35 Burst results for "Book Club"

A highlight from Introducing Crime Glasses: A True Crime Book Club Podcast

Crime Glasses

00:52 sec | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from Introducing Crime Glasses: A True Crime Book Club Podcast

"Reader. Crime glasses is your true crime book club podcast. Every month we'll be selecting a new true crime book to read using it as a guide to talk about the cases that shocked us. The underlying issues and the moments that had us closing the book desperate for a breather. And if reading is just not your thing, that's okay, I still welcome you to listen to the weekly episodes because I will give you all of the case details so you won't miss out. Also, I can't promise that you won't find yourself in a cozy nook devouring every page after. We will read everything from true crime classics like the Ted Bundy focus the stranger beside me by Ann rule to more recent favorites like we keep the dead close by Becky Cooper, which details the author search for the killer of Jane Brighton, a Harvard student who was murdered in her off campus

Ted Bundy Becky Cooper ANN Jane Brighton Harvard
Author Chat With David Yoon

Books and Boba

01:46 min | 3 months ago

Author Chat With David Yoon

"Hey we're hearing with david author and guess now publisher dvd. I'll stick thanks for joining us on books and boba. Thanks for hopping looking forward to this. Yeah we are here to talk about what we're talking to david about all his great accomplishments but also about his newest book version zero But before he gets that we always like to start because this is a book club about asian american authors. We always like to hear how did you. How did you end up becoming an author like what was your journey as a writer was always something that was part of your life or something that you discovered later on. It's definitely it's. I mean i love this question. 'cause for me. It's definitely been something i've always wanted to do Ever since i was in third grade. I wrote a story in the class and they loved it. They're cracking up. And i was feeling and then a another story interested in it was crickets. Okay okay good feedback gonna try them better. And since then. My favorite classes have been english. I major was in english. I went to grad school for fiction. That's where i met Nikola wife Yeah and yeah and we learned about writing but we didn't learn about the publishing industry so we spent a lot of years just working our day jobs because they paid really well and writing in the mornings or at night and Really the are grad school contacts for members in college was the way we got to be agents and people like that was that was mainly networking. And the the more you write the more you can make your own luck. So when the agent when you friendly do need an agent now i will assume your stuff budgets to sean

David Nikola Sean
Author Lauren Morrill Shares The Books That Sparked Her Interests

What Book Hooked You?

04:57 min | 7 months ago

Author Lauren Morrill Shares The Books That Sparked Her Interests

"So learn. What book hooked you Probably i've been a reader. As long as i can remember but a book that really sticks out for me was judy blume's just as long as we're together I was never when i was younger. That excited about historical fantasy And i think that was the first book where i read it and i was like this girl. The main character stephanie. Her parents are divorced. My parents were divorced. She had a younger brother kind of annoyed her. I had a younger brother. Who kind of annoyed me you know. She was always her friend groups and kinda liked boys but wasn't totally sure. What was going on there. And the book is set. And i think sixth grade And i thought well if this girl's boring life is the same as my boring life and her boring life can make a book then. Maybe my boring life or the ideas that i could. We could be a book and it was just sort of the first time that i came a week to the idea of contemporary fiction. Which became you know. The thing that i consumed veraciously then forever and still do instill despite meager attempts here and there really only contemporary So that's the book that looms large in my memory and you know i reread it as an adult many times over the course of my life and it's still great and i don't think you mentioned or maybe you did but what do you remember the age. What was the exact age. I was probably you know. Maybe like four fifth grade. Before that i was reading babysitters club. And that was kinda cool and but that was like oh books can really connect with you. They can be meaningful beyond just being fun and yeah that one always stuck with me and actually i had my copy that i used to read all the time and when i left for college i took all of the books that i had that i wanted to keep forever the ones that were meaningful to me and i put them in a rubbermaid ben in the closet and my mom thought that was the donate been donated all ex. She feels bad about it. And i didn't say anything for a long time because i do what had happened and i didn't want her to feel bad because my mom is also a big reader but every once in a while i think about that and i bought a new copy with new cover. And that's fine. But i one day it used bookstore found like the old version that had the cover i remembered and i bought it because i had to have it so with this book. Then being sort of that maybe lightbulb moment for you when it was like oh i can write about normal things. And that's a you know that's a thing that people write books about. What were your early attempts to be a writer. Like what were you writing. So my mom worked in a real estate office and she would bring home i. It was old typewriters that they didn't need anymore and then she also had word processors And so i would you know right on those and i would write books and they were all they were always about a girl who was new to school for some reason. I was obsessed with the idea about being the new girl in school. And starting your life over fish out of water. 'cause i i went to the same school from second grade until i graduated. So all the same people and unions stuck with whatever identity you fell face first into. I told that story to my agent at one point and he was like ha. You still only fish. All your books are like that. I was like that's true. Yeah i do love one of those and so as you then grew up. I'm assuming that kind of this idea of of of being a writer maybe still was in the back of your mind somewhere so when you became kind of a young person when you were a teenager what were you like. What books were you reading. What other things may be. Were you into describe lauren. As a so. I by the i was still reading a lot. The books i read. Were whatever oprah put on her book club. I was very into like adult sort of quote unquote literary fiction. That i would take stuff from whatever my mom had and yeah i think at that point it was like i graduated high school in two thousand one so i was like the middle range before there was wi- a really And i was really into journalism.

Judy Blume Stephanie Lauren Oprah
A review of the book, Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro

The Book Review

04:42 min | 7 months ago

A review of the book, Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro

"Jones joins us now from brooklyn. New york is the editor in chief of vanity fair magazine and this week she reviews the new novel by couso shapiro. Clara and the sun ra. Thanks for being here. Hi thanks for having me so for those who are not aware. Rodica is still one of us. We think you're at the new york times. She was formerly the editorial director of the books. Dusk before working at vanity fair. Where you've been now for more than three years right yet just a little over three years. What is it like doing that. Job in quarantine. We're so used to it now. I know so year. Old question is feels unless normal which i never thought i'd say but i will tell you this week. We released our hollywood issue which is traditionally an enormous photo production to create a three panel. Gate fold cover and it's a big group portrait so obviously in the age of group. Portrait's are rather challenging and unsafe and so we decided we needed an artist. Who would be up for the challenge. So we enlisted. Maurizio cuddle alon and pierpaolo ferrari. The italian conceptual artists to do a remote shoot with ten people. They ended up photographing people remotely over ten days on four continents all through laptops and you know very small local sets and it was really an amazing feat and so with every issue with every day covering the news. We are finding our way. I have to say. I don't know how it's been for you. But you know there's something about having new boundaries and new challenges that that pushes you to be creative and innovative. And i feel like that's what my team has been able to do. So it has felt very much like a journey. But i've been really really pleased with how creative we've been able to be and still sort of fulfilling that core purpose of entity fair to cover a range of entertainment reporting investigative reporting political reporting and iconic photography. And all of the stuff that we do best all right. I'm asking a superficial question. And i'll followed by deep one. It has to be slightly less glamorous. And i'm assuming that there's no vanity fair oscars party this year. I want you to know that for this podcast. I'm wearing my fancy sweatpants there in the rotation. it's our tradition to celebrate the oscars and and we are finding ways will find a way to do that this year. That is safe and respectful. It's an interesting year for the academy as well because even though movie theaters have been closed for most of the time and it's obviously been really challenging to get films out there. There has also been an explosion of actually really fantastic cinema and again presented in sort of innovative ways. And i know the academy wants to really celebrate that talent and so we are going to figure out ways to do that on our part as well all right. I promised i'd follow it up with a deep question. I don't know if it's steep but it's a literary question those of us here. At the time. I think all leaders of vanity fair and know that you are at heart very much A literary percent of book person. What has your year of reading been like in quarantine. I know you're usually at least part of at least one book club. Have you been having trouble concentrating on books. Have you found books to be refuge. What's it been like for you. I am ashamed to say that my reading at least for my comfort level has fallen off a cliff. So which is why. I was so delighted to get this assignment to review issue. Gross new novel because he is one of my favorite favorite living writers. And i am a complete us. I have read all of his works and will continue to read and reread them. As long as i live so that was wonderfully focusing and it was an opportunity to sit not only with the new novel but with so much of his former work and really think about it. But it's been tough. I don't know i mean i. I feel like for a lot of readers out there. It's been tough to focus. And i think that the thing that made a difference for me. Oddly enough was that. Because i was no longer commuting to work. I lost that staple commuting time which i realized. In retrospect is when i did a lot of my reading but it's that i do lead a book club of incredibly wonderful astute readers all women who work or have worked on wall street and so with them. At least i've been keeping up a minimum a reading activity. We just met last week. Actually and discussed martin mrs novel london. And we have a of great books lined up for our next meeting.

Vanity Fair Magazine Couso Shapiro Rodica Maurizio Cuddle Alon Pierpaolo Ferrari Oscars Clara Brooklyn New York Times Jones Hollywood New York Martin Mrs London
The Magical Language Of Others By E.J. Koh

Books and Boba

05:40 min | 8 months ago

The Magical Language Of Others By E.J. Koh

"And welcome to books and boba a podcast between pittsburgh asian and asian american authors. My name is yet. And i'm re-re you and welcome to our first book club. Discussion of twenty twenty one. We're discussing your january twenty twenty one book club pick the magical language of others by ej co but before we get to the book rear. How has your twenty twenty one going. I mean we talk about this a lot. How time is just like a flat circle and it just feels like january has flown by. It has even though i mean wasn't there a coup. Wasn't there a lot of things happened politically. Obviously but i don't know like everything kind of feels like a fever dream and with the vaccine situation. The it's it's just been constant change degeneracy that antibac- sir shutdown vaccination site now. I did not hear about that. But i did hear about was how we have a how how we have like a vaccine shortage for like more than half of the country and not there's like a new variant of the covid nineteen screen. Yeah it's gotten really bad and it's like a question of of like wilda vaccine be able to stop the symptoms of the new strains and i am trying to stay as calm as possible. I've been staying at home as much as i can. Considering that like now like covid has been happening on the outskirts of inner circle. So it's just like. I'm just i'm just like people. Please stay home because now now it's like right outside my door stop and you're kind of terrified at this point. Well we're here today to talk about our january twenty twenty one book club pick so let's get to it As always as always we're gonna talk all about the book the magical language others so if you haven't read it yet read it i if you don't wanna get spoiled But if you want to listen to us first and then read it. And that's fine to do you. And i would like to give out the trigger warnings of of eating eating disorder suicidal thoughts. I guess like child neglect This there's a lot of sensitive topics in this book. So i would proceed with caution if if you are sensitive to those topics art. So let's get started. A rewrite won't start off with the book jacket description. All right the magical language of others is a powerful and aching love story and letters from mother to daughter after living in america for over a decade g. Cho's parents return to south korea for work leaving fifteen year old and her brother behind in california overnight. G finds herself abandoned and adrift in a world. Made strange by her mother's her mother writes letters in korean over the years seeking forgiveness and love. Letters engy cannot fully understand until she finds them years later hidden in a box as nj. Translate the letters. She looks to history her grandmother. June's ears as a love sick wife and tej on the horrors her grandmother. Kumiko witnessed during the island massacre and to poetry as well as her own lived experience to answer questions inside all of us. So right off the bat. I figure i mean i really enjoyed reading this book I'm not like literally trained person but Ej's pros is really beautiful very descriptive. Very there's a lot of stuff going on and a lot of really like beautiful descriptions. But i know that because i am a son of immigrants and not a daughter especially not a daughter of a korean immigrant. I know that your relation to this story might be a little more deeper than than mine. But what did you. How did you feel about this book. Man i how do i even answer that question. Is i knew that i knew going in that memoir was going to be very difficult for me to read. I'm a very emotional reader for those of you. Who haven't been listening to our podcast for for a while. But when i memoirs are supposed to be personal and it's supposed to tell the story of the author but for me when i was reading. Ej hose book. It seemed like she was holding up a mirror. I guess instead of her instead of just like listening and consuming her story. It felt like i was seeing kind of like this distorted reflection of my own childhood and my own adulthood and like you said like her prose is really gorgeous. I think that has a lot to do with the fact that she is a poet and she knows how to use each word to its maximum effect. Just like an example of her poetic prose. I highlighted a quote from her. I watched the sun come up like an egg cracked open underwater. It's yoke rising with listlessness.

Ej Co Engy Pittsburgh CHO Kumiko South Korea EJ America California
The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires -- Librarian A - burst 02

Drunk Librarians Podcast

00:45 sec | 8 months ago

The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires -- Librarian A - burst 02

"So this is actually by grady hendrix. Which gig radi found out. Today was a white man. No humor favorite tiktok slow. I thought i thought there were parts where he described cubes in boobs. Thought you know this might not be a woman. This might be a man hugues boobs. Let's via white man. It's it's it's just like the eitel and dec- magin how pupils in boobs get into that hugues boob southern book clubs guide to slang vampires. Well if anyone could do it it would be a white man.

Grady Hendrix This Week Magin
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

06:01 min | 9 months ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Like a really important age milestone you in our personal like physical and social Rose say yes important because it's divisible by five and but it's also the your your brain stops true restore the braids now. Yeah this is. The last one sprain righetti to last spring update. And you just have to keep operating on that same computer even when there's other software and you have to try and make it adapt. Yeah yeah. I like that because like i definitely went through a very angry summer. You know of like. I'm not going to grad school this year. I'm staying in chicago another year. I don't have a job. Like i am i. I definitely feel trapped in now. Almost more like psychologically than like physically because physically. My body really likes the repetition. You know. I do very well being in the same place every day and doing the same things and seeing the same people. It's like as long as i can. Sort of throw in different sort of intentional variations. I can do pretty well. But in terms of like multi vision of myself and my future. I feel very trapped because there was like months. None of us knew what was coming next. You know and that sort of sense of like this is never gonna and i'm always gonna be here. Nothing's ever gonna change Nothing's ever gonna get better under. Stock is really hard to live with in your head and it's really hard to get yourself to like shower if you're like nothing matters And i think this will come up in a episode. Were prepping for. Because i'm reading pretty brown right now for weeks. She talks a lot about what loneliness is and yeah. I think I don't have fully formed thoughts yet. Because i'm still reading in. We'll more about it later. But that's something. I've been reflecting onto of like some days. I can feel really lonely and other days. I don't feel only at all and the people that i'm physically around have not changed And like vernice. Great calling me out. And i'm like i'm alone. He's like julia. And i'm like okay. Yeah but i'm like it's like a. It sounds so bad in three mississippi. Grateful sound like you're right. Like i could be fully alone and not have like even a pet besides my plants to keep me company. That would really suck. But i think there's like different levels of loneliness too like especially when we're both like emotionally feeling lonely in a day. Maybe the two of us talking because feel better. But maybe it's like we just sit in our sadness because we can't see your family's end really best friends but we're not family. Yeah you're not my mom. Sorry you would never be or the loneliness of lake Still am virtually but before the panel was very active in my church community here in chicago and like saying acquire and like that's a loneliness. I can't fill right now like i cannot be in a congregation with a lot of familiar faces and new faces Connecting into this routine. That i really find comforting for my own spirituality to seeing a space multiple people though i have grand visions of getting utah showed room together to seeing some like christmas song for parts covered. We do. I know salvin said he hasn't much of a senior about. I think we can get a minute if anything can like. I dunno clap along. can he can. He do like the base part of acapella where they just go do i. E fox asu. Doesn't cam sing tenor when necessary. Yes so we have. We could do soprano alto tenor baritone. Yeah there's food on my face it's okay it's a podcast well. Cranberry gel was pretty much all melted. It is a puddle so this means we should clean the table. We're going to go for a walk but in almost a bit we should. We should go now. Actually finished acted later. We'll go from happy. Thanksgiving happy thanksgiving happy holidays. Because who knows when we'll get this episode.

righetti vernice chicago julia brown salvin mississippi utah asu
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

08:21 min | 9 months ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Serious sentimental chat without recording it but of course not no. This is kind of plan we were like. Oh we can record like our friends giving the accountable when we do the week before thanksgiving with a roommate. Roommate other reminded the boys. And the boys the boyfriends and That will be cancelled because we're living in Pandemic wasn't quite wary case. Look outside recently. You been camping on your own for the ten months. yeah yet. Welcome to tony twenty. Yeah are natasha changed. Plans and has been with her family all week in new york ends picture. I had a tearful hello to burundi in the streets. Drop-off uses sweet. He's in a lot of the cooking family Yesterday at May also cooking today. But he came over dropped off like extra turkey to tex potatoes and three types of vegetables and four types of bread and like we have so much food. We have so much food we we will post picture because it didn't say how much food we have. We got the two of us. Seven people easily easily. Maybe a little bit more turkey would need more turkey. 'cause we have more beans. We don't really need more veg women integrating that's one thing we forgot. There's no gravy raven 'cause we for a real shame three different people who took him like. It's okay i walk in julie do it baby. She like now. I forgot coming to. Yeah it's one of those things you just take for granted that it's just going to be there on thanksgiving. One of the thanksgiving memories at my family always gets retold every year is. My aunt was hosting thanksgiving one year. And we all sit down. Is beautiful sprinted. Even though the other people help like she she did the bulk of the work that night And my uncle turns to her and her husband and his life. Where's the gravy. She just said goes. Why is she agrees. All of us start eating. She's like in the kitchen whipping agreement. And so every every thanksgiving we're together in chrissy. Who did you meet the grave gravy. Man she's never gonna she's life is never lived that you know like i just i can imagine her just like the night before waking up in a cold sweat like i meet the gravy gravy makes it like before. She's even made the same. Yeah scraps from the last accuser. Freezer full of grieving members. Guy like dallas has Everything together so it just turns into a big pile of bush. Miami have thanksgiving found wrong stores Yeah no thanksgiving's a quiet affair in the closet home. I kind of those things are quiet. That is an accurate statement. Yeah young unless you see. Football is on the one thing because my dad's shout these potato separate no legal the metals credibility smokiness. Yeah i was surprised. Stars expecting pure sugar. And i got to save navy for later on my plate so that i'm could like he's into the sweet thing. Yeah no no not at all. I think the corn would do a better job once again. I made myself. i'm sitting here. Congratulated for cell. Phone could did you used to like with with my mom's side of the family. They live all over the country. So it's been. We don't do a lot of holidays together. But everyone's around when we do and all the moms cook and they sit down and just start congratulating themselves and complementing each other on the food that they've just thanks and all the cousins are just like. Oh my god mom we get it. It's good like why. Are you still talking about it and like now that i cook more like cooked with people. Were like a group dinner. I'm get. I'm like i want to sit here and talk about the feet that we just accomplished. I twenty minutes. We had multiple dishes and not only was the effort of making it yet. Every time we get a holiday like this in my mind is blown my mom who can keep all the things in order piano. She does when things need to be cooked too hot all at the same time. The asking me like Prepped in advance and then reheated in the oven which things like really need to be served at the last minute. She just does head to usually writes things out especially. It's going to be like multiple days and then also with my relatives tonight now that we're older and helping more kitchen. She'll just like hand you a note card. You're in charge of these two things today. How here's your time line while it's a well oiled machine. That's that's Meals on the table. Yeah now. I'm the worst at that of timing things out so that they're done at the same time like i. Throughout my adult life has on several occasions finished one dish and had to wait another thirty minutes for the other ones to be done. And so i literally have my dinner while i'm waiting just standing there ready to cook and then i get the other half and then i i'm. I'm not good at them. Yeah i feel like. I'm quarantine something that it's done. Sort of forced a lot of us to spend some quality time with ourselves and maybe a little too much. Tory like man. I kinda suck. Can we should see other. People have been yourself but i think through the process. It's been an interesting exercise in understanding your own story and like where it's going and where it's been who's actually involved. You know who who is really a character that matters and your narrative arc like we have the book version of live where you guys many characters as you want. It doesn't cost more money. And then they try to make it into a fill we got cash and then they're gonna stage it getting me. He bought a stage. We didn't really trim the stabbing. We're going to do like low budget. We're only gonna do one sets. Let's do their heart rate. And that's the story of their life. You have to get that angle. And that's what this interior has been. Yeah it kind of feels like a sitcom union where you have one set and it's just the same for people coming and going in your life. Why are they always together. Don't they have lives. Why those roommates that good friends. No one is really good friends with all their roommate. We'll continue our lives. Young walking around with a laugh track ready to go on. My phone took a job in this. Play the laugh track because no one else will laugh.

tony twenty turkey burundi natasha chrissy julie new york dallas Miami navy bush Football
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

05:20 min | 10 months ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Two classically american. You she just really act. Kind of hit amazes america in so many different ways. And i feel like that's part of what I think that's part of what helped get obama elected. I think that's part of her power and continuing to connect to people even now. I feel like posts awhile. Presidency like it's michelle who's really like having a big public influence. Said like i mean the world is obsessed with her. I think yeah reading. Her upbringing found like it was a really cool sort of inside look into history of chicago. But like i said it looks a lot like a lot of my friends childhoods to until it was it was interesting sort of i don't know i really. I really enjoy that. And i can see why she can kind of go anywhere. And someone's like yes. I relate to you And i think that's really cool. I feel like that's something. She kind of talks about more in the next section becoming or sorry yes. We're going when she starts. I mean it'd be part of that is hurt in brock's relationship in we can get into that as well because i love love stories but also when she is hoping campaign for obama like it's through her relatable storytelling Like kind of cliche at this point. But so true of like the more specific you are more relatable atlantic. She has very specific store. She can Like us as a tool to build bridges of understanding between one and people who might feel like. Oh i'm so different from you. And she's like oh my. My dad was also disabled A big impact on our lives and yet like i literally wrote in my notes i loved the middle section that was like by far my favorite in watching them sort of advance in their careers. And like that's where the conflict really starts in their personalities and winning through that but particularly michelle obama on the campaign trail was a formidable force that i being like ten years old did not pay attention do and when it happened and so like i just had no idea. I literally wrote my notes. Michelle is the reason. That obama won iowa like like just the amount of face to face networking that she did during his campaign sort of unmatched among like potential first ladies like she was as much a public figure in a representative of an obama administration as brock. Like i think a opinion on this is like. I also read few months ago. Now i read ton ozzy cokes eight years in power and he has its essay collection. He has he wrote an essay couple years in the obama about physically amount about michelle. And he.

obama michelle brock america chicago atlantic michelle obama obama administration iowa
Africa and museums: shaping the future; rethinking the past

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:40 min | 10 months ago

Africa and museums: shaping the future; rethinking the past

"I just on your lawson. The founding director of the paloma in togo and andrew santo. Who's just written a book with twenty eight interviews with museum leaders across the world. I also speak to. Dan hicks about his book. The british museum's about the bronzes and for our work the week christopher repeal of the national gallery in london talks about san mateo painting of copernicus. That's coming to the national for an exhibition next year before that a reminder that you can sign up for the art newspapers free daily newsletter for all the latest stories goes to the art newspaper dot com and the link is at the top right of the page. And while you're there you can also sign up for a range of other newsletters including the book club and the art market. I now a new book by the writer and cultural strategy advisor andhra santo features twenty eight conversations with directors of museums and other institutions oldham during the covid nineteen pandemic the future of the museum. Twenty eight dialogues. Include voices from across the world attempting to define museums and the challenges and opportunities ahead of them now and in the coming days among them. Direct is of african museums including sonia lawson the director of the paladin loma in togo in west africa. Andress and sonia join me to discuss the role of museums today and look at how sonya's togalese institution reflects a new coq drew dynamism on the african continent andress. I wanted to begin by asking you. This book was written on zoom. Just as we are now essentially so you talked to twenty eight museum or cultural institution directors about what they were doing. It happened to be done in the covy deer as it were but was it. Germinating is an idea for a much longer period this spring. I wrote an article in art. Net news actually wrote it over easter weekend. So i remember did very well I guess that was early april. I can't remember the exact dates and it was an article about reopening museums. And it just hit a nerve. It really got a lot of people talking at the time. And i heard from dozens and dozens of museum directors and just became part of illogic conversation. And that's when we really realized that this is the moment because it gave us an editorial frame because it it really was a moment that made us ask what is the future about. Still trying to figure it out. I think there's no doubt in all of our minds that this is one of those years in the calendar that will be a turning point. A historical marker where new phase is beginning persona. I think this phase is the one that started in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine just ended. Now we have a new face. So what does that mean for museums. Once i figured out that this would be a book not just of conversations with museum. Directors conversations about the future not necessarily revisiting. Why museums have been great in the past of which many reasons to talk about that too but to really have a forward-looking and that is what led to choices like this extraordinary new institution in togo. Which i think is such a taste of where museums or cultural institutions or cultural centers are headed All around the world so so in a way this moment. This covert moment crystallized. How such a book could come about and how we would choose directors to be in it before we speak specifically about sons institution. I wanted to ask you about a phrase that you use in the to the book where you talk about how. The paradigm smashing experimentation in museums and cultural institutions is happening in effectively in the global south so in africa in asia in latin america. Can you expand on that a bit now. Because what do you think lies behind that. Well first of all i. That's not to say it's not happening elsewhere. And i think the book provides lots of examples of how people are thinking you in original ways about museums all around the world. But i think that there are perhaps two main reasons. Why so many of these truly interesting. And i would say inspiring. Examples of new practices are often happening in the global. South one is that many of these institutions are brand new. So it's you can speak to this. They have an opportunity to really design for the now and for the future. They're not dealing with a legacy infrastructure. They're not trying to retrofit something. That was already there and tried to adapt it to the future.

Togo Andrew Santo Sonia Lawson Dan Hicks National Gallery San Mateo Andress Oldham Sonya West Africa Sonia London Latin America Asia Africa
How small stores are cutting through the noise from the big-box stores this season

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:19 min | 10 months ago

How small stores are cutting through the noise from the big-box stores this season

"Are a business show. So yes we're going to start with what today means for a big chunk of the economy retail because the deals extravaganza. We still call black. Friday has actually already begun. The pandemic has a lot of us. Rethinking our shopping. 'cause we really wanna live in a world where only the big national chains survive. A survey from at taxi found that seventy five percent of shoppers planned to make an effort to shop local. This holiday season marketplace's kristen schwab reports usually this shopping weekend at territories in austin texas is one big celebrating and they walk in. They think they've joined like some mosh pit of Toys shoppers sylvia edwards says the general manager children running up and down everywhere loud music. You know noises from different toys being played with a cacophony of magic madness. And so it'll never get like that this year and not just because of social distancing territories has divided shopping hours. Grownups only ten to four all ages. Welcome four to six. The store is also offering night owl tours. Private appointments for shoppers after closing. You get a whole hour in the toy store and then a little personal salesperson that walks you through the store shows. You are twee workshop where we still cut wood and make toys. These are the kinds of personal touches. That could help. Small retailers cut through all the noise coming from big box stores. Disol- the keller at mintel says traditionally a third of shoppers to most of their buying this weekend and the message from retailers. She says is that they hope to see even bigger numbers this year. Basically start thinking about your holiday shopping and now because it's just only going to be more of a challenge to get what people want on time. The goal this season make day an occasion to shop. Frank reese who owns acapella books in atlanta is doing that with extra virtual book clubs and author events. A lot of our business in normal times. is not in this little store. What a lot of businesses is offsite events. And he's doing the free delivery thing by hand because you know amazon sells books to. I'm kristen schwab for marketplace.

Kristen Schwab Sylvia Edwards Austin Texas Mintel Frank Reese Acapella Books Atlanta Amazon
Study Sees Rise in Lonely Americans, and the Workplace Might Play a Part

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:53 sec | 11 months ago

Study Sees Rise in Lonely Americans, and the Workplace Might Play a Part

"New study shows about 60% of workers are feeling lonely during this pandemic. Almost Denise Whitaker talk with an expert about how to deal with that Erica's honor with health kick suggests reaching out to friends and co workers. Help both them and you with conversations. Plus, she advocates a bit of self care something I've been doing. For example, are these livestream fitness classes and even that, you know, even though I'm not in the studio with other people, there is a sense of camaraderie. And I know that that's definitely An emotional boost for me, if it's not exercise you crave. Then she suggests you find another outlet to find that social connection with people. And that could be anything from an online cooking class, a virtual book club, wine tasting or some other group that you can connect with online right now to share your hobbies, your interests and Have a little bit of extra conversation outside of work

Denise Whitaker Erica
Interview With Yahia Lababidi

Spark My Muse

04:21 min | 11 months ago

Interview With Yahia Lababidi

"Welcome everybody sparked by muse. And today i have a guest. Yahia la vida de. I hope i didn't mess that up too badly beautiful. Who is a writer. An egyptian who's come to america as a young adult eight critically acclaimed books of poetry and prose. he's an authorised an sas and most recently he sent me revolutions of the heart literary cultural and spiritual which is just a treasure trove of little gems. Some smaller pieces some slightly larger pieces and to begin speaking about it. It's hard to know where to choose at this banquet table where to pick but you so much for joining me for the podcast. Thank you for having me over here in new to and also. I want to make sure that we tell listeners about this book being the book for january. Twenty twenty one and meeting up with you in february on the third for a book club. Discussion and fighting. That'll be really fun. What's nice is that it's recorded so anytime someone wants to come back. And listen or it can be embedded on your webpage even or or any web page. Yeah it could be revisited and enjoyed over and over you define aphorisms as what is worth quoting from the souls dialogue with itself and you also say that you hope that might serve as a form of peace offering and bomb in these troubled times and for people who are not quite aware or quite. Have a handle on what aphorisms are. Perhaps you can just explain that a little bit and then speak about what that offers us today. Well it's it's basically it has currency without being recognized for what it is so anything when people have these quotes or inspirational sayings or even what they call it. A witty wise one liners. That's an aphorism if if it doesn't have a name attached to it and it's a maximum or proverb in the assuming some great sage cited then it's an another category of instruction but but enough for them. They're certainly more people who are aware of what they are. And who use them consciously now than when. I began writing them. Let's say thirty years ago at this point as a teenager. When i don't think anyone even knew what that meant but i grew up reading. People like braun. Nietzsche and blake and kafka and pascal who tended to write in offer 'isms and they basically i mean wild has some definitional skar wild about how he had some existing a phrase. I do not presume to some olives in a frozen any of my offers. But it's this. It's this idea of trying to encapsulate a great conversation. And that's why. I define it as a competition with the souls conversation with itself really so you go off. You're thinking about something dreaming meditating possibly weeks years even and then at some point. There's one line that you can extract from all that that can stand alone by itself that will be a key or a door or window or invitation for a complete stranger to have that conversation with themselves so a good aphorism doesn't in my understanding of it at least in everyone's got their own definition is just as suggestion or you to sort of the spark your own conversation With with your with your soul so to speak. And that's why. I really appreciate reading Books of aphorisms where there's few on the page and a lot of blank space because it's understood that they are in need of diluting the way you dilute. It is by bringing in everything you know. Suspect you know we're just breathing alongside it

America Kafka Nietzsche Braun Pascal Blake
Confesions by Kanae Minato

Books and Boba

04:51 min | 11 months ago

Confesions by Kanae Minato

"You're listening to books and bobo. Oppo club podcasts. Between books by easing american doctors are marvin gaye and angrier. And we're here today to talk about our october. Twenty twenty book club. Pick confessions by name and knoxville translated by steven snyder. Who re-re you picked. You picked a doozy for spooky twenty twenty. It really was the perfect read for for spooky month. In my opinion yeah. This episode should be released on election. Day twenty twenty. How are you feeling as we enter this potentially new era. I've just been trying not to think about it. I submitted my ballot a couple of days ago. And i'm like well. It's i don't know it feels kind of hopeless but you know you're i don't now i don't know i feel i don't wanna i don't wanna think about it. I like when the results come out. I'm still skeptical on. How much can change. How much damage control do yeah. Oh at least we can still escape to our books as a resident alien from canada. I'm counting on all you people to To us that's right. You can't vote. I voted for the first time when a moved to california. Because i didn't become naturalized until i was like twenty one twenty. Which very like my this is only like my second election because because the last election the first very first one i voted for was trump versus clinton and wow. I was appointed by the results of it my first election. I vote and i was like. Wow i feel like my vote. Didn't cout of but that's democracy for you right. I mean did count. it just didn't count enough. Yeah i know because of the electoral college or some bullshit like our international listeners are going to just be so continue. No i think they understand. Also what's at stake here. I mean everyone knows the situation that our country is an and yeah so Those of us in the future. How's it over there. I hope i hope it's I hope it's not as bleak but yeah Quick reminder that we're gonna be talking about the whole of confessions by claiming not so so that includes spoilers and since this book is kind of like a crime thriller. You definitely don't want to get spoiled before you get into it so make sure you read the book before coming back listening to our discussion. Yeah i would put this in the same category as never let me go. I'll just go into it as cold as possible and then come back and listen to us and it's a pretty quick read only about two hundred and thirty five pages for a novel. It's relatively short so you can probably knock it out in a day or two and back. Okay so we're we're gonna move on tear discussion. Yeah marvin what have you heard about this book before. Because it you know it was an international bestseller. It was extremely popular in japan. It sold millions of copies. And there's a movie based on this book as well. So have you heard about this book before. Going in actually haven't so this is my first time exposed to this I guess you can call source material. actually didn't know there was a film Yeah it's directed by tetsuya kashima. Who is a pretty well known director and it debuted at the toronto international film festival back in twenty ten and it got a lot of critical acclaim so i have not watched a movie and interested in how they adapted it. Yeah i mean it is a form of story that is somewhat familiar in asian media tropes which is like the revenge story right like we've seen this before in like the korean cinema. A lot of japanese films anime manga light novels also feature stories that like kind of focused on revenge right like the wrong party. Getting their justice is probably one of the darker ones of these that i've read

Steven Snyder Marvin Gaye Knoxville Electoral College Clinton Canada California Tetsuya Kashima Marvin Japan
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 1 year ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
Identify the New You!

RISE Podcast

05:33 min | 1 year ago

Identify the New You!

"Identify the new you. I think one of the hardest things about going through a world rocking life changing experience is that you come out the other side a someone totally different. Only. Your mind is still processing what's happened as who you were not as who you are now. It's like one of those sci Fi movies where the spaceship moves into hyper drive or warp speed or whatever they call it, and then the galaxies all blur into streaks and suddenly the enterprise is in another dimension. You. have become something else. You've moved on to an entirely new dimension, but your sense of self, the you that makes up your thoughts and feelings is still the you who you always were. Life is so rude sometimes. As if it weren't enough that you've got to deal with the emotional upheaval of what you're experiencing. Now you also have to contend with a big old identity crisis. Only most of us won't see the crux of the problem as a question of identity. Which makes it harder still? In my opinion, there are four different kinds of identity crisis as it pertains to loss pain or grief. One. You had an identity and it was taken away from you. I was a great worker, but my company laid me off now I'm just unemployed. To. You want an identity that is denied to you. I wanted to be a mom so badly, but the IVF treatment didn't work and I'm devastated. Three. You chosen identity. And no longer want it. I thought that I was happy as a stay at home mom but actually I'm depressed and not a good moment to my kids. For. Someone else chose an identity for you. That isn't who you are. Being in this management role keeps me from being creative. But my boss thinks I'm needed here. Feel I'm dying inside? For a more visual illustration, let me try using a subject I know almost nothing about. Basketball. Let's begin with the first one. The identity you had was taken away from you. Several years back I was speaking at an event for the Navy Seal Foundation and I had the honor of meeting with a smaller community of Gold Star. Families. If, you're not familiar gold star families are those that have lost a loved one in military service and that day there were about fifty women who had lost their seal in service. I have worked with the military a lot over the years. It's a community that is incredibly close to my heart and a big focus of the philanthropy we do through our foundation. That's why I know. I'll offend some of them when I say this because all branches of military service are incredible and. and. So proud. But Nobody And I mean, nobody has a stronger sense of military pride and identity than the Navy seals. Memory is so vivid. Because while I've yet to meet a military spouse who wasn't proud of their service member. The seal wives are a breed to themselves. As I sat in the room that day I story of loss from decades before and others from just a few months prior. But the narrative I heard again and again was I was his wife. And now he's gone. Who Am. I now. Who Am I now? I've heard that line from mothers who've lost their only child. And men who lost their jobs. I've heard it from athletes who have a career ending injury and college students who've been dumped. When I think of this identity crisis in terms of basketball, it's akin to having your series winning shot blocked. have. You ever seen a game where an incredible player takes the game winning shot that is for sure absolutely going in. At the last second without warning, it's violently batted away by someone on the other team. The pain of that is all the more intensified by the fact that you just had it. It was just here. And now suddenly it's been ripped away from you. I can't begin to tell you why this happened to you. But when it comes to your identity on this particular point, I need you to hear me You are still his wife. You are still her mama. You are still an incredible asset to a team. You are still an amazing athlete. You are still a great boyfriend. Just because the thing attached to that identity was removed, doesn't mean that the role you earned was taken away.

Basketball Navy Seal Foundation IVF Gold Star Navy
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Just it's so funny now, but yeah, Julia was like, oh my gosh, like anything I did that was like made me seem like touristy or American and it was so funny. I yeah, I was I was funny now at the time we were both like jet-lagged and I was just let me take a picture of Westminster Abbey. Okay. Yeah. I was so mortified like I would I genuinely like it's just so stupid but I like started using an English accent in like coffee shops because I just you know where I only have to say like three words because I just desperately didn't want anyone to know that I was American like that's how much I hate Americans abroad and then like and I was trying and there were certain moments where I like different International friends. I made we're like cuz I the way I talk I'm very loud. I tried to tone it down and just doesn't always happen and so like there would be moments where like I remember the first time I realized what it felt like to listen to like a group of American women like get all excited and talk and there were we were like I was like sitting on the tube reading and there was a group of them and they were just so loud in a silent car and I just like wanted to dissolve into a puddle my chair and they were like, we we gotta go start box first and I'm just like shut up, but I think we sort of suffer from both assuming that America is the only country but then also That we have to educate everyone about us because no one knows hundred percent. Yeah one line from that story that I thought was really interesting is Jose capacity says like mrs. Is like asking him to like help interpret her mental ailments and not he says but we do not face a language barrier what need is there for an interpreter and that line just really stuck out to me because I feel like There's this assumption. That if we speak if we speak the same language. Like well understand each other and just how much like your family Culture Your sort of regional Culture Your Country culture like your work culture like how how much we are shaped by these and how much interpretation has to go up into communication with each other and how much we assume like, oh, we'll just understand you don't mean we don't need to put in an extra and in any extra work to like understand someone who comes from a different background or whatever, but I feel like I sort of saw in that moment like the the the the flaw and off communication is they both thought that they understood their relationship to their relationship to each other and they were both had very different ideas about what it was off. So just because technically they both spoke English doesn't mean that they're saying the same thing. I don't know. I thought that was really interesting. It kind of set me up for how to think about this book. Yeah a hundred percent I think almost every story is at least in some part about Failures of communication even if the people are speaking the same language. They're just not understanding each other. Yeah. And this is like the the time that it's like very explicitly said but almost all of the stories are about people like talking past each other. I was curious what you guys thought of. interpreter of maladies as the title for the whole collection and what you thought it meant and I like what you said worrying about the failures of communication and that's break beam across the whole whole collection cuz I'm asking this question meetings. I don't really have a good answer like why this title and like who is The Interpreter in that situation and then in the title That's interesting. Yeah in so far as like she's taking all of these kind of like 20th century maladies of like how we are relationships and how we deal with like immigration and like family down barriers and and how families relate to each other and kind of interpreting them in stock reform. I don't know if that's too like Convoluted. Yeah, I was kind of thinking something similar. I feel like she's saying like no matter where you're from. We all have issues and they need a translator. You know what I mean? Like we don't just like automatically understand each other off. And so she sort of doing that for us. I literally wrote a note about this story. I wrote unhappy people and unhappy marriages are everywhere. No one culture has a monopoly on happiness or sadness like yes. Yeah like you just I.

America Westminster Abbey Julia Jose mrs. Is
Can I use other people's recipes for my ebook for children?

Side Hustle School

02:50 min | 1 year ago

Can I use other people's recipes for my ebook for children?

"Chris, Calloway from Sydney Australia. I be listening to your show right from the beginning our unemployed. I did work in between I'm unemployed. Now again, I've tried several side hustles over the years I haven't managed to monetize. Miss yet I've tried a book club and Dane Grip I, had some success. I've started a youtube channel Foodie phonics, lessons, children, and have a few thought of his. What most recently have self published an evil children. My question is am I, able to use recipes that I find on the intimate and rename them for use in book at the back so that I can use the link for readers to contact me and the floor to your response to them. Thanks for gration cheese. Hey, thank you so much for listening. Thank you for calling in and good work on continuing to try different stuff. It takes a while and then that's that's okay. I love the idea of the Youtube Channel for food phonics lessons. Let's talk about your question. So can you use other people's recipes essentially and kind of rename them a bit It's a bit of a grey area because. A lot of recipes are are very common here. So there's not a lot of difference between let's say some standard recipes. Okay. But other recipes are created by chef. And there is proprietary work that goes into that. So the best safest answer is that you would need to contact the recipes author or creator for permission to use it in this way unless it's clearly something that is in the public domain. Okay now, that said, a lot of recipes as I mentioned are pretty simple. Okay. Are Pretty simple are pretty common or just handed down over the years and such. So if you're making souffles or castle as or something that's either complicated or somewhat unique, I was trying to think like what is unique to Australia and I did some googling and I read about fairy kick which I don't know a lot about even though I have been to Australia many times and love that country but very cake because the thing Australia. So anything that is complicated or somewhat unique. Where a chef is clearly create that recipe and that is something you definitely shouldn't borrow like that belongs to them however since so many recipes are rudimentary and copied over and over for those I think you'd be okay with putting your own twist on it and renaming it as you suggest except perhaps calicut half cows magical mackin sheep's. Or. farm-to-table Foodie phonics fruit salad I'm just providing some names here feel free to borrow these. You can still these or Foodie phonics vary bread maybe it's actually very bread not very kick now that I'm thinking about this more but whatever it is very bread you call it Cudi phonics ferry bread, and perhaps tweak the recipe a little bit i. think that's okay. That's a little bit different than just wholesale. Copying recipe somewhere and putting it in your own yearbook.

Calloway Youtube Australia Sydney Australia Chris
US podcast downloads and audience per platform

podnews

03:05 min | 1 year ago

US podcast downloads and audience per platform

"We start with an exclusive today exclusive data from contract on total downloads an audience splint by platform for US podcast downloads. He shows that apple has sixty one percent of podcast downloads and spotify only nine percent. But when you look at total audience, it's a different story with apple being used by about a third of podcast listeners. But spotify by about a quarter, apple podcasts might still be bringing in the downloads but spotify appears a significant service in terms of increasing podcasting total audience. According to Lipson today is the last day to submit your podcast into Amazon music and audible. If you want to be there for the launch, you should be using your podcast hosts distribution option or if you don't have one of those in your podcast host, a new podcast host and be, you'll find a link in our show notes newsletter today. Last month, we reported that anchor was hosting pirated podcasts. Aaron Monkey is the latest high profile podcast to publicly criticize the platform after discovering pirated copy of his new podcast American shadows on anchor same art, same description he adds. Spanish language audio on demand platform. IDEX has launched subscription platform vokes plus it'll cost you eleven dollars ninety five a month content creators will be paid based on total plays and audience wanted to replace the subscription service from podcast network. Wondering will be free for year. If you've got a US American Express card, check out your American Express essentials care package email from yesterday a third of the adult population in Ireland of listened to podcasts recently, almost half doing. So since the pandemic hit according. To new data and another exclusive transcriber, an APP that offers unlimited transcripts released. Later today people can just hit record. It transcribes in real time for how long they want, and they can share the transcription everywhere says the APPS developer you get unlimited time for three dollars nine, hundred, nine, a month, and it podcast News Oprah. Winfrey has launched a podcast with Apple Oprah's book club is in a compliment to a feature on apple books and Apple TV, plus it's not exclusive to the Apple Platform. Upon cast, an oral history of the office is nearing its end. The finale is next week. It's spotify original, but it's available everywhere. The current episode features the final episode of the office including a surprise return of Steve Carell Brazil and polke are back together. Again, Brazil might Perry the former breakfast team at UK radio station. Talksport they've been reunited by PODCAST works for podcast supported by a sportswear retailer and the Lamar show is the debut podcasts from singer. Songwriter. Lamar. In conversation with living legends, entrepreneurs, creatives, and close friends,

Apple Spotify Apple Oprah Lamar United States Aaron Monkey Steve Carell Brazil Lipson Idex Amazon Brazil Developer Winfrey Ireland UK Perry
Amityville Horror

Ghostly

05:09 min | 1 year ago

Amityville Horror

"Welcome to ghostly is the AMITYVILLE. House. Haunted. ghostly is a podcast that comes out every other week. In each episode, we take a ghost story or paranormal event in look into its complete history. Rebecca then gives us evidence proving that the story is real. In, my job is to debate those pieces of evidence in to get you the listener prepared to vote on if it's real or not. You haven't yet please hit that subscribe button and as always we are your host I'm pat and I'm rebecca what's been going on Rebecca wow we've been thinking about that book club. Oh. Yeah I didn't know if we were going to mention that. Yeah. Well, I thought maybe I throw it out there you know K it was something that came out when we did our Edgar Allan Poe episode many years ago and I think I'm ready to maybe start doing it. Are You I am but I would really like to keep it paranormal based. Oh definitely or or history based APPS I think probably a bit of both like no fiction. Well, I mean yeah. It's going to be totally nonfiction I. Don't know you're talking about. Yeah no I'M GONNA put a post up go society. I was thinking and we could you know see what people are interested if you guys have somebody else's. Yeah. Awesome. Well, we also have the trivia contest and that's still going it is so they could win their choice of any ghostly shirt. I'm not just saying t-shirt because, oh, I'm thinking you know if they want one of the long sleeve shirts, they could get that to. I don't know that. Okay. It's expensive but you know our listeners are. Well we've already had some submissions we have and and the contest is going on until August thirty first. Yep. So still time. Yeah. So you could enter grossly podcast dot com slash trivia or just go to ghostly PODCAST DOT COM and go to the polls area and you will see the menu were there's a trivia but yeah, and then while you're there, you can also vote on our episode today absolutely absolutely. So do we have any listener mail we do we So we're going to actually finish up. We had started on the bloody Mary episode with 'em J. R. J.. She had sent a second letter and I too many stories to fit. In one episode. So Michael Jordan has been through a lot. So we're to finish up with her second meets Michael. Jackson. WHO Know. WHO All right. Okay. I'm ready. I got that out of. Every time. Okay so she continues. Again, they had moved three times and then. Things started happening again several entities So here's here's a bit more Okay. So she says now for the unspecified weird occurrences that have happened in the last year. Doing dishes home alone with the kids as I have already stated the kitchen is on the second floor and that there are no walkways outside the window. able to see a reflection of self I'm guessing like in the window while she's washing dishes right behind a heard a man's voice say, what are you doing? Are You Doing I looked up to see if someone was reflecting in the window. No one was there when I told my husband when he came home, he said, are you sure it was a man's voice because last night I heard a female voice say hi, how are you in the living? Room? This is. I did that sound the hi, how are you because I, think the. Female it's. Not Like I. Oh, are you? Okay that's more like it. One Friday when I was at work and the children were at daycare, my husband was sitting at home from work. He was sitting in the living room watching TV when he heard a baby cry if I just ignored it because it was not coming from within the house all both kids were at school so the sound should not be coming from inside after a few minutes the crying got louder. So he got up to investigate when he opened the door to her daughter's room the crying stopped and nothing was in there. If you remember the woodall incident then you'll get a real kick out of my next thing I'm about to say since we had a woody dull. We had to have a buzz light year Dow to per my son he was more my favorite actually I have totally Awadhi. Doll. Tom Hanks. Fan Though. You're zero unpopular. That you don't really you want publicity to. Know, it's for real. Go ahead, I'm sorry one day during the quarantine I was sitting in the other room working on my laptop when I started to hear something coming from the kids room.

Rebecca Michael Jordan Amityville Edgar Allan Poe Tom Hanks Jackson Woodall Mary J. R. J
American Airlines offering Apple TV+ shows as free in-flight entertainment

Mac OS Ken

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

American Airlines offering Apple TV+ shows as free in-flight entertainment

"Apple TV pluses playing to a bit of a captive audience. The Mac Observer says shows from the Cupertino Streamer are being offered free on American Airlines starting this month. According to the peace, apple originals are now preloaded into the seat back entertainment of American Airlines flights. Shows in the rotation include the morning show defending Jacob Dickinson for all mankind ghost. Help stirs home before dark little America, mythic Quest Raven's Banquet Oprah's book club and Snoopy, and

American Airlines Apple Jacob Dickinson Cupertino America
The Importance of Self Compassion

Therapy for Black Girls

04:58 min | 1 year ago

The Importance of Self Compassion

"If there's anything we can use right now and in the coming months itself compassion. Today I'm joined by Dr Kristin Nafta about the many ways of compassion. He can be a helpful to us to get through these difficult times. Kristen is currently an associate professor of educational psychology. At the University of Texas at Austin. She's a pioneer in the field of self compassion research conducting the first empirical studies on self compassion over fifteen years ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles and book chapters on the topic. She is the author of this book self compassion the proven power of being kind to yourself released by. William Moro. In conjunction with her colleague Dr Chris. Germer she has developed an empirically supported training program called mindful self compassion, which is taught by thousands of teachers worldwide. Dr Nefyn I chatted about what self compassion is how is different from self esteem, how it can be helpful in mediating difficult emotions and her favorite activity for practicing self compassion. If anything resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share with us on social media using the Hashtag t BG in session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today. Chris and I'm really really excited to chat with you. Self compassion was are yellow collective book club choice for last month. So it feels very timely for you to be joining us for this conversation. That's great. Wonderful. Happy to be here. Yeah. So I wonder if you could start just by talking with us about what self compassion is in what it isn't right. So the easiest way to think of what self compassion is simply being a good frontier self I saw in. Terms of how you relate yourself. Especially when you're struggling, you're struggling because you feel inadequate made a mistake or just when life is really difficult that you treat yourself with the same type of kindness warm care support concern that you would nationally showed two good friend, right? Most of us don't do that most of us go if we talk to our friends where we talk ourselves who would have no friends I in. So really self compassion is just turning that around and doing a u-turn in being kind ordered to ourselves. Now. Some people get confused about this they think. To ourselves me being self indulgent being lazy being selfish that actually that's not passionate right so so if you want the technical definition of compassion is concerned with alleviation of suffering. and. So in your self indulgent or you're lazy or you know you're helping yourself in your naturally getting your suffering, you're actually causing yourself more problems in the long run. Also, the word compassion comes from the Latin Pasha means to suffer an income means with. So. There's an inherent connectedness in self. Compassion is a sense set while everyone's imperfect everyone struggling. You know it's not just me, and this is what makes up compassion different than somebody Mike self-pity. Self Passion US remember that this is part of the shared human experience. You know it's not just me. To say that especially in today's times whenever I say that some people think this is like a coded version of all lives matter. Right. It doesn't acknowledge that some groups suffer more than others. Absolutely do the amount of suffering is different. The source of suffering is different. All people in all groups do not suffer the same way, and so we need to acknowledge that as the human experience. And yet every single individuals especially when it comes to relating to their own suffering, their own suffering is if you're paying. If you treat your own paying with kind of a kind caring response. You will be able to turn your attention outward more effectively. So it really sounds like you know sometimes we hear this conversation around like Grief Olympics are paying Olympics right where we're trying to say like, Oh, my heart is bigger than your heard, right? Yeah. Exactly. It's not like that York saying that my pain is bigger or smaller you recognize people's pain different is very important. I think especially nowadays you we have to recognize. Those. Who structural reasons pain of all people is not the same. And yet was self compassion. We can treat our own pain as worthy of a compassionate us. We're just saying that, hey, I haven't paying I haven't perfect and I'm not the only one very simple outweigh. The reason that so important is because if you get into self, pity was made for me like victim mentality fx not helpfully

Dr Chris Kristen Dr Kristin Nafta University Of Texas Associate Professor Austin Dr Nefyn William Moro Mike Self-Pity Latin Pasha York
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

08:12 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Weren't really necessarily the same conversation happening fifteen years ago and the things that were seen as progressive in pushing forward the genre of fiction fifteen years ago now seeing tired old. Maybe you outdated in their thinking. Things move quickly in the world and I feel like when it comes to things such as like social justice in politics and relations between like. Whether. It's like race relations are. Relations between nationalities like those conversations. And a lot of places like children's literature in why literature is kind of the ground report, those conversations are happening because people. Kind, of want to encourage outward, they're thinking into the lives of children, and so they'll take those issues to children's literature as a way to talk about it to young audiences and so. Things in this book that are like in a way, social justice oriented might have were a big bigger deal like fifteen years ago and now it's like Ooh, that's not really how we would approach that. At least I find issue with of what. Yeah what types of like social justice narratives are happening in this in this book. Only yeah, we'll get into that. mind. Totally Yeah, it is interesting. You said like I think of Adam. The Way Nickelodeon and sesame street and stuff. Recently have started addressing racism very directly, and it's making some people upset through their brainwashing children, but you can kind of see. What what people think it's important to tell children about. Is really like. One of the epicenters of cultural change don't like what what's so important to us that we think we need to. Simplify this and give it to children right. So it is interesting. the to some weird twitter dates. Like, what you know how you teach kids racism So I did not read this one recently am. I reread read. I think college was the last time I went through all of them. and. The first time I've read. I think because I'd seen all the movies I. This one didn't really stick out meeting partly, because the fourth movie is not really my favorite. I really don't like that director. I don't really like the choices he made. And it's really disappointing because it's a really fun story like how do you screw that up? But they picked the wrong guy. don't even really like the music Province I think their hair. Oh my God I hate their hair. Moving on and so I think the first time I read. This I was like you know it was more. Just kind of a stepping stone to get to the juicy stuff in books five six seven. But upon rereading. This book holds up incredibly well to rereading some of the other ones. You start noticing problems and you do notice. you start poking holes. or it's just less entertaining the second time you read this. This one. Was Better I. Think AF-. honoree read at least in my experience. because. The reveal. At the end of the identity of like is impersonating mad I. is so well hidden that you don't even notice the first time, and this is not just rhetoric. This is people and I notice at all, but also I rarely ever do. Because of the way that mad is character is set up like anything. Weird he does can be explained away very easily in you kind of go along your life, plus it's a character. We've never met before, so we don't have anything to compare it to. And he's supposed to be really weird. End Senile and. Just doesn't trust anyone. That's sort of how he sat up and so like. Someone's impersonating him. ANYTHING WEIRD THEY DO. He's just not. At. So, he gets up to some weird things, and you don't really question it. You feel uncomfortable around him, but you think that's because of who he is. And so re reading some of these scenes where mad I slash coach junior. Are Is there. Truly incredible work the way that it. You can see it works on both levels. uh-huh works on the like. How Harry's interpreting the same, and then you can see it for it also works on the like. What his Birdie conscious real motivations are in the scene at, and you can see it both ways, and it just like blew my mind when I read, it was like. Oh my gosh. Just Yet it's. That it ended up being my favorite. On the second time around I think yeah, the entertainment value of spoke is high lately severe entertaining read, and it has such a uniqueness with travelers tournament that we don't have another novels Econo- breaks up the series as well because some more than others. We get a lot of their schooling. We get that special in book five. That's important to the plot is like their day to day life as students, but if you have seven novels about going to cruel like. Interesting I also I love the bit about school and so It was tempered while with the interesting plot. and. A new elements being added in, but so some things we really love about the Harry Potter series. The world. I. Plug again like all the little. Bits we get between. The weasley is trying to care for Harry. Also be respectful of his family that are muggles, and so they like. Try like one time. Ranch is to call on the telephone because that's got an aquatic normal wage contact and he's screaming. He doesn't have telephones work and. In this one Mrs Louise Lee Sands. A letter addressed to the Jersey Various Beckley asking. We would like to take care of you for the summer. To get to the. Top and but she's put like thirty five stamps on this thing and. I hope isn't upstairs on this. Acquit? which is also like how I feel most the time? Like the how much your stamps these days and I got like a bunch of random like forty one cent Two of the WHO's. Postcards Moore's like what the heck yeah. Too. Many pay too much but Starting with the quidditch World Cup is Super Fun, because also we don't get any other credit, look. They cancelled the. Season basically because of the chargers. which doesn't seem totally necessary, but it just helps like. The fact that Cedric Hairier, both quidditch players so that they don't. have to get bogged down with that while they get also helps. Clarify this story model down. There is not enough room in this book. I know which now. But ten like. They're only three events in the tribe with Three..

Harry Potter quidditch twitter Nickelodeon director WHO Adam Cedric Hairier Mrs Louise Lee Sands Moore Beckley
"book club" Discussed on Cheerful Book Club

Cheerful Book Club

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Cheerful Book Club

"Hello. This episode of Fearful Book Club is me and add talking to rally Eddo Lodge about why I'm no longer took into white people about race, which is an incredibly important book. We talk about why it was needed the problems of structural racism in Britain. Rennie's learned since writing the Book Cheerful Book Club, talking to the writers exploring the biggest ideas of our time. Support for cheerful Bob Comes from vintage re boldly think differently follow at vintage books from. Talk About Rennie's book which just tremendously well, why I'm no longer took into white people about race which. I mean the whole thing started as a blog post and you write about this and what the blog post was was sort of you encountering so much defensiveness and denial about white privilege that you as an individual just so I'm exhausted by this. I can't have these conversations anymore and I was wondering how much the book has shifted that If. You feel just the nature of that type of conversation has got better I. DO think that the the type of person who I would have thought. I was banging my head against a brick wall to attempt to try and convince that structure racism as an issue. Generally accepts the now and I hope that the book has. been a part of that for many of those people. So you know that blog posts I wrote. was. My time in the feminist movement and I. Rushed into feminist activism sort of like age nineteen at university green-eyed. Grind. I'm trying to say now you. Don't green eyed, but anyway greed. Yes wide-eyed, naive excitable, and with this just general feeling like all of the women in this movement who I was meeting they were going to be. Allies for life, and we will go each other and the further into the movement I realized that that wasn't the case in that. An understanding of racism real barrier actually to solidarity and understanding between each other. And it was so disappointing I think to..

Fearful Book Club Rennie Eddo Lodge Britain
"book club" Discussed on The Current

The Current

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on The Current

"Become more and more dissatisfied with the way the politicians speak to them In simplistic terms we. We're not just partisans who are out there to have our buttons pushed by politicians and swayed in one direction or the other. We can handle this kind of complexity. And I think that's something that's really become a road from our political culture. We heard even from one of the the participants in the Book Club. This idea that we're eager to talk to people who agree with what we already believe and what we agree on and the idea of the filter bubble is a real thing where you self select and you follow people on Social Media. You interact with people who already share your your point of view. This is the conversation that we're having as part of this series called the fix where we're looking at these big sticky problems our world and one of them is that idea of polarization. This is it's not to diminish it but it is just one book club in one city. What do you think that can do to fix that? Sense of polarization. Well Yeah. It is one book club in one city I think you know some of our members have talked about the reverberations that it has in their life outside of the book club. And I think that's certainly been true for myself as well I think the paradox is that it takes this kind of close personal contact to make really deep change It would be great. I think if other groups in other cities were sparked to do something similar You know I think that that would be or or other forms of person to person contact. That doesn't have to be book club. There can be any one of a number of ways of achieving that just thinking of the name of the Book Club. How can you think that which could be read a couple of different ways? The one is where you accuse somebody. How can you think that? And the other part is is a more curious inquisitive precisely. How can how can you think that and it actually? There's a sense of wonder where you're wondering why this person thinks that way exactly. And that's exactly the goal is to move from that sense of disbelief to that sense of curiosity. The sort of engagement is important. But it's hard and it's hard to create that space where people feel comfortable and they don't feel shouted down and they they are willing to come and open themselves up. If somebody wanted to steal with credit your idea credit. I'd be happy to have them steal it. What advice would you give them? Really keep of variety of readings on the list. The challenge for us has been to maintain or or get to a balance of political views. I will say that We skew definitely towards the liberal End of the spectrum. Although on individual issues are members have really a a range of very diverse views but overall we do skew liberal. So maybe this is my plea to You know conservatives living in Calgary and I know that there are a few Police come to a book club and share your views and perspectives. We would love to have you. Company balance is really important too. And if you wanted to do what what you're ultimately hoping it will do you need that range of perspectives. There I think need a range of perspectives. I don't think it has to be perfectly balanced because I think we know from social psychology that having a couple of centers in a group is already enough to break that shift towards the polarization of the group as a whole And of course we're also reading books from a diversity of perspective so that's kind of baked into the structure of the group as well. Juliet's great to talk to you about this. I think people will probably want to grab this idea And Plug it into Iran community. Thanks so much. Thank you Matt said of is the host of the. How can you think that? Book Club at shelf-life Books and Calgary. She's also an adjunct professor in linguistics. Psychology at the University of Calgary don't have time to catch the current every day. No problem subscribed to the current weekly every Friday. We'll share some of the week's most engaging conversation starting stories boiled down to the bits. You just can't miss so the perfect link for your commute via walked with the dog. Maybe a five K. Run you can find the current weekly wherever you get your podcasts for more. Cbc PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts..

Book Club Calgary adjunct professor University of Calgary Iran Matt
"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

8-Bit Book Club

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

"That's next episode we're never doing mental city mayhem again we're thinking it's we're going to that that'll be our next sonic thing it would be awesome to put metal seem am into a cannon and like shoot it we don't have again easter sunday sonic is died but from the ashes sonic has risen the cave doors enrolled away and we have a new sonic new trinity of sonic products to enjoy got sonic thirty blast we got to dvd's sent to us by faith will fans we got sonic underground collector's edition that's a volume one three seven plus hours of sonic underground and sonic x chaos shadow sagas that's the one where they tried to actually make it entertaining and that's also equally fun but i'm very excited for sonic underground underground if you guys haven't seen it go on youtube watch the intro song it's fucking insane i want to say thank you so much everyone for sending us all this amazing for support the show and i think if you like the show please please please listen to none other podcasts yeah just know that none of deepak has came out of the love that we feel on a bit book club and has been kind of a natural morphing from eight bit book clubs we wouldn't have it without this show it covers our favorite things rolling dice and making murph mad yeah i think if you're you know if you're do bs because you've never played dnd before something it really is a very natural transition from this too not another de podcast because just if you like hearing us hang out and goof you'll love hearing us hang out in goof there we're about to release i think when this comes out we will release today supposing this later today posts today.

deepak youtube murph eight bit
"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

8-Bit Book Club

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

"This is a head gum podcast they man of a bad day any good game in game the way back has about welcome to a bit book club the only book club that makes you dumber i'm brian murphy joined as always by my life slash comedy partner emily for just sitting pretty kids today is my life's fantasies come to life and of course the human embodiment of magic tech armor that protects me caldwell tanner darkness starlight wall keep me from enjoying this podcast and we also have a special guest kylo ren is here someone that and we don't he doesn't shut up you touch the button what's the gives going skills this is going to say a few things what are you saying chilean what adam only again he wants to know the power of the dark side and he also wants to know what were doing on this laying sabree just turned on his lightsaber did allow you press him once and he goes for about twenty minutes somebody somebody sent a will run doll just goes on for so i don't know if we could hear them screaming meal all eight yeah he's one of those like big actionfigure slash doll guys yeah you press the button and he speaks but if you press him once he says like 10 things spaced out over thirty seconds in between each line conspiracy theory i'm convinced it is not actually adam driver's voice i'm convinced that they have a separate like voice actor that comes in to do the voices for these tall counter theory adam driver has been replaced and his soul now inhabits this doll and the voice you think is adam driver is an impostor conspiracy theory rescinded in favor of the counter theory hank here's another thing doesn't tom hanks have like a brother who does the voices of what are you know like video games yes i believe he do that logistic hook brother up.

brian murphy partner adam driver emily tom hanks thirty seconds twenty minutes
"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

8-Bit Book Club

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

"Real a vision next one we can't make this through barter yeah you know we could always just skip it or stop breathing at some point if it stops being funny we need read the i i'm very do you want me to i mean to this story how we don't need to skip ahead we'll get into it next week elderly guys as subscriber to the another de andy podcast sub bread it we eew podcast coming out i actually put a little sneak preview of the beginning of our campaign on that sub right it's we will there now you can listen to it also joined the epa book club sub red are a book club follow us on twitter call the is called oil add he asks for it is emily and at c h murph is me please rates the podcast guys we need them ratings and please check out our book emily and i have a old coming out february thirteen th that's a satirical relationship advice book it's called hey you up had to turn your budi kanjere emergency contact you can preorder edded preorder it down amazon again it is satire even though it's lewis stood under selfhelp it's actually listed under a humor as well yeah so it's it's listed under a bunch of different things yet because he's definitely don't take the fucking ice don't take advice from idiots take advice only from geck's mmhmm from gags two gags yeah from gags we are born to geck's we return and as far as time i know a lot of people were asking about time line on not another dandy podcast we're gonna be releasing an episode zero which is going to be you know ten to fifteen minutes long with us talking about the new characters that a leader in that a knee injury with the heroes of meat and dairy hey meisel meet and greet with the party and then we are going to be releasing the first full episode next thursday savannah.

epa amazon geck twitter emily lewis savannah fifteen minutes
"book club" Discussed on Slate's The Audio Book Club

Slate's The Audio Book Club

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"book club" Discussed on Slate's The Audio Book Club

"And just before we get to the book on a brief a bit of housekeeping this is going to be my last episode is the host of slates audio book club i love late and i love audio book club and it's been a total privilege and pleasure to do this show every month selden very sad sanur dr i'm going to be a staff writer at the new yorker writing on their website about books and culture and language and things great for them very sad for us and we're gonna miss you will at you've been ah you've been so good at this katie waldman in the one thing we did want to say is that uh we are going to update you on the future of the audio book club at a later date so watch this space in the wake of a the katie waldman era while i will miss you guys lot and before this devolves intimidated ride fast and utilized if it needs to like cut it iin retitled science india three hours later um our buck our buck this month is her body and other parties it is carmen raya machado's debut collection of stories which have made her a finalist in the national book awards on these stories have been compared to urban legends end to sandra fiction sifi erotic on har on but most of all they have been compared to fairytales or i guess we've said that they draw a lot on all of these genres and i guess i wanted to start by asking you guys whether you saw these stories is fairytales or arth saw them as as on as drawing on very deals because i didn't spoiler we know what all my goodness late yeah hey why don't you lay out yet lady of you why don't you lay out your reasoning for whitewater affair healthier you geico hurt i know this is also very off friends because i tend to.

staff writer new yorker katie waldman selden carmen raya machado geico three hours
"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

8-Bit Book Club

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

"This is a head gum podcast they man of book of saturday at a good game gave away has about welcome to eight book club the only book club their makes you denver i'm forever because emily has the mike at the ready to interrupt me the radically interro but yes i have joined as always by lifesized gobert's partner emily experts out there early on theme but okay here what up and the irony that we just went ton wellpitched so much before we started here and the air if gainsborough to my cloudshrouded faldo taylor what's up it's me the music pitch what's up hitches hours jana we're saying we're saying bitch alive today apparently emily came in and she kept calling ever woodbridge in an american to herself his behest emily said it was the cool if we did it she said why saying because we're going to go we're going to go out to eat after this and you said i said this bitch me as bids is getting me you also getting a 12ounce new sphere thank you also talked about daddy daddy is take added dinner if we recorded a very good podcast daddy's gonna take us to get some steak there's that's true and you unit like off to a strange sexual start you like our collective daddy like the kind of philosophical daddy which represents you wa self discipline yourself what i said is that everyone has their own interned daddy rained inner daddy can treat you if fuel um if you are good right and that's what we has an inner baby in an in her dad's uh once in a fatal.

lifesized gobert partner emily 12ounce
"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

8-Bit Book Club

02:22 min | 4 years ago

"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

"So what are known as well maybe only two by the talibans comes out so that unscom's out to episodes left in the finale is one of our favorite episodes probably my favorite episode of the season's adam drivers in that one year and he talks about he he did on and plays a big critter just to end this pact mistake celebration okay i did want to give a huge eightbit book club thank you oh my gosh to our first official fan mail which comes to us from matthew millions only at matthew sent us not only did they sent us this very nice card which is pack miss themed it's got it said in a man in his car you to fall it's beautiful i'm gonna read the cardiff or it please do hey sweeties thanks for putting out the funniest podcast in existence every week for free all right i thought i'd pay you guys back for all the hard work smiley face matthew millions excuse me while i fled the place i am going to get packed ac everybody i am i'm as happy as a critic and be because matthew is provided us with not one not two 3's sonic adventure books so you've basically given us a years worth of wei we will do three parts of each of these i'm sure eke a deep dive into all of these all this literature thank you matthew for freeing up our weekdays so we don't have to read anything but making our weekends horrible because we have to record like five hours of a damn game sri gang of which though i'm currently reading do oh and zoom it's pretty bad you said dum dum dum dum dum it's a book that we that someone sent that yes okay i was just clarifying i didn't know if you're going up and attention about d'une oh no no i'm reading doom and it's pretty get so look forward to that silic far to that yeah guys amid a mary berry day a measure as mary berry day to you and i no matter what pack holiday you celebrates we hope it's a good one from your from your buds over here at a bit book club.

unscom cardiff matthew official mary berry five hours eightbit one year
"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

8-Bit Book Club

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

"This is a head gum podcast they man of book of saturday at a good game gave away has about welcome to eight book club you only book club that makes you dumber i'm brian murphy joined is always buy my life slash comedy partner emily acts furred what brings year scan key high congo gone go and scurvy pirate caldwell tanner hi creamy i mean candy i mean murphy hello everyone this week we why stumm we reducing your scum alannah gravina's you're scott your although i don't believe that the kristen special was pierce come i truly love a cherished it yes we watched a this week we watch the congo bongo festival of lights which was the holiday episode i guess is not technically christmas episode because it is about seeing all the lights guest evil of life therapy presence there are present said he does add litter cranky does read a parody of the night before enrichment he's is pops out of a barrel of the eye hannah but i do think that you're right merv i'm glad that you got into this right off the bat i wanted to have a discussion or the kong's jewish can we get towns all religion or the kong i think therapy hong artificially christian he is because they're doing just one day of price of the truth not eight days that's a good point although there is no christ kong we that we know of that we know there is no trace coconut ak the holy grail ray that's true that is that the coconut that christ kong sipped from before that his wounds were so you got book before i was saying what we watch you guys were saying that you did really enjoy a absolutely i that it was wonderful it was so merv when we when merv turnoff we didn't talk about it because obviously were saving in it for a minute up you gotta savior juicy save jake arrieta sarraj's release a murphy said that's the worst thing i've ever seen and i said i loved that it's the way that.

brian murphy partner alannah gravina hannah jake arrieta sarraj emily scott kristen christmas holy grail eight days one day
"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

8-Bit Book Club

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

"Follow us on twitter at he act sort is emily add call the is called all at c h murphy's me follow hot date on twitter hot date and guys watched the tv show it's on every wednesday at eight tweet about it please hashtag hot date we need we need the viewers we need your support we lever abe at book club buds and and we hope they love us back please review the show on i tunes and check out the serb reddit i are eight book club that's where we are easily all hang out or you can also view hot day on amazon and i am deem being star the given the ten stars days just take less was amazon ten stores not amazon ira leaders guy we have identity through jane oil deals going to do on her quicko yeah i'm gonna say this is a a fervor uh another interesting okay we read the youth absolutely bad book this comes to us from max the human i'll give a quick shout out to the other ones that were recent josh todd and final hawk thank you so much thank you max the human rights listening while doing yard work and my neighbors probably think i'm crazy for laughing to tears while destroying leaves that's right you know at manning soon sarid himself on nature i agree i love that i hope you just chew up a squirrel willis fuck up those leaves and graders tested just get a critters stuck in your leave all right bahama keep may the bobby are gonna take you this night i by by that was a hate campaign against.

twitter amazon josh todd human rights abe ira jane oil manning
"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

8-Bit Book Club

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"book club" Discussed on 8-Bit Book Club

"This is a head gam had they made it a bad game in game three way pat has tall well convey a bit book club the only club that makes year donor i'm brian murphy joined is always buy my life slash comedy burner emily experts as you will war achieve good for the first one back and the the very into my low gosh halt hall tenor there is no place like hearth stoned awesome guys we're back much to our listeners who tweeted hey sweetie to try to get us to do the five there's a lot of things i there's a lot of lake things i don't respond to but if someone's gonna hey sweetie mere like i'm gonna zip up my pants and get to work thank you for the near constant harassment i i think everyone was so great that we got to start the show off with some shout out so i wanna thank jay she'd for his work on the way key at least i assume who worked a lot of wikki alerted or need to all of the work on a bit book club wikki which is so funny for all all you in there on it up there so many quotes in there that i don't remember them being said they have listed every single time emily mentioned wanting bigger boobs down to the time code importing i didn't even remember some of that you you brought it up quite a few paragraphs long quotes hot.

pat brian murphy harassment jay time code emily
"book club" Discussed on Slate's The Audio Book Club

Slate's The Audio Book Club

02:24 min | 4 years ago

"book club" Discussed on Slate's The Audio Book Club

"The slight audio book club is brought to you by audible audible has the best are you but performances the largest library in the most exclusive content you'll feel something when you listen learn more at audible dot com slash audio book club the following podcast and thing with the language hello and welcome to this they audio pochot on my name is key development iin the staff sites and i'm jane today in the dc studio by the writer and critic jacob brogan like eighty a jake of his the host of our podcast working so check him out there and all the way from paris france we are also joined by the audio book clubs founder another writer and critic meghan over time again nice to talk to you again high her good to be here with you virtually today we're gonna be talking about too much and not the mood a collection of lyrical essays by durga chew boasts on it as her debut buck on although she has made a name for herself as a as an internet writer a writer of internet essays and i just want to say upfront that our next uh selection for july will be my lee molloy's do not become alarmed okay too much and not the mood on i have a science from talking to both of you uh a little bit before we started recording that you have strong feelings about this jayco will you share just one strong feeling i think foot to to me the the best record describe reading this book is that it's a little opening or srs in search of pearl's whom you don't always find a parole but they're still this wonderful strange meet inside an you have the strange sense that it might go well with but cocktail iron for the most part of i found a delightful and engaging and even when it was frustrating exciting yeah do you feel like you have a strong sense of who this writer as the that's a good question because there's a sort of structurally of vase of quality uh to hers style of writing we learn a lot about her but were not always kidding.

writer paris france founder meghan lee molloy jayco pearl jacob brogan