35 Burst results for "Booker T"

Santa's back in town with inflation, inclusion on his mind

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 20 hrs ago

Santa's back in town with inflation, inclusion on his mind

"After two holiday seasons with COVID-19 precautions, Santa Claus is coming to town. Merry Christmas to everyone. The jolly old elf is back this year in person without plastic partitions or faraway benches. And kids once again sitting on Santa's lap, except at Macy's in Herald square, where Santa sits behind a bench. The company hires Santa dot com, says there's been a 30% increase in bookings this year compared to the last two seasons. Although COVID fears are easing, inflation is taking some of the twinkle up. Santa's eyes, many of the portrayers are older. They live on fixed incomes and bending under the weight of higher prices. But at least one companies paying more around 5 to $12,000 for the holiday season. Sandra Booker say this year, there's a higher demand for inclusivity, meaning they're looking for santas who are black or Spanish speaking, and those who know sign language. I Jackie Quinn

Herald Square Santa Claus Santa Macy Sandra Booker Jackie Quinn
Ayton has 29 points, 21 rebounds as Suns edge Jazz 113-112

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 d ago

Ayton has 29 points, 21 rebounds as Suns edge Jazz 113-112

"Deandre ayton led away with 29 points and 21 rebounds both season highs as the sun's edge at the jazz one 13 one 12, 8 and scored a season high for the second straight night following 28 on Friday. For this team I have to be that energizer that dude who making them plays was on the glass. It was Duncan the ball was getting the crowd in it, setting the hard screens setting the tone of the physicality. Devin Booker added 27 points as the sun picked up their fourth straight win to improve the 13 and 6. Jordan Clarkson 22 points, Kotlin Sexton 20 to lead the jazz. They've lost four straight and 5 to 12 and ten. George Canada, Phoenix

Deandre Ayton Devin Booker Duncan Jordan Clarkson Kotlin Sexton George Canada Phoenix
Suns hold on to win 115-105, Lakers' Beverley ejected

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 6 d ago

Suns hold on to win 115-105, Lakers' Beverley ejected

"Devin Booker and Mikhail bridges each scored 25 points to lead the suns to a one 15 one O 5 victory over the Lakers. Dwayne Washington added 15 points off the bench to shut down a late LA rally and give the suns their 5th consecutive regular season victory over the Lakers. Putting in the work, you know, and believing in yourself and when you put in a lot of work, you know, that's where confidence comes from. So, you know, I have confidence in myself, team has confidence in me, players got confidence in me. So just keep getting better. Anthony Davis led all scorers with 37 Patrick Beverly ejected late in the game for shoving sun center, Deandre ayton. George Tanner, Phoenix

Devin Booker Mikhail Bridges Dwayne Washington Suns Lakers LA Patrick Beverly Anthony Davis Deandre Ayton George Tanner Phoenix
Payne, Booker lead Suns to 116-95 win over Knicks

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last week

Payne, Booker lead Suns to 116-95 win over Knicks

"The sun shut down the Knicks in the second half to close out at one 1695 victory Phoenix limited New York to 34% shooting after halftime after carrying a 55 53 lead into the break All 5 sun starters scored in double figures Camera pain was high man with 21 points I know our points abuses will come down to the first chord and I set the tone And I just try to bring my intensity try to bring my defense be aggressive defensively and get stops get on the board Devin Booker had 20 and Deandre ayton added 13 with 11 rebounds Jalen Brunson had a game high 27 points on 11 of 21 shooting for the Knicks I'm Dave ferry

Knicks Phoenix Devin Booker New York Deandre Ayton Jalen Brunson Dave Ferry
Markkanen scores career-high 38 points, Jazz edge Suns

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

Markkanen scores career-high 38 points, Jazz edge Suns

"Lori marketing carried the jazz to their first win in four games One 34 one 33 against the suns Marketing poured in a career high 38 points including a turnaround jumper to beat the shot clock with 38.5 seconds remaining His performance came on just 18 field goal attempts Malik Beasley matched his season high of 18 points by halftime He went on to hit a season best 7 three pointers in scoring 27 points Suns guard Devin Booker had 47 points ten assists and 8 rebounds but he was held at just two points in the final period I'm Dave ferry

Malik Beasley Lori Suns Devin Booker Dave Ferry
Carter, Ross lead Magic to 114-97 win over Suns

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

Carter, Ross lead Magic to 114-97 win over Suns

"The magic have their first winning streak of the season following the one 1497 thumping of the suns Wendell Carter junior had 20 points and ten rebounds for Orlando with shot 52% from the field and was 15 of 33 from three point range Terrence Ross provided 12 of his 14 points in the fourth quarter helping the magic improve to four and 9 Franz Wagner finished with 17 points and Jalen suggs added 16 with 5 assists Phoenix shot just 40% with Devin Booker going 6 of 19 while scoring 17 points Cameron Payne had a game high 22 points for the sons I'm Dave ferry

Wendell Carter Terrence Ross Suns Franz Wagner Magic Jalen Suggs Orlando Devin Booker Cameron Payne Phoenix Dave Ferry
Booker scores 30; Paul-less Suns beat Wolves 129-117

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 2 weeks ago

Booker scores 30; Paul-less Suns beat Wolves 129-117

"Devin Booker and Michael bridges each scored over 30 points in the sun's one 29 one 17 victory at Minnesota Booker delivered 32 points and a season high ten assists Bridges scored 13 of his 31 points in the first quarter Cameron Payne chipped in 23 points starting in place of Chris Paul who sent out with right heel soreness Phoenix led by as many as 27 and rebounding from Monday's loss to the 76ers Rudy Gobert returned to Minnesota's lineup after a two game absence due to health and safety protocols Colbert scored 13 of his team high 25 points in the third quarter I'm Dave fairy

Devin Booker Michael Bridges Cameron Payne Booker Minnesota Rudy Gobert Chris Paul Bridges Phoenix Colbert Dave Fairy
Election Updates for Kentucky and New Hampshire

The Officer Tatum Show

01:23 min | 2 weeks ago

Election Updates for Kentucky and New Hampshire

"We're just waiting for some of these things to come in. I'm here for you. I'm here to try to monitor what's going on. We're in the gubernatorial race. If you look at the map right here, scroll over to the state there that has a gubernatorial remarks to it. It's just right now in New Hampshire right now, oh, it's only four votes in. So it's insignificant. They only have four votes in the Republican. I can't even see his name. What is it? That's a weird name. Chris Newton who is winning. Let's go up to some of the other races and look at them. Let's go up there and forget the house. Let's go to the Senate. Let's see anything that happened in Kentucky. So we got Kentucky results here and it looked like Rand Paul is ahead. There's only been about 4700 votes counted Rand Paul has 76% of the votes over Charles Booker in Kentucky. They got a long way to go in Kentucky. He's not even close. But right now we have, who is Rand Paul, we have Rand Paul winning in Kentucky. Let's go to New Hampshire up there at the top and see what New Hampshire got. A New Hampshire only 5 votes in right now. New Hampshire got 5 votes and all the votes have gone to what is that? Maggie Hassan. Hassan, Maggie Hassan, that's who it is in this all the Democrat. So not enough to give any feedback there.

Rand Paul Kentucky Chris Newton New Hampshire Charles Booker Senate Maggie Hassan Hassan
The latest in sports news

AP News Radio

01:59 min | Last month

The latest in sports news

"AP sports I'm Tom Miriam The defending NBA champions played the team with the best regular season record in the NBA last season It turned out to be no contest as the Phoenix Suns routed the Golden State Warriors one 34 one O 5 AP's George Tanner has the details Devin Booker led the way with 34 points and 7 assists Mikhail bridges and jock one Dale each had 17 Andre 8 and 16 sons scored 13 unanswered points in the third quarter to improve their record to three and one Steph Curry led the warriors with 21 And they had a bit of an edge out of that moment that nearly capitalized off of it Elsewhere in the NBA the thunder won their first game of the year over the clippers one O 8 94 The wizards topped the pistons one 2099 The pelicans etched the Mavericks one 13 one 11 despite not having Zion Williamson and Brandon Ingram Trey Murphy stepped in and stepped up with 22 points Guys are willing to step up and we got a lot of guys on our team a lot of depth So you know it just shows that we're teams resilient like I said last year is carrying over into this year NHL the avalanche edge the rangers three to two in a shootout and a gold standard duel The abs Alexander georgiev made 44 saves plus three more in the shootout and his first game back at Madison Square Garden after 5 years in New York It doesn't get much better than type shoot out where And the building the building is awesome I brought a lot of good memories The rangers Igor's historic and stopped 42 shots plus two in the shootout Also on the ISO record setting night for Phil kessel The golden knights forward set a new mark by playing his 990th consecutive game and marked the occasion by scoring his 400th career goal in a four two Vegas win against San Jose The Devils bedeviled the red wings 62 as desperate brought scored two goals Other NHL winners the bruins kings flames crack and coyotes wild and black hawks Baseball the Miami Marlins hired skip Schumacher as their new skipper replacing Don Mattingly who managed the Marlins the past 7 seasons Tom Arian AP sports

NBA Tom Miriam George Tanner Devin Booker Mikhail Bridges Steph Curry Zion Williamson Brandon Ingram Trey Murphy Golden State Warriors Phoenix Suns Alexander Georgiev AP Andre Pelicans Dale Clippers Rangers Warriors Mavericks
Suns push past Warriors for 134-105 win, Thompson ejected

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Suns push past Warriors for 134-105 win, Thompson ejected

"Devin Booker led the way with 34 points as the sun's defeated the warriors one 34 to one O 5 Booker says the key was scoring 13 unanswered points in the third quarter after clay Thompson was ejected with two technical files That's important for us We have an emotional team We have a competitive team talked about them and history speaking We've gotten those situations and kind of been sporadic and all over the place So to go together as a team bring it all in and just keep hoping And that's what we did Deandre netted 16 points and 14 rebounds as the sons improved with three and one Steph Curry led the warriors with 22 They fall to two and two Towards Phoenix

Devin Booker Clay Thompson Booker Warriors Deandre Steph Curry Phoenix
Suns rally from 22 points down to beat Mavericks 107-105

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

Suns rally from 22 points down to beat Mavericks 107-105

"Damian Lee hit a three point jumper with 9.7 seconds left to lift the suns to a one O 7 one O 5 victory over the Mavericks Lee scored all 11 of his points in the final frame as the sun's battled back from a 22 point deficit early in the third quarter That's something that you know I don't want to say I pride myself on but I've never shy away from is taking those big shots but you know I know people are giving me the credit and the game went and shot and all that but this was a total team effort Devin Booker led Phoenix with 28 points and 9 assists Luka Dončić topped the baths with 35 George tennant Phoenix

Damian Lee Suns Mavericks LEE Devin Booker Phoenix Luka George Tennant
The Legacy of Booker T Washington

The Officer Tatum Show

01:45 min | Last month

The Legacy of Booker T Washington

"Let me get back to the point that I was making about the civil rights movement. This is something that I think people always think I'm crazy when I say this. But Uncle Tom two lays it out very succinctly. And I bet Uncle Tom three would have even more information to validate what I'm saying here. I feel like if the trajectory was as such, and this is what Booker T. Washington was all about. Versus WB Dubois, which is always the conflict. It's like today's black conservatives versus the black liberal. That's pretty much what the dynamic was. And so Booker T. Washington was always under the assumption or under the impression that you will do better if you pull yourself up by your bootstraps and you become a productive person, giving people no excuse not to hire you and to put you in a forefront and give you opportunities. You don't big people for opportunities. You make them give you opportunities. How do you make them give you opportunities? You don't go and protest and they face all day and cry and lay in the middle of the roadway. What you do is you create value in yourself. Booker T. Washington was always for great education, being educated and formed having a skill. If you have those things, nothing can deny you success in America. And I believe black people, a lot of black people at the time had that trajectory. You got the Booker T. Washington came from slavery. We got people today that literally living with a silver spoon in their mouth and they crying about racism. You got back in the day, people used to come out of slavery and generate wealth to create universities. The tuskegee university. And I just bothers me where we at today, all are being and complaining.

Booker T. Washington Uncle Tom Dubois America Tuskegee University
Biden Asks Whether Deceased Congresswoman Is at White House Event

The Dan Bongino Show

01:45 min | 2 months ago

Biden Asks Whether Deceased Congresswoman Is at White House Event

"But one of the people who was involved in this food insecurity program was a representative Jackie Well so Biden's given a speech and he wants to give a shout out to Jackie walski so he wants to make sure she stands up so she can get acknowledged So he's looking around I want you to listen to what happens here He's like hey where's Jackie Check this out There's so many of you know so much about this as well and you're committed And I want to thank all of you here for including bipartisan elect officials like representative government senator Braun senator Booker representative Jackie are you here Where's Jackie I didn't think she was going to be here Folks I saw you just send me Jim Jim just texted me during the show He did it again He just did it again He just did it again But Greg price I'll put this out there Biden won this way from the podium again as the fema administration Look at the oh my gosh My gosh this is going on This is going on the podcast tomorrow Folks I'm sorry to do this to you There's no audio to that right Jim there's nothing for us to play for the radio audience Thank you Mister president Folks if you go to my Twitter I'm at D Bon Gino on Twitter You can watch what Jim just put up there He walks in the wrong direction the fema administrators go into grab them like sir the events not over this way Now getting back to the end of it Thank you for sending me This guy does not know what he's doing Jackie wolsky is dead She died in August and a car accident You got the commander in chief It was a major story Where's Jackie She's dead

Jackie Jackie Walski Biden Braun Senator Booker Represent Jim Jim Greg Price Fema JIM Twitter Jackie Wolsky
"Where's Jackie?"

The Trish Regan Show

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

"Where's Jackie?"

"To thank all of you here for including bipartisan elected officials like representative governor senator Braun, senator Booker, representative Jackie, are you here? Where's Jackie? I didn't think she was going to be here. To help make this no, you see Jackie couldn't be there because you see, mister president Jackie passed away. In a car accident, back in August, something that everybody kind of knew, and by the way, given that you were there at this bipartisan event to end food insecurity and to take on the issue of obesity in America, given that this was so important to her, don't you think it might have known? She was dead, that she passed away. Tragically, in a car accident,

Senator Braun Senator Booker Representative Jackie Jackie Mister President Jackie Obesity America
Joe Biden Calls for Dead Representative

The Officer Tatum Show

01:33 min | 2 months ago

Joe Biden Calls for Dead Representative

"If you didn't think that our president, I don't even like to call him president because they cheated. But if you didn't think that our president was as dumb as a bag of rocks that flunked the first grade, then listen to what he did, and then listen to Jean Pierre, try to explain the way how this man, who's the president, is calling for a dead person in the audience. He literally don't know this woman is dead. It reminds me of when he was caught telling a man a stand up. Stand up, man. Stand up and get the dudes on a wheelchair. Come on, Joe Biden. Why are you calling for this representative? She's dead. And you don't know she's dead. Your people didn't tell you she's dead. Matter of fact, you probably did. You don't know what's going on in the world, and people think that this dude will run for president again and beat Donald Trump. I can't see it. Let's roll clip one of Joe Biden asking for Jackie and she's not there. Officials like representative government, senator Braun, senator Booker, representative Jackie, are you here? Where's Jackie? To help make this. I don't want to laugh at that. I don't want to laugh at that, but my God, Jackie, Jackie. Oh, I don't think she's supposed to be here. She's gone on with the lord. Stand up. Oh, God, love you. What am I talking about? I tell you what, you're making everybody else stand up, though, pal. Thank you very, very much.

Jackie Jean Pierre Joe Biden Senator Braun Senator Booker Donald Trump
Biden Asks if Dead Congresswoman Is in Crowd During Speech

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Biden Asks if Dead Congresswoman Is in Crowd During Speech

"President Biden, somebody forgot to put the pill in the porridge. This morning, he was giving a speech up in Washington. And the guy was just all over the place. Biden went on to say that he didn't even know if he was talking about Tom vilsack. He couldn't remember who he was. You heard from senator secretary vilsack. Senator, excuse me, who are you? How can the society's doing a hell of a job? Unbelievable, and then he goes on and he's talking about he was calling out a Jackie wall or she was the congresswoman from Indiana. We're going to play the audio and then we'll fill you in all the rest of this. I want to thank all of you here for including bipartisan elected officials like representative government, senator Braun, senator Booker, representative Jackie, are you here? Where's Jackie? I didn't think she was going to be here. To help make this a reality. No, she's not here, mister president. She's dead. What's wrong with you? So he's calling for Jackie. She was killed in a car accident in August. What two of her staff members were also killed and Biden knew that because she put out a statement. It was a very nice statement to mourning her loss. So the idea that he either forgot that she died or or and this could be a possibility, maybe he thinks she's still alive.

President Biden Senator Secretary Vilsack Jackie Tom Vilsack Biden Senator Braun Senator Booker Washington Indiana
"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

04:54 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Mourn as well. Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Alabama governor Charles Henderson, former president William Howard Taft, as well as the former president who shocked the nation by having Booker over for dinner all those years ago. Theodore Roosevelt. Teddy writes I am deeply shocked and grieved at the death of doctor Washington. He was one of the distinguished citizens of the United States. A man who rendered greater service to his race than has ever been rendered by anyone else, and who, in so doing, also rendered great service to the whole country. Dubois writes an obituary for Booker in the December issue of the crisis. He praised his Booker as quote the greatest Negro leader since Frederick Douglass. But Dubois can't help getting in the last word. No surprise, they've disagreed so thoroughly. He goes on to say that quote on the other hand, in stern justice, we must lay on the soul of this man, a heavy responsibility for the consummation of Negro disenfranchisement. A southerner, a northerner. One, a self reliant pragmatist. The other, a principled intellectual. One older and born into slavery, the other younger in a product of the reconstruction era. When we take stock of the differences between Booker T. Washington and WEB Dubois, perhaps we should be less surprised that they ultimately clashed and more surprised that they didn't do so earlier. Yet, despite their different philosophies, both black educators were invested in the welfare of black Americans. The tuskegee institute will continue on. Soon, it will transform into a university, producing black leaders, entrepreneurs, and thinkers well into the indefinite future. As for Dubois, the later joke about how many seem to think he died at the same time as Booker. In reality, he'll very much outlive the wizard, continuing his work as an activist and academic. He'll move to Ghana in his twilight years and pass away in 1963. Just one day before another and future black American leader named doctor Martin Luther King Jr. will tell an enormous crowd gathered in Washington D.C. at the Lincoln Memorial. He has a dream. And while The Good Doctor's story is one for another day, hinting at it is also indicative of our lack of closure for this episode. Yes. Just as tuskegee university and the NAACP live on. So do Jim Crow, black disenfranchisement, and lynchings. The Negro problem,

Booker Dubois governor Charles Henderson William Howard Taft John D. Rockefeller Andrew Carnegie Theodore Roosevelt Frederick Douglass Teddy Alabama Booker T. Washington tuskegee university Washington United States Martin Luther King Jr. Washington D.C. Ghana Lincoln Memorial NAACP Jim Crow
"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

04:54 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Well. Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Alabama governor Charles Henderson, former president William Howard Taft, as well as the former president who shocked the nation by having Booker over for dinner all those years ago. Theodore Roosevelt. Teddy writes I am deeply shocked and grieved at the death of doctor Washington. He was one of the distinguished citizens of the United States. A man who rendered greater service to his race than has ever been rendered by anyone else, and who, in so doing, also rendered great service to the whole country. Dubois writes an obituary for Booker in the December issue of the crisis. He praised his Booker as, quote, the greatest Negro leader since Frederick Douglass. But Dubois can't help getting in the last word. No surprise, they've disagreed so thoroughly. He goes on to say that quote on the other hand, in stern justice, we must lay on the soul of this man, a heavy responsibility for the consummation of Negro disenfranchisement. A southerner, a northerner. One, a self reliant pragmatist. The other, a principled intellectual. One older and born into slavery, the other younger in a product of the reconstruction era. When we take stock of the differences between Booker T. Washington and WEB Dubois, perhaps we should be less surprised that they ultimately clashed and more surprised that they didn't do so earlier. Yet, despite their different philosophies, both black educators were invested in the welfare of black Americans. The tuskegee institute will continue on. Soon, it will transform into a university producing black leaders entrepreneurs and thinkers well into the indefinite future. As for Dubois, the later joke about how many seem to think he died at the same time as Booker. In reality, he'll very much outlive the wizard, continuing his work as an activist and academic. He'll move to Ghana in his twilight years and pass away in 1963. Just one day before another and future black American leader named doctor Martin Luther King Jr. will tell an enormous crowd gathered in Washington D.C. at the Lincoln Memorial. But he has a dream. And while The Good Doctor's story is one for another day, hinting at it is also indicative of our lack of closure for this episode. Yes. Just as tuskegee university and the NAACP live on. So do Jim Crow, black disenfranchisement, and lynchings. The Negro

Booker Dubois governor Charles Henderson William Howard Taft John D. Rockefeller Andrew Carnegie Theodore Roosevelt Frederick Douglass Teddy Alabama Booker T. Washington tuskegee university Washington United States Martin Luther King Jr. Washington D.C. Ghana Lincoln Memorial NAACP Jim Crow
"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

07:47 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"The gospel of thrift. But the Boston riot, as it soon known, has done irreparable damage to Booker. The reality, or perhaps the myth of black Americans being united under his banner is gone. It's becoming clear to all that WEB Dubois isn't part of a small fringe opposed to the wizard of tuskegee's economic focused patient approach, but rather a part of a legitimate sizable break that wants to go faster. Harder. A pack described as radical or militant. And that break is only growing. In 1905, Dubois reaches out to select black leaders. The talented tenth, if you will. Who are disenchanted with Booker. Not Booker rights. He proposes a conference for organized determination and aggressive action on the part of men who believe in Negro freedom and growth. To oppose firmly, present methods of strangling honest criticism to organize intelligent and honest negroes and to support organs of news and public opinion. Including himself and other organizers, 29 men from 14 states answer this call. They meet the next month, from July 11th, through the 13th, 1905, at a lovely hotel on the Canadian side of Lake Erie. It's a busy few days, but most notably, they organize as a group. The Niagara movement, and craft a declaration of principles. This declaration does not dither. It makes several unequivocal demands, including full manhood suffrage, civil liberty for, and I quote, all American citizens, honest economic opportunity, the end of Jim Crow, education for all American children, enforcement of the constitution's reconstruction era amendments, and other basics of full American citizenship. In conclusion, the declaration expresses gratitude to our fellow men and from the abolitionists down. And finally, the document contains a list of duties they willingly take upon themselves. Let's take this in fully. Giving us a chance to absorb it. And while we are demanding, and ought to demand and will continue to demand the rights enumerated above, God forbid that we should ever forget to urge corresponding duties upon our people. The duty to vote, the duty to respect the rights of others, the duty to work, the duty to obey the laws, the duty to be clean and orderly. The duty to send our children to school, the duty to respect ourselves even as we respect others, this statement complaint and prayer, we submit to the American people and all mighty God. Rights and duties. Clearly, these are thoughtful men who understand the full meaning of citizenship in a republic. These Niagara movement leaders never name Booker. Still, this declaration of principles is something of a declaration of war on him. He knows it, and with a sincere conviction that the far more aggressive Niagara movement isn't helpful, but damaging. He opposes it. Ardently. But his opposition doesn't stop its initial growth, particularly mid the injustices of next year. It's late in the evening, August 13th, 1906. Well, it's quiet here in Brownsville, Texas, and what a welcome change that is. See, it's only been a few weeks since the U.S. Army garrisoned the 25th infantry regiment in this southern Texas, heavily Hispanic, U.S. Mexican border town of 6000. But that's upset many of the town's white citizens because the 25th is an African American regiment. And now, at least three men in the regiment, two of whom are known to be model soldiers. Have reported false accusations, assault, or harassment from locals and customs officers. In fact, last night brought new, unsubstantiated accusations that a soldier attacked a white woman. Yet, all is quiet now, thanks to mayor Frederick comb and major Charles Penrose imposing a curfew. Good call. Too bad that won't hold. Suddenly, pistol shots ring out in the dark of night. Mounted police rushed toward the sound. They returned fire. Guns flash is an officer and his horse are both hit. The attackers continue, then advance on a local bar that strictly enforces the Jim Crow segregation color line. The terrified bar to keep tries to lock up, but it's too late. He's hit and eyes. Hearing the gunshots, fort Brown sergeant of the guard calls them into arms. As the 25th musters, they're sure as the townspeople attacking the fort. Yet, no salt cons as gunfire beyond fort walls dies out. The next morning, please return to the scene of the attack. They find Springfield 1903 rifle cartridges. The very same model used by the men of the 25th. Then 14 townspeople come forward as witnesses, swearing that The Killers were black troops. But the men of the 25th all claimed not to have participated in or know anything about the attack. U.S. Army concludes, it's a conspiracy that soldiers in the know are covering for the guilty. The matter rises through the ranks, past Secretary of War, William Howard Taft, all the way to president Theodore Roosevelt. The commander in chief discharges all men of the 25th regiment stationed at fort Brown that night. 167 men in total. Without honor. This without honor discharging rages many Americans. Particularly black Americans, they feel betrayed. How could teddy, the rough rider who fought beside black troops in the Spanish-American War, whose appointed African Americans to office and broke bread with Booker T. Washington. Issue such a hasty, sweeping draconian punishment. Meanwhile, further investigations cast doubt on the regiments assumed guilt. Major Charles Penrose not only stands by his men's integrity, but as a seasoned officer who knows his firearms is sure some shots fired didn't even come from Springfield rifles. He testifies to this during Senate hearings. The first two shots I heard were undoubtedly pistols, sir. And I think they were fired with black powder. Further, when called the arms all the men were accounted for. It's hard to imagine they sprinted through town and snuck into the fort on detected. Finally, when the guns were inspected in the morning, none showed evidence of use. Frankly, it sounds like a setup. In 1972, future president Richard Nixon will pardon the 25th regiments convicted soldiers. To say nothing of lost careers, only two will be alive to hear the news. But that's over half a century from now. Here, in 1906, black Americans have just lost their nascent Abe Lincoln like love of teddy. This shakes their faith in his adviser Booker T. Washington too. Though Booker voices his frustrations within the administration, he doesn't do so publicly and his ideological opponents in the black community hold that against him. We're still for Booker, the Brownsville affair, as this incident comes to be known, isn't the only large scale tragic event for black Americans in 1906. Only a month later, WEB Dubois town of residence for almost a decade. Atlanta, Georgia. Becomes ground zero for horrific, gruesome racial violence, known as a race riot. Tensions have been growing for years between Atlanta's black and white communities. The

Booker Dubois Charles Penrose Jim Crow Niagara Frederick comb Lake Erie U.S. Army fort Brown Texas Boston Brownsville Springfield Booker T. Washington William Howard Taft Theodore Roosevelt U.S. fort president Richard Nixon
"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

07:50 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Eventually regained some semblance of order. Though its jarring to speak after such an incident, Booker T. Washington does his best to preach the gospel of thrift. But the Boston riot, as it soon known, has done irreparable damage to Booker. The reality, or perhaps the myth of black Americans being united under his banner is gone. It's becoming clear to all that WEB Dubois isn't part of a small fringe opposed to the wizard of tuskegee's economic focused patient approach, but rather a part of a legitimate sizable break that wants to go faster. Harder. A pack described as radical or militant. And that break is only growing. In 1905, Dubois reaches out to select black leaders. The talented tenth, if you will. Who are disenchanted with Booker. Not Booker ice. He proposes a conference for organized determination and aggressive action on the part of men who believe in Negro freedom and growth. To oppose firmly, present methods of strangling honest criticism to organize intelligent and honest negroes and to support organs of news and public opinion. Including himself and other organizers, 29 men from 14 states answer this call. They need the next month, from July 11th through the 13th, 1905. At a lovely hotel on the Canadian side of Lake Erie. It's a busy few days, but most notably, they organize as a group. The Niagara movement, and craft a declaration of principles. This declaration does not dither. It makes several unequivocal demands, including full manhood suffrage, civil liberty for, and I quote, all American citizens, honest economic opportunity, the end of Jim Crow, education for all American children, enforcement of the constitution's reconstruction era amendments, and other basics of full American citizenship. In conclusion, the declaration expresses gratitude to our fellow men and from the abolitionists down. And finally, the document contains a list of duties they willingly take upon themselves. Let's take this in fully. Giving us a chance to absorb it. And while we are demanding, and want to demand, and will continue to demand the rights enumerated above, God forbid that we should ever forget to urge corresponding duties upon our people. The duty to vote, the duty to respect the rights of others, the duty to work, the duty to obey the laws, the duty to be clean and orderly. The duty to send our children to school, the duty to respect ourselves even as we respect others, this statement complaint and prayer, we submit to the American people and all mighty God. Rights and duties. Clearly, these are thoughtful men who understand the full meaning of citizenship in a republic. These Niagara movement leaders never name Booker. Still, this declaration of principles is something of a declaration of war on him. He knows it, and with a sincere conviction that the far more aggressive Niagara movement isn't helpful, but damaging. He opposes it. Ardently. But his opposition doesn't stop its initial growth, particularly mid the injustices of next year. It's late in the evening, August 13th, 1906. Well, it's quiet here in Brownsville, Texas, and what a welcome change that is. See, it's only been a few weeks since the U.S. Army garrisoned the 25th infantry regiment in this southern Texas, heavily Hispanic, U.S. Mexican border town, 6000. But that's upset many of the town's white citizens because the 25th is an African American regiment. And now, at least three men in the regiment, two of whom are known to be model soldiers. Have reported false accusations, assault, or harassment from locals and customs officers. In fact, last night brought new, unsubstantiated accusations that a soldier attacked a white woman. Yet, all is quiet now, thanks to mayor Frederick comb and major Charles Penrose imposing a curfew. Good call. Too bad that won't hold. Suddenly, pistol shots ring out in the dark of night. Mounted police rushed toward the sound. They returned fire. Guns flash is an officer and his horse are both hit. The attackers continue, then advance on a local bar. That strictly enforces the Jim Crow segregation color line. The terrified bar can tries to lock up, but it's too late. He's hit and eyes. Hearing the gunshots, fort Brown sergeant of the guard calls them into arms. As the 25th musters, there sure is the townspeople attacking the fort. Yet, no salt cones has gunfire beyond the fort walls dies out. The next morning, please return to the scene of the attack. They find Springfield 1903 rifle cartridges. The very same model used by the men of the 25th. Then 14 townspeople come forward as witnesses, swearing that The Killers were black troops. But the men of the 25th all claimed not to have participated in or know anything about the attack. U.S. Army concludes it's a conspiracy that soldiers in the know are covering for the guilty. The matter rises through the ranks, past Secretary of War, William Howard Taft, all the way to president Theodore Roosevelt. The commander in chief discharges all men of the 25th regiment stationed at fort Brown that night. 167 men in total. Without honor. This without honor discharging rages many Americans. Particularly black Americans, they feel betrayed. How could teddy, the rough rider who fought beside black troops in the Spanish-American War, whose appointed African Americans to office and broke bread with Booker T. Washington. Issue such a hasty, sweeping draconian punishment. Meanwhile, further investigations cast doubt on the regiments assumed guilt. Major Charles Penrose not only stands by his men's integrity, but as a seasoned officer who knows his firearms is sure some shots fired didn't even come from Springfield rifles. He testifies to this during Senate hearings. The first two shots I heard were undoubtedly pistols, sir. And I think they were fired with black powder. Further, when called the arms all the men were accounted for. It's hard to imagine they sprinted through town and snuck into the fort undetected. Finally, when the guns were inspected in the morning, none showed evidence of use. Frankly, it sounds like a setup. In 1972, future president Richard Nixon will pardon the 25th regiments convicted soldiers. To say nothing of lost careers, only two will be alive to hear the news. But that's over half a century from now. Here, in 1906, black Americans have just lost their nascent Abe Lincoln like love of teddy. This shakes their faith in his adviser Booker T. Washington too. Though Booker voices his frustrations within the administration, he doesn't do so publicly and his ideological opponents in the black community hold that against him. We're still for Booker. The Brownsville affair, as this incident comes to be known, isn't the only large scale tragic event for black Americans in 1906. Only a month later, WEB Dubois town of residence for almost a decade. Atlanta, Georgia becomes ground zero for horrific gruesome racial violence, known as a race riot.

Booker Dubois Booker T. Washington Charles Penrose Jim Crow Niagara Frederick comb Lake Erie U.S. Army fort Brown Texas Boston Brownsville Springfield William Howard Taft Theodore Roosevelt U.S. fort president Richard Nixon
"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

05:02 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"But most noted by many is the third chapter. Of mister Booker T. Washington and others. In it, Dubois describes the wizard of Atlantis speech as an Atlanta compromise. And he takes it to task. Dubois argues that radical white southerners didn't take to heart the part about uplifting their black neighbors. Instead, all they heard is that the status quo, Jim Crow is acceptable. Dubois sees the tuskegee and not as someone playing the long game, but rather, as an accommodationist. The scholar goes on, asserting that Booker, quote, represents a Negro thought, the old attitude of adjustment and submission. He calls the tuskegee and teachings, quote, a gospel of work and money to such an extent as apparently almost completely to overshadow the higher aims of life. Dubois further notes how still expanding Jim Crow laws are taking the vote in civil rights from black Americans, and that funding for black Americans in higher education is disappearing. He then makes the following assertion. To quote one more time those movements are not, to be sure, direct results of mister Washington's teachings. But his propaganda has, without a shadow of a doubt, helped their speedier accomplishment. Yeah, Dubois isn't messing around here, and I think it's fair to say that his position has shifted since he wrote book or that congratulatory letter after Atlanta. Booker takes the critique stoically, even welcoming Dubois that year as a summer instructor at tuskegee. But the wizard's unofficial position as the voice of black Americans is fading. This becomes abundantly clear to the nation that same summer. It's July 30th, 1903. A crowd of 2000 is filtering into the pews at the gorgeous red brick, African methodist episcopal Zion church on Columbus avenue in Boston, Massachusetts. It's an exciting day. Booker T. Washington is speaking. Yet, despite the many loyal book rights here, including members of the national Negro business league, trouble could be brewing. The black community in Boston is, after all, less favorable to Booker. His local detractor Monroe trotter has quite the following. But that's fine. The church has 11 police officers on hand. The law men keep a sharp eye as everyone settles into the pews. Soon, a thin bespectacled newspaper editor. T Thomas fortune approaches the pulpit to introduce Booker T. Washington. As he begins to compliment the wizard of tuskegee, pockets of disapproval, roar from the audience. Thomas won't stand for this. He doubles down on his loyalty to Booker, waxing all the more eloquent on the tuskegee virtues. But this an enraged man jumps up, screaming as he rushes at the speaker. Police officers grab and arrest him, but mayhem ensues as Booker's supporters and haters erupt on one another. Thomas tries to regain control of the meeting, but he can't stop sneezing. Suddenly everyone on the platform is violently sneezing and coughing. Amid the ruckus, it seems that someone threw Cayenne pepper on the speaker's platform. Booker goes to the pulpit and tries to reclaim the audience, only to have his local nemesis. Monroe trotter jump up. He bellows at the wizard. Can a man make a successful educator and politician at the same time? Are the rope and the torch all the race is to get under your leadership? The yelling at fighting only

Dubois Booker mister Booker T. Washington Jim Crow Atlanta gorgeous red brick African methodist episcopal Zi Booker T. Washington Monroe trotter national Negro business league Thomas fortune Boston Washington Massachusetts Thomas bellows
"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

04:53 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"But most noted by many is the third chapter. Of mister Booker T. Washington and others. In it, Dubois describes the wizard of Atlantis speech as an Atlanta compromise. And he takes it to task. Dubois argues that radical white southerners didn't take to heart the part about uplifting their black neighbors. Instead, all they heard is that the status quo, Jim Crow is acceptable. Dubois sees the tuskegee and not as someone playing the long game, but rather, as an accommodationist. The scholar goes on, asserting that Booker, quote, represents in Negro thought, the old attitude of adjustment and submission. He calls the tuskegee and teachings, quote, a gospel of work and money to such an extent as apparently almost completely to overshadow the higher aims of life. Dubois further notes how still expanding Jim Crow laws are taking the vote in civil rights from black Americans, and that funding for black Americans in higher education is disappearing. He then makes the following assertion. To quote one more time those movements are not to be sure, direct results of mister Washington's teachings. But his propaganda has, without a shadow of a doubt, helped their speedier accomplishment. Yeah, Dubois isn't messing around here, and I think it's fair to say that his position has shifted since he wrote book or that congratulatory letter after Atlanta. Booker takes the critique stoically, even welcoming Dubois that year as a summer instructor at tuskegee. But the wizard's unofficial position as the voice of black Americans is fading. This becomes abundantly clear to the nation that same summer. It's July 30th, 1903. A crowd of 2000 is filtering into the pews at the gorgeous red brick, African methodist episcopal Zion church on Columbus avenue in Boston, Massachusetts. It's an exciting day. Booker T. Washington is speaking. Yet, despite the many loyal book rights here, including members of the national Negro business league, trouble could be brewing. The black community in Boston is, after all, less favorable to Booker. His local detractor Monroe trotter has quite the following. But that's fine. The church has 11 police officers on hand. The law men keep a sharp eye as everyone settles into the pews. Soon, a thin bespectacled newspaper editor. T Thomas fortune approaches the pulpit to introduce Booker T. Washington. As he begins to complement the wizard of tuskegee, pockets of disapproval, roar from the audience. Thomas won't stand for this. He doubles down on his loyalty to Booker, waxing all the more eloquent on the tuskegee virtues. But this, an enraged man jumps up, screaming as he rushes at the speaker. Police officers grab and arrest him. But mayhem ensues as Booker supporters and haters erupt on one another. Thomas tries to regain control of the meeting. But he can't stop sneezing. Suddenly everyone on the platform is violently sneezing and coughing. Amid the ruckus, it seems that someone threw Cayenne pepper on the speaker's platform. Booker goes to the pulpit and tries to reclaim the audience, only to have his local nemesis. Monroe trotter jump up. He bellows at the wizard. Can a man make a successful educator and politician at the same time? Are the rope and the torch all the race is to get under your leadership? A yelling at fighting only grows

Dubois Booker mister Booker T. Washington Jim Crow Atlanta gorgeous red brick African methodist episcopal Zi Booker T. Washington Monroe trotter national Negro business league Negro Thomas fortune Boston Washington Massachusetts Thomas bellows
"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:06 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"Word fitly spoken. Sincerely yours, WEB Dubois. But in the years to come, this maturing scholar will become less convinced of the fitly nature of Booker's words. Before we get into this throwdown though, who exactly is WEB Dubois? Let's get his backstory. William Edward burkhart Dubois or Willie, as he's known as a child, so we'll use that just for the moment. Was born on February 23rd, 1868. Within the berkshires of western Massachusetts in the small town of great Barrington. His Haitian born father, Alfred Dubois, took off when he was only a child. This might have been due to friction between Alfred and his in laws, but whatever the case. Young Willie's mother, Mary, was left to raise him as a single parent with some help from her deeply rooted to the area burckhardt family. Fatherless in one of the areas very few black residents, Willie felt out of place growing up. But his mother taught him the values of hard work and education, and the intellectual child excelled in the town's integrated school system. As a teen, Willie's gift for writing came to bear as black newspapers published his work. In 1884, he graduated from high school at the top of his class. Willie aspired to go to Harvard, but the elite institution wasn't keen on great Barrington's relatively new high school. Nor did the young graduate have the funds, so he applied to the finest institution of higher learning for black students in the nation. Nashville, Tennessee's fisk university. With financial assistance from New England congressional churches, all was set. Willie started at fisk in September, 1885. This was a time of happiness and sorrow for the 17 year old collegian. His mother died that same year, yet the rural new englander also gained a new sense of community living with other black Americans. To quote him, I was thrilled to be for the first time among so many people of my own color, or rather, of such various in such extraordinary colors, which I had not seen before, but who seemed close bound to me by new and exciting ties. Willie excelled at his studies, edited the school newspaper and developed his public speaking abilities. But to return to sorrow, the youth also saw prejudice and, quote, a sort of violence that I had never realized in New England. Those potent experiences stuck with him after his 1888 graduation in subsequent acceptance at Harvard. Yes, Harvard, Dubois dream. And yes, Dubois now, no more Willie. Even will is dropping from use. Developing into a very formal man, even his closest friends begin to call him Dubois. I know, last names are not typical HTTPS style, but will embrace it, as it only further highlights the difference between him and Booker T. Washington, who does use his first name with friends. So anyhow, Dubois has entered Harvard, but while a fisk degree got Dubois in, the elite institution did not consider it good enough for him to start graduate work. He had to earn a second BA from Harvard first. Which he did in 1890, followed by a masters in 1891. Dubois missed the black society at fisk. He felt disconnected as he couldn't afford to live on campus and felt a second class citizen. Particularly when the university glee club rejected the gifted singer because they feared trying to tour nationally with him amid Jim Crow. So even though he stayed on for a PhD, Dubois's happiest days as a Harvard student weren't on the crimson campus. They were in Germany as he studied at the university of Berlin with funding from the John F slater fund. Returning with a Kaiser Wilhelm the second style mustache in 1894, the short, handsome, dapper dressed germanophile, took a teaching position in classics in modern languages at Ohio's black educating wilberforce university. By the following year, 1895, Dubois had completed his dissertation. Titled, suppression of the African slave trade in the United States of America. 1638 to 1871. Thus, the 27 year old historian became the first black person to earn a PhD from Harvard. He even spoke at commencement. So we've made it back to 1895. The year of Booker T. Washington's headline making speech in Atlanta. It's clear that Booker and Dubois have common ground in that both are educators and highly invested in the welfare of their fellow black Americans. But we can also see a number of differences. One is a formerly enslaved southerner who's learned to value education with the commercial focus. The other, a reconstruction era born northerner, whose elite education is steeped in the liberal arts. Clearly, they are very different men, but again their ideological clash on the best path forward for black Americans isn't immediate. Dubois and Booker are on good terms in 1895. In fact, last year, the Harvard man wrote to the wizard asking for a gig at tuskegee. He the new Booker's wife, Margaret, they attended fisk at the same time. The tuskegee and replied with the job offer, but was too late. Dubois had already taken the wilberforce professorship. The two men continued to write thereafter as we saw with Dubois congratulatory note to Booker after his Atlanta speech. In fact, he doubles down on that. Hearing that some black intellectuals are taking issue with Booker, the young professor defends him in the New York age, writing that the wizard of tuskegee's words quote might be the basis of a real settlement between whites and blacks in the south. If the south opened up to the negroes, the door of economic opportunity. Communication and collaboration continues. Dubois again asks about a job in 1896. This time Booker jumps, but no, the newly married scholar opts for the University of Pennsylvania instead. Once there, Dubois goes less historian and more sociologist and pushes social science to a new level with a 2500 household survey of black residents in Philadelphia's 7th ward. To publish this meticulously detailed study of the 7th ward a few years later, under the title, the Philadelphia Negro. More immediately, though, is when your gig at Penn is ending without renewal. Dubois is back on the academic job market. His Harvard dissertation adviser writes to Booker. Have you no place for the best educated colored man available for college work? But Booker doesn't bite. Dubois goes to another black institution. Atlanta university. Why did Booker pass? Could be pride, Dubois has turned him down twice now, but it could also be that Booker doesn't like the political direction. The increasingly vocal professor is going. Just this year, 1897, Dubois published a piece in the Atlantic monthly contradicting the one and only late Frederick Douglas belief that black Americans should integrate with white society by arguing that black Americans should look to their African heritage instead. Um. That's less Booker's direction. And he feels his path is working. I mean, in 1898, U.S. president William McKinley visits the tuskegee institute and the donations are flowing. This looks like promising progress. Let's not overstate their growing differences though. The two intellectual powerhouses come together again in 1899, as Dubois hosts a meeting in Atlanta. The subject title, the Negro and business ah, now that's Booker's language. The wizard of tuskegee attends an next year he'll launch the national Negro business league. But more immediately, Booker makes a third invitation to Dubois to join him at tuskegee. Yet, the maturing scholar hedges. Why? Well, profound events are impacting Dubois in 1899. Not far from his home in Georgia, a black man accused of rape and murder, Sam hose, doesn't receive a fair trial. Instead, a white crowd of 2000 captures him, slices off his fingers, ears, and genitals, gouges out his eyes, chains him to a tree, soaks him in kerosene.

Dubois Willie Booker Harvard William Edward burkhart Dubois Alfred Dubois Young Willie burckhardt Booker T. Washington New England university glee club university of Berlin John F slater fisk university wilberforce university Barrington Alfred Kaiser Wilhelm Massachusetts
"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:24 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"WEB Dubois doesn't disagree with Booker T. Washington immediately. In fact, the young scholar celebrates Booker's national acclaim, writing to him only days after his speech on September 24th, 1895. I dear mister Washington, let me hardly congratulate you upon your phenomenal success at Atlanta. It was a word fitly spoken. Sincerely yours, WEB Dubois. But in the years to come, this maturing scholar will become less convinced of the fitly nature of Booker's words. Before we get into this throwdown though, who exactly is WEB Dubois? Let's get his backstory. William Edward burkhart Dubois or Willie, as he's known as a child, so we'll use that just for the moment. Was born on February 23rd, 1868. Within the berkshires of western Massachusetts in the small town of great Barrington. His Haitian born father, Alfred Dubois, took off when he was only a child. This might have been due to friction between Alfred and his in laws, but whatever the case. Young Willie's mother, Mary, was left to raise him as a single parent with some help from her deeply rooted to the area burckhardt family. Fatherless in one of the areas very few black residents, Willie felt out of place growing up. But his mother taught him the values of hard work and education, and the intellectual child excelled in the town's integrated school system. As a teen, will his gift for writing came to bear as black newspapers published his work. In 1884, he graduated from high school at the top of his class. Willie aspired to go to Harvard, but the elite institution wasn't keen on great Barrington's relatively new high school. Nor did the young graduate have the funds, so he applied to the finest institution of higher learning for black students in the nation. Nashville, Tennessee's fisk university. With financial assistance from New England congressional churches, all was set. Willie started at fisk in September, 1885. This was a time of happiness and sorrow for the 17 year old collegian. His mother died that same year, yet the rural new englander also gained a new sense of community living with other black Americans. To quote him, I was thrilled to be for the first time among so many people of my own color, or rather, of such various in such extraordinary colors, which I had not seen before, but who seemed close bound to me by new and exciting ties. Willie excelled at his studies, edited the school newspaper and developed his public speaking abilities. But to return to sorrow, the youth also saw prejudice and, quote, a sort of violence that I had never realized in New England. Those potent experiences stuck with him after his 1888 graduation and subsequent acceptance at Harvard. Yes, Harvard. Do boys dream? And yes, Dubois now. No more Willy. Even will is dropping from use. Developing into a very formal man, even his closest friends begin to call him Dubois. I know, last names are not typical HTTPS style, but will embrace it, as it only further highlights the difference between him and Booker T. Washington, who does use his first name with friends. So anyhow, Dubois has entered Harvard, but while a fisk degree got Dubois in, the elite institution did not consider it good enough for him to start graduate work. He had to earn a second BA from Harvard first. Which he did in 1890, followed by a master's in 1891. Dubois missed the black society at fisk. He felt disconnected as he couldn't afford to live on campus and felt a second class citizen. Particularly when the university glee club rejected the gifted singer because they feared trying to tour nationally with him amid Jim Crow. So even though he stayed on for a PhD, Dubois's happiest days as a Harvard student weren't on the crimson campus. They were in Germany as he studied at the university of Berlin with funding from the John F slater fund. Returning with a Kaiser Wilhelm the second style mustache in 1894, the short, handsome, dapper dressed germanophile, took a teaching position in classics in modern languages at Ohio's black educating wilberforce university. By the following year, 1895, Dubois had completed his dissertation. Titled, suppression of the African slave trade in the United States of America. 1638 to 1871. Thus, the 27 year old historian became the first black person to earn a PhD from Harvard. He even spoke at commencement. So we've made it back to 1895. The year of Booker T. Washington's headline making speech in Atlanta. It's clear that Booker and Dubois have common ground in that both are educators and highly invested in the welfare of their fellow black Americans. But we can also see a number of differences one is a formerly enslaved southerner who's learned to value education with the commercial focus. The other, a reconstruction era born northerner, whose elite education is steeped in the liberal arts. Clearly, they are very different men. But again, their ideological clash on the best path forward for black Americans isn't immediate. Dubois and Booker are on good terms in 1895. In fact, last year, the Harvard man wrote to the wizard asking for a gig at tuskegee. He the new Booker's wife, Margaret, they attended fisk at the same time. The tuskegee and replied with the job offer, but was too late. Dubois had already taken the wilberforce professorship. The two men continued to write thereafter as we saw with Dubois congratulatory note to Booker after his Atlanta speech. In fact, he doubles down on that. Hearing that some black intellectuals are taking issue with Booker, the young professor defends him in the New York age, writing that the wizard of tuskegee's words, quote, might be the basis of a real settlement between whites and blacks in the south. If the south opened up to the negroes, the door of economic opportunity. Communication and collaboration continues. Dubois again asks about a job in 1896. This time Booker jumps, but no, the newly married scholar opts for the University of Pennsylvania instead. Once there, Dubois goes less historian and more sociologist and pushes social science to a new level with a 2500 household survey of black residents in Philadelphia's 7th ward. To publish this meticulously detailed study of the 7th ward a few years later, under the title, the Philadelphia Negro. More immediately, though, is when your gig at Penn is ending without renewal. Dubois is back on the academic job market. His Harvard dissertation adviser writes to Booker. Have you no place for the best educated colored man available for college work? But Booker doesn't bite. Dubois goes to another black institution. Atlanta university. Why did Booker pass? Could be pride, Dubois has turned him down twice now, but it could also be that Booker doesn't like the political direction, the increasingly vocal professor is going. Just this year, 1897, Dubois published a piece in the Atlantic monthly contradicting the one and only late Frederick Douglass's belief that black Americans should integrate with white society by arguing that black Americans should look to their African heritage instead. Um. That's less Booker's direction. And he feels his path is working. I mean, in 1898, U.S. president William McKinley visits the tuskegee institute and the donations are flowing. This looks like promising progress. Let's not overstate their growing differences though. The two intellectual powerhouses come together again in 1899 as Dubois hosts a meeting in Atlanta. The subject title, the Negro and business. Ah, now that's Booker's language. attends an next year he'll launch the national Negro business league. But more immediately, Booker makes a third invitation to Dubois to join him at tuskegee. Yet, the maturing scholar hedges. Why? Well, profound events are impacting Dubois in 1899. Not far from his home in Georgia, a black man accused of rape and murder, Sam hose, doesn't receive a fair trial. Instead, a white crowd of 2000 captures him, slices off his fingers, ears, and genitals, gouges out his eyes, chains him to a tree, soaks him in kerosene, then lights him

Dubois Booker Harvard Willie Booker T. Washington William Edward burkhart Dubois Alfred Dubois Young Willie burckhardt Atlanta New England university glee club university of Berlin John F slater fisk university wilberforce university Barrington Alfred Kaiser Wilhelm
"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

08:38 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"As you can see from that opening, the early 20th century United States has a sharp line. A color line, as it's known, separating black and white citizens. The racial segregation of Jim Crow made constitutional as we learned in episode one O one by the Supreme Court's 1896 decision in plessy V Ferguson is well entrenched. And today, our sojourn through the progressive era brings us to a new generation of black Americans facing these realities. We begin with the origins of our dinner guest, Booker T. Washington. We'll bear witness as he grows from slave to student to educator to becoming the voice of black Americans after his 1895 Atlanta speech. Or is it an Atlanta compromise accepting Jim Crow? That's how a younger black scholar named WEB Dubois will see it. While both men want the best for black Americans, the whole drastically different views. We'll watch their ideas clash as black troops and Brownsville, Texas, are gravely mistreated, and black Americans die in lynchings and race riots. Hence this episode's advisory. Again, heads up. This will get rough. We'll also hear about the Niagara movement, the founding of the NAACP, and then lay Booker to rest. Alas, the wizard of tuskegee, is not long for this world. Well, our path is set, so let's get to it by bidding a brief farewell to the progressive era and heading 36 years back in time to war torn Virginia. Rewind. It's an unspecified morning, April, 1865, and the sun is just rising over the borough family's small plantation inhales for the Virginia. Everyone enslaved here is up, alert, and excited as they walk toward the borough family's residence. AKA the big House. Their excitement has been building for a while, as it's become increasingly obvious that the Civil War will soon end with a union victory, but last night. When word came around that the morning would bring a big announcement, oh, that was it. Hardly anyone slept a wink. Has it come? The war's end? Freedom. The adrenaline of hope has energized these sleepless enslaver unions. They walk with vigor as the morning's early rays like the fields. Arriving at the big House, they find members of the borough family standing or seated on the veranda. There's also an unknown man. He more than anything will later stand out in the memory of one 9 year old enslaved child this morning. Standing with his mother, brother and sister, the young, all of skinned boy, watches as this unknown gentleman starts reading a paper. It's the Emancipation proclamation. Finishing the document, he then states plainly that all enslaved here are now free. The child's mother is overcome with joy. He'll later recall. My mother, who is standing by my side, leaned over and kissed her children, while tears of joy ran down her cheeks. She explained to us what it all meant, that this was the day for which she had been so long praying, but fearing that she would never live to see. Yes, the morning's announcement was just what they were hoping for. Freedom. It's a day that the young child named Booker will long remember. Booker has lived his entire life on the borough plantation until that likely union soldier arrived in 1865. Not the Booker knows how long that is. As the witty educator will put it in his future autobiography. I'm not quite sure of the exact place or exact date of my birth. But at any rate, I suspect I must have been born somewhere, and at some time. The borough family Bible will lead future scholars to conclude that he was born April 5th, 1856, and is thus 9 years old at this point. But Booker doesn't know that. Just like he doesn't know anything about his biological father, beyond rumors that he's a local white man. What the child does know is that his mother loves him. And her name is Jane. But with the Emancipation, Booker will leave this nebulous place of origin behind. Literally. His mother is taking him and his siblings to join her husband, Washington Ferguson, out in West Virginia. In a small town that will later be known as Malden. Hiking over mountainous terrain, Jane and her children travel for weeks to get to their new home. Her husband, Washington, or just wash, for short, gladly welcomes them, and soon little 9 year old Booker is working right beside him, packing barrels in a salt furnace. Booker will have little good to say of these days. He'll recall filthy air, rough neighbors, and a cabin that he'll describe as no better than his old slave quarters. One positive thing jumps out at him, though. The number 18. That number is assigned to his father, and the illiterate child watches with wonder as the straight line and two circles are stamped on barrel after barrel. It was illegal for slaves to learn to read in antebellum, Virginia. But that didn't stop Booker from craving education. Day after day, he had carried the borough children's books and watched longingly as they entered the schoolhouse. To quote Booker, I had the feeling that to get into a schoolhouse and study in this way would be about the same as getting into Paradise. Well, a salt furnace is no schoolhouse, but the eager child is ready for that Paradise. And if he can pick out numbers, he can pick out words. Booker's mother, Jane, procures an old copy of Webster's spelling book. With no help, Booker teaches himself the alphabet over the next few weeks. Then, the town's black community decides to pool money to hire an educated black man to teach their children. Booker's family can't afford to have him leave work for school though, so the determined youth studies with the instructor at night until, despite scheduling difficulties, he manages to go to work and to school. Finally in the classroom, hooker perceives something odd at roll call. I noticed that all the children had at least two names, and some of them indulged in what seemed to me the extravagance of having three. And so, when called on, Booker answers that he is Booker Washington. His choice appears to be a clear nod to his stepfather, but Booker will also attribute the selection to the names association with history, freedom, and greatness. Learning later that his mother originally named him Booker toliver. He decides that he too will indulge in the great extravagance of three names. Thus, he becomes Booker, toliver, Washington, or as we know him. Booker T. Washington. Years pass Booker keeps studying as his work shifts from salt packing to a coal mine. Then in 1871, the mine's owner, general Lewis ruffner and his wife, viola raffin, hire him as their house boy. The couple become crucial mentors to the studious teen, deepening his values of education, hard work, and self reliance. In his autobiography, Booker will describe viola as a lifelong friend. But his thirst for knowledge leads him away from the roughness the following year. Hooker's heard about a school back in Virginia that educates black Americans and trains them as teachers called the Hampton normal and agricultural institute. He's determined to attend. Located near the mouth of Virginia's Chesapeake Bay, the Hampton institute is 400 miles from Malden. Booker walks the distance, arriving penniless. For his entrance exam, he has to clean a room. No problem. Booker knows how to work. He prizes work. And with the white benefactor paying his tuition, he's able to commence his studies. As in Malden, Booker finds hard work and education go hand in hand. He absorbs the school's agricultural and industrial focus, particularly as the school's founder, former union general Samuel C Armstrong, becomes his mentor. Three years later, in 1875, Booker graduates with honors and speaks at commencement. So, Booker's done it. He's a teacher. Over the next few years, he returns home to teach in Malden, West Virginia, then heads back to Chesapeake Bay to attend Washington D.C.'s wayland seminary and teach at his Alma mater. The Howard institute. Not bad Booker. His education and accomplishments today are impressive, especially

Booker Jim Crow plessy V Ferguson Booker T. Washington Virginia Atlanta Washington Ferguson Jane Dubois Brownsville NAACP Malden Supreme Court United States Texas Hampton institute Booker toliver West Virginia antebellum toliver
"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

06:31 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"A few minutes before 7 30 p.m.. A 46 year old man with close cropped hair, all of skin, and dressed in a smart black suit, is riding in a carriage through the streets of Washington D.C. to The White House. Is it a tad anxious? Not that this is his first visit. No, no. In the month since William McKinley was assassinated and Theodore Roosevelt took office, the new president has already made it clear to this educator, southerner, and most influential black Americans that his council is very much desired. TR's already had him over. But this is different. Tonight, this gentleman a mister Booker T. Washington is going to The White House as the U.S. president's invited dinner guest. Turning up 1600 Pennsylvania circular drive, the carriage comes to a stop. Under The White House's iconic hillard port cochere. What thoughts must be going through Booker's mind? A natural diplomat, he frequently declined social invitations from why associates to avoid a possible misstep in this fraught. Segregated era of Jim Crow. But one does not say no to the president of the United States. So, the tuskegee institute principle acts like the honored presidential guest that he is. Thinking his colleague whitfield McKinley for the ride, Booker then ascends The White House steps and walks past the black door keepers as he enters the executive mansion through its glass paneled entrance. The roosevelts might be a blue blooded American family, but there's nothing stuffy about this dinner table. Take first lady, Edith Roosevelt. Per usual, Edith easily carries the conversation, even as she sits between and keeps an eye on her two young troublemakers. 7 year old Archie and almost four year old Quentin. I wonder which small creatures they've brought to the table tonight. A mouse, a snake. Yeah, there are animal loving Theodore Roosevelt's children all right. Kermit and Ethel are also present, chatting it up, but no one talks through dinner quite like our bespectacled mustachioed rough rider president TR. His speech may only slow down at the sight of servers with more of annual rourke's cooking. I can just picture his toothy grand growing as he gets a whiff of her famous biscuits, known as fat rascals. Oh, that smells good. And to either side of TR sits his two guests. His friend from Colorado, Philip Stewart, and of course, Booker T. Washington. Details on tonight are sparse, but I imagine Booker's great sense of humor and conversational skills are coming to bear. His nerves have faded. It seems the food and company alike are exquisite. With dinner over, the children head off to bed and the gentlemen make their way to the red room. The subject of discussion soon turns to the very issue on which Booker serves as an adviser to the president. Southern politics. There's no doubt that they mention teddy's recent victory. His recess appointment of former Alabama governor Thomas G Jones as a federal judge. Tom might be a former confederate officer and a Democrat, but he's an honorable man, opposed lynching and in favor of educating black Americans. Ah, that's why Booker recommended him. And now, the south loves TR. Aided by Booker's council and his southern blood from his Georgia born mother, teddy, the half southerner, as he likes to call himself, just might be the man to move the needle on race and break the Democratic Party's solid south. Or at least break Republican Party boss, Mark Hannah's hold on the GOP's southern delegates before the 1904 election. The men discuss their lofty dreams for the south until 10 p.m., then say good night, so Booker can catch the last train in New York. The next day, Booker is going about his business in the Big Apple when he notices a one liner in the New York tribune mentioning he dined with the president. Huh. Well, both he and teddy knew last night was somewhat significant. It was, after all, the first time a black man, a former slave no less, dying with a president in The White House. Teddy had even questioned briefly if he should invite Booker. But the mere fact that he wondered filled him with shame and solidified his resolve to do so. Yet, as Booker carries on in New York City and teddy does so in Washington D.C., it seems neither man fully grasps their dinners significance. There are a few exceptions, but newspapers south of the mason Dixon line come after both men. Hard. In Virginia, the Richmond dispatched proclaims, quote, Roosevelt dines a darkie. In Georgia, the Atlanta constitution complains that, quote, both politically and socially Roosevelt proposed to coddle the sons of ham, close quote. In North Carolina, the custodia gazette and the north carolinian. Both carry an editorial that shouts in all caps, quote away with Roosevelt and Negro equality, away with republicanism and all its abhorrent concomitants. But it isn't the death of his hoped for revival of republicanism in the south that worries teddy the most. It's the death threats, a South Carolina senator Benjamin Tillman announces. Quote, the actions of president Roosevelt in entertaining that will necessitate our killing a thousand in the south before they will learn their place again. Close quote. TR is baffled. Heartbroken. He tells a reporter, I had no thought whatever of anything, save of having a chance of showing some little respect to a man whom I cordially esteem as a good citizen and good American. Instead, teddy has pandemonium, as vulgar cartoons of his wife Edith circulate, opposing newspaper slam each other and, though a failure, a hired assassin, goes after Booker. The president has learned a hard lesson. Though he'll continue to counsel with Booker, teddy will never again break bread with the esteemed tuskegee educator, or any black person for that matter. In The White House.

Booker Washington D.C. White House Booker T. Washington Theodore Roosevelt tuskegee institute whitfield McKinley Edith Roosevelt Philip Stewart teddy William McKinley Thomas G Jones U.S. Jim Crow Booker's council Mark Hannah Edith Kermit rourke GOP
"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

06:30 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"A few minutes before 7 30 p.m.. A 46 year old man with close cropped hair, all of skin, and dressed in a smart black suit, is riding in a carriage through the streets of Washington D.C. to The White House. He's a tad anxious. Not that this is his first visit. No, no. In the month since William McKinley was assassinated and Theodore Roosevelt took office, the new president has already made it clear to this educator, southerner, and most influential black Americans that his council is very much desired. TR has already had him over. But this is different. Tonight, this gentleman a mister Booker T. Washington is going to The White House as the U.S. president's invited thinner guest. Turning up 1600 Pennsylvania circular drive, the carriage comes to a stop under The White House's iconic, hillard, port cocher. What thoughts must be going through Booker's mind? A natural diplomat, he frequently declined social invitations from why associates to avoid a possible misstep in this fraught, segregated era of Jim Crow. But one does not say no to the president of the United States. So, the tuskegee institute principle acts like the honored presidential guest that he is. Thinking his colleague whitfield McKinley for the ride, Booker then ascends The White House steps and walks past the black door keepers as he enters the executive mansion through its glass paneled entrance. The roosevelts might be a blue blooded American family, but there's nothing stuffy about this dinner table. Take First Lady, Edith Roosevelt. Per usual, Edith easily carries the conversation, even as she sits between and keeps an eye on her two young troublemakers. 7 year old Archie and almost four year old Quentin. I wonder which small creatures they've brought to the table tonight. A mouse, a snake. Yeah, there are animal loving Theodore Roosevelt's children all right. Kermit and Ethel are also present, chatting it up, but no one talks through dinner quite like our bespectacled mustachioed rough rider president TR. His speech may only slow down at the sight of servers with more of annual rourke's cooking. I can just picture his toothy grain growing as he gets a whiff of her famous biscuits, known as fat rascals. Oh, that smells good. And to either side of TR sits his two guests. His friend from Colorado, Philip Stewart, and of course, Booker T. Washington. Details on tonight are sparse, but I imagine Booker's great sense of humor and conversational skills are coming to bear. His nerves have faded. It seems the food and company alike are exquisite. With dinner over, the children head off to bed and the gentlemen make their way to the red room. The subject of discussion soon turns to the very issue on which Booker serves as an adviser to the president. Southern politics. There's no doubt that they mention teddy's recent victory. His recess appointment of former Alabama governor Thomas G Jones has a federal judge. Tom might be a former confederate officer and a Democrat, but he's an honorable man, opposed to lynching and in favor of educating black Americans. Ah, that's why Booker recommended him. And now the south loves TR. Aided by Booker's council and his southern blood from his Georgia born mother, teddy, the half southerner, as he likes to call himself, just might be the man to move the needle on race and break the Democratic Party's solid south. Or at least break Republican Party boss, Mark Hannah's hold on the GOP's southern delegates before the 1904 election. The men discussed their lofty dreams for the south until 10 p.m., then say good night, so Booker can catch the last train in New York. The next day, Booker is going about his business in the Big Apple when he notices a one liner in the New York tribune, mentioning he dined with the president. Huh. Well, both he and teddy knew last night was somewhat significant. It was, after all, the first time a black man, a former slave no less, dined with a president in The White House. Teddy had even questioned briefly if he should invite Booker. But the mere fact that he wondered filled him with shame and solidified his resolve to do so. Yet, as Booker carries on in New York City and teddy does so in Washington D.C., it seems neither man fully grasps their dinners significance. There are a few exceptions, but newspapers south of the mason Dixon line come after both men. Hard. In Virginia, the Richmond dispatch proclaims, quote, Roosevelt dines a darkie. In Georgia, the Atlanta constitution complains that, quote, both politically and socially, Roosevelt proposed to coddle the sons of ham, close quote. In North Carolina, the custodian gazette and the north carolinian. Both carry an editorial that shouts in all caps, quote away with Roosevelt and Negro equality, away with republicanism and all its abhorrent concomitants. But it isn't the death of his hoped for revival of republicanism in the south that worries teddy the most. It's the death threats, a South Carolina senator Benjamin Tillman announces, quote, the actions of president Roosevelt in entertaining that will necessitate our killing a thousand in the south before they will learn their place again. Close quote. TR is baffled. Heartbroken. He tells a reporter, I had no thought whatever of anything, save of having a chance of showing some little respect to a man whom I cordially esteem as a good citizen and good American. Instead, teddy has pandemonium, as vulgar cartoons of his wife Edith circulate, opposing newspaper slam each other and, though a failure, a higher assassin goes after Booker. The president has learned a hard lesson. Though he'll continue to counsel with Booker, teddy will never again break bread with the esteemed tuskegee educator, or any black person for that matter. In The White House.

Booker White House Washington D.C. Booker T. Washington Theodore Roosevelt tuskegee institute whitfield McKinley Edith Roosevelt Philip Stewart teddy William McKinley hillard Thomas G Jones United States Jim Crow Booker's council Mark Hannah Edith Kermit rourke
Larry Elder and Sebastian Discusses the Rare Footage in 'Uncle Tom 2'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:00 min | 2 months ago

Larry Elder and Sebastian Discusses the Rare Footage in 'Uncle Tom 2'

"Really kind of punched me in the gut with this movie is just the first four minutes just the footage that your guys found black families in the 30 40s and 50s, just the opulence, the prosperity, the elegance, the self confidence oozing out of two dimensional pictures and black and white, home movies, and look, I'm a white dude who's an immigrant to America. I was pissed of what's happened to that community in America. How did you guys just find that footage? Well, it was the director, Justin Malone, who's just an brilliant director. And our composer's name is Damon Chris well. He scored both movies. And again, it gave you kind of the atmosphere of the whole thing. But you're quite right. Even after black's emerged from slavery, when we were talking about lynchings and KKK and Jim Crow, black people still kept moving forward. Why? Strong nuclear intact family. It was rare for a black kid to be born into a world without his father married to the mother. A strong belief in patriotism, believe it or not, you read the speeches by people like Frederick Douglas Booker T. Washington, the riddled with praise for American values. Judeo Christian values and a belief in entrepreneurship. And Uncle Tom two talks about what's happened. How did the righteous civil rights movement get hijacked by these leftists, Democrats, socialists, collectivists, and marxists who want to dethrone God, marks, of course, was an atheist and on the website a Black Lives Matter. We talk a lot about Black Lives Matter and Uncle Tom too. They attack the nuclear family and Karl Marx hated capitalism, let alone entrepreneurship, so the very things that made black people and able to endure in the face of horrific obstacles. God, family, American values, and entrepreneurship are all under attack right now by people like Barack Obama who said America has racism in its DNA.

Justin Malone Damon Chris America Frederick Douglas Booker T. Wa Jim Crow Uncle Tom Karl Marx Barack Obama
"booker t" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:21 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Well, one of the things that the left does is it uses emotion and it uses psychological states rather than facing the truth. So, for example, if you're opposed to abortion, you hate women. If you're opposed to same sex marriage, you're a bigot. If you believe like I do, that the border should be secure, will then you're nothing but a racist. So what they do is they say you disagree with me, see a therapist. So it's very difficult at times to actually have a conversation about ideas without it collapsing into these kinds of accusations. And that is part of the whole issue also of how propaganda works. Remember, the purpose of propaganda is to shape people's view of reality that even when confronted with a mountain of evidence, they will not change their minds. That's very critical and the best kind of propaganda is where people are being deceived, but don't know it. And one of the things that propaganda does and certainly gables did this under Hitler as you well know, he said that propaganda has to bypass facts and the mind and it has to get to emotions. You have to get people angry. You have to get people believing in a cause and if you paint the picture correctly and you get them on board, they'll never change their mind. You know, Hitler believed that if you have a 100,000 people all shouting the same slogan in a stadium, nobody is going to stand against it, everybody who opposes it is going to be silent because of this huge cultural thing. And I quote in the book, the words of Booker T. Washington, who says that evil doesn't become good and wrong doesn't become right just because the majority believe it to be so. But this is critical, our desire to believe something oftentimes is exactly what leads us into propaganda. We so want to believe something that's what we do..

Hitler Booker T. Washington
"booker t" Discussed on The Officer Tatum Show

The Officer Tatum Show

02:54 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on The Officer Tatum Show

"In the country. We had, look at tuskegee. Booker T. Washington. We had prominent schools. We had a movie theaters. We had shows. We own entertainment. You talk about the genre of rock and roll, blues. I mean, hip hop, black people exploded with talent, we have talent and abilities, but we didn't know how to, we didn't take the approach of fostering our abilities like Booker T. Washington wanted us to do. And creating value in the market, instead we wanted to hand out and this is the problem that I see today is that people want to hand out. Man, look, let them get you 50,000. You ain't gonna do nothing with it. Next year you're gonna be broken. Some of y'all gonna make porta season with 50,000. You're gonna be worse off than you was before they gave you the money. I don't think 50,000 will help people get, you know, overcome slavery. So at the end of the day, I just feel like people need to start today and make better decisions today. And yeah, you may be behind a ball. Your mama may be on crack, okay? So you don't have a legacy and the legacy may start at you, right? You're not the end of a generation of wealth. You're at the beginning. Embrace it, thrive in it. You know, I was one of the first people to go to college in my immediate family. I was one of the first. Then my dad and my brother went to college. He went to college before me. I was one of the first. And then my dad ended up going to college and getting his masters. But nobody else in my family, they were barely graduating high school. You know, high school was just it. But me and my brother, we had the opportunity to be the first generation to do something better, or do something greater. We had more opportunity, 'cause my dad gave us a hand up. And then we get a certain point. Now we got to give our kids a hand up. And before you know it, we can generate generational wealth. But you're not going to do that game banging and thug on the street. You're not going to do that blaming the white man. You're not going to do that being a consumer. And not a producer. See, like, my gentleman Jason that was on the call. He owned his own business. We could own our own stuff. It's just that we don't have the mindset. Hold

Booker T. Washington Jason
"booker t" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:28 min | 2 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Now. Talk more about that issue of how the church has been silenced because of propaganda. Well, one of the things that the left does is it uses emotion and it uses psychological states rather than facing the truth. So, for example, if you're opposed to abortion, you do hate women. If you're opposed to same sex marriage, you're a bigot. If you believe like I do, that the border should be secure, will then you're nothing but a racist. So what they do is they say you disagree with me, see a therapist. So it's very difficult at times to actually have a conversation about ideas without it collapsing into these kinds of accusations. And that is part of the whole issue also of how propaganda works. Remember, the purpose of propaganda is to shape people's view of reality that even when confronted with a mountain of evidence, they will not change their minds. That's very critical and the best kind of propaganda is where people are being deceived, but don't know it. And one of the things that propaganda does and certainly gables did this under Hitler as you well know, he said that propaganda has to bypass facts and the mind and it has to get to emotions. You have to get people angry. You have to get people believing in a cause and if you paint the picture correctly and you get them on board, they'll never change their mind. You know, Hitler believed that if you have a 100,000 people all shouting the same slogan in a stadium, nobody is going to stand against it, everybody who opposes it is going to be silent because of this huge cultural thing. And I quote in the book, the words of Booker T. Washington, who says that evil doesn't become good and wrong doesn't become right just because the majority believe it to be so. But this is critical, our desire to believe something oftentimes is exactly what leads us into propaganda. We so want to believe something that's what we do..

Hitler Booker T. Washington
Liz Cheney for President? Sebastian and Matt Gaetz Discuss

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:52 min | 3 months ago

Liz Cheney for President? Sebastian and Matt Gaetz Discuss

"To be kind. I want to be charitable. She is fired. The people of Wyoming have fired her, but she needs a new job. She has quoted Lincoln. She compared herself to Lincoln yesterday, so she wants to run for the presidency. What is that campaign? What does that campaign going to look like? Can you help me out here, Madame Curie? We have so much to break down on the pending. Liz Cheney for president campaign, but I have a message to Liz Cheney. Just because you collude with The Lincoln Project doesn't make you Abraham Lincoln. The notion that she is having to surrender a crushing defeat and is then teasing a presidential contest just shows like peak Cheney, no exit strategy. No self awareness. Just, I think probably I think a narcissism that is guiding the decision making more than a review of what this lane actually is. So is the communication strategy for a Liz Cheney presidential campaign to have like an angry Dick Cheney growling into the camera about how the greatest threat to the world is Donald Trump. I'm old enough to remember when he was saying the same things about Saddam. You know, is laying there going to run in one that they're going to have to share with Adam kinzinger and Larry Hogan and the governor of New Hampshire sununu, kind of all these people that think that there's this mass calling. But I do think that Liz Cheney has satisfied her key constituency and that is Washington D.C. media bookers. I think Liz will have no problem sort of being on the airwaves. But when you actually get outside of the swamp of Washington D.C. and you talk to the real Americans who are watching and listening to us right now, there's not this great thirst for like a war mongering rhino who abandons the very principles that the American people are relying upon to build the country and ensure

Liz Cheney Madame Curie Lincoln Wyoming Washington D.C. Abraham Lincoln Adam Kinzinger Larry Hogan Cheney Dick Cheney Donald Trump Sununu Saddam New Hampshire LIZ
"booker t" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

The Suburban Women Problem

04:20 min | 8 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on The Suburban Women Problem

"Thanks for joining us on the suburban women problem. As Julie just mentioned, this week, red wine and blue is launching our parent playbook. It's a fun guide full of helpful advice for moms who want to organize in their communities. You can find the guide on our website at red wine blue, or at the link in the show notes. Our guest today is a man who needs little introduction. He's fought for legislation to address affordable healthcare, women's rights, climate change, and wealth inequality. He's a senator from the great state of New Jersey, Cory Booker, we are so excited to have you here on the suburban women problem. Welcome. I'm so happy to be on. Thank you so much for having me. Back in 2020, Donald Trump claimed that you personally would be coming to destroy the suburbs if Joe Biden got elected. We here at red wine and blue knew how absurd this whole claim was because all the suburban women we know would love for you to come to their neighborhood. So ever since Biden did get elected, we've been saying when is Corey coming to the suburbs. So welcome. We're glad that you're finally here. But the real question is, why do you think Trump used you of all people as the boogeyman? I think it was a form of dangerous demagoguery that unfortunately still exists. But it kind of hit home for me because in 1969 the year I was born, my parents moved into these great suburbs, but they weren't welcome. My parents had to get a white couple opposes them. Thanks to this incredible group of activists suburbanites, black and white, that came together to try to break the segregation in some of these towns. And it's actually an amazing story because they set up a sting operation where the white couples would follow my parents volunteers and my parents would be turned away from a home and then they would send the white couple and on the house of my parents loved they were told it was sold to white couple found out it was still for sale and then on the day.

Cory Booker Julie Donald Trump Joe Biden New Jersey Biden Corey Trump
"booker t" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

01:49 min | 10 months ago

"booker t" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Alive. And then that brightness of that morning sun, it fades. And I've never held on wanting that sunrise to last forever. But I sit and I relish and I watch that experience as it rises and as it turns into the morning sun. And so a lot of our suffering comes from believing that things are permanent. That we're going to be this way forever. Our suffering comes from believing that things are supposed to be perfect. That were never supposed to get sick. Or get old that were never supposed to have a bad day. And our suffering comes from believing that we are alone in this world. But other people don't have these same experiences. It comes from forgetting that we belong to each other. So yeah, I think that's what I have to say about the three characteristics. I like it. Well, some parts of it. I don't like, not your comments, but see, inherent dissatisfaction, yeah, sometimes that's no fun, but it also is the way it is and better to see it clearly and be aligned with it than to fight it all the time. Absolutely. I was watching the videos for the anxiety challenge the other day. You did a great job in those videos, even though I know it was a little stressful. And you did a great job in this interview, which I also know was a tiny bit stressful. So thank you very much for doing it and I want to remind everybody they can check her out in the anxiety challenge and then in the anxiety course which will live on in the app..

"booker t" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

KPRC 950 AM

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"booker t" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

"Booker T. And the MGS. Wouldn't it be the great music for Chili Palmer to walk or drive to you saw that movie, right? Refresh my memory. You know you didn't see them. Chili Palmer. John Travolta. I don't know that shorty. Get shorty. Okay? The Chili Palmer thing threw me off how he's like Booker T and the MGS. You know, as a core band. He should have been called Chili Palmer. The thing about Booker T and the MGs as it was a bunch of black guys and a white guy, And you always got to wonder. You know, the white guy, Steve Crapper. What did he do? To earn the respect to those brothers in the band. Well, did he do? What did he do? He played? I guess he played guitar played. Yeah, but he probably threw down in a fight to think they were one of the first racially integrated rock groups. They had two white guys, two black guys. Pretty cool band that what you're saying? You find black people to be violent and white People must also display violence to fit into that violent world. Which black people just natural living that what you say. And Kenny? No, not black people. I'm talking about musicians. Oh, yeah. Musicians for sure. Yeah. Musicians are great, but don't leave them alone with your wife. You know, You know what I'm saying? I just I just got done, saying, I think it's cool that that's right. Integrated Ban Cropper. By the way, we've hung out with him before real cool guy. He lives up in Memphis. Steve Cropper is alright. Okay. Earlier, we played a sound bite where a woman who claimed to be gender fluid was explaining how she wears different color wrist bands on different days of the week and heard her gender seems to a fall off and then reattach itself occasionally. So that's what gender fluid means. The colours of the wristband tell you what gender she is that day. Rick from New Orleans. Heard us play that and he thought he might call into the show. Go. What's Rick got to say? Go ahead, Rick. What do you got, buddy? Well, I'm an older gentleman. I'd like to be polite. So I'm confused. I always say yes, ma'am. Yes, sir. Mrs. And Mr. So what do I do with the gender fluid? Young? Ladies man. Read the wrist bands. Yeah, You got to read the great But what do I say? If if they're there the neutral in the middle Then you say they It's they and them. That's what she's now. Here's where it gets real confusing. What do you do? If you're color blind. Oh, Lord. I know exactly Give up on the world. Now you have now your talent, color blind people. They can't play along with your gender fluidity or they risk offending, you know, Frankly, I'm against it. I got to say at the end of the day, I'm thinking there's probably more color blind out people out there than people that made up agenda. Just be mine. Just my two cents. I've never actually met anybody before. Who thought they were more than one gender. But I've met a lot of people that are color blind over the Yeah. So I'm going to go out and take the color blind People side on this one, you know? Some creep in Florida was harassing two women at a bar last week. So the bartender pretended to pass. One of them are receipt. But it was really a note telling her to flip her ponytail to her other shoulder if she needed help. Now People online are calling him to do it. Yeah, I guess so. Yeah, now people online, or he should have asked her to pull her boobs out. I don't think that I don't think that would have helped. She was being harassed. She was already being harassed. She didn't need more. So now people online are calling him a hero after a photo of him holding the note went viral. That's kind of cool, right? Just a Bart. Of course, The odds are the guy was just trying to get some tips. He didn't want the girls leaving because they were being harassed. But he does seem like that was harassing female customers. It's bar one of the bartender just lean over, grab him by the hair on the back of his head and slam him face down into the bar three or four times until he learned his lesson about how to behave around the lady. Well, that's the thing right. He's busy making drinks so he didn't quite understand. Don't take long. So he made this. See how he's passenger. The note. Yeah, she seemed to like it, so she took Photo of it. Oh, no, I bet they're gonna be dating soon. I bet you dollars to doughnuts that bartender got more than just a tip that night. My didn't catch machine. I bet she did to. Yeah. Look how long it takes to grab somebody by the back of the head. Watch it. Hey. Oh, no. Oh, see Billiard. No time. Now I'm right back to making a mojito or whatever they Hey, are you okay? But check on him. Are you all right, buddy? Okay, over there. Did that hurt? It was all a trick. It was. It's like wrestling, is it But your but your nose looks like a cut. I don't know when you go down like that. You hit your hand instead of your hand. You just did You know he was going to do that to you? Yeah, we practiced you would you and him practice wrestling moves before the show where he beat you up like that? All right. I don't want to talk about this anymore. Okay? Well, all right, we'll leave it alone. Just I was surprised to see it. We never had violence in the studio before and then to find out it was canned violence. Well, I'm fine. I'm glad that everybody is okay, because after Yeah. Now we need a Houston Houston listeners helped. Okay, we got the family of a 62 year old grandmother who was killed outside of a Houston gym is asking for the public's help to find her killer. I don't know if you read about this. This just happened 62 year old grandma. For some reason, somebody thought she needed to be killed. Uh, so the families joined up with the mayor of Houston. That's Mr Mayor Turner. They're not a real helpful guy when you got a problem, and so they've announced that they've got an additional $10,000 on top of the other $5000 reward from crime stoppers to see if we can Help find these guys. She was arriving for an exercise class. She got ambushed in the parking lot in a robbery, and they murdered her as just ridiculous, the kind of stuff that's going on right now..

John Travolta Steve Cropper Steve Crapper New Orleans Rick Chili Palmer Memphis $10,000 $5000 Florida last week 62 year two cents two women Houston One MGs Mayor Kenny Turner