35 Burst results for "Boo Club"

Dinesh D’Souza: Go See '2000 Mules' as a Group in Theaters

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:04 min | Last week

Dinesh D’Souza: Go See '2000 Mules' as a Group in Theaters

"When there's a great response at the movie theaters over a weekend like this weekend, starting tonight. Then other movie theaters are forced to take notice, they have to acknowledge the box office receipts, and then it gets distributed even in even wider distribution. So even if you've seen the movie, going to the theater this weekend dinesh is really sort of a powerful grassroots effort that every American listening to me could get involved in, I've got that right, right, about the formula about 400 theaters and what that could lead to if we have a good turnout this weekend. Absolutely. And I would say that there is so it's important to go to send a message. And go as a group. By the way, a lot of people have been writing me the last few weeks. I'd like to take my club, my book club, my reading group, my Friends, and my point is this movie was made for the theater. It's kind of a whodunnit, it's great to see it on the big screen. I mean, it's fine to see it on your computer or your TV, but the big screen with other people who are just as interested in you as you are in this issue is a whole different experience.

Dinesh
Media Outlets Like CNN+ Conflate Fame and Popularity

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:29 min | Last month

Media Outlets Like CNN+ Conflate Fame and Popularity

"CNN plus has cratered, which is just phenomenal to see the cratering and the collapse of CNN plus, this is just another sign that what the propaganda that is being spread is not popular. And I said this a couple of years ago as we started to get into podcasting. I said, and I was only wrong on the timing, I wasn't wrong on the essence. I said to my our team Andrew, I said, I don't think people realize how fragile information consumption is about to become. Meaning, I can tell you exactly how many people are downloading our podcast. I can tell you how many people are watching our videos. I can tell you how many people are emailing us and we track those things. You see, we are always constantly Hawking the measurables. Whereas it's important to note and to realize that CNN or a lot of these other channels, they've never really been big on how many people are actually watching them or care about it. In fact, they say, oh no, the numbers are all wrong. We're fine. We're very popular. Well, if people don't want what you put on TV for free, why on earth would they give you money for it? Like cut 24. Yeah. Just went on that. They spent $300 million. They got 10,000 subscribers. Imagine the hubris of thinking that something that people don't want for free. That you're going to charge money for it. We're going to have the Jake tapper book club. Jake tapper seems like a great guy. But I mean, I feel like I don't have to pay for his book club. I feel like you should put that on Twitter. Pay for a Jake tapper book club. We're seeing the trajectory of things on the left collapse because they do not live in the world of objectivity. You see, I live in the world where I discern objective, they live in the world of the subjective, where constantly measuring how many people are downloading. How many people are listening? Where are we at in the charts? What are our ratings? CNN is like, oh, we're a multi-billion dollar machine. It makes you wonder how fragile really is the current media

CNN Jake Tapper Andrew Twitter
Matt Walsh Talks About Problems in the Catholic Church

The Dan Bongino Show

01:32 min | 6 months ago

Matt Walsh Talks About Problems in the Catholic Church

"I mean the church has to be the leader here not the follower Yeah I totally agree And that's why what happened with me with this church at SLU it's kind of a microcosm of a much much larger problem And that the pastor at this church he came to the mob He obviously was originally in favor of bringing me on and the mob was angry the people are angry And so he came to it And this is what we find all across the country not just in the Catholic Church but I think in Christendom in the west generally speaking are people leaders who are supposed to be representing the truth and bringing and guiding their flocks to the truth who instead have conform themselves to the world which is exactly what we're warned against in the gospels You have to think like Yeah I have no doubt that in many churches if a priest or papa were to stand up there and give a really firm homily on something like abortion you're going to upset some people in the some might get up and walk out right there on the spot But if they do then they're not there if you're not at the church looking for truth then you shouldn't be there anyway And we shouldn't be catering to people who don't want moral truth at church Once you give up on that then what's the point What's the purpose What exactly are you doing Now you're just kind of like it's a meeting ground for people It's a book club or something And we don't need that There's other places people can go to go and socialize and have community There's a very specific purpose of a church and if you abandon that purpose then the church might as well not even exist

Catholic Church
Obama Ripped For Slamming 'Phony Culture Wars' at McAuliffe Rally

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:31 min | 7 months ago

Obama Ripped For Slamming 'Phony Culture Wars' at McAuliffe Rally

"Welcome back to America first one on one with Andrew clavin. We have a pronouncement. He's back. I don't know why, but he's back the man who was the first black president of the United States is now an expert on culture and he has something to say about those rascally Republicans cut 7 play cuts. We don't have time. You might want to go to beep. Wasting on these phony trumped up culture wars. This fake outrage, the right wing media's pedals to juice their ratings. And the fact that he's willing to go along with it instead of talking about serious problems that actually affect serious people, that's a shame. Fake culture wars. That's Obama. Yesterday, the day before campaigning for one of the sleaziest objectively empirically one of the sleaziest Democrat politicians, Terry mccaul, sorry Terry mcauliffe. And he's saying it's invented. There is no culture war at all and I guess Donald Trump wasn't canceled on Twitter either. Let me give an example of how little a culture war there is. Yesterday, Wednesday, The Washington Post lead editorial cartoon is a delightful group of mothers sitting in somebody's living room with a grill a barbecue grill in the middle and they're burning books and The Washington Post calls this the mom's for liberty book club. Which side of the political aisle is kidding. It's banning books. On Amazon. And silencing speech, we're using the corporate, the power of corporations guided by the government, which is almost the definition of fascism. You know, he is so good. He's such a talented politician, Barack Obama. And the problem with him is that all of his philosophy is wrong. And so none of his policies work, so he became president at a time when the economy had crashed, and historically an economy that takes a nosedive will bounce up just as high just as fast. He sat on that economy with his stupid ObamaCare and his stupid policies. He was handed a piece in the Middle East. And he let loose ISIS in a war that took over a territory the sizable Ohio with terrorism and this wickedness that his exist in the Middle East. He failed at everything. And what did he do to take people's mind off his failure? Is he started a culture

Andrew Clavin Terry Mccaul America The Washington Post Liberty Book Club Terry Mcauliffe Barack Obama Donald Trump Twitter Amazon Middle East Ohio
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

07:37 min | 8 months ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Of it by taking it super super super duper seriously like he never breaks character. He treats it like it deserves to be discussed through the lenses of. He takes all these like film analysis philosophy. Feminism historical context like analyzing the director's intention even like some song analysis like there's a whole section. There's a cover of time after time that appears multiple times so he does like an analysis of that song. It sounds super bizarre and super funding. And knees shouldn't wear kind of the. This podcast is made possible by our wonderful book club members. You can support the show by becoming a member on by me. Your coffee dot com slash book club with jd. So julian i our readers. We like to talk about books. but we're also writers and so with our members we love to share newsletters of things happening in our personal lives as well as essays. Poetry other things were writing so starting at three dollars per month. Booklet members can connect with fellow listeners. Hope like books for future episodes. Unlock exclusive newsletters poems etc that we write and early in this kind of access to future events. If you wanna take you support to the next level you can also join the tisza tear which starts at five dollars per month. The tier is all about autism. Autistic person looking for community a possible diverse person looking for resources or an ally hoping to learn from an actually autistic person members of teargas access free to julius autism related articles on medium. The best part of any book club. Besides the books is the community so join us in our growing community of buchner's by becoming a member of the book club. Today you can follow. The lincoln are shown on a to buy me a coffee dot com slash foot club with. Jv to join the party now. Back to the books the rest is up. We're gonna talk to kind of an investigative lens. Yeah dissecting this book like what is the author doing who is the book for. Why is it funny. Because there's nothing more enjoyable than someone sitting around and try and decide how things are funny. I'm sure comedians everywhere love us. But that's what we're gonna do because this is what we do in this podcast. We talk about things in depth in a way the audit us though. I think we can take ourselves much more seriously than he. And we tend to pick books. We think highly off well. That's that's the thing i mean. I guess that's the place to start rate is like he's taking a book that does not deserve this He's taking a film that does not deserve this level of attention and writing a whole book about it ray whereas the taken hour long episode to talk about sort of the highlighting points of a book that we think deserves our attention rate. But we don't give it like there. There is like a page per second of this film. You know what i mean. Yeah permit it like. It's really in depth breakdown and it shouldn't work laid. Shouldn't you explain it to someone. And they're like that sounds really boring. It shouldn't work. It's an absurd premise. That he even like there's a section in the book where he acknowledges that like when he first pitched the idea for the book to his publishers and they were like what what are you talking about. It shouldn't work. So i wanna know why does yeah. I think in a way. It's what i audit as best right like it's it's comedy writing. It's film and he does it in his way. I felt like i was watching. Stand up special. I laughed as hard at this as i would. If i was like watching someone do stand up to the point that i put the book down sometimes because i was laughing so hard. It's very him like he knows his comedy voice and he was able to put in a book which i think is an incredible feat because so many comics art are good. Writers like a lot of comics also do. Tv writing and movie writing. They write their own up. I haven't loved every comics books speakers. Sometimes they take themselves too seriously. You know because the story of their life told in a humorous way but it's also like very personal it's like almost like a memoir is supposed to be more official and more more intimate than maybe they're like actual comedy is whereas i feel like i wanna like while he interweaves personal stories of his life like it's not ever posing as a memoir. It's him doing what he does best. Which many of us find humorous that are willing to buy the book so it works out well for him. Yeah i also think. His comedic voice translates particularly well to text. Because he's he has a very monotone delivery his character his persona his comedic persona is like an exaggerated version of himself which is very awkward intelligence. Nerdy kind of like geek like knows a lot and is gonna like lecture at you with all this information. And so that lends itself very nicely too. I am going to write a pretend book. Length essay like analytical essay in which. I explain things to people. And it's you know you don't have to incorporate the kind of tone and physical comedy at that like other comics might use you know when performing live because he doesn't really use any of that so yeah i think in the same way what are saying like we get laughing so hard well being so similar to stand up also because it wasn't just like a funny line like there's some lines we'll we'll get into and we get into. Why is that. We can pull out as particularly humor's but it all builds on itself rate. So it's like i couldn't even like stop and like read something a lot to learn and be like. Oh my gosh you meet this. Because that's not what's making you laugh. It's like the whole build up of the entire chapter to get to that line or pages so you can get the full emphasizes of certain punchline. So i guess that's what also felt like stand up comedy to me too because a lot of the comics i enjoy like i couldn't just quote one thing. They said because he will okay. Let's that's funny. But i'm like no you didn't get it. They told this story and then they got here than it was called back. It was interesting and he never breaks character is like a forward that's super ernest. Thank you to my mother for always supporting me in my comic career. Something like nah yeah. It's just like from the very beginning to the very end even through the index. All all the same voice all the same joke. Yeah i could see that kind of it comes across as almost a performance. Then i i didn't really think about it that way but that makes a lot of sense to me like i could see myself watching this. I want to listen to the audio book of him. Reading this is that design exists. Because i need it. Oh yeah. I don't know that'd be great because i see turning it into a show where he liked plays the clips and that explains does where he likes tax. Talk your ass tedtalk though at least so funny. Yeah i think it would work really well. Okay then like who's his target audience. Who is who is the book for. I mean i guess i can start. I literally when we wrote. Who is this book for. The first thing i wrote.

buchner autism julian book club lincoln
Patterson, Scholastic team up on new literacy initiative

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 8 months ago

Patterson, Scholastic team up on new literacy initiative

"A best selling author has started a literacy initiative with a donation of one and a half million dollars from author James Patterson and scholastic book clubs has launched the United States of readers it's a classroom program designed to address literacy and equality the initiative will help bring books to thirty two thousand kids across the country in grades K. through eight from low income families Patterson who's one of the world's best selling novelist says he's been working his whole career to get kids reading because he believes literacy is one of the biggest challenges the country faces is already donated more than ten million dollars to teachers and students through scholastic I usually employer

James Patterson United States Patterson
A highlight from Introducing Crime Glasses: A True Crime Book Club Podcast

Crime Glasses

00:52 sec | 9 months ago

A highlight from Introducing Crime Glasses: A True Crime Book Club Podcast

"Reader. Crime glasses is your true crime book club podcast. Every month we'll be selecting a new true crime book to read using it as a guide to talk about the cases that shocked us. The underlying issues and the moments that had us closing the book desperate for a breather. And if reading is just not your thing, that's okay, I still welcome you to listen to the weekly episodes because I will give you all of the case details so you won't miss out. Also, I can't promise that you won't find yourself in a cozy nook devouring every page after. We will read everything from true crime classics like the Ted Bundy focus the stranger beside me by Ann rule to more recent favorites like we keep the dead close by Becky Cooper, which details the author search for the killer of Jane Brighton, a Harvard student who was murdered in her off campus

Ted Bundy Becky Cooper ANN Jane Brighton Harvard
Author Chat With David Yoon

Books and Boba

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Author Chat With David Yoon

"Hey we're hearing with david author and guess now publisher dvd. I'll stick thanks for joining us on books and boba. Thanks for hopping looking forward to this. Yeah we are here to talk about what we're talking to david about all his great accomplishments but also about his newest book version zero But before he gets that we always like to start because this is a book club about asian american authors. We always like to hear how did you. How did you end up becoming an author like what was your journey as a writer was always something that was part of your life or something that you discovered later on. It's definitely it's. I mean i love this question. 'cause for me. It's definitely been something i've always wanted to do Ever since i was in third grade. I wrote a story in the class and they loved it. They're cracking up. And i was feeling and then a another story interested in it was crickets. Okay okay good feedback gonna try them better. And since then. My favorite classes have been english. I major was in english. I went to grad school for fiction. That's where i met Nikola wife Yeah and yeah and we learned about writing but we didn't learn about the publishing industry so we spent a lot of years just working our day jobs because they paid really well and writing in the mornings or at night and Really the are grad school contacts for members in college was the way we got to be agents and people like that was that was mainly networking. And the the more you write the more you can make your own luck. So when the agent when you friendly do need an agent now i will assume your stuff budgets to sean

David Nikola Sean
Author Lauren Morrill Shares The Books That Sparked Her Interests

What Book Hooked You?

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Author Lauren Morrill Shares The Books That Sparked Her Interests

"So learn. What book hooked you Probably i've been a reader. As long as i can remember but a book that really sticks out for me was judy blume's just as long as we're together I was never when i was younger. That excited about historical fantasy And i think that was the first book where i read it and i was like this girl. The main character stephanie. Her parents are divorced. My parents were divorced. She had a younger brother kind of annoyed her. I had a younger brother. Who kind of annoyed me you know. She was always her friend groups and kinda liked boys but wasn't totally sure. What was going on there. And the book is set. And i think sixth grade And i thought well if this girl's boring life is the same as my boring life and her boring life can make a book then. Maybe my boring life or the ideas that i could. We could be a book and it was just sort of the first time that i came a week to the idea of contemporary fiction. Which became you know. The thing that i consumed veraciously then forever and still do instill despite meager attempts here and there really only contemporary So that's the book that looms large in my memory and you know i reread it as an adult many times over the course of my life and it's still great and i don't think you mentioned or maybe you did but what do you remember the age. What was the exact age. I was probably you know. Maybe like four fifth grade. Before that i was reading babysitters club. And that was kinda cool and but that was like oh books can really connect with you. They can be meaningful beyond just being fun and yeah that one always stuck with me and actually i had my copy that i used to read all the time and when i left for college i took all of the books that i had that i wanted to keep forever the ones that were meaningful to me and i put them in a rubbermaid ben in the closet and my mom thought that was the donate been donated all ex. She feels bad about it. And i didn't say anything for a long time because i do what had happened and i didn't want her to feel bad because my mom is also a big reader but every once in a while i think about that and i bought a new copy with new cover. And that's fine. But i one day it used bookstore found like the old version that had the cover i remembered and i bought it because i had to have it so with this book. Then being sort of that maybe lightbulb moment for you when it was like oh i can write about normal things. And that's a you know that's a thing that people write books about. What were your early attempts to be a writer. Like what were you writing. So my mom worked in a real estate office and she would bring home i. It was old typewriters that they didn't need anymore and then she also had word processors And so i would you know right on those and i would write books and they were all they were always about a girl who was new to school for some reason. I was obsessed with the idea about being the new girl in school. And starting your life over fish out of water. 'cause i i went to the same school from second grade until i graduated. So all the same people and unions stuck with whatever identity you fell face first into. I told that story to my agent at one point and he was like ha. You still only fish. All your books are like that. I was like that's true. Yeah i do love one of those and so as you then grew up. I'm assuming that kind of this idea of of of being a writer maybe still was in the back of your mind somewhere so when you became kind of a young person when you were a teenager what were you like. What books were you reading. What other things may be. Were you into describe lauren. As a so. I by the i was still reading a lot. The books i read. Were whatever oprah put on her book club. I was very into like adult sort of quote unquote literary fiction. That i would take stuff from whatever my mom had and yeah i think at that point it was like i graduated high school in two thousand one so i was like the middle range before there was wi- a really And i was really into journalism.

Judy Blume Stephanie Lauren Oprah
A review of the book, Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro

The Book Review

04:42 min | 1 year ago

A review of the book, Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro

"Jones joins us now from brooklyn. New york is the editor in chief of vanity fair magazine and this week she reviews the new novel by couso shapiro. Clara and the sun ra. Thanks for being here. Hi thanks for having me so for those who are not aware. Rodica is still one of us. We think you're at the new york times. She was formerly the editorial director of the books. Dusk before working at vanity fair. Where you've been now for more than three years right yet just a little over three years. What is it like doing that. Job in quarantine. We're so used to it now. I know so year. Old question is feels unless normal which i never thought i'd say but i will tell you this week. We released our hollywood issue which is traditionally an enormous photo production to create a three panel. Gate fold cover and it's a big group portrait so obviously in the age of group. Portrait's are rather challenging and unsafe and so we decided we needed an artist. Who would be up for the challenge. So we enlisted. Maurizio cuddle alon and pierpaolo ferrari. The italian conceptual artists to do a remote shoot with ten people. They ended up photographing people remotely over ten days on four continents all through laptops and you know very small local sets and it was really an amazing feat and so with every issue with every day covering the news. We are finding our way. I have to say. I don't know how it's been for you. But you know there's something about having new boundaries and new challenges that that pushes you to be creative and innovative. And i feel like that's what my team has been able to do. So it has felt very much like a journey. But i've been really really pleased with how creative we've been able to be and still sort of fulfilling that core purpose of entity fair to cover a range of entertainment reporting investigative reporting political reporting and iconic photography. And all of the stuff that we do best all right. I'm asking a superficial question. And i'll followed by deep one. It has to be slightly less glamorous. And i'm assuming that there's no vanity fair oscars party this year. I want you to know that for this podcast. I'm wearing my fancy sweatpants there in the rotation. it's our tradition to celebrate the oscars and and we are finding ways will find a way to do that this year. That is safe and respectful. It's an interesting year for the academy as well because even though movie theaters have been closed for most of the time and it's obviously been really challenging to get films out there. There has also been an explosion of actually really fantastic cinema and again presented in sort of innovative ways. And i know the academy wants to really celebrate that talent and so we are going to figure out ways to do that on our part as well all right. I promised i'd follow it up with a deep question. I don't know if it's steep but it's a literary question those of us here. At the time. I think all leaders of vanity fair and know that you are at heart very much A literary percent of book person. What has your year of reading been like in quarantine. I know you're usually at least part of at least one book club. Have you been having trouble concentrating on books. Have you found books to be refuge. What's it been like for you. I am ashamed to say that my reading at least for my comfort level has fallen off a cliff. So which is why. I was so delighted to get this assignment to review issue. Gross new novel because he is one of my favorite favorite living writers. And i am a complete us. I have read all of his works and will continue to read and reread them. As long as i live so that was wonderfully focusing and it was an opportunity to sit not only with the new novel but with so much of his former work and really think about it. But it's been tough. I don't know i mean i. I feel like for a lot of readers out there. It's been tough to focus. And i think that the thing that made a difference for me. Oddly enough was that. Because i was no longer commuting to work. I lost that staple commuting time which i realized. In retrospect is when i did a lot of my reading but it's that i do lead a book club of incredibly wonderful astute readers all women who work or have worked on wall street and so with them. At least i've been keeping up a minimum a reading activity. We just met last week. Actually and discussed martin mrs novel london. And we have a of great books lined up for our next meeting.

Vanity Fair Magazine Couso Shapiro Rodica Maurizio Cuddle Alon Pierpaolo Ferrari Oscars Clara Brooklyn New York Times Jones Hollywood New York Martin Mrs London
The Magical Language Of Others By E.J. Koh

Books and Boba

05:40 min | 1 year ago

The Magical Language Of Others By E.J. Koh

"And welcome to books and boba a podcast between pittsburgh asian and asian american authors. My name is yet. And i'm re-re you and welcome to our first book club. Discussion of twenty twenty one. We're discussing your january twenty twenty one book club pick the magical language of others by ej co but before we get to the book rear. How has your twenty twenty one going. I mean we talk about this a lot. How time is just like a flat circle and it just feels like january has flown by. It has even though i mean wasn't there a coup. Wasn't there a lot of things happened politically. Obviously but i don't know like everything kind of feels like a fever dream and with the vaccine situation. The it's it's just been constant change degeneracy that antibac- sir shutdown vaccination site now. I did not hear about that. But i did hear about was how we have a how how we have like a vaccine shortage for like more than half of the country and not there's like a new variant of the covid nineteen screen. Yeah it's gotten really bad and it's like a question of of like wilda vaccine be able to stop the symptoms of the new strains and i am trying to stay as calm as possible. I've been staying at home as much as i can. Considering that like now like covid has been happening on the outskirts of inner circle. So it's just like. I'm just i'm just like people. Please stay home because now now it's like right outside my door stop and you're kind of terrified at this point. Well we're here today to talk about our january twenty twenty one book club pick so let's get to it As always as always we're gonna talk all about the book the magical language others so if you haven't read it yet read it i if you don't wanna get spoiled But if you want to listen to us first and then read it. And that's fine to do you. And i would like to give out the trigger warnings of of eating eating disorder suicidal thoughts. I guess like child neglect This there's a lot of sensitive topics in this book. So i would proceed with caution if if you are sensitive to those topics art. So let's get started. A rewrite won't start off with the book jacket description. All right the magical language of others is a powerful and aching love story and letters from mother to daughter after living in america for over a decade g. Cho's parents return to south korea for work leaving fifteen year old and her brother behind in california overnight. G finds herself abandoned and adrift in a world. Made strange by her mother's her mother writes letters in korean over the years seeking forgiveness and love. Letters engy cannot fully understand until she finds them years later hidden in a box as nj. Translate the letters. She looks to history her grandmother. June's ears as a love sick wife and tej on the horrors her grandmother. Kumiko witnessed during the island massacre and to poetry as well as her own lived experience to answer questions inside all of us. So right off the bat. I figure i mean i really enjoyed reading this book I'm not like literally trained person but Ej's pros is really beautiful very descriptive. Very there's a lot of stuff going on and a lot of really like beautiful descriptions. But i know that because i am a son of immigrants and not a daughter especially not a daughter of a korean immigrant. I know that your relation to this story might be a little more deeper than than mine. But what did you. How did you feel about this book. Man i how do i even answer that question. Is i knew that i knew going in that memoir was going to be very difficult for me to read. I'm a very emotional reader for those of you. Who haven't been listening to our podcast for for a while. But when i memoirs are supposed to be personal and it's supposed to tell the story of the author but for me when i was reading. Ej hose book. It seemed like she was holding up a mirror. I guess instead of her instead of just like listening and consuming her story. It felt like i was seeing kind of like this distorted reflection of my own childhood and my own adulthood and like you said like her prose is really gorgeous. I think that has a lot to do with the fact that she is a poet and she knows how to use each word to its maximum effect. Just like an example of her poetic prose. I highlighted a quote from her. I watched the sun come up like an egg cracked open underwater. It's yoke rising with listlessness.

Ej Co Engy Pittsburgh CHO Kumiko South Korea EJ America California
The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires -- Librarian A - burst 02

Drunk Librarians Podcast

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

The Southern Book Club's Guide to Slaying Vampires -- Librarian A - burst 02

"So this is actually by grady hendrix. Which gig radi found out. Today was a white man. No humor favorite tiktok slow. I thought i thought there were parts where he described cubes in boobs. Thought you know this might not be a woman. This might be a man hugues boobs. Let's via white man. It's it's it's just like the eitel and dec- magin how pupils in boobs get into that hugues boob southern book clubs guide to slang vampires. Well if anyone could do it it would be a white man.

Grady Hendrix This Week Magin
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Like a really important age milestone you in our personal like physical and social Rose say yes important because it's divisible by five and but it's also the your your brain stops true restore the braids now. Yeah this is. The last one sprain righetti to last spring update. And you just have to keep operating on that same computer even when there's other software and you have to try and make it adapt. Yeah yeah. I like that because like i definitely went through a very angry summer. You know of like. I'm not going to grad school this year. I'm staying in chicago another year. I don't have a job. Like i am i. I definitely feel trapped in now. Almost more like psychologically than like physically because physically. My body really likes the repetition. You know. I do very well being in the same place every day and doing the same things and seeing the same people. It's like as long as i can. Sort of throw in different sort of intentional variations. I can do pretty well. But in terms of like multi vision of myself and my future. I feel very trapped because there was like months. None of us knew what was coming next. You know and that sort of sense of like this is never gonna and i'm always gonna be here. Nothing's ever gonna change Nothing's ever gonna get better under. Stock is really hard to live with in your head and it's really hard to get yourself to like shower if you're like nothing matters And i think this will come up in a episode. Were prepping for. Because i'm reading pretty brown right now for weeks. She talks a lot about what loneliness is and yeah. I think I don't have fully formed thoughts yet. Because i'm still reading in. We'll more about it later. But that's something. I've been reflecting onto of like some days. I can feel really lonely and other days. I don't feel only at all and the people that i'm physically around have not changed And like vernice. Great calling me out. And i'm like i'm alone. He's like julia. And i'm like okay. Yeah but i'm like it's like a. It sounds so bad in three mississippi. Grateful sound like you're right. Like i could be fully alone and not have like even a pet besides my plants to keep me company. That would really suck. But i think there's like different levels of loneliness too like especially when we're both like emotionally feeling lonely in a day. Maybe the two of us talking because feel better. But maybe it's like we just sit in our sadness because we can't see your family's end really best friends but we're not family. Yeah you're not my mom. Sorry you would never be or the loneliness of lake Still am virtually but before the panel was very active in my church community here in chicago and like saying acquire and like that's a loneliness. I can't fill right now like i cannot be in a congregation with a lot of familiar faces and new faces Connecting into this routine. That i really find comforting for my own spirituality to seeing a space multiple people though i have grand visions of getting utah showed room together to seeing some like christmas song for parts covered. We do. I know salvin said he hasn't much of a senior about. I think we can get a minute if anything can like. I dunno clap along. can he can. He do like the base part of acapella where they just go do i. E fox asu. Doesn't cam sing tenor when necessary. Yes so we have. We could do soprano alto tenor baritone. Yeah there's food on my face it's okay it's a podcast well. Cranberry gel was pretty much all melted. It is a puddle so this means we should clean the table. We're going to go for a walk but in almost a bit we should. We should go now. Actually finished acted later. We'll go from happy. Thanksgiving happy thanksgiving happy holidays. Because who knows when we'll get this episode.

righetti vernice chicago julia brown salvin mississippi utah asu
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"It's hard to find meaning. I definitely think Especially if the election had turned out differently mind narrative outlook this year would just be constant downward trend but because of the election results it feels like you know like hanging drop plot mountain. There's usually a couple of little peaks and then there's the big win that it comes back down like i feel like this year. Just before thanksgiving saw slight uptick. You know what i mean. There's just a little bit and now it's going back down to who we we had a little and join. Yeah 'cause like. I mean obviously the case rate in infection rate in chicago is matt. It's sixty percent or something like that and like it's it's dangerous to go anywhere anywhere in the country right now like that. you know. it's pretty dark thing ever like. We still have to get through the winter bought. It hasn't been all absolutely terrible. You know the there have been moments of lights. I don't know like actually get to know myself. Like post autism. Diagnosis is the first time. I've really had a moment to breathe where you know i can. I can get to know what's What sort of daily patterns work for me because there isn't a ton of stuff minute you know there's like the number one priority is keeping myself alive so that involves the cooking the cleaning and the walking the kickball you know like the basics bathing and sleeping And so in those rhythms like learning to find what actually works and what isn't stress induced an-and just adding small things on top of that so adding the most important relationships and the podcast. Because honestly this podcast has been hoping i think in bringing us together with ourselves between the two of us in our friends and giving a sense of purpose and time. The passes positive. Time here marks. Another week asking podcast. One thoughts. amazing. I'm like up response to the podcast. When come up and say oh. It's on my plate. i just it. It's been a whole week now the last week number any of this weekend time time. Yes everything you just sitting here talking like. I guess before the pandemic i always thought of my self as someone who can move to new places can make best of situations i can like. I've never really felt like stuck somewhere. Because i always felt like i had a lot of opportunity to places physically mainly because i grew up living a lot of different places and i got those tools at a very young age of like this is how we stay connected to the people. We already now. This is how we build new friendships. This is how we moved to. New cities is how we embrace new cultures. Even the Not is very but still very cultures. You see across the us between the west coast in the midwest. Where i spent most of my life. I felt very adaptable. And i think if i can tell the story to myself twenty twenty being a year of adaptation instead of a i'm lake being stuck. Yeah i could write that story either way. I said i was stuck. I lost my job. I had to take other jobs that maybe weren't like the thing i thought i wanted to do. I couldn't see family in the same way. I couldn't see my boyfriend in the same way the same cadence i would use really do. Couldn't see my friends was really stuck or like sometimes i like imagine myself like. I want to move abroad some day. But it's probably look something like this. I'm going to go somewhere would have likely my partner with me. Maybe we'll know one or two friends. And i'll have to make the best of it and that's exactly what this year was was like. I love to friends. I'm able to see my boyfriend. We make the best of it and like learning how to adapt. And i think if i can pull those things that feels like more of a story growth can continue instead of being like well that years a wash right. Forget twenty twenty. And i was into a podcast yesterday where the host saying like. Yeah i'm going to be celebrating thirty one again next year because this past you didn't count like he's like flashes birthdays. No-one celebrate them. We're going to repeat it next year. I'm like that'd be kinda funny kind of find it. Throw a twenty fifth birthday party next year. But i'm like but this was what twenty twenty twenty five. Yeah was him. And so i think yeah this year is always going to be connected with.

autism matt chicago midwest west coast us
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Serious sentimental chat without recording it but of course not no. This is kind of plan we were like. Oh we can record like our friends giving the accountable when we do the week before thanksgiving with a roommate. Roommate other reminded the boys. And the boys the boyfriends and That will be cancelled because we're living in Pandemic wasn't quite wary case. Look outside recently. You been camping on your own for the ten months. yeah yet. Welcome to tony twenty. Yeah are natasha changed. Plans and has been with her family all week in new york ends picture. I had a tearful hello to burundi in the streets. Drop-off uses sweet. He's in a lot of the cooking family Yesterday at May also cooking today. But he came over dropped off like extra turkey to tex potatoes and three types of vegetables and four types of bread and like we have so much food. We have so much food we we will post picture because it didn't say how much food we have. We got the two of us. Seven people easily easily. Maybe a little bit more turkey would need more turkey. 'cause we have more beans. We don't really need more veg women integrating that's one thing we forgot. There's no gravy raven 'cause we for a real shame three different people who took him like. It's okay i walk in julie do it baby. She like now. I forgot coming to. Yeah it's one of those things you just take for granted that it's just going to be there on thanksgiving. One of the thanksgiving memories at my family always gets retold every year is. My aunt was hosting thanksgiving one year. And we all sit down. Is beautiful sprinted. Even though the other people help like she she did the bulk of the work that night And my uncle turns to her and her husband and his life. Where's the gravy. She just said goes. Why is she agrees. All of us start eating. She's like in the kitchen whipping agreement. And so every every thanksgiving we're together in chrissy. Who did you meet the grave gravy. Man she's never gonna she's life is never lived that you know like i just i can imagine her just like the night before waking up in a cold sweat like i meet the gravy gravy makes it like before. She's even made the same. Yeah scraps from the last accuser. Freezer full of grieving members. Guy like dallas has Everything together so it just turns into a big pile of bush. Miami have thanksgiving found wrong stores Yeah no thanksgiving's a quiet affair in the closet home. I kind of those things are quiet. That is an accurate statement. Yeah young unless you see. Football is on the one thing because my dad's shout these potato separate no legal the metals credibility smokiness. Yeah i was surprised. Stars expecting pure sugar. And i got to save navy for later on my plate so that i'm could like he's into the sweet thing. Yeah no no not at all. I think the corn would do a better job once again. I made myself. i'm sitting here. Congratulated for cell. Phone could did you used to like with with my mom's side of the family. They live all over the country. So it's been. We don't do a lot of holidays together. But everyone's around when we do and all the moms cook and they sit down and just start congratulating themselves and complementing each other on the food that they've just thanks and all the cousins are just like. Oh my god mom we get it. It's good like why. Are you still talking about it and like now that i cook more like cooked with people. Were like a group dinner. I'm get. I'm like i want to sit here and talk about the feet that we just accomplished. I twenty minutes. We had multiple dishes and not only was the effort of making it yet. Every time we get a holiday like this in my mind is blown my mom who can keep all the things in order piano. She does when things need to be cooked too hot all at the same time. The asking me like Prepped in advance and then reheated in the oven which things like really need to be served at the last minute. She just does head to usually writes things out especially. It's going to be like multiple days and then also with my relatives tonight now that we're older and helping more kitchen. She'll just like hand you a note card. You're in charge of these two things today. How here's your time line while it's a well oiled machine. That's that's Meals on the table. Yeah now. I'm the worst at that of timing things out so that they're done at the same time like i. Throughout my adult life has on several occasions finished one dish and had to wait another thirty minutes for the other ones to be done. And so i literally have my dinner while i'm waiting just standing there ready to cook and then i get the other half and then i i'm. I'm not good at them. Yeah i feel like. I'm quarantine something that it's done. Sort of forced a lot of us to spend some quality time with ourselves and maybe a little too much. Tory like man. I kinda suck. Can we should see other. People have been yourself but i think through the process. It's been an interesting exercise in understanding your own story and like where it's going and where it's been who's actually involved. You know who who is really a character that matters and your narrative arc like we have the book version of live where you guys many characters as you want. It doesn't cost more money. And then they try to make it into a fill we got cash and then they're gonna stage it getting me. He bought a stage. We didn't really trim the stabbing. We're going to do like low budget. We're only gonna do one sets. Let's do their heart rate. And that's the story of their life. You have to get that angle. And that's what this interior has been. Yeah it kind of feels like a sitcom union where you have one set and it's just the same for people coming and going in your life. Why are they always together. Don't they have lives. Why those roommates that good friends. No one is really good friends with all their roommate. We'll continue our lives. Young walking around with a laugh track ready to go on. My phone took a job in this. Play the laugh track because no one else will laugh.

tony twenty turkey burundi natasha chrissy julie new york dallas Miami navy bush Football
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"That is the whole book. It's the bulk of the book. So how do you make that interesting. You know they're not sort of like a hardboiled detective novels or something. There's a lot of like running around and guns and jumping over fences. And what have you and you know this is like sitting in a room talking but peeling back the subterfuge of you know. Who are these people really. Yeah it's even more simple than most of her books like most of her books have a little more going on. You know it's like poro is happens to be in the space or he's been invited there for some reason Sometimes he's called in after the murder happens sometimes he's already there. Sometimes his friend is there and is like hey. We need a detective but the bulk of the narrative is him like hanging out with rich people and they go. They do things. They have activities like people's daily lives sort of continues on after the funeral. All and he's just sort of in their space talking to them and news quietly through everything and observing. And so there's a bit more action you know in a bit less poro sits and thinks you know And then at the end all of a sudden there's this reveal and you're like oh my gosh i never would have seen it coming but this one is very very barebones leg and the the way. The book is outlined. It literally tells you like there's a chapter called the murder. A murder is occurring right now and get the title on. The orient express is a murder berry. Here we go and the yeah and like you know. There's there's like three sections of the book for each of the stages of detective novel so kind of exactly it and maybe it works because it had never been outlined like that before but and so she was the first one to be like. Hey this is the structure of mystery novel. Here you go. Here's her inspiration. Here was via reading some notes on like you know. She had travelled by train to these places the orient express and had experience getting stuck in the snow and whatnot but So if she was just like sitting thinking like could a murder happened here down or if she sat down from a more maybe structural perspective..

poro berry
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Two classically american. You she just really act. Kind of hit amazes america in so many different ways. And i feel like that's part of what I think that's part of what helped get obama elected. I think that's part of her power and continuing to connect to people even now. I feel like posts awhile. Presidency like it's michelle who's really like having a big public influence. Said like i mean the world is obsessed with her. I think yeah reading. Her upbringing found like it was a really cool sort of inside look into history of chicago. But like i said it looks a lot like a lot of my friends childhoods to until it was it was interesting sort of i don't know i really. I really enjoy that. And i can see why she can kind of go anywhere. And someone's like yes. I relate to you And i think that's really cool. I feel like that's something. She kind of talks about more in the next section becoming or sorry yes. We're going when she starts. I mean it'd be part of that is hurt in brock's relationship in we can get into that as well because i love love stories but also when she is hoping campaign for obama like it's through her relatable storytelling Like kind of cliche at this point. But so true of like the more specific you are more relatable atlantic. She has very specific store. She can Like us as a tool to build bridges of understanding between one and people who might feel like. Oh i'm so different from you. And she's like oh my. My dad was also disabled A big impact on our lives and yet like i literally wrote in my notes i loved the middle section that was like by far my favorite in watching them sort of advance in their careers. And like that's where the conflict really starts in their personalities and winning through that but particularly michelle obama on the campaign trail was a formidable force that i being like ten years old did not pay attention do and when it happened and so like i just had no idea. I literally wrote my notes. Michelle is the reason. That obama won iowa like like just the amount of face to face networking that she did during his campaign sort of unmatched among like potential first ladies like she was as much a public figure in a representative of an obama administration as brock. Like i think a opinion on this is like. I also read few months ago. Now i read ton ozzy cokes eight years in power and he has its essay collection. He has he wrote an essay couple years in the obama about physically amount about michelle. And he.

obama michelle brock america chicago atlantic michelle obama obama administration iowa
Africa and museums: shaping the future; rethinking the past

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:40 min | 1 year ago

Africa and museums: shaping the future; rethinking the past

"I just on your lawson. The founding director of the paloma in togo and andrew santo. Who's just written a book with twenty eight interviews with museum leaders across the world. I also speak to. Dan hicks about his book. The british museum's about the bronzes and for our work the week christopher repeal of the national gallery in london talks about san mateo painting of copernicus. That's coming to the national for an exhibition next year before that a reminder that you can sign up for the art newspapers free daily newsletter for all the latest stories goes to the art newspaper dot com and the link is at the top right of the page. And while you're there you can also sign up for a range of other newsletters including the book club and the art market. I now a new book by the writer and cultural strategy advisor andhra santo features twenty eight conversations with directors of museums and other institutions oldham during the covid nineteen pandemic the future of the museum. Twenty eight dialogues. Include voices from across the world attempting to define museums and the challenges and opportunities ahead of them now and in the coming days among them. Direct is of african museums including sonia lawson the director of the paladin loma in togo in west africa. Andress and sonia join me to discuss the role of museums today and look at how sonya's togalese institution reflects a new coq drew dynamism on the african continent andress. I wanted to begin by asking you. This book was written on zoom. Just as we are now essentially so you talked to twenty eight museum or cultural institution directors about what they were doing. It happened to be done in the covy deer as it were but was it. Germinating is an idea for a much longer period this spring. I wrote an article in art. Net news actually wrote it over easter weekend. So i remember did very well I guess that was early april. I can't remember the exact dates and it was an article about reopening museums. And it just hit a nerve. It really got a lot of people talking at the time. And i heard from dozens and dozens of museum directors and just became part of illogic conversation. And that's when we really realized that this is the moment because it gave us an editorial frame because it it really was a moment that made us ask what is the future about. Still trying to figure it out. I think there's no doubt in all of our minds that this is one of those years in the calendar that will be a turning point. A historical marker where new phase is beginning persona. I think this phase is the one that started in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine just ended. Now we have a new face. So what does that mean for museums. Once i figured out that this would be a book not just of conversations with museum. Directors conversations about the future not necessarily revisiting. Why museums have been great in the past of which many reasons to talk about that too but to really have a forward-looking and that is what led to choices like this extraordinary new institution in togo. Which i think is such a taste of where museums or cultural institutions or cultural centers are headed All around the world so so in a way this moment. This covert moment crystallized. How such a book could come about and how we would choose directors to be in it before we speak specifically about sons institution. I wanted to ask you about a phrase that you use in the to the book where you talk about how. The paradigm smashing experimentation in museums and cultural institutions is happening in effectively in the global south so in africa in asia in latin america. Can you expand on that a bit now. Because what do you think lies behind that. Well first of all i. That's not to say it's not happening elsewhere. And i think the book provides lots of examples of how people are thinking you in original ways about museums all around the world. But i think that there are perhaps two main reasons. Why so many of these truly interesting. And i would say inspiring. Examples of new practices are often happening in the global. South one is that many of these institutions are brand new. So it's you can speak to this. They have an opportunity to really design for the now and for the future. They're not dealing with a legacy infrastructure. They're not trying to retrofit something. That was already there and tried to adapt it to the future.

Togo Andrew Santo Sonia Lawson Dan Hicks National Gallery San Mateo Andress Oldham Sonya West Africa Sonia London Latin America Asia Africa
How small stores are cutting through the noise from the big-box stores this season

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:19 min | 1 year ago

How small stores are cutting through the noise from the big-box stores this season

"Are a business show. So yes we're going to start with what today means for a big chunk of the economy retail because the deals extravaganza. We still call black. Friday has actually already begun. The pandemic has a lot of us. Rethinking our shopping. 'cause we really wanna live in a world where only the big national chains survive. A survey from at taxi found that seventy five percent of shoppers planned to make an effort to shop local. This holiday season marketplace's kristen schwab reports usually this shopping weekend at territories in austin texas is one big celebrating and they walk in. They think they've joined like some mosh pit of Toys shoppers sylvia edwards says the general manager children running up and down everywhere loud music. You know noises from different toys being played with a cacophony of magic madness. And so it'll never get like that this year and not just because of social distancing territories has divided shopping hours. Grownups only ten to four all ages. Welcome four to six. The store is also offering night owl tours. Private appointments for shoppers after closing. You get a whole hour in the toy store and then a little personal salesperson that walks you through the store shows. You are twee workshop where we still cut wood and make toys. These are the kinds of personal touches. That could help. Small retailers cut through all the noise coming from big box stores. Disol- the keller at mintel says traditionally a third of shoppers to most of their buying this weekend and the message from retailers. She says is that they hope to see even bigger numbers this year. Basically start thinking about your holiday shopping and now because it's just only going to be more of a challenge to get what people want on time. The goal this season make day an occasion to shop. Frank reese who owns acapella books in atlanta is doing that with extra virtual book clubs and author events. A lot of our business in normal times. is not in this little store. What a lot of businesses is offsite events. And he's doing the free delivery thing by hand because you know amazon sells books to. I'm kristen schwab for marketplace.

Kristen Schwab Sylvia Edwards Austin Texas Mintel Frank Reese Acapella Books Atlanta Amazon
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"We want the things we want so for those who read sapiens at are looking for something else to read. Watch listen to next. We'll start fever. What would you recommend roy to. Sapiens can be loosely or closely related. I don't know come back to me. Maybe you guys. Okay gotcha What would you recommend yulia. I read books like the so little that the only thing that i have. That's at all similar as something recommend before. It called watching english by kate fox and it basically picks apart the What makes a culture. And in this case it's a particular culture of england and again. I find that all very fascinating and being able to summarize an intricate and elaborate. Human system into a few essentials is really cool. Let me tell you how many we have a few recommendations I mentioned i. Don't read a lot of mystery. There's one book that i'm also very slowly. It's been over a year trying to the. I really drew the content. Just takes me back to your through the great transformation. The beginning of our religious tradition by karen armstrong. If you found the bits in this in harare's book specifically about the evolution of religion from polytheists to pajama monotheist religions across the world. Carry on trump's book that's like what she dives into is that The evolution of of the kind of big religions in kind of the trajectory that they They went kind of arguing. That they they follow a similar pattern based on the current state of the civilization. That That religion was so that really fascinating. She's again kind of that. Big picture look at specifically at religious traditions. And then another thing. I thought of talking about math. This is like a loose related. Thank but if you found the bits of mass in us in in writing or the like brought about writing and storytelling There's a great article from will lincoln show nuts called. How storytellers use math. Inferences without scaring people away. It's a dan rock moore as the author of this essay in his. Talk about two books and specific. That haven't read the article itself. Just as really fascinating. I sent it to our friend. David who is a big math nerd and instantly so get your fund. The math part of savings interesting. I'd recommend not. And then lastly again very loosely related but the The last chapter verna was just referencing about happiness. And how Kind of.

kate fox trump roy fever harare karen armstrong yulia verna england David
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"When we got rid of like religions. With god's we replace them with humanism like he calls humanism a religion needs like you know we just replaced to your point. We've you know humanity sort of. I was europe. I guess collectively stopped believing in certain myths but just created new ones or replace them with new ones. And yeah and i think that's why a lot of people when they deconstruct religion either immediately cling onto something else for your life with just as much ferocity as the old one or they feel the sense of isolation because they're like i don't know i don't know where but anymore because we need a story we need a. We need a mess in order to feel like a human being. Just ask but kind of defines us as people but the just a lot of those things sort of clicked into place for me connecting all these different concepts and all these feelings that i'd had about like the facts. That money is just something we've made up out of necessity. it is just a story retailer. Ourselves that relies on intercepted like it needs. The whole economy needs the whole world to believe in it in order for it to work Which just makes me wanna scream at something. I don't know about you guys. So the bitter racing here with democrats and republicans it was partially the narratives retailer ourselves but also the the idea that her pointing out of like we operate in cognitive dissonance which communism insist on the sheer. About if you if you tend to therapy or maybe read up on Different psychol- psychology ideas on. Its idea that. Like i believe one thing and i believe this everything. And they're in Like they're in conflict with each other. And i'm having cognitive business when you're like i believe in this thing but i also support this candidate or something where it doesn't totally agree with this and that's a unique feature of sapiens that we can hold both and we can try for both things but it can lead to tension and so he writes how m democrats one more equitable society But that infringes on the freedom of individuals spending money as they wish because it might mean raising taxes to fund different programs and then republicans on hand when it maximize individual freedom even if it means that The income gap gets bigger. And so there's this tension because american ideals are both on like equality and justice but also individuality and freedom.

europe
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"And how like so much of human like the things that we experience day-to-day are just like things. Humans made up. And how would you lead. I thrive just talks about narratives. Like one of my favorite things. One of my favorite quotes. Let me see if i can find it Oh i don't have it quoted exactly but basically the humans dominance and sort of one of the defining features of us as a species is storytelling because we used it like we were able to communicate with each other wear. The water was worth a good berries. Work where the on where the dangerous animals were and like we developed the sort of grew storytelling and meaning making that eventually grew and evolved over time into all these different things but our ability to tell stories in ways that unified us Is like the reason that we're alive. Sickly and i I really enjoyed that. You know as as a as a book person as writer that time you know to realize like oh storytelling is into something that makes us feel good. Let's like the core of ours sees. I'm what's really fascinating But it also of points throughout the book. Like everything's made up harari actually. I think he was very specific when he came to the kind of the cognitive advantage that we gained i. He's used the words like we. Humans gained the ability to talk about fictional things which game day ability to gossip of which was like. Oh wow what a what a crazy framing of that. That's really interesting. To think about is now through gossiping you can gain. Intimate trust with another person ever met before like yes. I'm going to trust the chicago. Bulls fan obviously them. Because why are you chicago. Bulls fan Again the resonate with the narrative. Seven and glenn doctor things. That i'm like i've got. Why am i am comfortable with us. I think the The initial like oh We made it up or it's you know it's not it's not a real thing it's like. Oh that's like. I mean that feels really real to me and then you know in the next sentence. Her is not to say doesn't impact like something to get dumbledore quote It isn't a terrific. Hasn't done your head doesn't mean it's not real right and the impact that comes from these stories is very real. You know the stories. We tell ourselves about nationalism. Capitalism about What it means to be a chicago in like you're saying ver- like what it means to follow like a certain team where idea or like the stories we can tell ourselves about. I am podcast like those secrets have impact not only on individuals but like on the the whole community in. That's what polls people together. And i find that really interesting to that. Harare isn't saying like. I think the instinct is to be like whoa my things. Real like tomatoes non-real meal. Or i read it. Just make this up. That is ignore. It has real implications on your life recognize like humans made all of this. I guess what we can argue about like. What is the best lake. Should we have a free market economy or like the should be concerned about the the needs of individuals and especially like with the election this happening. Oh gosh i wish i would have flagged this parks. I didn't think about it until like literally speaking. He's great fit about republicans and democrats.

Bulls chicago us Harare writer dumbledore glenn
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"The one who honestly start talking about this book that i was like. Maybe i should read it In here we are like more than your later. Finally finally finished it on. This episode was going to come out in january but someone being made took way too long to read law though the figure from you about your experience reading the book so i wrote the book twice. Let's start with the. I read it once a at least a year ago. I don't know And i read it again before this podcast. I don't remember how i found it. But i do remember looking at the back. Cover of the book and being amazed by the people that were giving it reviews. They're quite well known. People like president obama and bill gates and others. I remember who else. But maybe i should because they're probably very close to the importance of those two. I think i'm prone to being an evangelist about the last thing. I did anyway but increases out. Yeah i'm impressed. You eat a full reread. Now were very diligent notetaker mom as as more recently and i really admire that too. Because there's so this book is really done in. This conversation is only going to scratch the surface of what. Hurry all gets into secular. He's done the work to deep dive into to what harare writing about like the past few days for earn was like. Hey juliet are you. Are you working on your notes for the episode. Was like no and he had this giant notebook just like filled with thoughts and he was like organizing them on his computer so could probably talk me under the table. Pretty much anything. We're about to cover but yeah i was like no. These notes are from over a year ago. Hope i know what they say. Yeah so i read this book. I had to go check my old journals. It was like fall winter. Twenty nineteen so. It was almost exactly a year ago. I started reading this book. And i think i bought it after a particularly bleak day. At therapy there is a bookstore right next door to my therapist license in it was cold by a few books and this was one of them.

juliet harare bill gates obama president
Study Sees Rise in Lonely Americans, and the Workplace Might Play a Part

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Study Sees Rise in Lonely Americans, and the Workplace Might Play a Part

"New study shows about 60% of workers are feeling lonely during this pandemic. Almost Denise Whitaker talk with an expert about how to deal with that Erica's honor with health kick suggests reaching out to friends and co workers. Help both them and you with conversations. Plus, she advocates a bit of self care something I've been doing. For example, are these livestream fitness classes and even that, you know, even though I'm not in the studio with other people, there is a sense of camaraderie. And I know that that's definitely An emotional boost for me, if it's not exercise you crave. Then she suggests you find another outlet to find that social connection with people. And that could be anything from an online cooking class, a virtual book club, wine tasting or some other group that you can connect with online right now to share your hobbies, your interests and Have a little bit of extra conversation outside of work

Denise Whitaker Erica
Interview With Yahia Lababidi

Spark My Muse

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Yahia Lababidi

"Welcome everybody sparked by muse. And today i have a guest. Yahia la vida de. I hope i didn't mess that up too badly beautiful. Who is a writer. An egyptian who's come to america as a young adult eight critically acclaimed books of poetry and prose. he's an authorised an sas and most recently he sent me revolutions of the heart literary cultural and spiritual which is just a treasure trove of little gems. Some smaller pieces some slightly larger pieces and to begin speaking about it. It's hard to know where to choose at this banquet table where to pick but you so much for joining me for the podcast. Thank you for having me over here in new to and also. I want to make sure that we tell listeners about this book being the book for january. Twenty twenty one and meeting up with you in february on the third for a book club. Discussion and fighting. That'll be really fun. What's nice is that it's recorded so anytime someone wants to come back. And listen or it can be embedded on your webpage even or or any web page. Yeah it could be revisited and enjoyed over and over you define aphorisms as what is worth quoting from the souls dialogue with itself and you also say that you hope that might serve as a form of peace offering and bomb in these troubled times and for people who are not quite aware or quite. Have a handle on what aphorisms are. Perhaps you can just explain that a little bit and then speak about what that offers us today. Well it's it's basically it has currency without being recognized for what it is so anything when people have these quotes or inspirational sayings or even what they call it. A witty wise one liners. That's an aphorism if if it doesn't have a name attached to it and it's a maximum or proverb in the assuming some great sage cited then it's an another category of instruction but but enough for them. They're certainly more people who are aware of what they are. And who use them consciously now than when. I began writing them. Let's say thirty years ago at this point as a teenager. When i don't think anyone even knew what that meant but i grew up reading. People like braun. Nietzsche and blake and kafka and pascal who tended to write in offer 'isms and they basically i mean wild has some definitional skar wild about how he had some existing a phrase. I do not presume to some olives in a frozen any of my offers. But it's this. It's this idea of trying to encapsulate a great conversation. And that's why. I define it as a competition with the souls conversation with itself really so you go off. You're thinking about something dreaming meditating possibly weeks years even and then at some point. There's one line that you can extract from all that that can stand alone by itself that will be a key or a door or window or invitation for a complete stranger to have that conversation with themselves so a good aphorism doesn't in my understanding of it at least in everyone's got their own definition is just as suggestion or you to sort of the spark your own conversation With with your with your soul so to speak. And that's why. I really appreciate reading Books of aphorisms where there's few on the page and a lot of blank space because it's understood that they are in need of diluting the way you dilute. It is by bringing in everything you know. Suspect you know we're just breathing alongside it

America Kafka Nietzsche Braun Pascal Blake
Confesions by Kanae Minato

Books and Boba

04:51 min | 1 year ago

Confesions by Kanae Minato

"You're listening to books and bobo. Oppo club podcasts. Between books by easing american doctors are marvin gaye and angrier. And we're here today to talk about our october. Twenty twenty book club. Pick confessions by name and knoxville translated by steven snyder. Who re-re you picked. You picked a doozy for spooky twenty twenty. It really was the perfect read for for spooky month. In my opinion yeah. This episode should be released on election. Day twenty twenty. How are you feeling as we enter this potentially new era. I've just been trying not to think about it. I submitted my ballot a couple of days ago. And i'm like well. It's i don't know it feels kind of hopeless but you know you're i don't now i don't know i feel i don't wanna i don't wanna think about it. I like when the results come out. I'm still skeptical on. How much can change. How much damage control do yeah. Oh at least we can still escape to our books as a resident alien from canada. I'm counting on all you people to To us that's right. You can't vote. I voted for the first time when a moved to california. Because i didn't become naturalized until i was like twenty one twenty. Which very like my this is only like my second election because because the last election the first very first one i voted for was trump versus clinton and wow. I was appointed by the results of it my first election. I vote and i was like. Wow i feel like my vote. Didn't cout of but that's democracy for you right. I mean did count. it just didn't count enough. Yeah i know because of the electoral college or some bullshit like our international listeners are going to just be so continue. No i think they understand. Also what's at stake here. I mean everyone knows the situation that our country is an and yeah so Those of us in the future. How's it over there. I hope i hope it's I hope it's not as bleak but yeah Quick reminder that we're gonna be talking about the whole of confessions by claiming not so so that includes spoilers and since this book is kind of like a crime thriller. You definitely don't want to get spoiled before you get into it so make sure you read the book before coming back listening to our discussion. Yeah i would put this in the same category as never let me go. I'll just go into it as cold as possible and then come back and listen to us and it's a pretty quick read only about two hundred and thirty five pages for a novel. It's relatively short so you can probably knock it out in a day or two and back. Okay so we're we're gonna move on tear discussion. Yeah marvin what have you heard about this book before. Because it you know it was an international bestseller. It was extremely popular in japan. It sold millions of copies. And there's a movie based on this book as well. So have you heard about this book before. Going in actually haven't so this is my first time exposed to this I guess you can call source material. actually didn't know there was a film Yeah it's directed by tetsuya kashima. Who is a pretty well known director and it debuted at the toronto international film festival back in twenty ten and it got a lot of critical acclaim so i have not watched a movie and interested in how they adapted it. Yeah i mean it is a form of story that is somewhat familiar in asian media tropes which is like the revenge story right like we've seen this before in like the korean cinema. A lot of japanese films anime manga light novels also feature stories that like kind of focused on revenge right like the wrong party. Getting their justice is probably one of the darker ones of these that i've read

Steven Snyder Marvin Gaye Knoxville Electoral College Clinton Canada California Tetsuya Kashima Marvin Japan
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"And so I found that it prompted a lot of self-reflection and I've just experiences that I had wage through and and how I felt like I had to prove myself in different ways or expend more energy to see more extroverted than I was so yeah. Yeah, it is interesting. Like the energy will get into Sylveon more later. But like kind of the premise of this book is she's writing within our culture and it's like hey, I'm saying that we need a book like this in some ways. Like we need a book to validate the power of introverts because our culture is so like so strong on that Sugar had scale but like that is what surprised and when she unpacks kind of like the history of that. I think it was really frustrating to realize like oh that's just something we made up. Yeah, like most things kind of thing frustrating like brainstorming. Yes, that's where I want to go. This is just a thing and it's like, oh, that's how brains that's how we collaborate that is a tool for collaboration. And then it's like someone made that up and it's like Oh, I didn't even think to challenge that. I mean I I guess some conversations with friends have like whether or not we like brainstorming but we never question the concept of like should we brainstorm off? So anyways will get into that. I'm getting way ahead of myself. But so Susan Cain was born in 1968 and it's American writer and lecturer and author of a few books off the quiet the power of introverts in a world that can't stop talking which we're talking about today came out in 2012 and has been a huge hit. It was named the number one best book of the Year by multiple things that give book recommendations. It's been translated to 40 languages and spent going on. I think it's at seventh year. Yeah on the New York Times best-selling looks like it's just stayed there since it's been published. She's got tons of alkaloids. She's partnered with big names such as Malcolm Gladwell Adam Grant and Dan pink to launch the next Thursday. Idea book club, which I thought was fun considering we also are a book club. And yeah their book club donates their proceeds to Children's literacy programs. She's not only written a handful of non-fiction books. But she also a prolific writer for various Publications the New York Times the Atlantic Wall Street Journal Etc. She's got a TED Talk out that's been viewed over 30 million times and it seemed about Bill Gates is one of his all-time favorite talks, which what an honor maybe I don't know depends on how you feel about Bill Gates. She moved to do is a graduate of Princeton and Harvard Law School, which she talks about her deep dive in this book often is within law and finance cuz that's kind of her background and her purview and she spent time as a lawyer she sent to him as a consultant for negotiations and eventually found herself as a writer, which I appreciate towards later in the book when she writes about how that wage. active choice for her to to kind of like live out her true her passions are in life and she wanted to ride so she she restructured her life so that she could do that and she now lives in the Black River Valley with her husband and two sons and you can check out a lot more about her and she started was called The Quiet Revolution quite we have. Com, so I've got tons of resources and things before we kind of building off of this idea of the power of introverts..

Susan Cain Bill Gates writer Sylveon New York Times Sugar Malcolm Gladwell Princeton Black River Valley Harvard Law School Publications the New York Time Atlantic Wall Street Journal Dan pink consultant lecturer Adam Grant
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | 1 year ago

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
Identify the New You!

RISE Podcast

05:33 min | 1 year ago

Identify the New You!

"Identify the new you. I think one of the hardest things about going through a world rocking life changing experience is that you come out the other side a someone totally different. Only. Your mind is still processing what's happened as who you were not as who you are now. It's like one of those sci Fi movies where the spaceship moves into hyper drive or warp speed or whatever they call it, and then the galaxies all blur into streaks and suddenly the enterprise is in another dimension. You. have become something else. You've moved on to an entirely new dimension, but your sense of self, the you that makes up your thoughts and feelings is still the you who you always were. Life is so rude sometimes. As if it weren't enough that you've got to deal with the emotional upheaval of what you're experiencing. Now you also have to contend with a big old identity crisis. Only most of us won't see the crux of the problem as a question of identity. Which makes it harder still? In my opinion, there are four different kinds of identity crisis as it pertains to loss pain or grief. One. You had an identity and it was taken away from you. I was a great worker, but my company laid me off now I'm just unemployed. To. You want an identity that is denied to you. I wanted to be a mom so badly, but the IVF treatment didn't work and I'm devastated. Three. You chosen identity. And no longer want it. I thought that I was happy as a stay at home mom but actually I'm depressed and not a good moment to my kids. For. Someone else chose an identity for you. That isn't who you are. Being in this management role keeps me from being creative. But my boss thinks I'm needed here. Feel I'm dying inside? For a more visual illustration, let me try using a subject I know almost nothing about. Basketball. Let's begin with the first one. The identity you had was taken away from you. Several years back I was speaking at an event for the Navy Seal Foundation and I had the honor of meeting with a smaller community of Gold Star. Families. If, you're not familiar gold star families are those that have lost a loved one in military service and that day there were about fifty women who had lost their seal in service. I have worked with the military a lot over the years. It's a community that is incredibly close to my heart and a big focus of the philanthropy we do through our foundation. That's why I know. I'll offend some of them when I say this because all branches of military service are incredible and. and. So proud. But Nobody And I mean, nobody has a stronger sense of military pride and identity than the Navy seals. Memory is so vivid. Because while I've yet to meet a military spouse who wasn't proud of their service member. The seal wives are a breed to themselves. As I sat in the room that day I story of loss from decades before and others from just a few months prior. But the narrative I heard again and again was I was his wife. And now he's gone. Who Am. I now. Who Am I now? I've heard that line from mothers who've lost their only child. And men who lost their jobs. I've heard it from athletes who have a career ending injury and college students who've been dumped. When I think of this identity crisis in terms of basketball, it's akin to having your series winning shot blocked. have. You ever seen a game where an incredible player takes the game winning shot that is for sure absolutely going in. At the last second without warning, it's violently batted away by someone on the other team. The pain of that is all the more intensified by the fact that you just had it. It was just here. And now suddenly it's been ripped away from you. I can't begin to tell you why this happened to you. But when it comes to your identity on this particular point, I need you to hear me You are still his wife. You are still her mama. You are still an incredible asset to a team. You are still an amazing athlete. You are still a great boyfriend. Just because the thing attached to that identity was removed, doesn't mean that the role you earned was taken away.

Basketball Navy Seal Foundation IVF Gold Star Navy
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Just it's so funny now, but yeah, Julia was like, oh my gosh, like anything I did that was like made me seem like touristy or American and it was so funny. I yeah, I was I was funny now at the time we were both like jet-lagged and I was just let me take a picture of Westminster Abbey. Okay. Yeah. I was so mortified like I would I genuinely like it's just so stupid but I like started using an English accent in like coffee shops because I just you know where I only have to say like three words because I just desperately didn't want anyone to know that I was American like that's how much I hate Americans abroad and then like and I was trying and there were certain moments where I like different International friends. I made we're like cuz I the way I talk I'm very loud. I tried to tone it down and just doesn't always happen and so like there would be moments where like I remember the first time I realized what it felt like to listen to like a group of American women like get all excited and talk and there were we were like I was like sitting on the tube reading and there was a group of them and they were just so loud in a silent car and I just like wanted to dissolve into a puddle my chair and they were like, we we gotta go start box first and I'm just like shut up, but I think we sort of suffer from both assuming that America is the only country but then also That we have to educate everyone about us because no one knows hundred percent. Yeah one line from that story that I thought was really interesting is Jose capacity says like mrs. Is like asking him to like help interpret her mental ailments and not he says but we do not face a language barrier what need is there for an interpreter and that line just really stuck out to me because I feel like There's this assumption. That if we speak if we speak the same language. Like well understand each other and just how much like your family Culture Your sort of regional Culture Your Country culture like your work culture like how how much we are shaped by these and how much interpretation has to go up into communication with each other and how much we assume like, oh, we'll just understand you don't mean we don't need to put in an extra and in any extra work to like understand someone who comes from a different background or whatever, but I feel like I sort of saw in that moment like the the the the flaw and off communication is they both thought that they understood their relationship to their relationship to each other and they were both had very different ideas about what it was off. So just because technically they both spoke English doesn't mean that they're saying the same thing. I don't know. I thought that was really interesting. It kind of set me up for how to think about this book. Yeah a hundred percent I think almost every story is at least in some part about Failures of communication even if the people are speaking the same language. They're just not understanding each other. Yeah. And this is like the the time that it's like very explicitly said but almost all of the stories are about people like talking past each other. I was curious what you guys thought of. interpreter of maladies as the title for the whole collection and what you thought it meant and I like what you said worrying about the failures of communication and that's break beam across the whole whole collection cuz I'm asking this question meetings. I don't really have a good answer like why this title and like who is The Interpreter in that situation and then in the title That's interesting. Yeah in so far as like she's taking all of these kind of like 20th century maladies of like how we are relationships and how we deal with like immigration and like family down barriers and and how families relate to each other and kind of interpreting them in stock reform. I don't know if that's too like Convoluted. Yeah, I was kind of thinking something similar. I feel like she's saying like no matter where you're from. We all have issues and they need a translator. You know what I mean? Like we don't just like automatically understand each other off. And so she sort of doing that for us. I literally wrote a note about this story. I wrote unhappy people and unhappy marriages are everywhere. No one culture has a monopoly on happiness or sadness like yes. Yeah like you just I.

America Westminster Abbey Julia Jose mrs. Is
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Red version or the paper version. Yeah. I, definitely want to come back to the footnotes but she doesn't read the footnotes in the audiobook. She doesn't I'd have to go back and listen to like specific moments. Sometimes, the footnotes translate Japanese to English man she might have done that she might like said the Japanese word ends on the English word in kept going. But otherwise, she didn't read the footnotes. Okay cool. Yeah I changes the book a Lot Yeah I K- like because Victoria. If there's one thing between love book, it's a footnote I. Love. And so I even last. Night I was like, Zohar you enjoying the but note since she was like. Well. I didn't know there were any Until too late. A little bit more about with executive she is new. American. Canadian author filmmaker. Zen Buddhist priest. Wishy. Yes Ribs On. Her website she has a few quotes from different. Publications that have talked about her work The independent described her novels as witty intelligent passionate. The Chicago Tribune I love this one says she possesses a shrewd and playful humor luscious sexiness in Connecticut pizzazz. My not only a newspaper review would use that many actives and. She's the daughter of a Japanese mother and a Caucasian American father she was born in New Haven Connecticut. She went on to attend Smith College and graduate with degrees in English literature in Asian. Studies. She went to Japan. Precede graduate work in classical Japanese literature, women's University, and during the time she had a really diverse experience in Japan She worked in a entertainment district is a bar hostess. She studied no drama and mask carving. She founded a language school and taught on the Faculty of University in Kyoto. Just. You know only day's work. When she won returned to New York City, she started a film career and she worked as an art director designing sets and props for low budget horror movies. Who Does that? That's awesome. It sounds like a dream. So, she worked movies, mutant Hund- breeders propolis in, robot Holocaust. Who? Were, what holiday? she also had some time in television production and directing documentaries as well as making your own films and she won the new visions award at the San. Francisco. Film Festival for body of Correspondence. which is also on PBS, and having the bones wishes autobiographical film. That was screened at Sundance Film Festival the Museum of. The Montreal World Film. Festival and others. So. She's done a lot and then she starts reading novels like, of course. On she wrote. My Year of meats was the first novel published in Nineteen Ninety, eight percent came out Jackson three creation and her most recent novel. We're talking today attempt for the time being came out in twenty thirteen. And it was a finalist for the man Booker Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Word was. Published all over the world. It's been called a masterpiece pure and simple. she is a Buddhist priest she was ordained into doesn't ten and she continues to study. She's affiliated with the Brooklyn Center on Everyday Zen Foundation, and she's editor of the everyday end website. In her personal life she is married to the German Canadian environmental artists, Oliver Kill Hammer, and she's a dual citizen of Canada and the US engine advisor time between. Cortes Island British Columbia where book sets set and New York City. That leads this summer because. I think. I. Personally was very curious by. Reading this book. The they're sort of two main storylines. And one of that. Is a character named Ruth with a husband named Oliver who is on a remote island in British Columbia Whose writer who I'm? SORT. Of Uncovers A. Plastic bag on the beach I'm sort of washed up from the ocean and it's sort of bags upon bags upon bags covered in Barnacles, but inside is a hello kitty lunch. And inside that. Is a sort of mysterious journal To actually one written in English by a teenage girl one written in French. From the nineteen forties and then a bunch of letters. Also written during world. War Two and it's all from Japan they figure out. and so. She starts reading the diary I'm an seeks people out who can translate the Japanese in the French And So. Then we read along with her about the story of a girl names now. A Oh. who is sort of writing her story She grew up in California. during the tech boom in like the eighties and nineties. But her parents originally from Japan she was born in Japan and during when the DOT COM bubble burst, they're her family. We've backed Japan Tokyo and they had a really hard time and she starts sort of. After a series of insane TRAUMAS and her father drank kill himself multiple times she starts writing her story in this book And They're. Really compelling and they Intersect with each other I. Think Ruth is kind of stand-in for the reader and sort of your. It feels like you're reading this journal alongside her uncovering now story. And it's. A really heartbreaking story but also really. Human and you really connect to. Aten, you also learn a lot about as Buddhism because now great grandmother. After her son was killed in world. War Two she. Makes sure. Her daughters are insecure marriages than than she. Becomes a Buddhist monk and shave your hair. Supposed to live on a mountain ads she lives until she's like one, hundred and five. And so now gets to learn from her and her practice and. It serves. The closes comparison if you've never read it as sort of Murakami esque but that really. Even, come close to explaining this book. So you Kinda just have to read it. And it's amazing. Whether you are casual reader or total book, fiend BRISAC logic, join us for this episode of Book Club with Julia in Victoria..

Japan New York City Oliver Kill Hammer Ruth Victoria Japan Tokyo Nineteen Ninety Smith College New Haven Connecticut Chicago Faculty of University Museum of San Kyoto Cortes Island British Columbia executive PBS Booker Prize Murakami
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"And they're still a crowdfunding right now. So that they can continue working on production. I would highly recommend wolf through fifty nine in general. It's an amazing SCIFI radio drama like incredible writing incredible characters let. You go for the you know space, but you stay for the workers. And so I'm really excited about their new project and please go help support them. A link their. Page on the show notes. Myrick predation is nothing new I'm not the first person to do this, but I was with my parents the last couple weeks and my parents didn't they haven't seen Hamilton and obviously now, we can't actually go see it anywhere except from Disney plus in. So we decided to treat ourselves like we were at the theater. So we all dressed up and we make some of the couch and report on Hilton. We started a little later we meant to we only got through act. One. But it was really fun. Well, thank you so much. For joining us for this episode, recommending this book and being on the phone with this long. One thank you for having me. I've been pouring myself glasses of wine the whole time so. Point I'm like toasted. Feels Great. And Do A book club. No. Coherent thoughts by the. Next episode will be with another gas AMAS, smart and we'll be reading to the land of nod by Tracy Broomhall. This is a collection of poetry that Emma recommended to as we were so excited to have another poetry absurd here on podcast. So you guys next episode for that. A If. You are interested in the recommendations we gave and some other things we mentioned.

Myrick Tracy Broomhall Disney Emma Hamilton
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

07:48 min | 2 years ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Yeah I thought that was very. Very, moving and nuanced way of presenting. This community and they're sort of loss of autonomy. I think it's sort of a larger example of what we see with. In a conquest personal narrative where? It really there. Something, that's already inherent within him and as already inherent within their community. is their ultimate downfall, and it's about it's sort of like a tragic hero with rather than these. Victims who have other agency taken away and are just like squashed. It's It's a very dignified. Tragedy. I can't think of another word to describe it because it. It's really not about. Lou White people you know what I mean. He totally dissenters them. He didn't like yes there. This evil presences slowly growing, but it's really not about them, and they don't show up to like three. The Very very end the problem. Sort of seeds were already rising in like a fatal flaw was already there he was already battling with in smaller ways, and so to the colonizers were sort of the final test. and. It felt like a very. Very? Human Way to her TRAE, these people who have their whole lives of Rudin. Rethink if we look at the books that fingered and inspired ashamed when he was in college I feel like we see the awesome. See what he's saying. We we see these characters in heart of darkness who like? Heart Intelligible they like. Their dominate can't really speak in there just so like scary, but also like pawn understandable rates. Incredibly elephant, like they have a very sophisticated society, and it's only the white people coming in who are saying. They're uncivilized. They're in many ways more civilized than the. That are coming in. And then there's another book mister. Johnson by Joyce. Here is an anglo-irish. Author. And he wrote a novel set in Nigeria and is one of the box excited as a like. We gotTA do some. Of the main characters very docile knee. Nigerian, who ends up being shot and killed by this British master ends like. The response seeing. the Western Wall was A. This is a great, not a woman who need up in look at this and His activities professors along with reviewers praising the book, but. Achieved, road the him. His classmates responded as you are exasperated at his bumbling idiot a character like that. Here is not a major area basically an idea you. Of was the exact opposite. He's very strong. He's very well respected and. End Even. The way that he dies is not. Sort of He. He takes his own life. And it's sort of like him. Coming to the realization of what he's done, rob the white. Man Never had the power to take his life. He ultimately gave it up. This seems like the exact opposite narrative of what you just. One thing that is. Top of mind to talk about here is the government. With people so cool there democracy. In many ways democracy. I don't know probably other words for. People with our. Back elective oligarchy. APP pens oligarchy is a small kind of what we have slow. Collection a very horrible. Because it's like a whole democracy, so the way you described s, the beginning is that they have. He describes it as a perfect democracy in that everyone has power over every save two degrees of power. Yeah. But like? Everyone else has power over something and like women, their powers moreover like. Cultural things whereas for the menace. Memorial is my understanding in resolving conflict everyone has vote. And The I mean I'm not described very well. But the the sort of checks and balances in place are present. There isn't like a representative government. There are elders who have the most power because they've been. They've been alive the longest. In they're the most trusted and respected. Who have sort of final setting in certain situations but. Everyone is our over something. Like A. Is Perfect. The. SEC The beginning. Remember his amp. You said it. Yeah. Yes so there. Is that The. The white collar is at the end I know ricky focusing on that part in end of the novel, but they come to impose their law in of justice and they're. Just like we're GONNA. Take you to trial I'm going to do these things and you will have whatever and they're like. Yeah and this like criminal justice is racism fearmongering impression is what it is. It's just masquerading as a justice system, and it's even more shocking to the reader because you just experienced two thirds of the novel underneath. A the, Restricts, the perfect democracy when? Clan Nand we see it like. An. Example is a accidentally murder. Someone like is a accidental homicide. What do you call? It is that we would call a man's lung, yeah? He's manslaughter and he is exiled for like seven years and. It seems like it works pretty decent form of community justice where. A condo recognizes like this is a system in place. I don't have to happen annual leave. might other relatives. My Mom's side of the family. For seven years in combat, he misses out on some opportunities to like. Half precision he also beckoning can still be a part of the community He's not locked in A. Metal Room for seven years and not able to yeah. He's able to feed his family and take care of his children. Still have a human connection. Yeah, so we have this example like okay..

Lou White Nigeria SEC Rudin representative murder Johnson Joyce
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

08:12 min | 2 years ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Weren't really necessarily the same conversation happening fifteen years ago and the things that were seen as progressive in pushing forward the genre of fiction fifteen years ago now seeing tired old. Maybe you outdated in their thinking. Things move quickly in the world and I feel like when it comes to things such as like social justice in politics and relations between like. Whether. It's like race relations are. Relations between nationalities like those conversations. And a lot of places like children's literature in why literature is kind of the ground report, those conversations are happening because people. Kind, of want to encourage outward, they're thinking into the lives of children, and so they'll take those issues to children's literature as a way to talk about it to young audiences and so. Things in this book that are like in a way, social justice oriented might have were a big bigger deal like fifteen years ago and now it's like Ooh, that's not really how we would approach that. At least I find issue with of what. Yeah what types of like social justice narratives are happening in this in this book. Only yeah, we'll get into that. mind. Totally Yeah, it is interesting. You said like I think of Adam. The Way Nickelodeon and sesame street and stuff. Recently have started addressing racism very directly, and it's making some people upset through their brainwashing children, but you can kind of see. What what people think it's important to tell children about. Is really like. One of the epicenters of cultural change don't like what what's so important to us that we think we need to. Simplify this and give it to children right. So it is interesting. the to some weird twitter dates. Like, what you know how you teach kids racism So I did not read this one recently am. I reread read. I think college was the last time I went through all of them. and. The first time I've read. I think because I'd seen all the movies I. This one didn't really stick out meeting partly, because the fourth movie is not really my favorite. I really don't like that director. I don't really like the choices he made. And it's really disappointing because it's a really fun story like how do you screw that up? But they picked the wrong guy. don't even really like the music Province I think their hair. Oh my God I hate their hair. Moving on and so I think the first time I read. This I was like you know it was more. Just kind of a stepping stone to get to the juicy stuff in books five six seven. But upon rereading. This book holds up incredibly well to rereading some of the other ones. You start noticing problems and you do notice. you start poking holes. or it's just less entertaining the second time you read this. This one. Was Better I. Think AF-. honoree read at least in my experience. because. The reveal. At the end of the identity of like is impersonating mad I. is so well hidden that you don't even notice the first time, and this is not just rhetoric. This is people and I notice at all, but also I rarely ever do. Because of the way that mad is character is set up like anything. Weird he does can be explained away very easily in you kind of go along your life, plus it's a character. We've never met before, so we don't have anything to compare it to. And he's supposed to be really weird. End Senile and. Just doesn't trust anyone. That's sort of how he sat up and so like. Someone's impersonating him. ANYTHING WEIRD THEY DO. He's just not. At. So, he gets up to some weird things, and you don't really question it. You feel uncomfortable around him, but you think that's because of who he is. And so re reading some of these scenes where mad I slash coach junior. Are Is there. Truly incredible work the way that it. You can see it works on both levels. uh-huh works on the like. How Harry's interpreting the same, and then you can see it for it also works on the like. What his Birdie conscious real motivations are in the scene at, and you can see it both ways, and it just like blew my mind when I read, it was like. Oh my gosh. Just Yet it's. That it ended up being my favorite. On the second time around I think yeah, the entertainment value of spoke is high lately severe entertaining read, and it has such a uniqueness with travelers tournament that we don't have another novels Econo- breaks up the series as well because some more than others. We get a lot of their schooling. We get that special in book five. That's important to the plot is like their day to day life as students, but if you have seven novels about going to cruel like. Interesting I also I love the bit about school and so It was tempered while with the interesting plot. and. A new elements being added in, but so some things we really love about the Harry Potter series. The world. I. Plug again like all the little. Bits we get between. The weasley is trying to care for Harry. Also be respectful of his family that are muggles, and so they like. Try like one time. Ranch is to call on the telephone because that's got an aquatic normal wage contact and he's screaming. He doesn't have telephones work and. In this one Mrs Louise Lee Sands. A letter addressed to the Jersey Various Beckley asking. We would like to take care of you for the summer. To get to the. Top and but she's put like thirty five stamps on this thing and. I hope isn't upstairs on this. Acquit? which is also like how I feel most the time? Like the how much your stamps these days and I got like a bunch of random like forty one cent Two of the WHO's. Postcards Moore's like what the heck yeah. Too. Many pay too much but Starting with the quidditch World Cup is Super Fun, because also we don't get any other credit, look. They cancelled the. Season basically because of the chargers. which doesn't seem totally necessary, but it just helps like. The fact that Cedric Hairier, both quidditch players so that they don't. have to get bogged down with that while they get also helps. Clarify this story model down. There is not enough room in this book. I know which now. But ten like. They're only three events in the tribe with Three..

Harry Potter quidditch twitter Nickelodeon director WHO Adam Cedric Hairier Mrs Louise Lee Sands Moore Beckley
"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

07:48 min | 2 years ago

"book club" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"Book Club with Juliette and Victoria, we are two roommates and friends since high school who read a book at each episode? This episode about Harry Potter Goblin fire by J. K. Rowling and if you have not read this book yet, go hit. Pause, come back. We'll still be here. 'cause this episode will contain spoilers and we want. That from the top Fiat. Jacuzzis boilers in this one so not really safe to proceed unless you really don't care about spoilers. Yeah, so if you've already read the book award like you said. Julia said you don't care about spoilers. welcome to the party well. We're in the fourth book of the series Yeah we are going through each of them one by one. We thought it would be a a reprieve. Away from the craziness of pandemic. Right when we decided to do these of course, Jake. Come out again and says. Makes him. Frustrating claims yeah. Hurtful claims edges tweeting stuff that we don't agree with and really disappointed in her as a person, especially as the author book series that so many of us have grown up with an have really appreciated We just as more in our last episode. On book three, so if you want to hear that conversation, go get that bit listen. It's like the I I. Don't know five ten minutes of that episode. But yes. We hope that if you are so wanting to cherish Harry Potter, because of what it meant to you as a child or the adult were still today community. There's voice to read this book recognizing your experience more so than anything the author has to say. Yes Julia Yeah. Why in summary is? The fire especially reminded for those who maybe it's benefit since read the. Stem a bit for me This book is sort of our halfway. Point right so this is a major turning point in the series. The kids are grown up. You know they're fourteen now and it roughly. The books double in size. A hefty one. It's a hefty tome. We get a lot more darker themes which will address later on in the episode and. Basically we start off the book going to the Quidditch. World Cup which is like a great way Flashbang way to start off a book to make it. Sort of sets apart is making it very different right because we don't start off on the train to hogwarts. With Harry doing his homework under his covers. It also takes very dark turn very quickly. Some deputies show up and they have shown up in a long time. This confidently, and they torture muggles who own the land that the? Quidditch World Cup is held on. An. We've dark mark. Tra- create chaos, and so from the get go, we have this book is going to be very different, also going to be really dark and then when Harry running get to school, they discovered that The Tribe was tournament has been reinstated competition between three's sister. wizardy schools from around Europe so there's though batons which is. In the Lens from France and Durham strain from Bulgaria. and. So on top of classes, we also have a bunch of international students and. Like crazy crazy competitions that are really someone should have died. Among does. But there's a lot of. Teen Angst and Eventually comes back, so we gotTA lot longer on all year Yep. I think that's it. So Harry. Shouldn't have, but somehow his name shows up in the goblet of fire important. Very Potter participate in this. Tournament even though he's too young. Yes, so one representative from each school will be selected by this magical devices to fire. There's moments as like older upperclassmen who aren't quite of age trying to enter, and so when Hayes named, it's pulled as a fourth challenge or force. Champion. When there should only be three one from each school. It's a big deal. There's a lot of. Animosity. Because people think Harry Potter is. tricked his way in early fall of himself. Yeah, and seeking the fame really. He's terrified that he's going to die right because he's a really complicated tasks that are for like. Seventh Year Wizards. You know like like the best of the best of those two young. Harry's. Trials and tribulations not as a teenager but also. Competing. Very difficult visiting and he needs her thought of help like he needs like her Miami and novel and. Professor Moody, who think is professor, I'm serious like he gets a lot of help from a lot of people. And Cedric a little bit because they're both kind of on the same team question. Mark Anyway so Victoria. Do we read this very recently yet? Your been your experience feeding me so this is actually my third time for reading his. Yes I was kind of fun to like. Come to a again as one of very familiar. But there's there's so much in here that it's like. Really Fun in some ways I love. Where many aspects of where the world is kind of opened up to? The idea of like other schools they're like even Harry has always I never really thought about it, but yeah, that makes sense of these other schools of students out there like these only. UK Irish British and Irish students really at the schools like. The Wizards in the world and what they're doing. We. Learn more about the ministry magic, but even like the world is expanding. We're also getting into these more complex. Ideas and I think this really firmly sets us in like we are now a fiction. Genera- like this book in afterwards are very much situated for young adult readers. More than the beatings, whereas like book one, we're definitely the world like children's literature I feel like it's like a weird fuzzy line. You know when? One has a story. To mature or to quote unquote childish. So Yeah I. I enjoyed it. I think this would also had some problems. That came to light with. The world of Harry Potter that I hadn't really. Keeping, been a whole lot of thought to before and again like we've touched them in some other episodes were reading this in twenty twenty. This book is like. Fifteen. Years older so and so. Things that are common to talk about now..

Harry Potter Julia Yeah Wizards Victoria Fiat Juliette J. K. Rowling Quidditch Jake Europe France UK Professor Moody Hayes representative Cedric Flashbang TA