in the parliamentary party had been loudly calling for his return Tory lawmakers wishing to enter the race must secure the backing of 100 of their colleagues by 2 p.m. on Monday Charles De Ledesma London

Boris Johnson Liz Truss Johnson Britain Parliamentary Party Johnson Dominican Republic London Charles De Ledesma
Boris Johnson eyes comeback bid as UK Tories pick new leader

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Boris Johnson eyes comeback bid as UK Tories pick new leader

"British political analysts say Boris Johnson is eyeing a comeback bid as Britain's conservatives pick a new leader Former prime minister Boris Johnson is among several British lawmakers trying to scoop up support ahead of a short intense contest to become the country's next prime minister the Conservative Party is choosing a replacement for Liz trus who quit on Thursday after a turbulent 45 day term favorites include former treasury chief Rishi sunak and a House of Commons leader penny mordant the wildcard is Johnson who was forced to resign by the party just three months ago amid ethics scandals Meanwhile opposition leaders are calling for an early general election Charles De Ledesma London

Boris Johnson Liz Trus Rishi Sunak Britain Penny Mordant Conservative Party House Of Commons Treasury Johnson Charles De Ledesma London
Sebastian and Mike Graham Discuss Liz Truss' Resignation

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:04 min | Last month

Sebastian and Mike Graham Discuss Liz Truss' Resignation

"Given the situation, I can not deliver the mandate on which I was elected by the Conservative Party. I have therefore spoken to his majesty the king to notify him that I am resigning as leader of the Conservative Party. No U turns this lady's not for turning, I remember that catch phrase from Margaret Thatcher when I lived in the UK well, this one didn't just do U turn. She got off the highway, a record 44 days in office, shortest serving prime minister ever, gone, goodbye, Liz truss. What does it all mean? How did it happen? We stay on top of international news as much as anything else. I'm your host Sebastian gorka, and you're listening to America first on the Salem news channel. Who do we rely upon? Our good friend across the Atlantic, the man who speaks truth and common sense on the fastest growing channel there. It is talk TV. It's our good friend. Mike Graham, welcome back to America first. Sebastian, thank you very much. Indeed, well, it's been quite a day. It's been quite a week. It's been quite a 44 days. You might say, as you said, the shortest period ever, some think this has been a remainder plot. There are those in this country who still can't take the fact that Brexit was a success and that we left the European Union. You know, we now have Jeremy hunt, who's had Chancellor, who voted to remain in the EU. Let's trust was a remainer who changed into a brexiter and is now out. Boris Johnson, however, is the big name on everybody's lips tonight because but hang on, hang on, hang on, didn't you just get rid of him, Mike? Yeah. We might be getting him back. It could be the greatest political comeback of all time. You know how he's very much like Donald Trump. They're trying to get him every single step of the way. They are terrified of Boris Johnson coming back because he is the one man who can unite the Tory party who can win an election against the Labor Party and who could actually restore everything for them. Nobody's quite sure if he's going to run, but he's already in the lead in the polls and he's already in the league in the House of Commons as far as MPs is supported.

Conservative Party Liz Truss Sebastian Gorka Mike Graham Margaret Thatcher Brexit America European Union Boris Johnson Jeremy Hunt Sebastian Atlantic UK Tory Party Donald Trump Mike Labor Party House Of Commons
UK spy chief says rise of China world's top security issue

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

UK spy chief says rise of China world's top security issue

"British spies have given the increasing British spies have given increasingly negative assessments of Beijing's influence and intentions Last year the head of the MI 6 overseas intelligence agency Richard Moore called China one of the biggest threats called China one of the biggest threats to Britain and its allies while in 2020 then British prime minister Boris Johnson followed the U.S. in banning Chinese tech firm way way as a security risk ordering it to be stripped out of the UK's 5G telecoms network by 2027

Richard Moore China Beijing Boris Johnson Britain U.S. UK
Jim Carafano Discusses His Recent Trip to Ukraine

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:40 min | 2 months ago

Jim Carafano Discusses His Recent Trip to Ukraine

"I am Sebastian gorka, this is America first with one of our regulars mister national security and foreign policy for the conservative mothership. It is, of course, the heritage foundation heritage and colonel Jim caravan of doctor carafano is freshly back from Ukraine, and he has so much to share with us. Don't you, Jim. So this is weird, you know, I was in the army for 25 years. I was never deployed to a combat zone once. And in the last two months, I've been in two combat zones, so you had two busy playing with those nuclear weapons. I care, right? I guess. So I had another group of experts working with a Polish think tank. So we went to Ukraine. You fly to the border, the Polish border. The Polish border take a train to ten hour train ride to Kyiv. So you and Boris Johnson, secret trainer. Yeah, yeah, everybody takes the secret train ride. It's a private train. It runs at night. The security is ridiculous. Everybody, WeChat our own SEAL Team 6 guy. I mean, it wasn't SEAL Team 6, but they look like social security. Yeah, they look like something out of the movie. And everywhere we had like this arsenal. And I was just like, I've pitied anybody that would come after us. But these were supplied by the Ukraine government. This was actually these were actually supplied by the Polish government. Wow. And so we went to bucha, which is the high water mark of the Russian incursion towards the capitol, which is stunning how close. Where there was basically genocide. Right. So the town horrible, terrible. I mean, one is how close they actually got to the capitol. The other is, is the destruction was just terrible. I mean, including obviously blowing up things that are not military targets in any way. We'll show some photographs and then of course this is a scene of one of the mass burial sites. And tragically on the day we left, they found it even bigger mass barrels. People bound tortured. Families bound together in the latest. Hundreds of people thrown into a hole in the ground. And no matter what you take away from this, no matter what side you're on, if you're a neocon or a restrainer or whatever and you want nobody can think that Putin is a global player. And the notion that you would just sit back on your hands and just let him run wild being the murderer and soulless godless killer that he is. And think that someday that wouldn't come after you. That's just nuts.

Sebastian Gorka Heritage Foundation Heritage Colonel Jim Caravan Carafano Ukraine Polish Government Bucha Boris Johnson Kyiv JIM Army America Putin
Truss, Johnson, May in tributes to queen

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Truss, Johnson, May in tributes to queen

"As crowds assemble outside Buckingham Palace British prime ministers who served under the reign of Queen Elizabeth II share personal tributes to the late monarch There were 15 prime ministers during the queen's reign from Winston Churchill to Liz truss who was appointed just this week trust has told lawmakers the reaction to the queen's passing has been deep and profound We have witnessed the most heartfelt outpouring of grief at the loss of her late majesty Trust his predecessor Boris Johnson remembers his last meeting with the monarch She was as radiant and as knowledgeable and as fascinated by politics as ever I can remember Former prime minister Theresa May told lawmakers the queen was the most remarkable person I've ever met as well as the most impressive Charles De Ledesma London

Liz Truss Buckingham Palace Queen Elizabeth Ii Winston Churchill Boris Johnson Theresa May Charles De Ledesma London
Liz Truss becomes Britain's new prime minister

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Liz Truss becomes Britain's new prime minister

"Liz trusts is the new British prime minister after being appointed by the Queen at Balmoral Castle in Scotland Trust has become Britain's new p.m. replacing Boris Johnson in the post The former foreign secretary immediately needs to confront a major task ahead curbing soaring prices She'll also need to ease labor unrest and fix a healthcare system burdened by long waiting lists and staff shortages another top of the box item is the energy crisis triggered by Russia's invasion of Ukraine to conflict threatens to push energy bills to unaffordable levels shut a businesses and leave the nation's poorest people shivering in icy homes this winter Charles De Ledesma London

Balmoral Castle Boris Johnson LIZ Scotland Britain Ukraine Russia Charles De Ledesma London
As Boris Johnson departs, UK takes stock of his messy legacy

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

As Boris Johnson departs, UK takes stock of his messy legacy

"The moving vans have already started arriving at Downing Street as Britain's Conservative Party prepared to evict prime minister Boris Johnson the debate over what Mark he left on his party his country and the world were linger long after he departs in September if indeed he really is gone for good Johnson led Britain out of the European Union and won a landslide election victory before his government collapsed in a heap of ethics scandals During his final appearance in parliament as prime minister in July he summed up his three years in office as mission largely accomplished Johnson cultivated a buffoonish public image but he has had a serious impact on his country He bears much of the credit or blame for Britain's departure from the EU London

Britain Boris Johnson Conservative Party Johnson Mark European Union Parliament London
Robert Wilkie Reflects on the Anniversary of the Afghanistan Takeover

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Robert Wilkie Reflects on the Anniversary of the Afghanistan Takeover

"Wilkie, we were talking in the break. If you're on ram, but you can hear our discussion. Different styles of leadership. I'd like you to expand upon that. But first, your reminiscences of this anniversary. Well, sadly, it brought back memories of the 1970s. I was old enough to take in what was happening. But it was a very different level of disappointment. My father was a senior officer in the 82nd airborne division back at fort Bragg. When Saigon fell. And the countenance of the senior leaders in our neighborhood. After all, of the blood and treasure spent in South Vietnam. Sadness, the evacuation is showed that the United States was not an omnipotent, although we had basically pulled out. It was very different from what was happening in Afghanistan. We just had a few people at the embassy. Yeah, it wasn't thousands of people. No. We didn't leave. We didn't leave soldiers behind. Oh, there's some would say that we left POWs behind. But very different dynamic then. This showed the world that at the very best, the national security leadership of the United States was incompetent. There's a reason why the Taliban did not kill American soldiers on Donald Trump's watch. Because they feared what the retaliation might be. This president not only abandoned American equipment. He abandoned American allies, did not have the common decency to tell Boris Johnson or Macron or Merkel. That we were pulling out. That we were leaving.

82Nd Airborne Division Wilkie Fort Bragg South Vietnam United States Afghanistan Donald Trump Taliban Macron Boris Johnson Merkel
Supreme Court Political Hackery Revealed in Sam Alito's Rome Speech

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:22 min | 4 months ago

Supreme Court Political Hackery Revealed in Sam Alito's Rome Speech

"This political hacked Ness goes all the way up to the Supreme Court. I guess there's a new low, but Sam Alito is she wrote about Sam Alito went to Rome to correct some jokes after overturning roe. He said apparently Sam Alito went to Rome and let his free flag by guaranteeing he is now known internationally as a head. Yeah, this is him. Here we go. I had the honor, this term of writing, I think, the only Supreme Court decision in the history of that institution that has been lambasted by a whole string One of these was former prime minister Boris Johnson. But he paid the price, what really wounded me was when the Duke of Sussex addressed the United Nations and seemed to compare the decision whose name may not be spoken with the Russian attack on Ukraine. Wow. The crisis test has Boris Johnson and Trudeau. I mean, now he's admitting it. I mean, it's out in the open now. You've got a Supreme Court, the majority of whom are conservative hacks. Right. And we'll deliver for all the people who and Sheldon White House is right about this and he's been right about this for three years now. He's delivering for their donors the same way a congressman would.

Sam Alito Supreme Court Rome Boris Johnson Ness Duke Of Sussex United Nations Trudeau Ukraine Sheldon White House
UK, Irish leaders join funeral for peacemaker David Trimble

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

UK, Irish leaders join funeral for peacemaker David Trimble

"The leaders of Britain and Ireland have joined for the funeral of politician David trumbull who shared the noble peace price for helping to end decades of violence in Northern Ireland Trumbull who led the Ulster unionist party for ten years became a key architect of the 1998 good Friday peace agreement after he reversed his long held opposition to negotiating with the IRA linked party Sinn Fein then he shed the noble Peace Prize with moderate Irish nationalist leader John Hume for ending the sectarian conflict Britain's outgoing prime minister Boris Johnson and Irish premier mihiel Martin joined trumbull's widow and for children for the service at harmony hill presidential church near Belfast trimble died on July 25 at the age of 77 I'm Charles De Ledesma

David Trumbull Ulster Unionist Party Ireland Britain Trumbull Sinn Fein John Hume Mihiel Martin IRA Boris Johnson Harmony Hill Presidential Chur Trimble Belfast Charles De Ledesma
New Founding's Matt Peterson on Justice Alito, Christian Nationalism

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:20 min | 4 months ago

New Founding's Matt Peterson on Justice Alito, Christian Nationalism

"With us right now is a great American patriot cofounder and general partner of new founding and also the president of American firebrand super PAC and friend of the show. Matt Peterson Matt, welcome back to the program. Hey, it's great to be here, Charlie. So Matt, I want to get through a couple news items here. But first, I want to play a piece of tape here from justice Alito's speech. I think he gave it in Rome, which is super scary 'cause that's where the Catholic Church is headquartered and not allowed to do that. And I want to play cut 94 here. And the way the media has responded is a new line of attack that you can see in kind of the smart coordinated circles, the people that are considered to be smarter than not. However, they are all kind of coordinating their attacks around Christian nationalism, play cut 94. Over the last few weeks, since I had the honor, this term of writing, I think, the only Supreme Court decision in the history of that institution that has been lambasted by a cold string of foreign leaders. Who felt perfectly fine commenting on American law. One of these was former prime minister Boris Johnson. But he paid the price, Matt kind of mocking Boris Johnson there, Sam Alito, who I think is the best thing George W. Bush ever gave us, probably my favorite member of the court. They're attacking him as being a Christian nationalist. What do they mean by that, Matt? Well, in their minds, of course, they think Christian nationalism is a smear. They think both of those words are bad. And if you put them together, it's too bad things. And that's one big bad thing, and it's a scary monster, which I think in their minds means something like handmaid's tale and enforced Christian religion. They think it's racist too, somehow they seem to only regard whites as Christians, interesting. But white people who are Christian controlling the country and shoving their views down everyone else's throat is what they mean by it. And the hilarious thing here is that neither of those words are bad and when you put them together, you actually get what I think millions of people throughout the country think is normal.

Sam Alito Matt Peterson Matt Matt Boris Johnson PAC Charlie Catholic Church Rome Supreme Court George W. Bush Handmaid
Justice Alito Cracks Dobbs Jokes Abroad

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:15 min | 4 months ago

Justice Alito Cracks Dobbs Jokes Abroad

"Want to play for you justice Alito abroad, talking about European reaction to the Dobbs decision. Can we play cut number one of justice Alito yesterday? A few weeks since I had the honor, this term of writing, I think, the only Supreme Court decision in the history of that institution that has been lambasted by a whole string of foreign leaders. Who felt perfectly fine commenting on American law. One of these was former prime minister Boris Johnson. But he paid the price. Post hoc ergo propter hoc, right? All right, so that's a joke. And don't take it as anything other than a joke, because of course, former prime minister Barack Johnson is still the prime minister, but justice Alito is gracefully telling non Americans that they don't get the make Supreme Court law. The United States Constitution dictates what Supreme Court law is. And even if they made a mistake, 49 years ago with roe and doubled down on that mistake, 30 years ago in Casey, now the court has it right. It is up to the states.

Alito Dobbs Supreme Court Barack Johnson Boris Johnson Justice Alito United States Casey
"boris  johnson" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:05 min | 4 months ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on Today, Explained

"To be the person putting up taxes. Read my lips. So you've got all of these pressures on the Conservative Party to balance the books to pay people more and really, they're just something has to give and Rishi sunak is the one that's getting hit with this. So he's got a bit of an uphill struggle to claw that back and win back support of the Conservative Party members. But don't write him off because he's a very slick professional smart operator who does also have a message, which is if you unleash tax cuts too early, you will only stoke inflation and once inflation starts to build interest rates will go up and they will hit homeowners and who are the fundamental Tory base in Britain. It's homeowners. Middle class, middle aged homeowners who do not want to see their interest rates on their mortgage go up. So that is an interesting challenge between the two. But right now, trust is the favorite. And either way, it's a continuation essentially of Boris Johnson's administration. What is Boris Johnson end up in the history of UK politics? A success or a failure. It sounds like there's no way anyone's taking back Brexit and at the end of the day he did pull that off, right? Yes, this is the challenge of trying to weigh up Boris Johnson. He, in some ways, leaves a legacy that is more consequential on British politics than almost any previous prime minister. Even Thatcher included because you can always cut taxes or raise taxes once the previous guise of bead in, right? That's how it works. You know, if that's your manages to shrink the size of the state, Tony black and come along and grow the size of the state. And so that's something that is a problem for all prime ministers when they come to when you come to way up their legacy. For Boris Johnson, it's quite simple. He took Britain out of the European Union and it's very, very difficult to go back. And if Britain never goes back in, it's going back in on completely different terms to what it had before. It will have to renegotiate everything. And that is a stark lasting legacy for his supporters. It's obviously a great thing for his opponents. It makes him the worst prime minister that we've had since the war. So that is the constant challenge. But what I think both sides will agree on to some extent is that however consequential he is he threw it away for such absurd reasons, so so pathetic were the scandals, so of his own fault, nothing about policy, nothing about anything major, you know, he was lauded for his support of Ukraine. He came through the pandemic having nearly died himself in the pandemic with his popularity high because Britain had a good vaccine rollout, but he got some credit for. He had all of these things and he threw it away for party gate for, you know, wallpaper gate for all of these absurd things that just revealed a kind of lazy character at the center of it. So you have to weigh up both of these things and that's why he's such a confusing figure to try and cover his unlike all of the other prime ministers really in that regard. Tom, staff writer at the Atlantic based in London, England, our episode today was produced by today explains own Philadelphia bureau chief miles Brian. He had help from Tory Dominguez and even more help from Matthew collette, Laura bullard, and Paul mounsey. I'm Sean ramus from. You can find today explained on Twitter at today

Boris Johnson Conservative Party Rishi sunak Britain Tony black Thatcher European Union UK Ukraine miles Brian Tory Dominguez Matthew collette Atlantic Tom Laura bullard England London Paul mounsey Philadelphia Sean ramus
"boris  johnson" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:30 min | 4 months ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on Today, Explained

"As prime minister. Hasta la vista, baby. Which is obviously this nod to I'll be back. Essentially, I'll see you around. I'll see you another time. So he's saying that. He is clearly setting himself up. He is defending his position in his resignation speech. He sets out that, you know, my job was half done. I did what I said I was going to do. I had a mandate from the people that had a mandate from the Conservative Party members, and I've been removed because of, in his words, the herd mentality of members of parliament who just kind of moved like sheep at one moment and took him out. But as we've seen at Westminster, the herd instinct is powerful and when the herd moves, it moves. So it clearly he's setting himself up for, you know, at least keeping that option open in case the Conservative Party loses the next election under the new leader. And you can see it, right? You can see it right now. The Conservative Party loses and he stands there and says, you would not have lost if you'd have kept me, you lost the faith. That was your mistake. We all look to the U.S. and what's happening in the U.S.. Donald Trump lost, but he still looks like he's got a very good chance of coming back. Boris Johnson hasn't even lost, so maybe that's going to happen. What, or rather, who comes next ahead

Conservative Party Westminster parliament U.S. Donald Trump Boris Johnson
"boris  johnson" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

04:39 min | 4 months ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on Today, Explained

"These allegations. It was something that was only raised with me very cursory. But I wish that we had in particular had acted on it. That was it really. That's the final thing where members of parliament just felt we're just being told lies by this guy. You know, we've gone through all of these previous scandals. We've gone on to the TV and onto the radio defending him. Being told one thing, repeating that thing and then finding out, you know, weeks or even hours later, that it's not true and they just got sick of it. So he just about survived party gate. And then over this, again, a pathetic, stupid lie, he gets caught, and that's the end of him. And they just move then en masse the conservative MPs to declare that they didn't have confidence in him. And just became too much, the tide swept him out of number ten. It was rather dramatic. I mean, all of his ministers were resigning in this sort of waterfall. Two unexpected high profile cabinet resignations first from the health secretary saggy javid and then from the Chancellor Rishi sunak, the man who lives next door, both of them attacked Boris Johnson's leadership as they quit. All day, it felt at times like every ten minutes or so, conservative MPs were sending letters saying the prime minister should go. Going, going surely nearly gone. And that's the beauty of the British system in that it's this unwritten constitution, so it's not like the American constitution where things are set and you can get rid of a president in this way and his replacement will be this person and that person. And it's all kind of ordered and neat. In Britain, it's very messy, but it can be brutally efficient. So the prime minister is only prime minister if they can command a majority in the House of Commons. If they can't command a majority in the House of Commons, they're done, they're not the prime minister anymore.

saggy javid Rishi sunak parliament Boris Johnson cabinet Britain House of Commons
UK Conservatives picking final 2 in race to replace Johnson

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 4 months ago

UK Conservatives picking final 2 in race to replace Johnson

"Britain's Conservative Party has chosen Rishi sunak and Liz trus as the two finalists in an election to replace prime minister Boris Johnson The numbers of votes cast for each candidate is as follows mordent one zero 5 soon act one three 7 trust one one three In an announcement to lawmakers senior conservative Graham Brady declares that trusts and sunac will face a runoff to become Britain's next leader the race pits sunak a former Cheshire chief who steered Britain's economy through the pandemic against trust who's led Britain's response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine as foreign secretary The two contenders will spend the next few weeks campaigning for the votes of about 180,000 Conservative Party members around the country who will vote by postal or online ballot Charles De Ledesma London

Rishi Sunak Liz Trus Prime Minister Boris Johnson Britain Graham Brady Conservative Party Sunac Sunak Cheshire Ukraine Russia Charles De Ledesma London
Why Inflation Won't Stop at 9.1

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

Why Inflation Won't Stop at 9.1

"Yesterday I sat on the show that 9.1% inflation was probably going to be the peak because the fed was going to raise interest rates and other three quarters of a point. I was wrong. After the show that producer price gains from June, were published, producer level inflation. That's the wholesale level. Went up 11.3% on an annual rate. In the month of June. That staggering that money is coming right at you that inflation is coming right at you as a consumer. So 9.1%, even though gases began to drop. That's only the most visible part of our inflationary spiral. I don't know that we're going to drop in when the July number is released in August. That's really bad news.

FED
"boris  johnson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:45 min | 5 months ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Single day, can't get the big policy announcements out. It's not just these last few months or even these last few years, though, and I think this is what bewilders a lot of onlookers is that Boris Johnson has been a thoroughly known quantity in this country for the thick end of 30 years. Why did the party indulge him up to the point of electing him leader and allowing him to run the country? You got to remember that we had problems with getting out a message across and whilst yes, there were character flaws in his personality, there was also a magic about him. And there was an ability to campaign and reach parts of Britain that we had never touched on before, but now we're realizing that the difference between campaigning and governing. And when we saw him act in the city hall, he ran London, he was a London man for some time. He had a lot of very good people around him. And that was where I think when things went wrong with the prime minister this time is that there wasn't that team that was able to back up to provide the substance of the detail, the strategy that you need to make the country work. Are you concerned that there might yet be more to come in terms of revelation scandals related to Boris Johnson wandering in particular given your position on the defense select committee if you have a view on his very recent admission to having met Alexander lebedev, who is of course a former KGB officer without any officials present while he was foreign secretary. I think these are now more and more relevant, I think now. I think they're absolutely what's going to happen now is that we move forward. Whatever happens, it has happened. It makes their difference anymore. He is departing. We now look to a new leader. We're going to have a leadership contest, stalls will be set out in order to work out where we go to next. And so whatever happens, yes, it's very likely as you suggest that there will be more there. That's hasn't been uncovered to date. It doesn't matter anymore because it's the direction of the country that people will focus on less about the prime minister. Do you not think there is still a Johnson tendency in the Conservative Party, though do such characters as attached themselves to him like Jacob riis Morgan Nadine Dori still pull any weight whatsoever? You're absolutely right to point this out because what happened is that there was an erosion, if you like, dissolve them if you like of the standards. We became used to the fact that you could get away with stuff. The high standards that we have in Britain and British politics, the mother of all parliaments, it meant that because of the way the prime minister acted, it was okay to do these things because the prime minister, the Boston care too much about it. There was this culture of being able to sort of get away with it. And we absolutely need to revisit that because ultimately the nation look at this and they say, no, thank you. This isn't who we are. And just to step back from Britain as a whole. You know, we all see the next exemplars to how democracy is done in the world. And when we start to lose moral compass, our guidance of where we want to go is very easy for then Russia and China and say, hey, look at that. They've broken into national law. They don't care. Look what's happens in number ten. You complain about us. It's in the free world as well. You're just as bad. That's why, I think everybody just said, enough, we need to regroup and that's exactly what the party is doing now. Are you not even slightly tempted to have a bash at leading this regrouping yourself? Well, it's very kind of you to ask. There's a lot of people ahead of me measuring the curtains. I would certainly like to be prime minister one day I won't hide that. I'm not sure it's the market right now for somebody like myself a moderate member of the Conservative Party. It's still a Brexit market, if you like that's where you're going to get the vote because don't forget it isn't facing the country immediately. It's facing the party base. And much as though they're important to the party very much is the case that they are still attuned into Brexit into that Brexit feeling. And I personally believe we need to move on from that. But I do think it will be a brexiteer that will end up winning this particular race. But do you yourself have a preferred leader in mind if not necessarily a who then or what kind of qualities you would like them to have? Certainly the quality must be to reach the entire country to be able to have the vision to answer the big questions of the day to unite the party in a post Brexit post COVID environment and for us to play a role on the international stage. That's absolutely critical. There's an absence of leadership in Europe at the moment. Britain can actually fill it. So yes, there's some important things to do. We'll see what the stores are, see what the leadership actually says. So we'll see in the next couple of days what the various candidates have to offer. Tobias elwood MP, thank you very much for joining

Boris Johnson defense select committee Alexander lebedev Britain Jacob riis Morgan Nadine Dori London Conservative Party KGB city hall Johnson Boston Russia China Europe Tobias elwood
"boris  johnson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:20 min | 5 months ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"His period as prime minister? Yes, there is. And I think perhaps principally it was the way in which he applied himself to the vaccine rollout and the need to get vaccines as many people's arms as quickly as possible once those vaccines were available in response to COVID. And don't forget that COVID very nearly killed him, literally, killed him. And the application that he put into that and the drive that he put behind it was extraordinary to behold and was successful. That's not to say that the government's overall handling of the COVID epidemic was successful. It wasn't. But what he did show was when he applies himself and puts all of his energies into a task, he can move mountains and he did move mountains along with his team. So there are things that he achieved and on a purely political level, although I fundamentally disagree with Brexit and believe it was a disaster as policy for the United Kingdom to embark upon. He said that he would get it done. And by his own lights, he did get it done in that. We have left the European Union. The terms of our withdrawal are starting to unravel and people are starting to see the weaknesses in the arguments that he put forward and indeed in the deal that he struck. But at least there was a deal. And just a final very quick question pertaining to Boris Johnson's curiously upbeat semi sort of resignation speech which we heard on Thursday. Do you think there's part of him that thinks that this is sort of a temporary setback that in some shape or form he's not done yet? Well, he's not done yet in terms of the Boris Johnson story. But I think the Boris Johnson story will now go off in a very different direction. He'll probably go back into the journalism stroke commentating stroke entertainment industry and probably make a great deal of money being entertaining and making speeches around the world. If he thinks that his political career can be restored after this, then he's even more naive than I think he is, although he has shown in the past to have a remarkably much higher opinion of himself than anybody else seems to have. Lance price, thank you, as always, that was the former director of communications at number 10 Downing Street Lance price, and you are listening to the foreign desk on monocle 24. This is a special live edition of the foreign desk I'm Andrew Muller. In one 48 hour period earlier this week, more MPs resigned from Boris Johnson's government than had previously resigned from any government of any length in British history. Not among them was Tobias elwood conservative MP4 Bournemouth east, though this was likely because he had no portfolio to relinquish, having long since made his disapproval of the prime minister abundantly clear. Tobias elwood joins me now on the phone. Tobias, first of all, was that your impression that the Chris pincher affair was some sort of actual last straw, or was the sudden flight from Boris Johnson more to do with those recent calamitous by election results. I think it's a combination of both. I think it was that last straw, but it has been a general I think erosion of trust with the British people. And we started way back in November with Owen Patterson, remember that event when we try to change the rules. And there was then a question of style of leadership because of party gates as well. What was going on in number ten? Absence of focus, absence of clarity, absent to discipline as well. And a huge promise to change to reforms actually regroup. But not about actually happened. And the consequence of that is that we ended up with more and more people over time, choosing to actually no longer support the prime minister. I came out earlier. This is back in February that I came out with, but more and more people chose to then join me. We then had a vote of no confidence across not enough people should have been enough ready for any prime minister normally to resign when they didn't feel they had it. It then took the Chris pincher event for people to say right, that's it. I can't defend this anymore. I can't defend the prime minister's behavior. And it's overshadowing as well. We are fighting firefighting every

Boris Johnson Lance price Tobias elwood Andrew Muller Bournemouth east Chris pincher European Union United Kingdom Owen Patterson government Tobias
"boris  johnson" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:34 min | 5 months ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"It, I think, in a hindsight, it was the wrong thing to do. Downing Street had previously said mister Johnson hadn't been aware of the allegations. Now deem zahawi, the new Chancellor of the exchequer, defended mister Johnson this morning. Do you think this prime minister has integrity? I do. I think he needs to know. Well, because he's determined to deliver, but his voice here is one of the few. In the face of a chorus of descent. MPs from mister Johnson's party have toured breakfast shows calling for his resignation. Some people think that he can walk on water. I'm not one of those people. I'm afraid I don't share the Chancellor's view. Of his integrity, and I don't think that. But so far, he seems determined to stay. Johnson had been facing questions for some days over what he knew about his deputy chief with Chris pincher who resigned after admitting he'd been harassing men in bars. Matthew hull House is The Economist, British political correspondent. In quite dramatic fashion we saw the resignations of the Chancellor of the exchequer arushi tsunami that is the finance minister and of Sajid javid, the health secretary. The letters landed within a few minutes of each other close to 6 o'clock yesterday. They both basically said that these were standards that they were unable to defend. They felt that the British people deserved a better government than this more honesty. And so they walked and it really began an evening of reeling is Johnson sword to reassemble a new top team around him. But those weren't the only ministers to resign last night, were they? They were not no later on in the evening and we had the resignation of Alex chalk the solicitor general. He's one of the government's law officers and then a slew of much more junior figures. So Johnson does seem to have managed to have contained the damage. Had it been the case that another two three four 5 cabinet ministers had walked, that would have been a much, much more catastrophic media loss, as it was, he was just these two, although it can not be stressed enough. These are some of the most senior figures in the British government. It's not a good thing for any prime minister to lose your Chancellor and your health secretary. And did they all resign for more or less the same reason? They laid out fairly similar reasons for resigning in his letter said that the public expected government to be conducted properly competently and seriously and he said that these are values worth fighting forcing you know that is an allusion to the slew of scandals that we've seen, not just over Chris pincher, but over party gates over Johnson's contact with party donors over who was paying for the wallpaper in Downing Street flat, the list goes on and on. Similarly, javid said that to the British people that expect integrity from their government and that it was time for a new direction. So they're both very much focusing on these questions of ethics and competence in government. And so Matthew, how is the party responding? The concept of parties incredibly restive. Johnson got through a leadership contest. It's just a month ago. He survived not by the biggest of margins. Now formerly under the rules. That should have been the end of the matter for a year, but ultimately the rules are made by the MPs themselves. And so it's perfectly possible for those rules to be changed. The other scenario which seems to me perfectly plausible is actually that we're stuck in this sort of pattern that we've been in for months and months now, which is people say, well, you can't go on. It's humiliating. It's debilitating. It's aimed at prime minister. This is just intolerable. And yet somehow the concept of party manages to tolerate it. And there's just sort of drags on and on. One thing which is really worth noting is just how poorly coordinated the effort to remove Johnson is. This is very much far from the managed leadership challenges that we knew in days gone by. So Johnson has many, many enemies. They arranged against him, but in some ways he is quite lucky and just how poor his enemies are at organizing themselves. So how long do you think he can survive? The exit of a prime minister and a leadership crisis is not an event. It's a process. It's a condition rather than a moment and particularly when you have somebody like John who really, really is determined to dig in. He considers his mandate to come not from MPs or it should be a classical understanding of the British constitution, but from the people himself he scrubs to a form of popular sovereignty, which is the presidential in approach. So that is to say he really will be determined not to go. We saw his determination last night to rally new team around him and to push on. That said, people within the party who were previously loyal now think it really is terminal and you're talking about weeks or months best. What is clear is that whatever timetable of merges, you really are in a distinct phase of this premiership one, which is Shaun of authority, Shaun of the capacity to believe his and get things done. It just is a question of how long the Conservative Party thinks that that is a suitable way to run a government. So Matthew, in the event that he does step down, who's waiting in the wings. The field in contest weeky quite wide. Has positioned himself as one of the head of the Red Bulls. You have Jeremy hunt, a former health secretary who's been quite open that he would fancy another shot at the top job within cabinet you have people like Ben Wallace, the defense secretary who seems to have handled the Ukraine crisis fairly well. So it's a very, very wide field. Unfortunately, the problem with the Conservative Party is that these tend to be a very sort of myopic affair. So there's a huge amount of energy invested in looking at his positioning. He was making contact who's organizing the drinks parties. The thing that gets missed in all this is just the challenges that will be awaiting any prime minister. And really the extent to which Britain is suffering from a lack of leadership at the moment. You have the context of this huge squeeze on real incomes with very, very high inflation in the UK at the moment. We know that the UK has got quite chronic problems with low growth at the moment we have relations with the European Union really as poor as they've ever been. And this goes on and on and on. The point is that for the Conservative Party, whether any contest of any candidate to replace Boris Johnson is willing to engage in these problems. Or whether it's going to be a lot like contests gone in which you engage in this terribly fanciful exchange of ideas about Britain being a global power, about the need to cut taxes about the need to revive the Thatcher at agenda or blue sky things but none of which really engages with the reality of the challenges facing the British government. Now the great attraction from any members and MPs of Boris Johnson is that he was willing to take them on a bit of rhetorical journey to this comfort zone. Whether the party now has the appetite for people who are willing to deliver some home truths about their condition of the United Kingdom and the choices that have to be made is an open question. All right, Matthew, thanks so much for joining us this morning. Thank you. The intelligence podcast is sponsored by Shopify. It's the sound of another sale on Shopify, the all in one commerce platform to start run and grow your business. Shopify gives entrepreneurs the resources once reserved for big business, so now anyone can sell everywhere and synchronize online and in person sales. Go to Shopify dot com slash the intelligence for a free 14 day trial with full access. Grow your business with Shopify.

mister Johnson Johnson Chris pincher zahawi Matthew hull House Sajid javid Alex chalk javid British government Conservative Party cabinet Matthew Shaun gates Jeremy hunt government Red Bulls Ben Wallace Boris Johnson United Kingdom
"boris  johnson" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:35 min | 6 months ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Support for the show today comes from future, you know, the guy with the song about the masks on or the mask off no, I'm sorry, sorry, I'm getting no, I'm getting a message here. Future is the app shaking up how people think about exercise and self motivation. It might be by pairing you with your own personal fitness coach, future holds you accountable and helps you work towards your goals with the support of an expert, get started right now with 50% off your first three months at try future dot com slash explained. Again, that is try future dot com slash explained again not the rapper future, the app, the app or future. Goodbye. The Coca-Cola Company, Keurig Dr Pepper, and PepsiCo are bringing consumers more choices with less sugar than ever before. In fact, nearly 60% of beverages sold contain zero sugar. Visit.

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"boris  johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 6 months ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Those Brits hadn't heard about the snail sex The report of the yearlong investigation into party gate was released this week finding there were at least 8 drunken parties at number 10 Downing Street while the people at 10 Downing Street the government forced the rest of the country to stay locked inside The parties which Boris Johnson denied knowing about at the time even though they took place at his house included karaoke wine time Fridays and a game called pin the responsibility on the underling People became suspicious by the way that these wild parties were going on at the time when they noticed what the prime minister looks like every day of his life Boris Johnson always looks like somebody who just said to his best friend you can let go of my hair I think I'm done throwing up Is anybody resign over scandal anymore Oh no Yeah That's very 20th century Nobody does Yeah in fact you run on the scandal next time You might remember me from all those headlines Yes Boris Johnson's slogan for his reelection will be I will fight For your right two party If I put on the beaches I will fight for it All right Steph here is your last quote And it is Tom Cruise 36 years after the first one it's here I hope you enjoy the ride Tom Cruise was talking about his big new sequel out this week the sequel to what The sequel to Top.

Boris Johnson Tom Cruise Steph
"boris  johnson" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:27 min | 8 months ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Worth your.

"boris  johnson" Discussed on Was jetzt?

Was jetzt?

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on Was jetzt?

"On running kenyans evil. Hd market stein shoe hairstyle our stash. Riots mid numbers on us dan from stockton zolia also yet scoots one sess- nitin and gotten sloshing so thinking involves alison middle of isla is tennis bela a roger feta imbecilic on sheila under the polish border and schrool ruin. These him for mid-september is anemia. Under new yorker burgan on thought you elect uber. Seen million dollar pivoted synthesizer. Tom have to alsatian niamh. Nick gunston on and problem is the tusker chefs monday. That sets them down off. Swear billy as fireman vietnam to put in on down here. It's calvin does some einon zwicky side camis for am had angered as problem does hot and lockdowns he zone in vietnam still cheetos. Good fish on demand colleague austin rock rockets data hit stomach really shifted. Yes hello faubion. Movie hottest undergrad off on top and these lockdown momentum does not ask about is in von order. Moon our seat by on esten hype yards thousand. Annan's vans ish zayn schwartz who not portend in vietnam woida pussy. Lassen on get vice onto names. Were released as vocation. These are fallen of vietnam for noon. Yet up zoema. Vietnam goes and tides and lockdown for hang as public muslim countries in the the von monitors. Oh god on desperately missed us on can plug ones lund hut on this clar vaas income. Lynn vaughan passed yet. Is this your journalists. On the swings respondent variety in mocked. I'd start up on the spot. Particular niche potential offshore. it's emitting congo. In vietnam would tear up because he had because the nyc addidas puma pussy allow in vietnam about needs to not put send the on at night. Somebody spear hot. After the french wound addidas is put sand on taught him hat to name. We could angle. Thus z. want. Seen vaughn and tuneful one half indian land on this shown outspokenness heisman voters shyness as inventory on by under of this problem because ready alliance enough for lesson. It's cops on on these exact him does he. Event suge plight digging dr nutrition. Bars and ganga zimmer at fifty million dollar i ain't gonna says new but took no banham yet as most indian context as these varnished in bosnian. Prospect is pepitas. I don't name our skip before annabel birthday. Asthma listed voters spy on in the house. Pastor is in new york and the bazargan on to a dozen voted in this respect for at least dot madden in. This one was names of visiting on by on on their climb to them. Hung does the atlanta vietnam pulled up on to wish the sky in this. Lock down the even. our i. financial physical fudosan image team. Current about iraq is usually viterbo button on zaina tickle. A shined hooded huggy shannon's and so bite done if she didn't his on data sets more speed have mountains. Update mickens even more flu as yet society or the hedge take bus hits by saddam. Doesn't eka ill of indians analyzing monkeys.

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"boris  johnson" Discussed on Was jetzt?

Was jetzt?

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on Was jetzt?

"The hollow owned hats. Common suva's yet. St- tim nine podcast fun site online. I'm mitchell teams exner october. What does play eastern luba v. boris. Johnson goes potanin. Asta christopher in michigan and our team here input podcast owned by i n give dot schweitzer schule hash la anger publ. Ema had somebody knock miami's faubion. Sheila should either. Bison matures peer. Hooton morgan the When you own in the chaffetz thousand politics in opinion abadan does happen. The dots click chefs loud rat. Chef sean michelle by them. Keep them in. Slovenian leftist dementia. After gets dammit of our politicians aligned gang was swimming dish panel in fatness tahina. If your heart is invest bycatch.

"boris  johnson" Discussed on The Leader

The Leader

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on The Leader

"From the evening standard in london. I'm david malls land. And this is the leader worcester. Yes is with his covert winter plan. Still under wraps boris johnson to the british gas training academy in leicester as if daring the headline writers to do their worst here. He is a scientists. Warn of another couvert peak. Getting a lesson on how to deal with pressure pressure. And we're better to get advice on what to do about a leak from a gas company. Leaking trusting respect to meanwhile although many of the of proposals for the rest of this year have been widely trailed the pm staying tight lipped on at least one aspect and he wrote out a winter lockdown or is it still potentially on the table. We've got to do everything that's right to protect the country but the way things are going at the moment we're very confident in their steps that we've taken all be sending out a lot more Tomorrow i'll give you a full update on on the plans for the of the autumn in the window and that is not a new well. Deputy political editor. David bonds are westminster office and he joins me now. David as being a lot of speculation about a pandemic firebreak and everyone sent back to their homes and masks. Is there anything more to those rumors. It's very interesting. Because boris johnson was saying that they got to do everything right the country. So he's not ruling our this stage despite there being lots of opposition to it from his Backbenches the idea of having yet another lockdown And despite the the the comments from his own cabinet. So i think it's unlikely But i think the moment johnson wants to keep in his back. Have they completely ruled out. Vaccine passports now again there. There's some confusion uncertainty. I mean we had nadeem zahawi last week turning. Mp's the plan was still introduced him into nightclubs by the end of the month by sunday had said he javid the health secretary. Say that actually been ruled out completely fa- now so i think there is confusion number ten again of said that they want to retain the ability to use them at some point. If needed so. I think there is a great deal of uncertainty. I think the only thing you say for sure now is that they went becoming in by the end of the month and we also have some uncertainty about facemask use. Well don't worry yeah and again. I think you know so much of this will be really interesting to see. What's in the detail when we get boris trump's winter plan tomorrow but to raise coffee. The worker pension secretary Was saying on monday. Morning that These are sensible measures. I think we're exact words they want to look at retaining because i think the truth is as cases rise and You know runs into windsor flu. They're absolutely desperate. Not have health service overwhelmed again. So i think that they just want to try and retain as many powers as possible at the same time signaling that they won't go back to those draconian lockdown measures which really 'cause the economy's grunted a whole so i guess with all of this room is speculation going round. You can see why the prime minister kind of feels like he needs to make a statement to clear things up doesn't he and i guess i wonder if that's been a theme throughout this pandemic that it's all being a little bit muddy at times that people haven't been certain about what's going on. Yeah that's why critics of the government would say. They haven't helped themselves because they performed so many u-turns i mean again. You saw it. Combats point about vaccine certification. Over the weekend you know you have one minister saying one thing on. I think it was wednesday. I think you had another minister. All of the dowden. Friday saying the plan was to introduce them by sunday. You had such a javid saint completely the opposite and they'll number ten saying well you know they might come in so i think they don't help them with some of the messaging. It is obviously complicated as fast moving situation. You know the truth is no one really knows what's going to happen at the moment. The days of looks like it's going in the right direction in terms of hospitalizations and deaths. But you know there is still a possibility of a new very coming along or if the vaccine starts to not be as effective through the winter months then boris johnson would be in face all sorts of criticism if he was then to say well. I'm going to rule out taking any of these measures in the future. The nhl looks up being overwhelmed. One thing we do know that pretty much the only thing we know about the impact of kuna virus right now is its effect on the economy we can see it laid bare. We know there have been job losses and the prime minister has been talking about trying to kind of re up the economy today. Hasn't he has. And if you look at the gdp figures last week again. Sort of signaling. The some concern about the true effects coming through on the economy after the sort of beast with reopen coming in the summer that perhaps the economic recovery is going to level off a bit. It's not going to be as strong as expected. So clearly the charts. The soon extremely worried about this. I think one of the things that johnson really wants to do is fine. Get people's focused post pandemic on economic recovery on job creation so was obviously very keen to be talking apprentice ships and jobs for graduates during his visit to leicester on monday to try and create this sense that you know there is. There are jobs out there again to his. Coffee was talking about the number of vacancies and the sense. That plan to save jobs has worked. They're very keen to emphasize the way furlough scheme people out but that you know the fellow scheme is winding down and so you might start to see that coming through In terms of unemployment numbers in coming weeks but you know whether the economic recovery sort of course it was a very big question johnson. Yeah and if he wants to shift the conversation away from the pandemic itself and back towards leveling up the country as he says then avoiding that overwhelming of the nhs over these coming months. it's going to be essential to that isn't it. Yeah i mean absolutely hence that lockdown. They really can't afford to have another look down in the coming months. That'd be desperate to avoid at all costs and one of the interesting things look for in the winter plan when it comes on tuesday will be to just see which pieces of legislation are going to be taken out of the government's toolbox on us because that will tell us which things they think they no longer need. So things like You know laws close schools to detain infectious people restrict large gatherings and other events. That will really give us a sense of the direction of travel. Of course they can always just bring back in legislation today as they did during the real peak the pandemic. But i think you know all. I think they want to message to people that this thing is over that boris johnson is key in the people. Don't live with it. Even though of course you know death still a significant level. You can read more from david in the evening standard newspaper and online at standard dot co dot. Uk where you'll also be able to follow breaking news on this story and everything else on our live blog. That salita podcast. We're back tomorrow at four. Pm cast recommends more more episodes more great shows keep listening to hear a new show. We recommend home in the suburbs of boy dreamed of saving all the poor children off the wall. He builds a charity that attracted the walled stops and liberties and be needed. Pollsters become your life. Work won't behind the scenes. Things started popping up allegations about corruption. Blackmail this is the story of a charity. That did well when it was supposed to be doing good. The white saviors. Canada land original podcast a-cash comments..

boris johnson david malls british gas training academy David bonds nadeem zahawi javid boris trump confusion johnson worcester leicester westminster cabinet london flu David nhl standard dot co jobs government
"boris  johnson" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"At the stroke of midnight on what was dubbed freedom day in britain last week clubbers hit the dancefloor starting what is in effect a grand epidemiological experiment watched by the world restrictions on the size of gatherings social distancing and masks all lifted this weekend a major music festival called latitude happened in the county of suffolk with forty thousand. Attendees the unlocking is powered by a belief in the strength of britain's vaccination campaign although deaths remained low and cases have fallen from a peak last week. Nearly thirty thousand people at day are still catching. Covert and five thousand. People are hospitalized. The architect of this bold plan is prime minister. Boris johnson who has as of this weekend but office for two years. The dodgers the doomsters the gloomsters. They outgained to get it wrong again. The people are british politics columnists. Adrian wooldridge hardly knows what great to give for the prime minister's performance but appropriately. He puts it in the way. Mister johnson's alma mater oxford university does alpha versus gamma. And there's plenty of work to mark. This was quite frankly extraordinary. Hectic two years he's proved parliaments for which he was rebuked by the supreme court is expelled. Twenty one grandees from the conservative party. Costea ms majority and he's being reelected with a massive majority. If you look at his life personally he's had a child he's supposed to second wife. He's marriages stood. Wi fi almost died all curve. Nineteen so there's been no

Adrian wooldridge Mister johnson alma mater oxford university Boris johnson Britain dodgers Costea ms conservative party supreme court mister johnson boris
"boris  johnson" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"They were in coalition with the conservatives number of years ago and prompted a number of reforms. That's what led for example to this fixture in parliament act was was a result of that coalition But certainly i would think if it was that. Or boris johnson who is going to go forward with the no deal brexit than that would be possible now again we've been talking about elections in in future machinations in all of this but it of course still does not answer the question of whether brexit and under what form of brexit so this general election. I think assuming it happens before. The uk crashed out would essentially then be seen as a a second referendum on brexit but it is difficult if you still have a labor leader. That is broadly supportive of it and then it would become a question of whether or not he would back a second referendum as part of his a party manifesto going into election. Yeah i mean it's a second referendum except in the sense that both sides support leaving to one degree or another right. It's it's the leaders certainly do so before we turn to Other matters. I wanna i wanna focus briefly on jeremy corbyn substantive views here. He wants you said he wants to negotiate a better deal himself. I don't have the impression for all my distaste for her. That theresa may left a whole lot of negotiating leverage on the table like that. She sort of gave away the store to the eu. What is the thing. He thinks he can get that. She didn't get in those deals that he criticized as not good enough. I mean interestingly much of what he wants. I think you could still end up. Getting underway. theresa may deal. It would just politically require him to support. A theresa may deal so we tend to talk in shorthand about the brexit negotiations or the brexit deal. There's actually two separate documents. The first document is that withdrawal agreement. That's essentially the divorce settlement. It deals with payment with northern ireland border with the question of you know what the rights of british citizens living in europe the rights of eu citizens living in the uk. All the technical details of what the divorce looks like. And it's it's rather difficult to see how you adjust much of that leaving aside the conversation. We had about the backstop for northern ireland. The second document is the political declaration. That's not legally binding and it deals with the broad framework for what the future relationship between the uk and the eu ends up looking like and this is also a place that we're starting to see a lot. More divergence from boris johnson. So i think for jeremy corbyn he would like to see the uk. Stay in a customs union with the rest of the european union. And so what he wants could have been addressed in the political declaration by setting that out as a political aspiration for these future negotiations..

boris johnson jeremy corbyn theresa european union uk northern ireland europe
"boris  johnson" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"The question is is going to be the timing. So there's two things. Essentially that parliament could do one is. Mp's could try and seize control of the house of commons order paper and timetable to force through legislation requiring. Boris johnson to ask for an extension at the act. Tober thirty first meeting. The members of parliament were doing this. In march they did manage to pass legislation. Doing that but theresa may had already come to the decision herself to ask for the extension in april so so one question is whether they can use legislative mechanisms to try and prevent a deal. No deal brexit. The second option is this idea of no confidence vote. So parliament is on recess right now in august. It comes back on september third labour leader. Jeremy corbyn is already talking about calling a vote of no confidence in boris's government several years ago when there was a coalition government. Parliament passed this six term parliament. Act to try and prevent a number of snap elections so under this new legislation if you call a vote of no-confidence and the government loses that vote. There is a fourteen day period where members of parliament can try and cobbled together a government. So could boris cobble together. A different configuration of government. Could jeremy corbyn cobbled together. A government and one of the things people have been talking about is a letter writing government as they're calling it essentially a government of national unity. All this government would do is write a letter to brussels asking them to extend the deadline from october. Thirty first so that there would not be a crash out with no deal now. Some people are arguing that it's very difficult to see some conservative. Mp's backing jeremy corbyn in doing this But that is one of the parliamentary gambits. That people are looking at the other question. That people are asking is if force johnson loses a vote of no confidence in theory and as i understand it under the legislation. He gets to set the date of the election so he could say fine. We'll have an election on november first but we are leaving the eu on. October thirty first. So then you get into all sorts of debate about whether the queen would get involved and whether the queen could force him to have an earlier election. So people are very Deep in the weeds of british constitutional law. Now looking at these things. But i think the the the number of scenarios are either some sort of legislation to request an extension or a vote of no confidence. And whether or not you could prevent boris from setting a later date and whether it would be possible to cobble together a unity government to ask for an extension and do we have a sense of whether that one vote majority if if a vote of no confidence were put on the floor of parliament tomorrow. Not that we've been all that great anticipating what parliament will do. But do we have a sense of whether the conservative party and the democratic unionists hold together. And you actually prevail by one. Vote on that side or would there be as there were with. Theresa may a whole bunch of defectors from her own caucus that that absolutely is the the key question. I two things one that that one vote majority actually relies on ten votes from the democratic. Unionist party so he doesn't even have a majority based on his conservative party. He's already relying on this unionist party from northern ireland to give him ten additional votes Otherwise he would be down significantly and so that's why reverting to a backstop for northern ireland only would cost him likely ten seats Second it's really going to be a question for some of these conservative. Mp's you've had some of them be very vocal throughout the leadership campaign and even now that they don't support a no deal brexit. They think it's going to be disastrous and so for them. It's really gonna be this question of conscience as to whether or not they vote against their leader what that means for their own seats longer term and knowing the mood of the public in terms of these these last elections now. The conservative party has gone up in the polls in the last couple of weeks..

jeremy corbyn parliament Tober boris Boris johnson house of commons theresa government of national unity brussels johnson eu conservative party Unionist party Theresa northern ireland
"boris  johnson" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"After a no deal brexit are that the brits deal with the situation in northern ireland they pay their outstanding bills and they deal with the rights of eu citizens living in the uk so from the us perspective. Boris is going to have to deal with the set of issues either now in advance of a no deal brexit or immediately after a no deal brexit the e. u.'s. Perspective is that it's going to be so catastrophic in chaotic for boris. That he's going to have to cave on all of these issues and come back to them begging for resolution to these things to negotiate a future relationship so dumb question. But i wonder if part of what's driving boris johnson. Here is a delusional sense of who blinks in the game of chicken. So i look at this situation. And i say a new deal. Brexit is a royal pain in the ass and very embarrassing for the eu but it is potentially catastrophic for the uk and. I don't understand why. Boris johnson would look at that situation and think that people in brussels are suddenly quaking at the at the prospect that he might pull a forty five out of his pocket and shoot himself in the head. Is there some sort of damocles hanging over. Brussels that is not hanging over. boris johnson. Himself were or is this or is this a situation in which he's standing under a giant sword and they're standing under like the toothpick of damocles and threatening them. i think those are very apt analogies. I think he expects the europeans to be much more freaked out about the prospect of a no deal brexit than they seem to be. It's certainly going to be economically damaging and problematic for them. It's not something they want but they have been preparing for it for the last year or to the french. The dutch others have been hiring additional border. Guards their attitude is. It's going to be painful but but we can bear this the only country that's really gonna suffer in. Interestingly it's the one that's the most dogmatic on this question of the backstop is ireland Because ireland of course is going to have to live with the consequences of a destabilized peace process in northern ireland. Which you're already seeing continued warnings of the political economic insecurity risk there The uk government is said. We're not gonna put customs infrastructure on the border with with ireland. We don't wanna do that. The irish government has also been saying that publicly but the problem for them is if they wanna maintain trade with the rest of the eu. They're going to have to comply with the regulations and certify that what is coming out of their country is in compliance and so ireland is is really the remaining eu country. That's going to get squeezed the most on this But i think most observers would agree with with your assessment of the situation. And i find it a little hard to understand why boris assumes that the eu is is going to blink which is very amped up rhetoric on no deal. Brexit seems to suggest that that's the path he's very rapidly heading down all right so option to is that his government does not last long enough for this. Now he's got a one vote majority or however many you said he had one right and there are plenty of of tores who did not support brexit and cannot be happy with the situation and so my question is why should we assume his government will last. You know five weeks let alone. Three more months i is. It's very difficult to see Not having an election at some point this fall..

boris johnson eu uk boris Boris brussels Brussels irish government us Brexit
"boris  johnson" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"boris johnson" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Of coupons and with that gone things all more difficult. I think for the tory party. I paul was an mp for buckinghamshire see. I obviously as more expert knowledge. But i think this is a risk for the tory posse poco x ex-pat knowledge idiot but chechen nash. 'cause i didn't sit for that. Seaside is further west. Didn't i do remember the two thousand fifteen general election. jerry cole. Wilson tour is able to use. There was the specter of an alliance between labor in the n. with scotland unresolved. I wouldn't be a tool surprised if boris johnson was able to do that next time. Round so rule stars weaknesses. I think. Boris johnson still got cards to play on the southeast. Nps being jittery. It's true this will make the mortgage re but his parliamentary management is troubled. Anyway as we've seen from the row about the door point seven as we saw the vote this week on the train. A virus extensions as we saw when they crumbled without any votes. At all in the face of mockus rochford a majority of eighty. These days isn't really well. So i'm not really shaw. This makes matters more difficult. Although there will be more people begin to raise the kinds of stuff. That falani is now raising on conservative. Home about policy. They'll be more people for example eight. i think everywhere but around london. Notice your else asking. How were they to pay for net zero point the andrew neil. Gb us interview has begun amplify and make a little noise about so sure candidate. The james's ball together. All but i think a lot of these problems theft boris johnson anyway. And when you look at the big picture he still set pretty fair with his majority of eight hundred hold on next time as opposed to beating that about the factories of some of the problems. That you've broaches highlighted so if portions and cannot press ahead with planning reform. How much problem is that. His level of agenda because level offers a very broad concept lots of eighties. It feels that it's mainly about mittens and north politics. That's how the tourist set out but planning reform was built as part of this in terms of increasing obscene t and has in the future so james if he can't do that. Is that a big problem. In terms of his premiership in the short term you can rewrite in the planning rules to essentially encourage more house building in the north and the midlands where it is jen really more popular especially with new tory voters there. Lots of whom on new homeowners. I'm basically stop and not bill. Very many houses in southeast that is storing up huge problems for the tory party for the future..

Boris johnson jerry cole boris johnson london buckinghamshire this week paul eight hundred eighty andrew neil two thousand fifteen general e scotland eighties james party zero Wilson eight point seven chechen