35 Burst results for "Books"

Pastor David Englehardt Wants to Be the 'Exact Opposite of Richard Rohr'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:38 min | 1 d ago

Pastor David Englehardt Wants to Be the 'Exact Opposite of Richard Rohr'

"Him. According to your version of the Christian faith, which I think is my own, is Richard rohr theologically orthodox and just iffy in some areas or is he really problematic? I think he would, I think most people would say he's really fuzzy about all about solid the solid issues. So I think he would probably consider himself orthodox, but he's fuzzy about lots of issues. He wrote a book called falling upward that I read a couple of years ago and it was basically a philosophical copy of this kind of second half of life concept and I know a lot of I know a lot of Christian progressives that are my age that are leaders that are thought leaders that find this guy to be like the monk on the mountain. So in some degree, I want to be the exact opposite of a Richard rohr, who's obscure, kind of find your own path kind of wander towards Jesus kind of stuff and maybe you'll find him in the tree or in the bird or in the next phase of his life. That's funny. And what I'm saying is, no, there are specific boundaries, and there are cliffs to fall off. One of the quotes my buddy John Mark McMillan wrote that song, oh, how he loves this. And he says, if grace is an ocean, we're all sinking. And I say in the book, you know, grace may be an ocean, but there's another body that should be familiar with, which is called the Lake of fire. We can sing about oceans of grace, but we must also balance that with lakes of fire because they're both represented in our story. And we can't have just this soft kind Christianity if we don't forget the hard and sharp

Richard Rohr John Mark Mcmillan
'Good Kills' Author David Englehardt Is #1 in Christian Ethics on Amazon

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:53 sec | 1 d ago

'Good Kills' Author David Englehardt Is #1 in Christian Ethics on Amazon

"Show I'm talking to my friend David engel heart who has a new book out good kills God good and the sort. It's a funny thing. So many people buy books through Amazon and Amazon has all these subcategories so they tell you your number one in whatever obscure category no one ever heard of. My Bonham for book is consistently number one in systematic theology. What could be more strange and depressing than that? It's like I'm kicking Wayne Gruden's behind. Hey, no, it's kind of funny to me. And so your book or I think and my Luther book was number one in Christian popes. Not to be confused with all the other types of popes that are out there. But I mean, it's so bizarre. So your book, good kills, is smashing the competition and what category at this point too, but Christian ethics it's been smashing. Oh, Christian social issues and then Christian

David Engel Amazon Wayne Gruden Bonham
 Spider-Man comic page sells for record $3.36M bidding

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 d ago

Spider-Man comic page sells for record $3.36M bidding

"Single single page page of of artwork artwork from from a a spider spider man man comic comic book book has has sold sold for for more more than than three three million million dollars dollars long long before before this this the the entire entire world world is is about about to to forget forget the the Peter Peter Parker Parker spider spider man man with with everyone everyone the the fourth fourth spider spider man man movie movie there there was was this this pages pages from from a a comic comic book book and and what what is is just just sold sold for for three three point point three three six six million million dollars dollars at at a a four four day day event event in in Dallas Dallas it it was was page page twenty twenty five five from from Marvel Marvel Comics Comics secret secret wars wars number number eight eight released released in in nineteen nineteen eighty eighty four four that that marked marked the the first first Spidey's Spidey's black black suit suit which which would would eventually eventually lead lead to to the the emergence emergence of of the the character character venom venom a a rare rare copy copy of of Superman's Superman's debut debut Action Action Comics Comics number number one one sold sold for for nearly nearly three three point point two two million million dollars dollars putting putting it it among among the the priciest priciest books books ever ever auctioned auctioned hi hi Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn single single page page of of artwork artwork from from a a spider spider man man comic comic book book has has sold sold for for more more than than three three million million dollars dollars long long before before this this the the entire entire world world is is about about to to forget forget the the Peter Peter Parker Parker Spiderman Spiderman which which everyone everyone the the fourth fourth spider spider man man movie movie there there was was this this pages pages

Peter Peter Parker Parker Dallas Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn
What Is Money?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:16 min | 2 d ago

What Is Money?

"What is money? Money is monetary energy. Every person listen to this, hopefully, has some money. And ever decreasing value of money, that's for sure, no matter how rich you are. Money is as all this time because money is supposed to represent value. Money used to be represented in seashells, gold, silver coins, and the barter system. Absent civilizational construct and government coining currency, people will still need to trade value for value. You have a farmer and he needs to trade 5 goats and he has to get a car, he's got to make a deal happen. The barter system still happens, in time to time, mostly off the book, transfers, but the barter system is incredibly inefficient. The barter system is hard to track. It's also hard to kind of find purchasers for that particular value because someone says, yeah, I don't want to go. I want a dog. Or I want corn or I want to bushel of wheat, whatever. Money replaced it, so you could have an objective measurement of value so you no longer had to find a specific buyer for a specific product and make those trades

Eric's Tips for Becoming a Better Writer

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:31 min | 2 d ago

Eric's Tips for Becoming a Better Writer

"How do I become a better writer? How do I expand my vocal to talk intellectually? I think that's a typo. I think it means vocab. How do I spend my vocab, which is really a sloppy way of vocabulary. Better speaker. I say that if you want to become a better writer, you need to read the classics. You need to read great writers, great books. Great books. Yours means everything. Well, you can read my books, but you can read anything written before 1980, probably. But reading the classics learning how great writers and thinkers have expressed themselves. That's always the way to become a better writer. It's a good way to become a better thinker. So I do think reading the classics, whatever that means, is the way to become a better writer. And when people say how do I expand my vocabulary to talking intellectually, that's a silly question. Nobody cares about the size of your vocabulary and nobody believes that speaking clearly speaking accurately understanding how to think logically. That's all that matters. If something appears quote unquote intellectual, that's nice, but it's not dispositive to use a William of Buckley vocabulary vocabulary. It doesn't ultimately matter. If you can think clearly and express yourself clearly and that's everything. So don't worry about sounding intellectual.

Buckley
Mitch Albom Never Intended to Write 'Tuesdays With Morrie'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:30 min | 2 d ago

Mitch Albom Never Intended to Write 'Tuesdays With Morrie'

"Show. I have a guest right now. My bet is that you have heard of him, you may have read some of his books. His name is Mitch album. He is the author of a book called Tuesdays with Maury. I know you've heard of it. It was made into a film, a TV movie. It was on The New York Times Best Seller list for like four years. And speaking as an author, I want to say, I deeply resent you Mitch album. Welcome to the program. Well, outside of the resentment, thank you for having me on the resentment is bitter, but I'm gonna let it go. There's no reason to cling to bitterness. No, seriously, that is, as an author who is familiar with some of these metrics, that is an extraordinary thing, and the book that sits atop a bestseller list for years is extremely rare. The only one I can think of offhand is M Scott peck's the road less traveled, which is also a book about, hey, what's the meaning of life? So I want to ask you, first of all, you have a new book out. I want to mention that up front. And it is a novel called the stranger in the lifeboat. Is this your first novel? Oh no, no. I've written about 7 novels. All right. So maybe two 7th novel. But you're most known for Tuesdays with Maury. It tell the story behind that for people who are unaware. They still exist. Some people who are unaware of how that happened for you. Sure. Well, it was really quite an accident, so actually the fact that it stayed on those best sellers was for that long was even more remarkable because it wasn't ever supposed to be a book. I had seen my old college professor, Maurice Schwartz. On nightline with Ted cop, and he was talking about what it was like to die from Lou Gehrig's disease. And I had been very close with him when I was back in college, but then I had lost touch with him as I had gone on to chase my career and my ambition. And for 16 years, I never got back in touch with him and all of a sudden I saw him on television. Basically saying he had a few months left to live. So I went to go visit him. And one visit turned into two to turn to three, four, 5, 6. It was never supposed to be a book. Erika was just it was just him kind of counseling me on what's important in life once you really know you're going to die as he did and how you can change your life to live

Mitch Album Maury Scott Peck The New York Times Maurice Schwartz Ted Cop Lou Gehrig Erika
How Do You Convert a Science-Driven Person to Jesus?

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:11 min | 2 d ago

How Do You Convert a Science-Driven Person to Jesus?

"How do you convert a science driven dad to Jesus? Oh my God, talk about a softball question. How do you convert a science driven dad to Jesus? This is really simple. In my book, is atheism dead. I basically go to some lengths to explain that not only is science not the enemy of faith and faith, not the enemy of science. On the contrary, actual science inevitably will point to God. Which is to say, parentheses Jesus. It's inevitable. So the question really is, does somebody have the ideological purity and honesty in intellectual honesty to follow the evidence? If you're really science driven and you're not ideologically driven as somebody who has adopted a naturalistic materialistic scientist philosophy and you call that science because that's not science. But if you've adopted that philosophy, you have a predisposition and animus against the God of the Bible. And what I'm here to say is that if you follow the science genuinely, the science will lead you to faith in God. And I think in the book I make it clear that what we call science actual modern science comes inevitably out of Christian culture. There's just no way around it. And I give you the details in the book. So the canard that sciences at odds with faith or faith with science, it has to be exploded. People have to understand that that's not true and that anybody who's bought into the idea that I'm pro science and that's why I don't believe in God, you don't know what you're it's like saying, I'm pro math. That's why I don't believe in science. I mean, it's a meaningless statement, and you've bought into something. So I think that if you're dealing with a person a friend or a relative a dad, you know, you want to be kind about that. I don't think you want to be, you need to be in their face, but I always hope that my book will help them to see that they've missed some of these pieces, probably and they need to recalibrate their

Softball
What Will Eric Write in 2022?

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:42 sec | 2 d ago

What Will Eric Write in 2022?

"Much. Question number one, what will you write in 2022? What will you write? Eric Matthew. What will I write? I think people assume that I write a book a year. Yeah. That would be a bad assumption. He wrote two last year. I didn't write to last year. Two came published last year. I essentially wrote them in the previous year. But writing a book a year is not a great idea for one's mental health. But I don't think I will publish a major book this year, the years already started. So even if I had a book now and I said to a publisher, hey, here's the book. Let's go. They'd be like, man, we can't get this until 2023. And by the way, that was a brilliant impression of most

Eric Matthew
Journalist Julie Kelly Describes the Recent Hearing of January 6 Defendant Ryan Samsel

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:15 min | 3 d ago

Journalist Julie Kelly Describes the Recent Hearing of January 6 Defendant Ryan Samsel

"Guys, I'm delighted to welcome back to the podcast my favorite journalist Julie Kelly, the heroine of the January 6th reporting. Julie has, well, Julie writes for American greatness, but she has an important and bestselling new book out. It's just called January 6th and I'm going to read the subtitle how Democrats use the capital protest to launch a war on terror against the political right. Julie, welcome back, delighted to have you as always, you were just at a hearing and tell us all about it. So thank you, dinesh for having me on and we'll talk a little bit about my book. But there was just a hearing this morning on Thursday morning related to the case of Ryan samso, who has been in jail arrested last January 30th. And it's important because this ties into the ray eps controversy that we've been seeing for the past several days. Ryan samso is the man who ray Epps whispered in his ear right before Ryan Samuel becomes the first Trump supporter first capital protester to breach the initial lines at the perimeter of the grounds that day. He has been, as I said, arrested and detained since last January, the government continues to delay his case. He wasn't even formally indicted by grand jury until August. What DoJ is doing now to delay his trial and what I believe is to delay revealing what happened with ray eps because of course it was a critical point right before the breach is delaying his trial. They've added defendants to his case. And the judge judged Tim Kelly again today delayed for the next few weeks until January 27th, another status hearing is DoJ adds defendants ads indictments and then claims they need to add more discovery. This is just part of DoJ's gamesmanship in delaying as much as they can what happened on January 6th and specifically related to any sort of government informants or assets that were used in the capitol

Ryan Samso Julie Julie Kelly Ray Epps Ryan Samuel Dinesh DOJ Tim Kelly
Eric and Naomi Wolf Discuss Virtue Signalling, From Their Yale Years to Now

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:18 min | 3 d ago

Eric and Naomi Wolf Discuss Virtue Signalling, From Their Yale Years to Now

"To Naomi wolf. Naomi, I have to bring this up. You and I were in the same class at Yale, a class of 84, although you graduated at age 11. But I want to say that we were in the same class, didn't really know each other, but I say that because the first time I bumped into this kind of thing that we're talking about, I'm a working class kid from Danbury, Connecticut public school, suddenly among the cultural elites, and it was very clear to me if you were in the humanities, which is which I was. There's a certain way of thinking and that if you don't think this way, you'll be labeled a bigot or something. And I remember not knowing better kind of going along with it. And I remember at our graduation being told, oh, you've got to wear these two. I wrote wrote about this in my book fish out of water. That at our graduation, everybody who was somebody had to wear two ribbons, one signifying solidarity with the, I don't know, the Yale union workers who were being oppressed by the man. You know. And with solidarity with the idea of taking our class funds out of companies that were invested in South Africa. And it was that kind of virtue signaling was the first time I'd bumped into that, but it was really strong in the early 80s at Yale in certain circles. I know you were also in those circles. But it was the first time I saw that. And all of those people have gone on to be the leaders of the world. And I feel like they bought into this. And some of them like you were independent thinkers. I don't know how you have evolved. But it's interesting to me that you're willing to say these things now. I'm willing to say these things now. But a lot of people, there's still hanging back. They're afraid of something. Right. Well, oh, Eric. This is so painful. I mean, yes, there was a very kind of monolithic right on this. And that has only gotten worse and worse. Over the decades on the left, I will note respectfully that I think the right has its own form of virtue signaling. And I guess I'll also say that when it comes to things like publicly supporting decent wages for working people or publicly supporting investment in South Africa, ironically, exactly the kind of thing that is being constructed everywhere around us and discrimination society. I agree with it. I don't think that public support for a cause necessarily is the opposite of free thinking and classical liberal values from classical people. Right. Okay, sure. But I want to go on because we're getting into very deep waters that we need to get into. I am starting to look at I've been doing a lot of reading about how the Chinese Communist Party is influencing academics. And it clearly they've bought up along with World Economic Forum, any number of the policymakers that are implementing some of the most un American. Let's put it that way. Attitudes that you have to have now. Like cancel culture, totally un American, right? Very, very Chinese, Communist Party, right? So

Connecticut Public School Yale Union Yale Naomi Wolf Danbury Naomi South Africa Eric Communist Party World Economic Forum UN
Naomi Wolf on the Horrifying Trend of 'Shaming Your Neighbor'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:55 min | 3 d ago

Naomi Wolf on the Horrifying Trend of 'Shaming Your Neighbor'

"Feed they folks I'm talking to Naomi wolf Naomi, you were just saying something. It's so horrifying, but the idea of shaming your neighbor unless you're an idiot who doesn't read books and has no sense of history, you immediately think of Germany in the 30s. You immediately think of similarly horrible periods and cultures. This is never who we have been in the United States. But right now, and again, the irony is that it seems mostly to be the left that is jumping aboard this bandwagon. It's truly horrifying, I think. Yeah, so just to pick up where I was sort of heading with my conclusion because I knew at talking about this in public, but this is a massive edifice of the anti human, right? Everything that characterized us as human beings is actually such a book I'm writing now. You know, everything from smiling and hugging and speech and language and music. It's all being targeted by policies that otherwise don't make sense except that they're massively anti human and that they're based on lies as we're seeing fall apart over and over. One of the main lies underlying the mandates is that vaccines prevent transmission, even the CDC director is admitting they don't affect transmission. So the basis turn on MSNBC or CNN or The New York Times, the whole predicate of why you should shut your neighbor why you should coerce your neighbor. Why you should fire people who are just trying to do their jobs, you know, if they don't agree to this injection, is based on a lie, right? So where I was going is that I've really studied history. I've looked at this edifice from every angle, I know about that politics, human politics. And this seems truly to be beyond human

Naomi Wolf Naomi Germany United States CDC Msnbc CNN The New York Times
Glenn Beck Previews His New Book 'The Great Reset'

Mark Levin

01:43 min | 3 d ago

Glenn Beck Previews His New Book 'The Great Reset'

"In any event you got a fantastic new book at it already shot to the top of Amazon.com I sure as hell hope it stays there a while You've got all these reprobates that have their books 1619 and you know how The New York Times waits the independent bookstores because all the freaks go to stores And my book wasn't in most of them by the way Nor will your thing But tell us tell us the general drift of this book Why you felt right You know that 15 years ago everybody was asking the same question What the hell is happening How is this happening to us How did we get here And quite honestly nobody really could figure it out And then I heard Hillary Clinton talk about saying I'm a very early 20th century American progressive And she was proud of it And so I started to do my research on that And that answered everything But in about 2014 I was on the air and I said the end of the progressive era is here You might think it's continuing but they've played it as far as they can now It's either got to go to Marxism fascism or something else What I didn't know was what that's something else was That's something else and honestly I stumbled into this because I remember seeing the slogan for Joe Biden and it was built back better And I thought that's the most senile ridiculous awful slogan I've ever heard Who came up with that Well it's from the world economic forum The Davos people that is the slogan for the great reset

Amazon.Com The New York Times Hillary Clinton Joe Biden
Mark Levin Agrees With Sen. Mitch McConnell on One Thing

Mark Levin

01:26 min | 3 d ago

Mark Levin Agrees With Sen. Mitch McConnell on One Thing

"Now Mitch McConnell said something today on the floor that shocked me 'cause I agreed with him I actually agreed with the man And then we're going to move on Cut 13 go He said our country will be an autocracy If he does not get his way so the world saw our commander in chief propaganda as against his own country his own country to a degree that would have made proud blush There was no consistent standard behind anything the president said He trampled through some of the most sensitive and sacred parts of our nation's past He invoked times when activists bled and run soldiers died all the demagogue voting laws that are more expansive than what Democrats have on the books in his own home state Georgia has more days of early voting than Delaware or New York Georgia has no excuse absentee voting which Delaware and New York do not have If Georgia or Texas present Jim Crow emergencies then so do a whole lot of democratic run states By the way it's amazing how the media have ignored all of that isn't

Mitch Mcconnell Georgia Delaware New York Jim Crow Texas
Why Stephen Moore Felt Compelled to Write 'Govzilla'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:18 min | 3 d ago

Why Stephen Moore Felt Compelled to Write 'Govzilla'

"Let's end on this. Give us a little tease. Everybody needs to get it, but tell us a little bit about why you wrote Zilla and what people will find in it. Because I am really concerned that our kids, I want this book in schools. You know, and you can read it. It can be Reddit two nights. I want our children to understand what is happening to our country, that every child born today. Any child today born less than 5 years old. By the time they reach 30, they're going to have a $300,000 share of the national debt. Is that the legacy we want to leave to our kids, is that the American Dream is that you leave every generation better off when we're doing right now is fiscal child abuse. It's outrageous, passing on these trillions and trillions of dollars of Bill. It's like we're powering at their expense. And so I want people to be aware of what's happening and we've got to turn it around. And I'm optimistic we will do that. But I guarantee you the schools aren't teaching anything that we've been talking about for the last 45 minutes. They don't teach any of this. They teach America is a terrible country. We're racist. We killed all the Indians. We're probably responsible on all the problems in Africa. We're colonias. And we are the greatest country in the world. We're not perfect people, but everyone wants to come here because we are a land of opportunity and we're a land of freedom.

Zilla Reddit Bill Indians America Africa
Can 'Trumponomics' Exist Without a Truly Conservative GOP? Stephen Moore Explains

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:43 min | 3 d ago

Can 'Trumponomics' Exist Without a Truly Conservative GOP? Stephen Moore Explains

"Down. So here's my question to you. You've written the books. You've written Trump and nomics. Use the revised president Trump. You'll be advising him if God willing he comes back. But is it all for north if we don't have a Republican Party that is truly conservative and believes in Hayek? Believes in fond messes believes in laughter. Stephen, can we do it? You know, it's funny, you know, I don't think that Donald Trump even knew who he was. But you know, he instinctively got it. You know, he did. And so, you know, in Trump accomplished so much, even with the bureaucracy and the Republican Party kicking and screaming the whole way. I'll give you an example of something I didn't even agree with Amanda was China. I said, boy, you're going to be you're being really rough with China. You know, why are you, why are you picking a fight with China? Well, he was right. And I was wrong. He was the first president in modern times to recognize that China is that the Chinese leadership is evil that they are not friends. They're not allies, they're adversaries and enemies, and that they were engaged in incredibly predatory economic and trade practices. And he almost single handedly stood up to China. And now, I think everybody agrees that Trump was right. So. I think Trump has, and I don't, look, I think he probably will run for president and I agree with you if the Republicans take over the House and Senate, and it's a fair election. I think he could very easily win again. But he still facing so many in the party who are guns

President Trump Republican Party China Donald Trump Hayek Stephen Amanda Senate House
Fed survey finds economy growing modestly despite COVID

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 d ago

Fed survey finds economy growing modestly despite COVID

"The the federal federal reserve's reserve's latest latest survey survey of of regional regional business business conditions conditions finds finds the the economy economy was was still still growing growing is is twenty twenty twenty twenty one one ended ended despite despite the the Omicron Omicron search search of of coronavirus coronavirus cases cases the the fed's fed's twelve twelve regional regional banks banks found found the the economy economy growing growing at at a a modest modest pace pace with with ongoing ongoing supply supply chain chain disruptions disruptions and and labor labor shortages shortages holding holding growth growth back back the the survey survey known known as as the the beige beige book book says says optimism optimism remains remains generally generally high high expectations expectations for for growth growth over over the the next next several several months months cooled cooled somewhat somewhat has has covered covered nineteen nineteen cases cases spying spying to to close close out out the the year year many many regions regions reported reported a a sudden sudden pull pull back back in in spending spending on on leisure leisure travel travel hotels hotels and and restaurants restaurants the the beige beige book book findings findings will will form form the the basis basis for for discussions discussions when when the the fed fed holds holds its its next next policy policy setting setting meeting meeting later later this this month month Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Washington Washington

Federal Federal Reserve FED Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Washingt Washington
The Argument for God Is an Open-and-Shut Case

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:02 min | 4 d ago

The Argument for God Is an Open-and-Shut Case

"Oftentimes, something is open and shut. But if everyone doesn't know that it's open and shut, that it's been decided, it almost doesn't matter, right? In other words, you know, and I know that the case for there is no longer any case. Let's be honest, okay? In 18 59, you can make a good case. Sure. You can make a case in 1966. You can make a case. And that's why Time Magazine comes out with is God dead. But in this day and age, given what we know from science only from science, you can no longer really make a case. But it doesn't prevent people from blowing smoke from pretending that they can make a case. Or pretending that if you're even talking about it, you're not being rational. In other words, they've conflated rationality with being somehow hostile to faith. With some kind of scientistic way of thinking, I don't know if you talk about that in the book. Yeah, that's the final section in the book is how do we our faith and science at opposite ends of the spectrum or are they too books that God has produced that don't contradict each other? The book of science is just as true as the book of faith, and they compliment each other quite well. And I look at it, not simply from a scientific perspective, but I look at it from a scriptural perspective as well. And that's the final third of the book. It's important because Christians need to understand the Bible does say certain things. But the Bible doesn't say everything. The Bible is God's communication to us about critical things he wanted us to say and it's in the manner in which he chose to say it. But you take Moses on Mount Sinai in Moses gets a dispensation from God, God wasn't as concerned about fixing Moses science as he was fixing Moses theology.

Time Magazine Mount Sinai Moses
Why Lawyer Mark Lanier Wrote 'Atheism on Trial'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:33 min | 4 d ago

Why Lawyer Mark Lanier Wrote 'Atheism on Trial'

"If you need a great lawyer, can I recommend my new friend Mark Lanier? Unfortunately, right now he's busy doing this program. So you're going to have to stand in line. Mark Lanier, you have a book out about atheism. What prompted you to write a book with a title like atheism on trial? I have so many friends in the legal world who are atheists. And I sit in constantly talk to them about their faith or lack of faith, depending on how you perceive it. And I am amazed that it's not well thought out. And I thought, you know, if they just took the courtroom tools that I use every day to try and persuade an unbiased, that's the key to any jury, an unbiased group of people. I don't see how they'd walk away unpersuaded. Because if you think about the American judicial system, in it, sets America apart from I'd say every country in the world. We have hit the Pinnacle of societies, ability to best facilitate, determining truth. We are so confident that our court system and its rules will determine truth that will put people to death based upon a jury verdict that we will change corporate behavior that we will decide which parent gets a child in a divorce proceeding. I mean, this is the bedrock of truth finding in America. So I thought let's take those tools in that approach and let's use it and put atheism on trial and see where the jury would stand.

Mark Lanier America
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

04:51 min | 4 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"To episode thirty two of stacey books news and views about they see literature from the world over. I'm your host. Jenny bought thank you for tuning in today's episode. We have vinod bus cheat in the day. See croft chat segment. He'll be discussing his debut novel silent winds dry sees as i mentioned in the last episode. We're rolling out. Some changes based on listener feedback. The audio episodes will now be shorter more frequent and focusing on single authors. That will also be more text and audio content on the day. She books website to ensure. You're getting all the new. They see books and writer updates. Please sign up for the weekly newsletter by going to the website they see books dot co now. Please enjoy the rest of the episode. In.

stacey Jenny
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

03:00 min | 5 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"Of facebook's news and views about ac literature from the world over. I'm your host jenny bud. Thank you for tuning in today's episode. We have sanjiv sahotra in the dc cross chat segment. He'll be discussing his latest book along listed novel china room. And we have dr guthrie seti discussing her five favorite books in the five they see faves segment. Her new hybrid memoir is out now titled on belonging. It's been a busy month. They spoke so i wanted to share some very quick update. Before we get going here. I you may know in the past month. That's being a new weekly text interview series published on fridays. This was started because quite frankly i cannot read all the amazing new books out there and interview all their terrific writers but still wanna spotlight a number of books each month because they deserve more attention so this text interview series called. They see books ten. Qa is a set of ten questions where the author discusses their own latest book and some of their favorite day books. Please head on over to the website to read these second. There is now a facebook page for those who prefer to get their weekly updates. There look for basie books f. b. one word and like the page sherrod comment third the monthly new notable book segment that i used to do at the beginning of the podcast is moving to a text full matches as well again. This is because given the volume of new books like to spotlight. The segment was making the podcast episodes longer. So you'll be able to see these books monthly on the website as well As always you can see entire lists of twenty twenty one. Us in uk books on bookshop dot org which benefits local independent booksellers directly. And you'll find these lists on the website right there on the main menu and in the side ball and he has my usual request. If you've got a new book coming out. Pleased had the account on twitter or instagram facebook. To let me know you can also sent.

jenny bud sanjiv sahotra dr guthrie seti facebook china basie sherrod uk Us instagram twitter
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

05:34 min | 5 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"In <hes> <hes> <hes> <hes> <hes> on belonging I highly recommend unde- elise essays because these twenty essays. When i read them in hindsight i wished i had had <hes> the <hes> depth in the delicacy with which she treated some of these topics In my own book. So each of the books i've selected for your books i read after i had already drafted and redrafted and revised my own work but speak and are excellent and conversation. My book so Unbelievers this one of those that speaks really across many themes explored in on belonging Her essays are food for thought and just offer so much insight on who we are. Ask theses in the south. In the united states <hes> it's very situated And thought provoking. So that's the first they see fave but not favor. It's very difficult for me to pick Just a few. I love them all for so many reasons and different reasons The next book. I wanna to tell you about is one that again in the mode of being an educator as i was many of the themes in the book where themes i taught about global studies courses and curricula created while i was still actively teaching and I would use border and rule global my gration capitalism and the rise of racist nationalism by herschel willia- was released by haymarket books earlier this year in twenty twenty one. This book is full of contact. That i would wish to teach about migration the so-called migration crisis and the function of borders across a political social cultural systems and I would definitely a sign on belonging and harsha wall us book together in a course Exploring identity in a global context Many of the themes again you know about nationalism about border crossings about my own life history being a descendant of folks we experienced a partition You know all themes explored none belonging that would be situated by a border and rule Contact a lot of fact. Historical geographic. A lot of framing 's from political science and sociology and history. That would really help me to teach The themes of belonging so Bordering rule is another one on this. They see five list Next i want to tell you about a novel in. I intended for young adults by jasmin. Core also released january twenty twenty one from harper If i tell you the truth is a novel in verse. It is a young adult book. There are so many verses interwoven with the story of a mother and daughter who have border crossings and experience a great deal of personal trauma but also a story of resilience and heritage and finding ourselves and chosen family all themes i also exploring on belonging and another reason that i'm really drawn jasmine's book is because i was Involved in reading earlier drafts of this and discussing them in the spirit of being an authenticity. Reader guide book on t to the project. and so i'm familiar with themes as well as the verse Writings eyesight jasmine. And she has a character in this novel named sahara and as a nod to jasmine as well as to the relationship i have with this kind of blended hybrid writing And using of words and job and other languages that i also have a verse called sahara aspirations in On belonging and so i signed her and i say i aspire to lead my life in such a way that i'm a soft place to land for folks who are intimately oppressed by forces of belonging. May we find each other. May we know reciprocity mutuality. May we offer each other sahara and sla. May we tell brave truths to each other. May we call each other in for guas. may we speak radical healing love into each other's broken hearts. May we heal collectively mayor existence. Be a bomb may are solid dirty. Be rooted in our visa and extend to all humanity. Let us come join. Imagine new worlds and possibilities and that's an excerpt from the draft of On belonging that is a nod to jasmine cores. If i tell you the truth and also a nod tuned to keep the gill who's newest collection of poetry wear. Hope comes from poems of resilience healing in light.

herschel willia haymarket books sahara jasmin united states harper jasmine guas sla gill
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

04:58 min | 6 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"As podcast especially doing literary podcast muted. Yeah that president publisher waging to kinda. Give us money for permitting. Book side and i read something by Just today talking about righteous people of color promoting books on social media. How we don't get that. Yeah there's this expectation that it is automatic because our love of books is enough to an extent emphasis on to an extent that is true. Because that's why we create these entities but then there just seems to be this assumption of well. Yeah you'll do it anyway right. And you're about the people and it's just like pause recognize the capitalism at play. Here exactly right and i don't want to be paid by appropriate. Shook as i draw the have my you know independence. As far as how how i promote certain writer or talk about that books but i think i wouldn't want what happened to the pizza recently. Which is she was being dictated terms. By the publicist in about when to promote what to say how to say it. I would not want to deal. Yeah it's real. It's real annoying specifically i so but can you tell us a little bit about. How does he books podcast. How did that come about is like fubu situation for us by us. Even doing a podcast is just a lot of work. Having talked to mike second tagawa last fall. Winter days are weird right now. He broke down the amount of hours he spent per week on both of his respective podcasts. And it was basically a full-time job. While yeah i mean he's got to so i'm very much an of them well for me. I actually floated the idea of the podcast on twitter in two thousand nineteen. I think it was january. Twenty nineteen gun at that time. I don't think i'd even signed my book contract with leading toward anything. So i was just sitting to find some writers off south asian origin and it was not that easy unless you happen to be published by the big five or you jumping hero. Someone rushdie so..

tagawa mike twitter
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

04:21 min | 6 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"Picnicking. Listen back in the family's pretty secular india She comes in this slum through own choice and busy to outside his own community it'd being Seema's ex husband who's.

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

04:46 min | 6 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"She hadn't even gone to live with him. She was Still at her parents house but nevertheless she had to spend the rest of her life with shaved head wearing a plain white. Sorry no jewelry. Eating only one meal per day and doing much of the cooking and cleaning and her extended family household. She became regarded as a kind of saint within her family because of her selfless service but in her own. Mind she question these traditions. On at one point she agrees to help. Deliver the baby of a so-called untouchable family which was not something that was done in her family. But she does it and in her old age she speaks out in support of a recently widowed young woman who refuses to live the slavish life that tradition assigned to her. The book makes the point that this custom was away for families to benefit from the cheap labor of these widows and the book putting ma is the character. Panorama is based on the life of the author's great aunt. The real pentium whispered her story to the authors mother who in turn told it to her daughters and one of whom was was this author so This is how the story of this forgotten women who represent so many other forgotten widows in india has come to light. unfortunately i couldn't find a source that offers the english translation for purchase but is on the shelves of a number of university libraries. You could use inter library loan to request it. The movie based on this book is available through amazon prime. Although not in english it is in canada with french subtitles. The fourth book. I would like to recommend is By bama faustina. It was originally written in tamil first published in nineteen ninety two n translated into english in twenty twelve. This is the astonishing autobiographical Autobiographical novel about a roman catholic woman from ballot or so-called untouchable community and. Maybe i'm naive. But i found it shocking. To learn that even after converting to christianity her family still had to suffer so much discrimination and abuse because of their hereditary caste and Throughout her life bama was constantly looking for ways to help others. Who faced similar discrimination. She became a nun specifically because she wanted to teach and help other girls who were in her situation. She found that even within the convent. Discrimination persisted so she left the convent and began writing about her experiences The fifth and last book that i want to recommend is not actually a translation it was originally written in english and it is a nonfiction book. It is called the history of doing by rod. kumar. It is an illustrated history of women's rights and feminism in india from eighteen hundred to nineteen ninety and it was published in nineteen ninety-three when i first encountered this book it was so i open to learn about feminists from my ancestral country. Even to see a photo of working class women wearing saris with nicotine children on their hips. Human you see women like this all the time in india and you never think oh. These women are powerful or these women are activist but in There's a picture here with their fists. Raised and they are activists they are powerful which was so inspiring to me so even though i've grown up in english speaking country i often find that books originally written in native indian languages. Speak to me in a deeper and more direct way than books written in english by indians. Not always i mean. This is a broad generalization but When i read these books originally written in indian languages. I feel like i can get a better sense of the real india and not just the india that is portrayed by writers who are westernized enough to feel comfortable writing in english. I think these books have influenced me as a writer because they give me a sense of my indian writing heritage. You've been listening to episode twenty nine of macy books news interviews about they see literature from the world over. I'm your host jenny. Bart episode thirty will be up in a month or so follow on twitter at. They see books own instagram at they see docked books and tack the accounts. If you have requests suggestions email at hello. They see books at g. Mail dot com. The transcript will be up in a few days. Stay healthy keep reading and right well.

bama faustina india amazon canada kumar rod Bart jenny twitter
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

01:38 min | 6 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"To episode twenty nine. They see books news and views about they see literature from the world over. I'm your host jenny. But thank you for tuning. In in today's episode we have no ause amid in the deysi kroft chat segment. He'll be discussing his debut fiction radiant fugitives which was just long listed for the center for fictions first novel award and we have jokes serene of arson discussing five of her favorite books. In the five they see faves segment has short story collection. These americans is out now. I'd like to mention An online festival. That's starting in the uk. This sunday july eighteenth. It's free to attend online so you can attend from anywhere globally. And it's cold. The south asian heritage month festival. The aim is to celebrate. They see autzen culture..

jenny uk
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

03:29 min | 7 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"Hello and welcome to episode twenty eight per racy books news and views about.

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

03:47 min | 8 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"Have some other things you're going to be doing long seidel. Yeah i mean. I've got i've got that i am also working on inspection by juggling a few things as right. Yeah right and then is that. Do they have a time. Line on when this is going to be On on tv or series when it will be out. Is that not something happens. This i have no idea so. Obviously i don't know how the timelines work but is there. Is there a date in my gear in mind when it will come out. We're really early we We are literally just now interviewing potential writer show runner so that would be the persona is in charge of the whole the whole show there on the show. Run the pilot with me. So i'm not gonna do anything until we have collaborator. Yeah okay got it got. Yeah that's quite a long press because yet it film was such a collaborative medium. You need to have people adult. Yes so okay well look to you with all of that with this book and We'll be cheering you on thank you for having me. I love this podcast. So it's very exciting. Thank you already take care. Of course okay. Great by saw in that they see kid lit segment. Dr guy three. He is back with some new book recommendations. Look up episode. Twenty four for her previous recommendations and the introduction to her own work. This selection is ideal for holiday. Gifting so the books are somewhat lighthearted as got three explains how listen. Thanks for having me back to that. They see books. Podcast to talk about the kid lint on i want to mention a few authors who have new books releasing between april and june of this year and i wanted to share books that are really ideal for holiday gifting on birthdays and summer reading. So i've chosen books that are light hearted and lend themselves well to gifting. Renfrew key is author Based in the atlanta area and she has two books coming out this late spring. She's notable author of leila's lunchbox mirrors picture day her new book and she also has her very first middle grade. Buck for ages. Eight to twelve called unsettled Tha- which is based on loosely on her own life story. She's of pakistani descent and immigrated to peachtree city georgia from the uae. A teenager She's a photographer And she's written a beautiful book called unsettled and it's a middle grade novel in verse with themes of belonging identity moving to a new country and culture It's just beautifully written And hannah kahn. Has given a lot of praise to the book And calls it a gorgeous lee written story filled with warmth and depth and a mira's picture day is her new picture book which is releasing from holiday house books on april thirteenth And in this book There are beautiful illustrations by me..

april thirteenth Eight two books hannah kahn Twenty four atlanta april peachtree twelve june of this year unsettled and depth and a mira's picture Renfrew this late spring first middle grade uae leila georgia pakistani authors
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

05:05 min | 8 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"Uk dash twenty twenty one my apologies to non us non uk listeners. But i always mentioned note. They see folks from other parts of the world on these episodes as well so i just don't have bookshop list for them yet and i know i don't always catch new books by writers of south asian origin. So if you've got a new book coming out please tag. That they see books account on twitter or instagram. To let me know you can also send me an email to The they books account at hello. They see books at g. Mail dot com. The social media links will also be in the transcript and they're always on the website now. I missed mentioning an april book in the last episode. Let's talk with that before. We get to the new notable books in the first half of may by via victor. Excuse me is a hybrid book of prose and poetry. I reviewed it at npr last month. And will share the link in the transcript. It's a book that looks at the everyday lives of south asian immigrants and particularly five in the us who were killed by white nationalists. This is so far one of my favorite rita view next. We have waves across the south a new history revolution and empire by sajid civil syndrome. This is a book about environmental history. The consequences of historical violence the legacies of empire the extraction of resources and the indigenous futures that western imperialism captured a military history of india. Since one thousand nine hundred seventy two by urgent supermum is about how the indian nation state and its own forces have coped with the changing contours of modern conflict in the decade since nineteen seventy two and it looks at the conflict with or within Pakistan china cashmere sri lanka punjab and more. Now he's going to be on an upcoming episode on the five day see face segment as well. The color of god by s chowdhry is her memoir about the joys and sorrows of growing up in canada in a fundamentalist puritanical muslim household and in revisiting beliefs and ideals that she was raised with chaudhry invites us to re imagine our ideas of self and family and stayton citizenship love and loss. She'll be on our next episode with reading. From the book is well the marvelous mercer girls by sheba. Corinne is a delhi-based novel. It's witty and thoughtful. It's more than a teen romance story. I think because it's also about finding meaning in one's roots and heritage and speaking of which the next book also does that the potted earth by anjali and jetty is a sweeping petition based novel covering multiple geographies and periods through. The lives of three generations of women like the previously mentioned novel. As i said this one is also about finding meaning and purpose through discovering our roots and heritage next is cyclo pedia exotica by a her dhaliwal. It's graphic novel that was first serialized on instagram. And through the lives of this mythic cyclops community dhaliwal explores the microaggressions and xenophobia faced by immigrants. And with this parallel universe she comments on race difference beauty and belonging touching on all of these issues with a deadpan. Humor seeped in millennial references next. We have how to kidnap the rich by rahul. Raina another deli novel that covers a wide range of themes and plot points conmen reality television capitalism and more it say social satire a love story and to throw it up. It's out in the uk..

uk instagram chowdhry sajid stayton npr victor rita twitter chaudhry punjab lanka sri Pakistan Corinne india anjali china dhaliwal canada
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

02:10 min | 9 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"Hostels of banaras and i was very familiar with the nurse being this holy city. That hindus believed that. If you die there you'll be freed from the cycle of reincarnation. I kind of always known about that. Because i grew up in a fairly spiritual household with a lot of literary material that i could read or not read to to my whim so i kind of knew this but had never really thought very much about it. But the article is my introduction to the death hostels. I had never heard of these places before. Ever and i was instantly really. Fascinated is a really big leap to make to go from reading an article to deciding. You're going to write a book about it and again that question of will you've never been there and at the end of the day what do you know just kept drumming in my head so what i started doing is because i was just really really captivated with the idea of this place and i wanted to learn more about it is. I just started reading about it just to satisfy my own curiosity and the more i read the more fascinated i became and i just wanted to learn more and so again quite a few ethnography is that i went through and i looked at and from learning all of that information. I also then became really hungry for visuals. So i started transitioning to documentaries Two books of photography to other film to looking at short tourist made videos on youtube. Anything i could get to just place myself there. And i think what happened from doing all of that is i ended up building a version of the city in my head inadvertently. It did not set out to do that. It just ended up happening and in building that city in my head. The thing that i mentioned at the top of this conversation about characters just showing up about hearing bits of dialogue and seeing bits of seen that also started happening as an after effect of all of that research..

youtube hindus Two books
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

03:08 min | 10 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"They see dash books dash. Uk dash twenty twenty one my apologies to non us and non uk listeners. But i do always mention notable. They see books from other parts of the world on these episodes as well. I just don't have a bookshop list for them yet. I know i don't always catch old new books by risers of south asian origin. So if you've got new becoming out please tag. That they see books accounts on twitter or instagram. To let me know you can also send an email to hello. They see books at ci. Mel dot com. The social media links will always be in the transcripts of the episodes and they're always on the website. I here are some notable books that i missed. In last month's roundup first witnesses of remembrance selected new poems these By cohen orion translated a ryan. It's the first book length translation of the author's poetry to appear after his passing away. In twenty seventeen it has an eclectic wide ranging selection of poems from his latest five collections. This bilingual edition is also substantive with over a hundred poems translated and introduced by paul ryan who has spent years with his father's poems. I want a poem. Other poems by jerry pinto. This is his second collection. Pinto is a writer of fiction and nonfiction and literary translator these poems playful profound and wise and their wide ranging in theme and mood the demon ess best bangladeshi stories edited by niaz zaman published to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of bangladesh's independence these twenty-seven stories feature the finest short fiction from the nation since before it achieved independence in nineteen seventy one to the present day and it includes all the great writers of bangladesh now for few New notable books that are out in the first half of april gold diggers by sunday. South is a debut novel. It's a magical realist. Coming of age story focused on second generation indian americans. It's about they see immigrant culture in the. Us ambition the model minority myth and more. She'll be the podcast soon. Talking about in the dc kroft chat segment radicalizing her. why women choose violence by nemi gory. Nothin coronado whose own family history is intertwined with resistance.

jerry pinto paul ryan twenty-seven stories Pinto second collection twitter indian instagram first book sunday five collections last month second generation cohen orion niaz zaman twenty seventeen fiftieth anniversary nemi gory over a hundred poems first witnesses
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

05:59 min | 11 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"Yeah i've number two. I'm to have to pick those up. Thank you for for the tip. So i will thank you so much. This was so great. I know we could probably go on for awhile. But i i appreciate your time and this was a great conversation and i i just. I loved this book. I can't recommend it enough to people and I wish you all the very best with the book success because it deserves to be more red. Thank you for inviting jenny. And i deeply grateful to you for amplifying. The message of this book through your wonderful podcast. Thank you all they see. Kid let is a new quarterly segment. I'm hoping to add to the podcast. We'll have dr guard. Three thirty sharing a set of new notable books. Each quarter that belong in this genre doctor said he is an educator writer and independent consultant based in atlanta georgia. Her debut illustrated why a book on belonging is forthcoming this year. And it's a coming of age narrative of multiracial africa and america it will explore identity into cultural anti blackness social justice and the south asian diaspora the illustrations will be by debut. Seshadri doctor said he's also known widely as they see book. Auntie on social media. Which is how. I learned of her. She's a champion of children's literature and a co founder of the day. See hitler's community. Which will have by the way a summit at the end of this month. And i'll share that link in the transcript as well as i said we're hoping to make this a quarterly roundup segment where guidry will share new notable books with us. They could Books with us here. She is now. I like to share some notable south asian owned voices. Kid'll it Books that. I am really thrilled about this year. These are books released between january and april of two thousand and twenty one and there in three categories Picture books for ages three to six middle grade bugs for ages. Approximately eight to twelve and young adult books. ages thirteen and up I'm really thrilled about a few of these books. And i will speak about them in category so in the picture books category There is a brand new book. India in india by mango in marigold press in. This book was released. January twelfth of two thousand and twenty one and the story of an indo american girls first trip to india for.

Seshadri america atlanta georgia africa jenny two thousand January twelfth this year april six january indo first trip Three thirty end three categories mango India south asian Approximately eight
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

03:45 min | 11 months ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"That's something that you know. Christianity has some priests but he knew them. His large leah A male religion in terms of how it's administered and how the power players are are situated. So that's something that's still troubles me home but The i changed my mind about trees. And i knew them now with much more. I don't know what i forgive them. If one is allowed to say that. I think i view them much more in a much more charitably. Yeah that's fascinating. That's i agree with you. They all human. And i've been counted both good folks doing that. That kind of work. And i mean my i come from a family of priests. My dad's not a practising priest. But we have priest and our family we go back to yourself Because park means preached in guess right and so yes you know. My dad has cousins and brothers-in-law in law who actually are practicing priests. If you like they go. There invited to do weddings and officiate ceremonies and things like that. So i kind of have a closer view. I guess i i don more conflicted. I told you what you're saying In fact i wanted to ask you. That jenny is a temple in south. India called the mu become temple which is in karnataka. And all the preset are called actives. And so i wondered if you had the south india connection. I don't but you know so we might particular about some. I won't digress too much when we actually didn't even come from so we came in medieval times. We have the butts who came from. Up to trough as a whole story about how. The king of trout at the time had actually killed his own coal to become the king. And then you wanted to appease the gods local brahmins priests said no we will not accept Food and in charity from motor and so he had to invite priests brahmins from british because that goes the local one side. We want nothing to do with you anyway last night. Yeah so that's how we all came in us anyways as long story anyways so coming to you mentioned this particular takeaway and actually with each chapter you have a personal takeaway. Which i love. 'cause you're giving the readers giving us something more to think about and a point. I wanted to pick up on one of those. Which was you write about. How the practice of hinduism as a family as a wet children's but dissipate on the rituals doesn't happen as much as a dozen other cultures like say judaism which is also covered.

karnataka last night Christianity each chapter India south india hinduism judaism one side british both good folks dozen brahmins one south
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"Now. I'd like to talk a little bit about a new project. That was starting at the podcast. They see books in translation club since the podcast because then in april twenty twenty i've been asked about a virtual book club this year going to do it in december at mentioned the month. Long collaboration project with the global literature in libraries initiative g. l. i. for short to spotlight south asian literature in translation through interviews with the translators. This was a huge success. The eyesight saw new readership highs and there was a fair bit of interest across social media to the project how we have so many literary gems that have been translated into english over decades from many regional languages across south asia which happens to be one of the most linguistically diverse regions in the world. However these books of received uneven at best coverage in my introduction to that december series. I wrote about why we should read south asian or a c. books in translation. You can read the whole thing. Because i'll link to it in the transcript finale. Let me mention this point in his book. The three percent problem chad post writes it is a historical truism and will always remain the case that some of the best books ever written were written in a language other than english. I definitely agree with that. And i feel this is certainly true for south asia where some of the best literature has been and continues to be written in non english languages and there are hard working translators in the painstaking work of bringing these brilliant works to new readers through the bridge language of english. So i'd like to invite all of you to read it. They see book and translation a month with me and hopefully the translator. If they're willing to join us at the end. I'll invite the translator for a conversation on the podcast. We'll start this march. And i'll include a whole of five books that we vote in pick from in the coming weeks. Readers can then share comments and thoughts on social media using specific hashtags. So that we can find you posts and tweets. And i'll try to get questions for the translator discussion from these hashtags. Well we're going to keep this casual and simple. No sign up saw mandatory participation. The translator is free to offer a book. Giveaway through the podcast is would like to do so other than that. We're going to let this book club. Take shape and evolve over time. No hard and fast rules. The goal is just to enjoy a communal reading experience..

south asia december april twenty twenty this year five books english one three percent south asian this march over decades most linguistically
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"Tragic flaw midnight's children is also one of the first books by an indian author that fits in the shandra of magical realism ignoble. Style of voicing of oppression and marginalization first popularized by latin america's literary colossus gabriel garcia marquez. Like other works of magical realism. Rushdie's novel remains faithful to the contours of official history but fills them with fantastic figures strange collages odd pairings and a great deal of retailing of standard mythologies colonialism and decolonization poignantly yet playfully capturing the trauma of the british buys quintessential policy of divide and rule and its consequences for the so called survivors. The new citizens of india and pakistan rashy sets a high bar but also the stage for many future writers to experiment with the sub genre of historical literary fiction and loves garden. Hazard suddenly certainly been watered by. Its plentiful stream of possibilities of clear absurdity within seeming. Reality once more. Thank you for joining me in this discussion of five extraordinary works historical fiction by indian writers. I hope you will make the time to read many of them own in today's boost segment. We have a new show. The paul born anew jerk kimera writes poetry flash fiction and creative nonfiction. She is the author of the poetry chapel cup. Undo which was up this year from unsolicited. Press and two poetry books in nepali as well. She's the best of the net and push got nominee by day..

Rushdie india two poetry books five extraordinary works one indian gabriel garcia marquez nepali first first books today this year colossus pakistan british Tragic flaw midnight latin america
"books" Discussed on Desi Books

Desi Books

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"books" Discussed on Desi Books

"Dash twenty twenty. This is us based site so my apologies to non us listeners. But you can still see list of all the books that have come out in twenty twenty and been mentioned on the podcast. I know. I don't always catch all new books by writers of south asian origin. So if you've got a new book coming out please tag. That they see books account on twitter or instagram. To let me know you can also send an email to hello jc books. That's one word. at gmail.com. the social media links will also be in the transcript. And they're always on the website as always going reference. Just a couple of books that i've missed in earlier episodes i up. We have a dominant character. The radical science and restless politics of jbs holding this is by summoned subramanian. It came out in july this year. It's a biography that explores the science politics and life accomplishments of dane a celebrated polymath who made significant contributions during both the great wars. The book of indian essays. Two hundred years of english prose edited by arvind. Krishna mehrotra came out in november. This collection starts with the roseo in the eighteen. Twenties and ends with writers admired for their pros..

november arvind july this year twitter mehrotra instagram Twenties both english jc Two hundred years one word. at gmail.com indian twenty twenty Dash asian subramanian couple of books twenty eighteen