20 Episode results for "Bonte"

6/11/21: California appeals judges ruling that overturned the states assault weapons ban and more news

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

04:10 min | 2 d ago

6/11/21: California appeals judges ruling that overturned the states assault weapons ban and more news

"This is the l. a. Times brought to you by oregon pest control don't let bugs ruined the moment oregon home is where the bugs aren't. It's friday june eleventh. Here's today's news. It'll be sunny today with a high of seventy nine. Expect clear skies tonight with a low of fifty. Nine california attorney. General rob bonte on thursday filed an appeal to a federal court decision. That overturned the state's ban on salt weapons. He argued that the ban is needed to protect the safety of californians last week. A us district judge said the state's three-decade ban on assault weapons is unconstitutional and has had no effect on reducing the number of mass shootings. Although courts in other states have upheld assault weapons bans supporters of the banned. Worry that the decision is part of a strategy by the gun lobby to get cases to the us supreme court. The judge stayed the order for thirty days to allow the state to appeal. Bonte says his filing asks for the state to be extended until the case is decided next it may be recalled time for la councilwoman ziaur rahman just six months into the job. She was served with a recall. Notice wednesday a campaign committee that formed last month argued that rahman's office is inexperienced unresponsive and to politically radical rahman defeated councilman david review by a comfortable margin in november. Kerr fourth council district stretches from hancock park north to sherman oaks and east to silver silverlake. The committee would need to collect more than twenty seven thousand valid signatures between july and early november to get a recall on the ballot in other news. California saw a big drop in spring college enrollment numbers especially when compared with the rest of the country. It's due to a steep decline in community college students. Many of whom have struggled with pandemic hardships. That's according to a report released. Yesterday by the national student. Clearinghouse research center in a separate survey more than half of students said their income decreased during the pandemic about fifty seven percent said they faced basic needs insecurity and many in that group are students of color recruiting efforts are underway to boost retention at california community. Colleges will this trend reverse in the fall. It's too soon to say moving on hiring more muslim. Creators and combating onscreen stereotypes. That's what was on that at the start. The oscar winning film sound of metal is doing. The actor has long been disturbed by hollywood's depiction of muslims as terrorists on that has teamed up with pillars fund and the ford foundation to create twenty five thousand dollar fellowships for muslims storytellers. They've also commissioned a study highlighting the marginalization of muslims in hollywood muslims accounted for twenty four percent of the global population in two thousand fifteen according to pew research yet muslims accounted for just one point six percent of nearly nine thousand speaking characters across two hundred popular films between two thousand seventeen and two thousand nineteen. That's according to a usc. Annenberg inclusion initiative study published yesterday. And it's been nearly three decades since two disastrous. Earthquakes shook california into looking more seriously at its seismic vulnerabilities. The state has made some significant improvements on seismic safety since then but vulnerabilities remain and in ways. The public does not always consider. Are you ready for the next. Big earthquake subscribe to unshaken the la times newsletter guide to earthquake readiness and resilience go to l. a. times dot com slash earthquakes to sign up for these stories and more visit l. a. times dot com six steps past screen. This twitter family mosquitos mosquito eggs in mason jars where mothers bloodsucking mosquitoes. Don't let miskitos ruin the moment organ homes where the bugs aren't.

rob bonte Bonte ziaur rahman oregon rahman david review Kerr fourth council silver silverlake Clearinghouse research center us supreme court california hancock park sherman oaks la hollywood ford foundation
Reality Checking Account For Your Big Podcasting Dreams [S3E97]

Podcast Pontifications

07:24 min | 2 months ago

Reality Checking Account For Your Big Podcasting Dreams [S3E97]

"Low startup costs. Get people as excited today about podcasting as was the case. Fifteen years ago. But with the rise in some podcasts popularity. Are you considering the real costs to compete at the top. Hello and welcome to another podcast. Bonte vacations with me yvo tara. How big are you thinking about your podcast. How big is your thinking. Four your podcast. And how big are your expectations of your podcast. Let me take you back in history. When the first mass circulation newspaper was launched in new york city i big mass circulation newspaper launched in new york. City it costs the equivalent of ten thousand dollars in us. Today's money did thousand bucks not a big deal. When the first mass produced newspaper mass circulated newspaper was produced in new york city tin grant. That's it fifteen years later just fifteen years later. The cost to do the exact same thing. Because of competition to release a mass circulation daily paper in a major metropolitan area would cost two and a half million dollars from ten thousand two and a half million in fifteen years now. That story is often told. And as i heard it in new formula days of the internet back in the arts as proof of the net. Being the great. Because we don't have to do that anymore. There is no longer that barrier to entry because now we have the internet now powers in our hands. But i wonder is that really true in broadcasting when i got i reflected on that video which of course i will link to here in the episode details. You can see it. I i was thinking maybe podcasting is in a similar space. The trick is that word mass circulation. That's what really hit me. Mass circulation that means in podcasting parlance a show that is widely listened to not not just us inside pont guessing but the truly big shows that are on. Everyone's lips part of the name recognition. That goes out there. You know the names of these shows. I'm not gonna repeat the names of these shows but many people say. Oh this is what i think of. When i think podcasting they they all operate. I think under a very different operating budget then. The other shows back to the newspapers a moment. The technology was a big part of that two hundred and fifty times increase. Right they have a big huge high startup costs one thing to do things on a quick basis printing but now you got by big drums and machines and blah all that stuff right much much. Higher infrastructure costs not so much in podcasting. You would think right. I mean we have bike. Reform should spent a lot more a little less on a microphone. Editing software i am both the startup cost that technology the infrastructure prices really. Aren't that much more from a physical goods point of view. What about staffing a show. That is designed to be mass circulated to reach everyone. What about marketing. Pr all those costs that do go up. Significantly now distribution costs were also part of the cost increase in newspaper back in the day. But not so much here in podcasting effectively. It costs almost the same amount of money to reach one hundred people as it does thousand or a hundred thousand or even even ten million right yeah negligible increases in bandwidth. But we're not passing physical goods. Were passing electrons around and any additional bandwidth cost we might get are going to be easily offset by some simple revenue models that do in fact scale for our show as and talking about programmatic advertising of course but still i think outside of the equipment costs and outside of the distribution costs which are negligible. It's all the other costs. It's those staffing costs as the marketing causes promotional costs. It used to be like last week the way i thought about this when people ask me about marketing. And how do. I grow my showed. How really really big. I would tell them this. Podcasts tend to get the audience. They deserve a. You've probably heard me say here on the program more than one time and in wrapped up inside of that podcast tend to get the audience. They deserve to be two things. And they're still there. Pitfall pitfall avoidance. Don't do dumb things with your show that would block people from actually finding a lot of that happens and also quality. Those are the two things you wanna. You wanna get your audience. You want to get the audience. You deserve for your podcast. Get rid of the pitfalls make a quality show and it'll work out for you. But i realize now that i think about it fifteen years later twenty years later on how you count. That may not be the case anymore right because there's all of the competition at the top. They're already really great shows to reach everyone. I'm thinking about adding a third piece to my explanation of podcast tend to get the audience they deserve and that is promotional avoid the pitfalls make an extremely high quality show and then do the promotion necessary to get it to reach mass-circulation. Then maybe and only maybe. Do you have a shot. But of course this is for mass circulation shows. Only plenty of shows don't want mass-circulation. Plenty of shows are never going to get mass-circulation. they're not designed for mass-circulation and within them plenty of shows are big enough. There sustainable doing the things that they need to do to make the money for the people that want to make them. So that's okay. I'm not saying everybody has to invest crazily but if you try to go for that. Mass market appeal to reach everybody. Promotion is going to have to be a part of what you do these days. How big are you thinking about your next show. How are we going to fund that. How much risk are you willing to take to really try and reach everyone. In the world of podcasting we live with today with so much competition out. There of course can always start a show with any budget that you want but if you're going for mass circulation everybody listen to this thing. Are you up for that now. If i helped you think at all about any of this please go to buy me a coffee dot com slash tara and slide. If you virtual coffees my way because this shows never going to have ritual or mass. Appeal was designed to have mass appeal. But that's always nice. It'd be nice if you'd like to to mention the episode to a friend. Who's thinking about growing the really big show share podcasts. Monto vacations with other podcasters in your life. I would appreciate that. That's it. I shall be back tomorrow with yet. Another podcast quantifications cheers.

Bonte yvo tara new york city new york us Monto
Rush Limbaugh Aug 18, 2020

Rush Limbaugh Morning Update

02:00 min | 10 months ago

Rush Limbaugh Aug 18, 2020

"At steeple believe investment advice is about more than helping you manage your wealth. Our investment advice is about you. It's about providing your kids with opportunities for a head start in life feeling secure in your retirement in realising dreams just may become a reality because you have a plan we believe in you, your path to investment advice starts with your full financial adviser find. Your new steel financial adviser at stifled DOT, com. That's Sti F. E. L. Stifle Nicholas company INC member SIPC NYSE the rich are in the news I love when richer in the news New York Governor Cuomo openly worrying that rich New Yorkers have had enough. They won't stay in his high tax high crime state even after the virus fades hint, they're already gone governor. Apparently West Coast Liberals have the same fear Democrat lawmaker introduced a bill that would force rich California's to pay a wealth surtax even if they leave the state. State Assemblyman Bob Bonte wants to levy additional tax on Californians worth more than thirty million dollars he claims this would only affect thirty thousand people and supposedly raise a billion dollars the kicker if rich California's try to avoid the wealth tax by fleeing, they still have to pay the tax for ten years the first year after leaving, they'd pay ninety percent of the tax, the tax decrease by ten percent every year after that assemblyman Buntha says it after all these rich people accumulated their wealth while in California. So why shouldn't California tax them after they leave? What nerve this brazen plan is theft. It's extortion. It's punishment all rolled into one. And it's pure socialism which is what the Democrat Party has become if you are successful in life. See you as a target and a suspect, and now they don't even bother trying to hide it. You should try hiding what you have.

California Assemblyman Bob Bonte Sti F. E. L. Stifle Nicholas c Democrat Party Governor Cuomo extortion theft New York assemblyman Buntha thirty million dollars billion dollars ninety percent ten percent ten years
John & Ken Show Hour 4 (04/28)

John and Ken on Demand

32:23 min | Last month

John & Ken Show Hour 4 (04/28)

"China can't show john kobylt and ken chiampou. Kfi am six forty live everywhere on the iheartradio app. Nine at about one hour. Who joe biden is going to address. A joint session of congress. Most will not be in their seats at the capitol. We'll give you an idea but it's all about spending a hell of a lotta money. We'll get into that coming up in the next segment. When we go biden ville and i'll be on definitely seven thirty tonight on foxtel so you're gonna have a rebuttal. Yes that's right. I can be your. Who will be your counterparts lisa bloom. Knock gloria allred but lisa bloom. Just what did they pair you up at the same people all the time. it seems. I don't know it's chemistry. You know see there. it isn't. What's it tim. Call him that damn liberal. Ls michelson stems. Issue sacramento district attorney and marie schubert. We've had her on a number of times. Yeah big with the golden state killer case. Obviously that's where she really came to prominence in the state but she's been added quite a while of the legal system now recently. You may be aware we had an attorney general. Xavier joined the joe biden administration. But we're just using biton pronunciation and he got replaced by someone named rob bonte who i've never heard of an assembly member the bay area. Nobody seems to know much about him. But Ameri schubert Wants to run against bonte. She's announced she is running in. Its bonte and will not be until next year this november of two thousand and twenty two but she see also be up. You gotta get started early. You're in a major camp. Oh absolutely raise. The recognition awareness fundraising events. That's right get a get a whole infrastructure together and marie schubert. Welcome again to the john. And ken show here on. Our voters guide for next year. It's thirty type. Yeah well we. We talked to you a number of times and all kinds of issues and you really have a common sense attitude on what needs to be done. And i think one of the reasons. You're running. I'm guessing is because of the rise of george gascon here in la and chesa bowdoin in san francisco this extreme progressive attitude to let all the criminals off early and don't put them in jail to begin with is is not the direction you think. California should be going. Oh absolutely not. I think it's quite clear that you know if you if you live in the system you understand that we've entered this is world of chaos and we just continued to see the erosion of public safety and accountability and and really victims rights. And i mean it's nowhere better seen in los angeles county. Who is you know. The biggest fan of george goes probably newly appointed attorney. General is that right. I was gonna say what's the what's the comparison there that you know of for us because we're not familiar with rob bonte. Well i mean he he You know endorse gas goan. Who supports gascon. When the newly appointed attorney general was nominated gas tweeted out how happy he is and you know they're they're all cut from the same cloth quite frankly i mean it's all the same types of things which is less and less accountability. You're seeing you know bills that you know when you talk tough about hate crimes but then you turn around and and you do. Nothing actually enforce consequences for hate crimes. You a hotline is good enough That's not really somebody. That's gonna advocate for real life consequences. So there's a number of things weakening gun laws lots of things. But you know. I'm all about you know having a system that has some sammy to it and right now we don't have that right. You're not you're not completely opposed to alternatives. But it's is not. I mean anybody that knows me knows that you know and i said this story my launch. The other day was you know i believe in in rehabilitation one hundred percent. I mean most folks are coming out of a prison someday and we wanna make sure that they're coming out with the skills and the services that they need but there when we're letting violent criminals out what or when you've got you know a video of a guy in prison. That's from la celebrating. That he's gonna get out under dascomb policies that's chaos and there was actually paid enough now. Kelly i mean he was. He is a convicted murder. And he's you know they're all celebrating when you have people like that are celebrating and then you're having victims that the mother of murder children murdered children that are being left Abandoned you know. You look at Poor jessica corday. Who had to go to a parole hearing by yourself because gas goes send anybody there to represent her. It's really despicable. What's happening in la but really the most important link for the voters understand these these individuals whether it's gas going or whether it's voting Are all of the same set that the newly general is in. And you look at what's happening. La you got city after city voting no-confidence or george gas gone whittier. Just voted or yesterday. Do you think it's the case in la county. I don't know about san francisco so much county. Voters did not know they were going to get this many voters. Say yeah we're all we appreciate reform but when you see what he did on december seventh and he you know he dropped a bomb of all these directives. People are coming forward saying well. I voted for the guy. But i think is gonna do this. I mean seriously. You're not gonna send somebody to parole here. You're not gonna file gun enhancements or you and you have to be sued by your very own prosecutors. Actually do your job. That's not just chaos that that is absolutely unheard out in the history of this country where the da union sue their boss. I never heard of that. He wanted to drop gun enhancements for cop killers. He wants to draw. I mean he wants to drop consequences. I mean you know we've got you know very tough gun laws in the states. But why are we not turning around and holding violent felons balance accountable for those gun crimes. You know people want we got. We got a massive number of illegal guns on the streets. If you look at la county crime through the roof. Violent crime is through the roof right now it is. I know shootings here in. La seventy five percent. That's what's weird contradiction with some of these progressive of district attorney's like gascon is is progressive. Tend to vote for strict gun. Control laws hate crime laws but gaskin doesn't want to use the gun enhancements. He doesn't want to use the hate. Crime enhancements anymore. He wants to let these people who are doing the killing at the to get out early and that. That's a strange contradiction. That i don't understand it. Well in back is is that the newly-appointed trae general has the same philosophies. I mean you're you know. He had a bill. That says you know you could be a repeat offender and and just be released without any bail at all no supervision no risk assessment. So those are the things that is continuing to engage the community. And we're just essentially giving you know lessening the consequences for gun gun guns illegal guns on our streets hate crime and really violent criminal activity. Is this coming from. It seems so obvious. That you don't wanna let murderers and child rapists out early that you'd want to prosecute him with all the enhancements to put them away for a long time where where is this philosophy coming from. And what's the upside ear. Do they really believe that. These people are when they come out early or not going to do further damage. Well i think you know. I don't speak for inmate rice groups but you know some of the arguments have been. We've got to reduce mass incarceration. I mean you listen. The last thing prosecutors want to do is send people to prison but some people earned their ticket as i call it and we have reduced the prison population in california from one hundred seventy plus thousand two under like about ninety thousand and you know but the thing that people need to understand. Is that the people. That are most impacted by violent crime especially in los angeles county or african americans and hispanics and so what happens when we reduce the consequences for motors and violent crimes that we're further harmony the very communities You know they ask the american hispanic community and we owe it to all victims to stand up for them and hold people accountable. I think it's important to point out to listeners. Who maybe didn't hear when you've been on the show in the past. You were had a major role in cracking the golden state killer case in recent years You also have been heavily involved in trying to investigate the tens of billions of dollars that have been squandered with the unemployment office louis. I'm proud of both of those things. Obviously you know. We don't hear much from rob buntha on the dvd fraud. What is he doing well. I mean radically enough. I mean first of all this this. Add fraud is probably the biggest scandals. We'll see the history if not just the state and craps country. I mean billions are. It's well over twenty billions. I mean there was just an arrest yesterday that neighboring county and you know it's upwards of multiple millions of dollars but then but then you have the added combination that the money's being used for guns and you've caught and folks that are you know they're ripping off the government and they're taking that money and they're not just ripped off the government riffing off good people that are entitled to those benefits that really needed them because of the pandemic but there's just this combination of easy fraud and in gangs and guns and drugs that it's you know we're seeing massive again violent crime spikes in our in our state So that's significant but the office. I've yet to hear anything saying they're going to actually step up on the statewide issue Who stepped up the. Da's the not not gas going but myself and a number of other deities across california or aggressively trying to investigate and root out and prosecute these people you know. Some of them are convicted. Murderers benefiting from this. I don't know it sounds like we financed the crimewave with our tax money. The crimewave mainly we're flooding streets with with you know taxpayer dollars that are being used then for them to buy whatever maserati or guns or whatever they wanna buy well and know. We'll be talking to you again. We thank you for coming on. And you're going to have our -cipline attorney general. Okay thanks so much have a great day sacramento county. Da ameri schubert who has announced she is running for california attorney general in the vote that comes in november of two thousand and twenty two so long way off. But you gotta get an early start and make your case. Yeah i've forgotten that there were reports that the fraudsters particularly ones connected to the prisoners who ripped off. Dd money we're buying guns. I mean that explains the uptick in shootings. Sure you start. Dd tax money. This ties into the recall because gavin newsom was responsible for zero overstate zero oversight on the dvd when it is told as far back as july. This thing is a disaster. He did nothing for months and months still hasn't done anything that's been useful and now all that money that was stolen. We're supposed to be your unemployment money if you lost work. Because of the pandemic it went to finance criminals and gangs in los angeles who then used it to buy fancy cars to buy guns and now looking at shootings are up. Seventy five percent and gas gone doesn't want to prosecute anybody got more covered up virtuous circle. Isn't it john and ken. Kfi like to formally welcome you to the rest. Tony welcome to bite unveil everyone. All men are created. Go you know the you know the thing. We have to come together. That's why i'm running. I'm running as a proud democrat for the senate supposed took it to curse today for the same reason i was a democratic caucus elated effective strategy. Demobilize sure last oppressor shelters. Tears was clearly rocking. I think it's a right for people at remains joe burrow dog face pony by the way jilin. I've always enjoyed his chest. And i should say together on the trail for secretary of health and education. I nominated hobby year career president harrison. I took a virtual tour vaccination zona my my The guy who runs out over there now to give you a tour of invisible for your extended stay ears. John and ken together. They go on birds. Yes those are features. I you know we're going to put that guy in charge of spending six trillion dollars six trillion. Yeah we have some detail of tonight. By the way. I'm reading some of the previews he's really gonna go full on attacking trump and the of course we're he'd be standing tonight addressing whatever members of congress. Show up they're not gonna have too many there. It's going to be light capacity. He's going to talk about what happened on january six. You know all that the worst invasion since the civil war. That's all that stuff is old news. They must have done some polling research that this whips up. Oh absolutely you know. Trump trump has gone now. He's not even on twitter and he needs something to feed off of still so it will be what happened on january six years the strategy to get people whipped up in distracted by trump and by january sixth. And then he's gonna slip in these proposals. And i'm sure. They'll have all kinds of buzzwords and paul tested phrases that everybody could agree with except it's six trillion dollars that is one third of the annual output the annual economic output in the united states six trillion is one third. This is never been done before anani scale which brings back the old question other enough very rich people to pay for that well. They're going to confiscate well first of all. No there isn't. They're gonna confiscate a lot of money from the wealthy and and It's still will come near to paying for six hundred dollars worth spending the thing is. You're not going to hear any details. You're going to hear brought ideas about green energy or broad ideas about childcare. Well we know here. In los angeles we gave him several billion dollars for homelessness. And what happened. Homelessness increased astronomically. It's not about their gauzy. Catchphrases that he's gonna give. It's about how it's actually spent and whether it's effective whether it's efficient whether it's necessary whether it's gonna make life better or is it just gonna enrich everybody who's politically connected. Which is what happened with the billions. We blew homelessness the last few years. Well here's part of the list. Free universal pre-k free two years of community college. A national family leave program that could get to twelve weeks off and expansion of the child tax credit one point eight trillion dollars. He's calling it. The american families planned part of was just an opinion right. And she when you when you phrase it as american families. I supposed to argue against that right but somebody should effect a lot of people should because i don't really understand why people can't organize their lives without needing constant handouts from the government and nobody's ever answered that to be. It's like well we have to give the money you know they have children. It's like how about we have a discussion as to why you have children before you could afford to have children before you have the time to take care of. The children never discussed. It's like oh you brought out a bunch of cats good. Here's some money money for the government. it's on us. I mean we just blew billions of dollars here in california and all the school districts and in la they still wound open the skulls we did. We gave the bribes that the teachers union demanded and they still are stay at home. Well they still will come in. It's just an example that we spent billions of dollars in high speed rail. There's nothing there. They believe that this country has too many working poor people. And that's why he's pitching all of these programs whether that's a fact can be debated whether nets because of the system that we have that has led to this. We do have a lot of working poor people yet but you can only earn your way out of being poor. There isn't enough tax money and government money in the world to get you permanently out of being poor unless you work unless you require education and skills but if you get people free this and free that for the rest of their lives. I don't know that might get to more of upper poor position report. Yeah that's what it is. You get upper poor but my my resentment is you know. I didn't have a bunch of kids. In my twenties. I tried to build a career in my twenties like nazar privileged and now i have to get penalized. Give money to other people who don't have the common sense knocked have a bunch of kids before they're making decent money. Now what is what is the. What is the moral defensive. That we'll talk more about this when we come back also a couple of things about tonight's speech which will not be carried by. Kfi to to mention when we come back. John and ken. kfi can show world's on. john. Kobylt ken chiampou. Kfi am six forty live everywhere on the iheartradio app. We're still in biden ville in about twenty minutes. He will speak to a joint session of congress as you know usually presidents to the state of the union. But your first year. It's just considered a speed because you haven't been around long enough to fully ascertain the state of the union. Yeah joe biden eight. Seventy eight hasn't been around long enough congress nineteen seventy-two. Let's another thing. I'm increasingly impatient with all the artificial playacting in theater that everybody participates in when it comes to public life there. There's anybody alive. Joe biden has anything to do with these policies other than agreeing to announce them. He's got a very large staff a lot of woke progressives much younger than he s. He never used to push any of this stuff. I mean he was a senator and vice president for forty seven freakin years. A lot of this stuff that he's pushing. Now he never discussed let alone voted for infect often voted for the opposite seems even beyond obama. I mean it obamacare. That was a big change but he worked on that for years and i thought the only thing he got done because stuff is unbelievable. Because you know. I've read about this. The progressives were angry with obama as years went by they thought he was too conservative. Too timid not bold enough that when he in his first two years when he had full democratic control of congress he didn't accomplish much and then the republicans took over congress and he got screwed and that they look at his years as being a big disappointment. In about all you had going forward is that he was the first black president in their minds other than that he didn't do much that You know any any other middle of the road. President would do so biden now because he's half in the bag. His brain is adult. I think it's easily manipulated. And he's selling stuff that he never campaigned on never pushed never agreed with infect. His campaign was basically. I not bernie sanders. I'm not elizabeth. Warren extreme leftists socialists. Kooks and then he presents trillions of dollars of legislation and other policies that that absolutely would be what bernie sanders would be trying to impose. Don't forget the amnesty bill. They're still hoping for well. The whole the whole thing is a fake. it's a charade he run on this. He never believed in this stuff. He never voted for it. In fact that's what people are comfortable with them that he was going to drain all the dry. All the trump drama out of the world and he would just bumped along down the middle of the road. That's what the democrats who voted for him. Thought and now you got all this wacky stuff that nobody could possibly pay for. Nobody even knows what it is. You know how they do these bills. I'm looking at three bills here worth about two trillion dollars each six trillion dollar total. You know what they do. They ran a three thousand page. Bill that nobody reads. And it's written in broad terms. It's handed out to various bureaucracies. Who implement all kinds of crackpot programs many of which don't work unnecessary wasteful. Whatever i said what are we here. Also i don't think things add up. It'd be he's talking about raising income taxes on the very wealthy and they're talking about people that make more than a million a year. Which is i think from the number. I saw here only five hundred thousand people in the whole country. You can't get enough money out of that. And then these raising the corporate income tax rate the corporate tax rate is going up. But i tell you one thing. Did you see this chart. His capital gains proposal in the state of california. And this is only the high end very high tax payers but still the combined capital tax gate rate between california tax on capital gains and the federal tax will take it to fifty six point seven percent. You imagine that fifty six percent. Why would you. Why would you even bother. Investing vast really if more than half of it will be taken away and tax. What why why. Why would you try to play in the stock market and make any money or even or buy real estate. If between the feds and the california government they're gonna take fifty six percent of your profits. You might as well just dig a hole in the cayman islands and berry earlier. Cash there now. We know that because he's already done this supposedly he's going to push this through. What do they call it. The reconciliation process where he obviously they can get it through the house but senate is pretty much deadlock when we have kamla harris there when it's a financial tax and spend bill they can get around the filibuster they can get around the republicans blocking it by doing this special reconciliation process and i think that exists so that the the the the business of government can keep going even during difficult political times that you can still keep the money in and out otherwise everything would grind to a halt. The thing is there a lot. There's a number democrats who are holding up the stop sign on all this taxing and spending because you know in new jersey for example connecticut There's a lot of wealthy donors who donate to the democrats and they're calm these guys up and saying what the hell are you doing here. I heard that the only way they're gonna vote for this in those high tax states california's also one of them is. If they bring back they take away. The deduction limit right bring bit assault. They call it state and local tax deductions. Which is capped at ten thousand right these democrats in those states. Those high tax states. Say there's no way. I'm going for this infrastructure bill as other spending unless you get rid of that and bring back the regular deduction methods and the thing is all. These bills are headlined and the headlines of fraud. The covert relief bill that they passed a little while ago two trillion dollars only five percent actually went to covid relieving man. Okay this infrastructure bill. And i think our normal person thinks that as roads bridges Reservoirs if there's a trout that's like six percent of the bill the rest of it's made up nonsense. They declared i heard some democratic. Tv saying well if you talked to her mother they'll tell you. Childcare is infrastructure when get outta hair hiring. a babysitter is not infrastructure. Interstate five there's infrastructure. One last story on biden. We'll tell you everything you need to know. Friday i think is hundred day. It's coming up this week. Some stupid hundred day thing. He's going to georgia to do a driving rally for climate change so the irony here. He's going to be up there. Spouting about climate change with people parked in their gas guzzling cars watching him right. Probably some of them with the engines on who. They'll keep the engines idling really a dumb stupid. You don't even know what to say. He can't make this stuff up. Everything sounds like us. Like a satirical skit biden's having a an anti global warming rally really. It's it's driving driving british suv. Or your everyone's gonna your suv so you can fit the whole family. We got more coming up. John and ken. Kfi six forty live everywhere on the iheartradio app. Remind you about the voice line in two days during this hour. So those calls on anything that you need to rant about or comment on what eight seven seven moist eighty six one eight seven seven six six four seven eight eight six. This story almost seems bizarre. And surreal of people who pay attention to these things. In fact i noticed. Last weekend i went to a sam's club or a costco. I said what's that big night. Oh yeah people. Buying gas gas prices of course are running up again. They had been for months but now with the usual april may stupid summer blend. Excuse they're running up even faster. Put to complicate matters. There's a story out. you may find you. Go to your favorite gas station. They may not have any gas and it not the usual reasons that you think going back. Remember the gas lines and fm so shortage of tanker truck drivers to bring the gas to your favorite station. Somewhere between twenty percent to twenty five percent of tank trucks in the fleet are parked because there is a lack of qualified drivers at this point two years ago it was only ten percent and the reason for that is when the gas demand plunged all of last year. Some of these drivers went on to do other things with their lives. They can't sit there and wait to drive a tanker truck again. They needed shockingly. They found out they didn't miss driving a gas tanker day of their lives. Who take like play once you stop doing something it's like. I was doing that. He had a number of drivers left the business a year ago. I'm driving something that could explode at any minute. I could be incinerated just because some more on cuts me off on a freeway. It does require a special certifications a commercial driver's license and weeks of training after being hired. Well what i've also read. I didn't read it specifically for this. Be away from home for days or weeks if you do this and at any moment you but there is that you're having trouble getting truck drivers in general who pass drug tests. Who messed criminal history. Tests inside of the time right. No there's so. Many people should do away with those tests. Then do away. Well that's what's dettori years ago. They they were you. You could not ask somebody for their history on an application like their criminal history idea right but it's a terrible box. Yeah if it's your business that's a terrible idea. Exactly you always write these laws for for somebody else's problems somebody else's business. Yeah i i think that's also playing into it is that you know there's just there's just a lot of guys who are bad risks. Oh i see there. You know they because i remember you were taught like keep your. Keep your record clean. There's a permanent record out there somewhere as you gotta keep it clean because you start fouling up with arrests or drug problems. You're not going to get a job and it's true and it's gotten to point where they they they can't find people to drive plus it's it's a terrible job. I'll bet she's pretty decent. Pay though. Oh yeah yeah. The truck driving jobs pay but it's it's boring it's arduous. We got you like to drive though so i could do it. Yeah no i i had. I probably forgot to tell you too long. Driving trip over the weekend sep you behind the wheel drive there. I didn't know that. No i well partway. I had to help my son moved. I flew to salt lake city. We drove to home in back. Yeah but i'll tell you more there way. Some really unusual things happen. But it would take too long to explain now. Tim conway here. Thank you this stuff you do for kids. You wouldn't do that for me. No actually if you know along. John you want me to do a long drive for you on there okay. I like driving myself. I love be a truck driver. When i was younger. I thought i'd be like a greyhound driver. It'd be kinda cool every deal with you know you now you get twenty homeless guys with covert aboard. Now you're not looking the traffic. You're looking for the night night. But we got jim mcdonald as the sheriff of la county will come on. He'll come on at six o'clock. We'll talk about what the the rise in in violence is all about you. Yes it's crazy right. It's unbelievable on then petro's come on at eight o'clock and then we have a story that breaking story in two there's a fire up in can stake. And then there's the shooting in sherman oaks. Were involved a guy and an off duty. Lapd officer so we'll get to all go shootings. Yes exactly the bottom of all that a lot of chaos out there into the racist yet to make sure we're okay. Racism of the cop and the person that was shot. I didn't. I didn't look into it yet. I'd roll over the kentucky derby. But i watched that show the the great race. You ever watch that the great race. I was that the amazing amazing race. Amazing amazing race. I've seen it before not a long time. I think it's about jewish people the basic race. I'd never seen the show. I gotta run joe biden. that's right. You're preempting joe biden. Tonight's all the hate email every line carrying june. He's the president. I think it's great counter programming because the only thing on opposite of a presidential speech is qvc so here you don't buy anything. Yeah right on your radio version. Yeah don don. Kfi koa hd two los angeles orange county live everywhere on the iheartradio app.

marie schubert bonte rob bonte gascon la county biden ville lisa bloom congress ken john kobylt ken chiampou la california joe biden administration biton Ameri schubert joe biden george gascon chesa bowdoin jessica corday
Episode 6  The Biggest Tax Conundrums From the 2018 Filing Season

The Financial Heartbeat Podcast

25:07 min | 2 years ago

Episode 6 The Biggest Tax Conundrums From the 2018 Filing Season

"Welcome to the financial heartbeat podcast with Mike cloudy in this podcast. We talk about overcoming the challenges families and business owners face in their financial lives. We discuss big and small life events, the implications. And how to plan ahead and control. What you can let us help you redefine the retirement. That's in front of you into a better one. Now. Bonte today's episode. Hello and welcome to another financial heartbeat podcast today. We're going to talk about one of the more timely concerns that we have found the general public has especially that Mike has heard of from his client specifically, which is the tax conundrum. You know, the the new tax laws were were rather confusing for a lot of people, and I think people had some unrealistic expectations on what was going to happen. Both positively negatively in super cool today that Mike's gonna walk us through some of this stuff. So Mike, welcome to the show. And where are we at with all this, man? Well, first off, I mean, I'm sure met you. Just filed your taxes on a postcard. Oh, yeah. Yeah. The goal was just to file it in the postcards. You could do it in a half sheet of paper. You remember Tammy Becker talked about that in our other podcasts that we did with her. My a great account of the street from me. But bottom line is is that what's funny about that is. Yeah, you can do it on a half a sheet of paper. But then you have like seven schedules that go what I can tell you my tax return looks a lot thicker this year than it did last year. So I'm not really sure where the half a piece of paper came from. I so that's the first conundrum as it's simpler, an should be less. But it seems to be more. Well, and and that's that's the, you know, Mike, if you can ever figure out how to convince the powers that be that it should be a couple of check boxes, and we're done with our taxes, that'd be flipping awesome. That'd be awesome. But but here's what I'm finding. And literally I've talked to one hundred of my clients, plus many of my colleagues, I've also been on the phone with probably twenty to thirty local accountants in the last month as everybody's finishing their tax returns for two thousand eighteen and you know, what I'm seeing is in general taxes are down and everybody goes, but but my they're not really down because I'm not getting as big of a refund. Well, that's true, man. You're not getting as big of a refund. But that doesn't mean you're taxes are down. So again, that's another conundrum. I'll hold on here. How how how that doesn't seem to make sense in? How you explain that you have to unpack that some more. Well, it's fun. I meet here's the bottom line when they redid the withholding tables if you remember back at the beginning of two thousand eighteen the IRS came out with a whole new set of withholding tables with the new tax rates because in general taxes went down a little bit. Like the fifteen percent want to twelve the twenty-five percent one to twenty two percent. But the other thing that they did is they said we want to give as much money back to people as we can. So they got them to be much tighter than they used to be. So bottom line is maybe an here's an example, one of my clients said to me, he's like I got eighty five more dollars per month where you figure eighty five dollars more per month times twenty six you know, that's a decent amount of money. But bottom line is is that you know, it's over two grand. But he got five more a week, man. You know, any five more week didn't seem like much and doesn't buy what happens by the third paycheck. You are you've absorbed it, and you think it's just normal. Right. So bottom line is is when he didn't get as twenty five hundred dollar refund or three thousand refund like he. And she always got guess what they thought they paid more taxes. So what we actually did is we took their two thousand eighteen tax return. We looked at their two thousand seventeen tax return, and they paid about eight nine hundred dollars lesson taxes, but they thought they paid significantly more because they didn't get a refund now is this is this a common across the board between income levels. I'm finding this a ton pretty much all income levels. Moses, the income levels go up, I'm actually finding in those cases a lot of. Times because people weren't able to get as many deductions. They actually are paying a tad bit more in taxes. Yes, they're getting the benefit that the tax rate went down. But depending on where their income is at they're also not having as many deductions as they've had in the past because yes, they get the standard twenty four thousand, but they don't get the maneuver. And they don't get the right. Some things off that they used to get the right off before. So they're actually paying tad bit more in taxes. But bottom line is is this conundrum is what I'm saying is a people, especially a lot of my clients have used the tax return. I think wrongly, but they use it as a force savings. Man. Right. What they wanna do is. I want to say I want that big refund that refund this client of thinking of you. They use the refund every year for their summer cabin. You know up north. So they take that you know, they put their money in they give the government the money. They get their check back and boom the money's right there to go to their cabin. And so bottom line is is that in we talked with our clients year ago saying, hey, if this is the time to maybe set some money aside set up an account so that we can be ready. You know, but a lot of clouds are like, well, you know, what's not that much money. Well that much money times twenty eighty five times twenty six ends up being a pretty good chunk of change the forced saving aspect of it. There are other ways that people really do need to be more involved instead of giving the government the money. There are other things they can do I want you to to start with that. But there are some new things that people aren't aware of so can you pivot after you answer the question about what what they should actually do with that eighty five dollars a week. Let's talk about some of the neat things that are new that a lot of people didn't pay attention to because there was so much noise. Well, you know, I. Off how do deal with the eighty five dollars just set up a systematic withdrawal? You know, a lot of our companies we even have some companies that have no front no backs. No charges. Even just go to a Bank and just every paycheck every two weeks or twice a month. Take that eighty five dollars and just put it into a savings account. So that you have the use of it instead of of the government. Now, I've had some clients which I strongly recommend, you know, some clients not it'll are going in and changing their exemptions. Matt. So that they're going to have more money taken out by the government. So the government will hold the money. But again, I don't think that's the best way to go. You need to set up your own systematic investment plan, you need to set it up you need to control it. And plus you get a little bit of interest. So do you want to give the government the interest, Matt or do you want the interest? Well, I want the interest. I'm sorry. It took me a second to calculate that. Because that seemed like such a weird question. But that's a great question. I mean, do you like giving the government alone? I mean, that's what I tell clients all the time. What you're giving the government a really big refund. What are you doing? In essence, you're loaning the government money. You don't wanna do you want to pay the government as little as possible? The government actually did you favor by giving you more of your money back when they changed the withholdings. It's just what we all are the vast majority of us didn't do is. We didn't take action to save that money that they've given us. Yeah. I mean, so so again, that's the conundrum. I keep going back to the conundrum. I like that word. I love that work. That's a good word. But but it really is. Because it's like why is it going this way? But it's really this way. And it's just forces you to have to take some action. Now, there's other things that are out there that are really impacting taxes, first and foremost, the ten thousand hour limit for state local taxes now I have a colleague of mine who works Massachusetts. Well, I mean, they're they're livable this map because you know. I mean, you can have one hundred thousand dollar house. I think it'd be over ten thousand for the taxes and the property taxes and all that I mean, they have a tax for attacks. My sister lives in New York. I mean, I'm amazed at how much they pay in taxes. Well, guess what? Even though they're married. Their maximum deduction now is ten thousand dollars. My sister did pay a lot more in taxes because that really hurt. Her because she no longer was able to take more out even though she and her husband could get twenty four thousand dollars standard deduction. Bottom line is they lost a lot more because of all the deductions that they lost. So that's really been been tough to math. And I'm sure you've talked to people all over the country. You've heard that from other people too. I have I absolutely have. You know, the other thing that I've heard is the the the charitable deduction aspect and the health insurance. Don't you talk about that? Well, the health savings account to me is is really really cool. The first thing that you should do is find out if your plan is eligible or not. And if your plan is eligible for an HSA that should be the first thing you fund all the time and again talk to your tax advisor talk to your health insurance person. But why I like the HSA Matt is potentially you will never pay tax in that money. So not only will you get the deduction. Right. So you get the deduction. So if you put in. Thousand dollars that comes right off of your your income. But then if you pay a medical Bill, guess what? And you pay that Bill direct you ever have to pay taxes on that way? If you wait till after sixty five you can pay your supplement premiums. There's all kinds of things you can do with that money and as long as you use them for qualified medical expense. The health savings account is the best new tool. In fact, people were shocked people would call me up and say, Mike, I need to lower my taxes. And I only have so many dollars in my accountant says I should put the money in an HSA or I should put it in an IRA, which one would you recommend and as the financial adviser where I don't sell health savings accounts map, which one would you think I would respond? The IRA Brian. I never did. Because the health savings account, you you potentially can get tax not an incompliance is going to listen. So I need to be careful. It is an act its tax advantage. Because of the fact that you potentially will never have to pay taxes on those dollars. When you take them out as long as they're used for qualified expense. And I should preface all of this that you should always talk to your tax advisor and your account, and we're gonna talk about that in a little bit how we should team up and work together to do that. But bottom line is. And I think this is really important is that health savings account has to become just a huge part of your road. Now, the other thing is again with the Affordable Care Act, which was has been an issue for the last few years, the problem with that is and while there's a lot of positives on the Affordable Care Act. One of the negatives is how the premiums are calculated. Because if you make just a little too much money, you go from paying very. Little too a lot like overnight, and again, so you have to be so careful with your income to make sure that your income is right. So you don't have to pay too much. So that's a little crazy to Matt. So that whole health insurance piece of this equation has really become important, but I absolutely loved the health savings account. And it's something especially my small business owners. I'm talking to all of them saying we need to look at your plan. We need to see if it's a veil for an HSA because health savings accounts are awesome. And they really can not only help you pay your medical bills in the most taxed advantage way. They also which I think is very cool. You know, give you a deduction that isn't subject to the twenty four thousand and there aren't many of those out there, especially let's say if one person is covered under a retirement plan, but the health insurance has an HSA. I mean, it's just really a neat neat thing. So it's a great tool that everyone should be looking into. So what? What else should people be thinking about well the charitable deductions too tough. I mean, you talked a little bit about it. One of the things that I'm going to talk a ton about with my clients at some point in time. We're going to talk about you know, charitable remainder trusts. We're going to talk a little bit about donor advised funds. But if you are seventy and a half, you must in my opinion, must must must pay any charitable places. You know, your church the why big brothers big sisters the boys in curls club. The United way any qualified charity. You should pay directly out of your IRA because the beauty of that is especially if you're not able to hit the twenty four thousand dollar deduction Matt or not when they're it's not twenty four. It's actually twenty six six because once you have aged sixty five you get next or thirteen hundred dollars each if you're married of standard deduction, isn't that? Great. So you have twenty six thousand six. Hundred dollars at you have to get up to before you're able to write it off while the neat thing about the RFID rule. So you have to be over seven and a half to do this is that if you pay that charity direct, guess what you never have to declare it as income it doesn't count as a deduction, but since you never paid income on it again, it's taking money out of that account almost for free. One other interesting sort of side note, while we're on IRA's is if after you're gone, you're considering giving some money to a charity like at death, and you have both IRA type accounts qualified accounts non-qualified accounts in today's situation in most cases, and again, always talk to your attorney in your tax person in general, I recommend using the IRA for the charitable deduction or the charity gift, and allowing the non-qualified money to go to your heirs because the non-qualified money in most cases will get a step up in value. So the cool thing is they don't end up having to pay tax. And the charity doesn't pay tax in the IRA. So again, it's just a little nuance. But it's something you really need to think about and that's where this is getting so so detailed orientated that if you'd make some tweaks you really can save yourself some money and save your era. Someone. Well, that that you discovered a huge amount of ground there. And you are going to spend some time on later podcasts. Talking about the charitable remainder unit trusts and all of those sorts of things because those are wildly applicable to a lot of the tax out. Now just to touch on that before we move on have any of those laws did any of that stuff? Get massively changed with the new tax laws, and then we'll dive into that on the later podcast. Not a ton that I'm aware of. Okay. I mean, again, that's when we added to those. That's where you really have to have that good financial team. You know, if you're going to do a CRT charitable remainder trust, we need to find it top top tier attorney. And we need a top to your trust company. You know, because you really need to have people that do it, right? Because the bad thing is if you do it wrong. That's not a good situation. The IRS has lots of fun, then that's cruel. They might listen to this should be nice. The IRS is gonna come in and do their job. And if it's not done, right? You know, you've got gotta make sure it's right. So you gotta make sure your dot your eyes and cross your t's on those. The daughter advised funds are really becoming popular and are neat way to go. In fact, I'm actually been looking at potentially doing one myself because I just think it's a neat way to be able to put some money away. And then you know to be able to structure a especially with how these crazy rules work where you have to stack your deductions. All right, Jim mind, just taking a moment to dive a little bit more into the different kinds of retirement, planning type stuff, the the Roth the 4._0._1._K, the traditional IRA, would you mind? Oh, no. Well, again, I mean how I look at the Roth and the traditional, and and you know, eve set it right to a client today when we were talking about it is, you know, first and foremost g want lower your taxes today or do you want to pay less taxes in the future? That's the difference between a Roth under attritional IRA with a traditional IRA you lower your taxes today. But when you take the money out guess what the government's gonna get it's cut with a Roth IRA, you don't get a tax benefit today. But when you take the money out, at least in principle, you should be able to get the federal taxes, you know, the money out federally tax free. That's the same with. Zero one K, you know, the part that goes in on a on a after tax basis, you will get out, you know, tax free. If you put it in pre-tax and save taxes today, you're going to pay taxes, you know, one of the strategies we do at the ton of people. We do it. We did it a lot in the last couple of weeks as the tax season started to come to a close is we would do one spouse with a traditional IRA and one with a raw. So we would have both tools because once you're retired. The neat thing is if you have the Roth and all of a sudden, oh my God. I wanna go on an Alaskan cruise, and it's going to be fifteen thousand dollars, and I don't want any credit card debt. I just want to go on Mike, send me a check. Well, vice have to send it to you out of your IRA. I might have to take you out to get the fifteen right? The neat thing with the Roth is I just send you fifteen. We call you pay a little bit of state tax, and we all sin Coon by you. Get to go catch salmon bottom line is is that you know, that's the big difference. And so to me there's places for both again a couple of my rules. I was just talking to one of my clients 4._0._1._K, we do work with four one ks. I'd minister, I don't administer them. But I'm the advisor on the plan. And as I said, you know, if you're young and you're in that ten or twelve percent tax bracket, we have noticed Gushin pay the tax as you get older as you have less time than the traditional 4._0._1._K. You know, if you're on a twenty five percent tax bracket math. It's pretty hard for me not to say take the tax break fair. And so every situation is different. And that's why it's so important to work with your tax. You know, it's so important to work with your tax person and ask good questions. So you know, what the right thing to do is. Now that's for the. No for the business. There are all kinds of neat things out there, if you're a business owner, and you're listening to this. And you're saying jeez. I just wanna put more money away, the my fifty five hundred or sixty five hundred now actually six thousand seven thousand because this last year Matt in two thousand nineteen we actually can put more money away six thousand dollars now and seven thousand dollars for mature, folks. Like me that are over fifty. I used to call it the old person bonus. But now that I'm fifty I call it the mature burners. But you can tell been doing this a long time. But bottom line is is that you know, if you wanna do more than that. There's a great tool called the simple IRA. It is one of the few things in life that truly is simple in the IRS code. You know as a company you just have to commit to matching three percent client match. So if a client if if you let's say. Five hundred thousand dollars a payroll the most that it would cost you as fifteen thousand dollars if every person put in and wanted to get three percent match. I've seen a ton of studies that say yes health insurance is the number one thing, but the number two things retirement and a simple areas. Great a self-employed pension plan can also work. It looks great for a self employed person you can put up to twenty to twenty five percent of your your net income into it. But if you have employees, whatever you put in percentage wise for you, you have to put in for your employees from the single 4._0._1._K is another great tool, and then also we do 4._0._1._K's. And if you do a safe harbor that again, there's no way I could get into the year. But maybe down the road. We will if you do a safe harbor 4._0._1._K. There are some really cool things that you can do where you can really take care of your folks in your employees. But on the other hand also really beneficial to the owners, so the key again is to have a plan in to sit down and really look at what's the objective of this. Plan. And how it worked for me? What can I do today? So let's wrap up today's podcast by by talking about some of the things that you recommend for clients who've already done their taxes for this year. What can they do to make it? So that one they have a better more realistic understanding other taxes and number two, you know, what can they do to either reduce their overall tax burden or take advantage of some of these programs? Well, I think the first thing that you really need to do is take out your two thousand eighteen tax return and look at it. And see, you know, how close was I to being a bracket lower, and those are questions you may want to ask your tax prepare. But what we're going to be doing with our clients as we're actually going to be you know, what I'm sending a letter out. And I'm in the process of finishing. It will be going out to all of our clients. And we're going to offer an offer to anyone listen to this that you can come in bring us your tax return. We are not tax payers, but we can look at it. And what we'll do is. We'll actually hope you put questions together to ask your tax prepare now. Maybe I can answer the questions but on the. The other hand, you know, we can put together some questions and say, you know, does it make sense right now, I'm in a traditional for a one K. Would it make sense to do a Roth? What happens if I go up to this level? Where is the how much money do I have to put in? So I'm in a lower tax bracket things like that will look and see do you have an HSA are you fully funding, the HSA, you know, do you work for the government? Can you do a four zero three b can you do a four fifty seven plan, and then we're also going to talk to our clients about. Okay. You were surprised that you didn't get such a big refund. Maybe we should set up a a monthly plan. Whether we set it up, so that it automatically goes into a Bank account, not like your checking, but maybe just the savings account at your Bank. Or maybe you want to set something up through our office. We have some options for that too. We're happy to sit down. There's never costs for someone to come in and meet with us, and it would be just our tax reviews. So you know, I would love to have that opportunity to sit down with you just give our office a call at seven eight two one six four two you can talk. Julie you can talk to even heck I even pick up the phone a whole bunch of times to were more than happy to talk to you and say, hey, you know, here's some ideas that you have. And and this is what we would recommend you, Mike. Thank you so much for walking us through this magnificently complex can under. Yes, I still love the word. And it is truly a conundrum and remember, you know, if you really want to know what your taxes are pulling your seventeen and pull at your eighteen and see, which was bigger awesome. All right, Mike. Well, Lou, we're gonna continue to unpack a lot of this stuff when it comes to just taxes and overall really good planning for you. If you're an individual, or if you're a business owner, and if you are a business owner ordinance vigil, and you want to do this please make sure that you reach out we got the phone number in the show notes. And of course, you can just basically Google my clock his name, and he will show up immediately because he actually has a fantastic website that you can also get some really good information through so Mike once again, thanks for being on the show. Thank you. Everybody. Have a great day. If you have not subscribe to the podcast, make sure you click that subscribe now button below that way, every time it comes out with a new podcast or directly on you're listening device. And if you know somebody who really needs this information could use it all you have to do is click the share button and make sure your friends and family get to hear the podcast to so for everybody caulking investment. This is Matt Halpern. And we'll see on the other side of the Mike berry. Sue, thank you. For listening to the financial heartbeat podcast with Mike cloudy, but the subscribe button below to be notified when new episodes become available. If you have questions for Mike, please call him at six zero eight seven eight two one six four to visit his website at WWW dot cloudy, financial dot com or stop in for a visit at six thirty five. Second avenue south on Alaska. Wisconsin by four six five zero securities offered through Securities America Inc. Member FINRA SIPC advisory services offered through Securities America advisors Inc. Clunky. Investments and insurance does not give legal or tax advice. Floppy investments and insurance in securities. America Inc are separate entities.

government Mike Matt Halpern IRS advisor business owner attorney Bonte Mike berry Tammy Becker Moses IRA Massachusetts Mike cloudy Alaska
3/25/21: LAs biggest quake threat sits on overlooked part of San Andreas, which may be good and more news

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

04:20 min | 2 months ago

3/25/21: LAs biggest quake threat sits on overlooked part of San Andreas, which may be good and more news

"This is the l. a. times it's thursday march twenty fifth. Here's today's news brought to you by hotseat. a new memoir from jeff immelt the former. Ceo of general electric raw honest intimate hotseat is that and more as image for counts. What it's like to be a leader in times of crisis by your copy of hot seat today. Wherever books are sold today will be cooler with a slight chance for rain. Cloudy skies and a high of sixty one tonight expect even more cloudy skies with a low of forty nine our top story. Elliot's biggest earthquake threat sits on an overlooked part of the san andreas fault. But according to a study published yesterday in the journal science advances that may be a good thing if they're analysis is correct experts. Say it's possible that when a devastating earthquake hits it may not do quite as much damage to the region as some scientists feared. The big one can be triggered only by a massive rupture on a long stretch of the san andreas fault. And if the rupture follows a fault strand with north western orientation the energy would be diverted away from the l. a. basin that means the region would be spared devastation. experts also. Say the debate over. How the big one would play out may not be completely resolved until the earthquake occurs in other news. Los angeles could become one of the country's first major cities to nearly eliminate fossil fuels from its power supply in a steady released yesterday. The national renewable energy laboratory has concluded that la is capable of achieving ninety eight percent clean energy within the next decade and one hundred percent by twenty thirty five and can do so without causing blackouts or disrupting the economy. The timeframe would meet president biden's most ambitious climate goals. The path forward would rely on the rapid creation of solar farms and wind turbines and getting solar panels on rooftops electric cars in garages and electric heat pumps in homes. The study does not offer a detailed. Look at how energy bills might change for angelenos over the next quarter century. It also doesn't estimate how many jobs might be lost in specific businesses however it does project several thousand new jobs a year building and operating clean energy facilities in housing and homelessness. Dozen homeless campers remained in echo park yesterday. Vowing to resist a massive city effort expected as soon as today to push them out. Homeless people have been camping in the park since late. Two thousand nineteen and their numbers have grown during the pandemic and earlier yesterday. More than one hundred fifty homeless people and activists gathered at the park to oppose its closure homeless service providers also recruited campers to get on shuttle buses to three hotels city councilman mitchell. Farrell has said he would close the park and repair damage but he resisted requests to publicly note when it would close the homeless campers and their advocates anticipated. That police would arrive late night or early in the morning to begin ticketing in politics. Governor gavin newsom appointed democratic assemblyman. Real bonte as california attorney general yesterday. Bonte is a leading advocate for criminal justice reform. Who has campaigned to abolish the death penalty and eliminate cash bail for many offenses if confirmed by the state legislature bonte. A resident of will be the first filipino. American to serve as california attorney general viewpoint. Appointment also ends weeks of political wrangling by supporters of a dozen democrats with interest in becoming the state's top cop and finally president biden has asked vice president. Khama harris to lead the administration's efforts to handle the increase in migrants on the united states southern border. Her responsibilities will involve at diplomatic relations with the central countries known as the northern triangle el salvador guatemala and dora's where many of the migrants begin their journey officials described this initiative as an intensive effort designed to address the root causes of migration there particularly focusing on the violence and poverty that is driving many central americans including unaccompanied minors to the united states for these stories and more visit l. a. times dot com.

earthquake jeff immelt president biden san andreas fault general electric san andreas national renewable energy labo Elliot bonte echo park Bonte Los angeles la gavin newsom Farrell Khama harris mitchell california
Attorney General Rob Bonta,a true homeboy! EP29

The Vibe Juice Podcast

1:28:40 hr | 2 months ago

Attorney General Rob Bonta,a true homeboy! EP29

"Greetings i'm sonia brooks the song be and this is the vibe. This is episode twenty nine. Five jews podcasts. And this is where the fives are in the juices. Sweet and i am your host with most sonia song and we have with the vibe crew. Today we have ali our rushie way. Ali ali g. g. eileen we actually have increased differ who is playing around with the camera cameras trying to make some happy happy. You want to say hey to it. Okay we'll walk green so smooth today. Catch y'all go ahead go rhino anyway. So yes episode. Are you telling me cool. That's okay gentlemen. Don't even worry about me so so since last time that we've been together folks What's happening in politics. We have the big issue now with the republican party. That is trying to totally Through legislation come up with about one hundred and thirty one hundred eighty something bills i think to turn over in create their own volney volney rights just trying to completely modify while the democrats have come up with the are they having introduced h. Hr one yet but it will be and threat to hr one. The bill young Which is really to enforce and protect. The one passed the house. it passed the house. Yeah but what about the filibuster threat. Normal is still beth real threat okay. And and it is but it's passed the house That's why the democrats trying to gear up to really make this all out battle will they're going to have to really gear up because there's a lot going on so we have so what we have. Now we've seen in arizona where the republicans were able to pass. It makes a modifications to The voting conditions of voting in the state by meal. Right and we cry requiring Notarized if you're gonna Have absentee Ballots so they've got all these other requirements in conditions in terms of that really going to impact people of color and then we have states georgia and carey and then so. The georgia is introduce their new bill which is basically. The goal is to keep democrats from Electing officials throughout the state of of georgia. So this the whole georgia's issue has been getting a lot of attention in the news. I don't know if people have paid much attention to what what this means. But even the president finally binding had to speak on it and he is calling the jim crow in a suit. Yeah pretty much matter of fact polo shirt. A knife tennis all white nike tennis. A white nike polo shirt and white drugs. Were white drugs white. Dad that i mean i get why as in who wants to be still reading the world right white right so we go in all white. I used to say it took me when i said more. I've thought about this. I really that it. You know what i'm saying. That's what they feed into the people who you white so this is a whole thing is. This is a segue from trump's presidency when he alleged voter fraud any had all of his constituents in his followers and so forth there steel shuffling board. And we'll continue. They weren't going anywhere anyway. No this is all in preparation of twenty twenty four so they're trying to stack the cards. So everything is the shoe in. Based on the way they want to run and control this country to impact us for the next for a lifetime for a lifetime. this is you know it's it's really crazy so so far. There are thirty three states. That are ready to take on new legislation. That's going to impact loading forever a. It's actually forty three better doing it with thirty three. You're already in the process okay. You know what i'm saying right. Most of them have already initiated already. Isn't it. i think that. When i i think that the saddest part about it is that you know from a state level when it comes these types of bills and things like that. It's just so hard understand what they're actually doing until they do it. And then it shows up at the ballot on ballot day and then we get pissed off because of fucked us over. We realized what it was doing. You know saying that that always seems to be with the cases. We always seem to be you. Oh yeah well what were then selling work to me. And then Comes as works and they'd be met. You should pay attention heaven right and we got down clusters over again. It happens every single time. You know saying they find a way to find a loophole. Whatever you know jamie get a debt you know jim. It's okay. I was recording time. But yeah but Yes so you know. But but at the but at the end of the day I think that their diabolical plan. You know what. I'm saying to some extent Will show up in the next two years in san moving out and we'll figure out what they did. You know zan end the most. We figure out what they did in. We'll figure out a way to reverse it before the next two years right so by twenty twenty four whatever they tried now may only working twenty twenty two but then again if it does work twenty twenty two when they were able to do something like wrestle congress away or something like that then we'll be right because guess what they're not gonna give you know fan not going to be easy to get it back You know. I just can't believe anybody believes anything. That those fuckers do I can't believe that we are giving them any chance to do anything. You know what i'm saying you know to to. They ought to be in fucking jail. Honestly off basset ahmed for disenfranchising people from the democratic process. That needs to be interesting then needs to be a crime. I think they need to turn. That was in being accountable for this bullshit. They're getting away with it. It's against the law or not. Aren't going to be any right. That's the yeah. That's why stacey. Abrams was so successful in georgia every time. They the pond on the chessboard. You know they looked up in news. Queen swing it in life. You should make it three or four moves in way who i just made one more. But but that's the way you have to play right but they're gonna be making five moves while we're waiting for the next move right and that and that's the whole thing is the shit just moved so quickly in the in the end what they do you know. I'm just confused. i ain't gonna lie. I mean If ever i was a guy that was more confused. it's now i'm working fused about politics. Now that the democrats are at the helm right because they bitch and moan about shit. They're just got a victory lap right digit together. You know because victory laps. You'll be very short lived in You know you just go ahead. Let these fuckers outmaneuver you because you're a power you know they're they're kicking your ass in state legislatures until they can federally whoop your ass in or or they're kicking the state legislature state with your or locally will be fan can ask what you know. They'll they'll start winding shit again because that's what they're going to be. Nobody run help helping. Will you the entire courage battleground scenario that we hear about read about ceiling fucking tv all the news on and on and on and on if there is a tacit agreement that we trade off periodically and that okay the ds will be the bad guys for like. Maybe the last six years the next six years ours. The next it'd be to do these. In trading all soden elements certain elements of what the democrats are not doing in what the republicans are not doing. Reflect some complicity to go. Look we know. We don't have to be masked keep the public fight going right. I think i think about what's your name you know Now appears to me to be the most conservative white bitch ever seen in my life right. You know what i'm saying. I mean you know. I mean literally like women women all the situation talking about trump. You never really believed in shit either. I mean right now you jumped right back in line with you. Know with the with the with the texas two step of of You know just you know. Politics as usual ryan. You are trying to get anything progressively. You're not you're not aggressive. You are not progressive. You're you're like you're not down with the squad you are not never has been never will break. That is one reason. Why the progressives want to get rid of. Get rid of her. She didn't find time looking. She's about to looks like he's gonna step by what's going on here because i was looking at on nine lake deal. Dinosaur old is who's love them. Non hundred and see you see what use indian about her coming hurt retiring that that that's a whole nother subplot. She had been severely criticized in question about her age. Her work habits did it got quiet. The newsom doesn't press conference and says that our replace feinstein leaves a black replacer. Oh yeah Now she has. She has not announced anything. They've been no determination. No indication of any known facts. They're gonna facts. Come out. yeah. And that's what i'm saying. Is we have to be aware of how how our enemies manipulate win. We know certain things because if we keep thinking that the media actually is doing anything other didn't serving the movers and they will be fucked up. Yup yep see there and then loose some late naming The guided boehner bolt seven. Boulter is now going to be the new attorney general. I like i like you to and he visits me. Yeah oh yeah he actually got me actually got me when i when i my unemployment fell off like like ten years ago right. He was simply guy. Then you know he's been he'd been around. What anna. I remember. I was like dude. This messed up. I was like it was like checkmate for me. When this wasn't a whole comic left last time. Saying and i can remember i. You know i was like what. Am i going to do mop right. I know you wear those. I'm serving so okay this serious. I was living a fucking car. You know what that right. Yeah and so. I was like you know you know you gotta get shit together man and so they like well You know talk. Your simply member collects i called. I called barbara lee Right because i would like fuck. That'll calm barbara lee and they was like nah kubota night boca and then then i talked to one about a staff members. I'm saying i was like man. I'm a veteran of buchan. Broke up saying my shits supposed to be here. It's not here. i'm living in my car. You guys know my phone up. And i'm like you do when that goes out all systems off as all bad for everybody. You know what i'm saying. Everybody everywhere right. I was like oh man this is jack up and then the next thing you know the person called me Like we're going to try. And we sit your information. Missed the boat blah so and so forth. And do you know who call me fucking bolts. Didn't really thought it was like i got this. Don't worry about this home. Bought and i see really. It was like dad will. Your was that that was like two thousand nine. Okay okay yeah ball to fucking call me on the phone. So he's representative for your district. He's assemblyman why area filipino. American right named attorney general right for the largest safe He got on the phone with somebody. Said hey is in because contrary to a lot of people know him as assembly much. They don't realize that he actually comes from the criminal justice. See that's why if you look at the issues of cracking home about it's always you know what you guys are saying his name wrong. The wonder i was kinda being stupefied. Here is rob bonte bill into a using both tie us outta now. You will say and bottle blonde on down. My name is robyn bonte anti yeah talking about all right so now. I understand okay honorable honorable. He just wanted to correct. It wouldn't banta whenever you want. Okay keesa killer case. Arise awry me way not trying to give me give the man the side side of the male school mount the mail. Okay yeah i know who you're talking about. Okay robot okay. I swear no but we can find one. I've really is generally you guys. Were saying volta. Oh no i don't see one. Okay oh wait a minute. Maybe if i spell the name correctly views data instead of volta a bota bong okay. Yeah i'm yeah. I met him. I've had a. I've gone to Such as well With just joe with a town northgate rick and it was a fundraiser. And he was you know it was just a little businessman alhough persons. I should say men. And i was one of the people of color. Their data in ruined his mother remembered international hotel downtown san francisco. That whole thing happened over there with all man. The asian pacific islander. when was this latinos seventies. Oh okay this way back now. But his mother was one that was to what happened in the international hotel. Hotel for who came a major milestone in filipino americo and okay their involvement in radical change in the united states that nobody viewed as being politically active. All k- wade the us all kinds of latino but international hotel was a major major. Blow out major blow. You know but. I mean that's just that that is speaks to how he was raised by see because he i mean he comes from a family where they daring solid right right. There wasn't enough. He was doing right right now. That i've i've found that out right after right. Wasn't that during the period when the filipino americans. Were becoming more vocal yeah. That's what i politically active. That was one of their early milestone In terms of for themselves standing up right in saying no no this is go. Ride to that shit right you know. And his mother's a fireball. she track i swear. I had pitcher that but he comes from oval to say a good. Oh so yes doc. Right generational what is from from good stock is from from the stock. Okay so we got a little accent gone on these bins and they are Right in there. Aren't you a shot to try. That moore brothers do books. Oh what tell us about it then. Spady book tribe Guys that i served with in the gulf war. I was a spade books and we traveled all over. The saudi arabian peninsula. Thick asks taking names steel women. Thanks for the little sideline breaking hearts this book. I think i got the base move comes out of the baby. Okay so bonte now. We're talking about we. We just looked at as the taking over a new attorney oversight. Yeah didn't they just announced that about a last week. Was it win right. it was recent. Yeah that's that's that's phenomenal. That's a phenomenal opportunity. That's wonderful for him and for the filipino community. I don't know. I guess you'd say which one who's previous person the center the center moved to the senate now with a descent. No zero became Health and human services in the biden administration. One of the things that come that the democrats are managing to do. Is that whole shifting process. See where you know can't besir goes into be the secretary this. I think it's healthy. Yeah okay he moves there that empties the attorney general slot. You move botha into be the attorney general then at the same time newsweek. Saying listen don't trip when applied stein steps. Now i'm going to nominate a black hole right right well maxine. What could be somebody like that. I don't care what he's looking for. And what a lot of damage where she from cameras does she. Yeah she was the state of what she she was. She was state floor speaker of the state. I think your yellow and she's from. She's from southern cal. Yeah that's who that. That's what i was getting ready to say is karen bass May i think be more likely. Yeah what bob has done. Barbara has built a massive infrastructure and plugged just the way she lowered the way she learns. Dallas did that for her because now you okay became chief of staff ryan carson. Stop being chief. Staff adele went to be board supervisors alameda county bay would to steinle say december raise watson. Okay but you see them saying that to me. I look for thinking. Okay the pr. The bs around the campaigns. That y'all shit. I wanna see what moves be mailed chessboard. And what ryan. What does that move being exactly. See a plan. This has got to be a plan and boulder is very very progressive. So i've been to what seven or eight events that he's coordinated and organized to were about men of color of young men of color. And how everything. Wrong in america's laid trying. Okay my brother now go. Please communicate with them please. So moving right along yes. Question is trump immune to criminal prosecution for insurance fraud tax. Banking criminal offense. No definitely not well is he what we're saying. Then the reason that the tissue. Yeah james the an attorney general for the state of new york. Yeah the reason that the prior attorney general made sure she handed off smoothly to letitia. Yeah see this is what trump may or may not understand. They've been looking at him ten or twelve years right. Okay so letitia. James knows beyond rumor fact right and law. He became president. There is no presidential pardon. Pardon for violation of state laws. Well but his defense team has been effective particularly. Says you said it. Ten years even for ten years now so that means at least two or three years before he became president but they have not been. They've never they've never brushed. Artas acute have never been charges. These center the state or the york. They had been literally accumulating evidence right nothing he's never been told he's being charged so that means nothing official has happened. You've heard all the rumors we've seen the newspaper articles. The magazine article. What he should have been prosecuted for his attorney went to deal for colon right so and that may still happen. This'll be interesting to see what happens from there because from the talks and what. I'm hearing on the defense side in speaking that. There's no justifiable case really. This is what they're trying to argue though. I do think that he's going to get away. Because it sounds like no no and the reason i say that A lot hinged upon the recent supreme court decision right about the release of his financial records. Correct right now from what. I which is not at all of this but from what i hear. There were two digit if not three busy me and bolers expend insecure in that decision. Okay with trump. You have to remember that. The initial representation in the mass media that he'll get along the way but i remember asking a former law. Professor mind okay. Do you think the new york would has a real hard on. Yeah okay so the district cyrus vance manhattan and state attorney general. But i'm asking sister to law professor mind and she said ali he's you know everybody knows it. You can't pardon a person ask president. You can't pardon a person for state crimes. It has to be violation of federal law. So if you are being accused or prosecuted for violation of state laws and there is no presidential. Pardon for you. And every since that every says that has begun to seep out. You know it is interesting. How at one point trump was talking about it was a witch hunt and they wanted this and they wanna dat you know there have to be. He's after me. they want me. They want my money. They don't want me to run for president bob blah blah blah but. Those charges were never presented on purpose right because if we never presented them you never had an opportunity to actually know what we got with james saying state attorney general. She's got a bank fraud. Wire for all of my from insurance fraud. Eric's okay all violating state of new york laws. So it'll be interesting because it sounds like it's going to be at least another nine months because he's still particularly from his taxes because he's i don't understand. They finally released about eight hundred pages of his taxes. And that's the first shift was supposed to be another six. Eight hundred pages is like that. So he's going to jail. You know it's just it's a matter of when they decided they want to pull the trigger on hand they're gonna pull the trigger on him. You know there's a lot of people say you know. There was that argument where people say. Oh you know. They're going to get rid of cuomo when they get rid of cuomo. They're going to. They're going to get rid of james. No yeah not going to happen because it was an elected position. You know what i'm saying. There's no state attorney. General is not like the united states attorney general where you are appointed by at the at the pleasure of the executive right now. It is not like that. You are wearing james sweatshirts new york. Yeah it's my girl really attorney so i'm trying to get me one so we'll need to keep an eye on that we'll have to be continued because you know they're not trying it if they have to change laws. This is the approach they will try everything screaming and kicking. Hey i honestly honestly think. They believed that they had cut a deal with the united states. supreme court. yeah. I sincerely believe that. And if you look at the three people that he put on there right roberts court okay recalling his ass. 'cause they said that they. Fbi didn't do proper investigation of kevin but but but out of nine members of the court. Right you got three. He appointed then. You got clearest. Whatever he's last claire. Yeah donte clarence thomas okay auntie and then you got a couple of others strays their but the bottom line is whatever happened. Once again. can't prove it. I heard that the money was accepted. That was spent to lobby the court and they still gave a shit up now. Whatever that means. But i know is important. I don't know all the specifics. But i know that if you pay me two digit million for me to reach a decision and i reached the opposite decision. Okay that something's not telling something up right. Okay okay that the state charges also relate to a lawsuit against trump in florida. You know. i've had the laws do lawsuits in georgia. That's that's how you know trump knows. He's in trouble new york. When he decided to change his residency from the state of new york. Laura he was like oh let me get out of here and take all my paperwork with me van to florida so that i can you know so that can get you know. Basically hide everything. I need to hide. Say new york My business down here. Every listens to segue throughout the country. Florida and then the net. Now you know is out of comfort about the the island property bought. No oh you off the coast of florida. H- privately okay. I wanna just like his right right. Oh kinda daughter pablo escobar. No no i know the other boys. Yeah yeah epstein. Yeah a couple of them you know. They're good old boys team. Barg yom beret. You know all those guys don't by the way they're right that's like Eight rep rep. Anyway mr herpes. You have had. I should get more ahead well. You shouldn't be ahead if you weren't a bobblehead you wouldn't have the happy anyway so speaking of crimes and on moving on crimes so recently we've seen huge incident in at the attacking laura shootings so let's just a little bit of my tutti. This brings up the second amendment again. Whether they wanna talk about you know Looking at addressing you know Gun gun laws enforcing gun laws and restrictions and so forth. But of course those people sat in you know to their demise. That happened Now they're trying to say the community the asian community in atlanta. Georgia is saying that. This was a racially motivated. And then you have the police department. That immediately kind of wanted to defend the guy said that he has sex. He claimed to have sex usa a bad day that he's you know he's a cath. Lincoln he wanted to attack the source of his bath like nowadays is not what you need to fucking be krill killing people and. I'm not sure if it was catholic because whatever they took down apparently his picture was posted on the church church website our facebook page and like get him off so he clearly had an affiliation with the sex callers in in this church. I bird's feathers about right but it is taken taken at the end of the day. This guy was not come on man. You know full beard. No moustache giant absurd. You already know what that means christopher coop same thing but it didn't the other guy in colorado. He had a beard. He didn't have a moustache on a very very very much man. That's was civic. But he has an arab name though the dying. Olea all syrian right. Well it wasn't he see. I'm not sure what fashioned eligible was contrary maybe arabic but he is also a right wing rationalists right and i think he is syrian. If i remember our ally yeah at least. Didn't he got bullied or something like that. They said when he was in school. You know airs did have a full beard mustache on. Sorry yeah he addict all the same can we can. We all agree Here i mean say twisted perverted dick. Twisted perverted what was his reason for doing what he what. Where do you home released that supermarket. Consumer it was a supermarket case. Suits hungry bolder. Boulder uses the boulder right over colorado. That's g killed ten people including the police officer. I mean i just. I love boulder colorado. It's just such a nice little quiet town. It's kind of like berkeley with shows like the place that but then when you say colorado that's the columbine is started with combine i mean and how many more shootings has colorado head in this very open gun do walk into the place in aurora movie theater and movie theater. That's right good for that. It was him and batman. The joker kevin drifts like joe al play speaking the joker so i understand speaking of the joker so recently right now. We're still kind of like winding down on spring break and you know that that that miami was stormed by late teens and twenties for spring break. They just went mad all over the place. Apparently there was a guy that was dressed. Like the joker going fuck. It ain't nobody gonna tell us the where no mass conspiracy. It's bullshit he's standing and he's all on camera and everything. They just lost their fricking monkey. Mind's down there won't down about that one right. What was it would had the two little black boys. Oh yeah raped. The girl and i just heard walker you guys do. They were various raiders. Man come on in their minds. Probably he's like you know. This is what we do. Spring break everything goes. Yeah now you can. Spring break life with no parole. The hate to be They may not even be college students. Everybody that goes down there and not even for. Yeah no i get it you just dummies saying i mean just really not very smart. Young men. look made made a mistake that you'll never be able to erase and now you're shits over with. I mean you tragic let there be less than everyone when they go out there. I mean every young man every young woman. You know Just christie's been there before you know who who know. You know what. I've been close enough. You know what i'm saying. I'm in close enough. But you know what i was. I was raised right. And i was i was. I was smart enough to when i wanted to go out now. I'm out of here. You know i have to do with that right. you know. that's running right right right. You know not knowing. No trains running train but running you. Just don't do shit like that. You know just stuff you you you step away from. Yeah but when they're in the midst of and it's always the ones that just there's not much i will never do. I raised them right. I'm telling you and oftentimes those are the very ones that get away from home. Ain't been waiting now. The bus lab. We go there exactly have there. Nobody will go to school there exactly exactly and we do all the shit we dreamed of doing right now. They used to go jewett right strange right. They used to do it abroad. That was a big thing. Mexico or someplace else caribbean placed. They just looked should sheets. Bad doc i can make the florida. I can't make other terrific. The union the european shit is out. Now yeah but you don't really hear too much. Spring breakers going into europe during spring usually a tropical place where they can go and get new nicoting. Cut up in open right. Mexico used to be the spot. So i don't know maybe it's a covert thing and that's why they're not all going is not. I think that in mexico you can lose your ass well true. That's right okay and you don't want to go to jail in mexico. He's at wants the cartels right. It's a different game control locally. You can't be doing over. we'll come back. I know travel agents to tell people all the time. I can't book you there family to me. Okay because your your body will come back and there will be no head to bury you. There'll be no head or might not get the body at all right you know. Recently they've been doing arms and legs and his they've been finding tolson's y'all's watching this show called zero zero zero last night accountable interesting show And was about It was it was it. It showed how one shipment of cocaine goals from you know the order in italy to mexico and then the step that attempts to get across Is this a series of mysterious okay. Yeah and And one of the one of those aspects of part of the part of the other different people as americans there's is there's a there's africans there's Mexicans there's italians enough to end there's people from all different countries that are all part of this international waiting here and the mexican side of it was was really interesting. Was there any special forces. Commandos guys that That sort of pulled back and fell out of the military and then became sort of illegal guys but then they decide they're gonna take over this one city and they raised an army and you know they utilize the money from a cartel. Then they took over the cartel. And i was whoa you know and the government like it used to be in the military but wait one fucking with these guys. Did they worked for us right. We know what they do. We know what the right wing fucking with that. And it's almost like a religious thing. It was like god told us we need to do. This lives in scary shit. Yeah good about certain place might be sheet up. You know so you think you can do it but you better. Not clinic done So moving on entertainment. The speaking of zero zero zero the series right into entertainment. You've been dying really the he's like all other does she's divorced benefit okay. So what's the state. What's the update with connie. Which is his wife. Kim kardashian west has filed for divorce and the world is like a girl is about time. You know what's interesting. They're ending their show. The kardashian show after after all of this time all the money that they made either show off a who is scowl. Man was the cash. Well he can take the whole family relieving that. I think the whole release of the news releases about him being a billionaire right versus a millionaire right. I think it's all a crock. Yeah and i think it's time timing's a billion would what's getting ready to happen. His wife files and then he has to getting more than what she's worth and then he'll end up being bankrupt and sitting on a sidewalk somewhere talking about cakes. Smoke aches so so cardis was famous. Turn attorney so what makes you think that the wife would not be sapped. She's a savvy businesswoman. She thinks ahead hand she plans. That's who she is. Plotted lands every player. Every okay lewis. Even the porno for johnny is a little too late to put that out. It's a little too late to kid out. You ve already fallen in sunken play absolutely absolutely and this is what happens on the end. We told you we warned you do straight up and you'd be like oh to go money like when she was supposed to do dummy and she what made you because they turn into every male something goes on and if they don't get out they ended up being connie eight four beth. Whitey were recruited originally. That's that's didn't scorpion. And the frog story right. Know that one with the script. Frogs on the on the side of the river. Bed in the scorpion. Give me a ride. And just man man but i think if we both is yeah you got a point there so he jumps on back and starts women in halfway -cross scorpions things here. This is dumb as we're gonna do that. 'cause that's what i do right. I'm a gourmet right. It's kind of like there's a snake storyline the same similar. Same -nology right right right right. Make one new met me. What did you think i was gone. Right exactly jimmy. A sandwich but some people don't believe that it's a motherfucking. Yes absolutely and you know so. Yes i think that you know at the end of the day. You know I'm really looking forward to seeing how this all turns out With regard to the settlement on this whole relationship. I know she's gonna get something of coins. No chrome snatches. And he's just gonna like. I said you know i just i just don't know if he's going to survive this thing But we shall see in agenda. I don't know if he's going to jail. Well you know what. I think generally happens is the first reality. Had he's angry. You start out angriest. He's brought real angry because he's his says some things in in media in reference to his anger you know in even remember before this divorce filing because she filed this time. Right i heat allegedly file remember. And when he did he was out there saying You know. I knew she was basically. I knew what she was a new. She was in this that and the other it was saying all that stuff and then and then it got quiet and then it was supposedly the whole thing quiet and it's like older that nothing happened is still together now. You know the ball was in the in the works and then she comes out and see thousand divorce and then she was a fire cracker like gets all into his head. Go turn gets all d league. Oh yes you know she. You know the end of the day you know we knew it was going to happen. We saw it was going to happen. Everybody saw the writing on the wall and You know here. It is like i said though. We'll see the whole thing play out on. I'm i'm looking forward to seeing you know. i hear. He has lots of lawsuits against them particularly when he did that. Church thing he was out all in different places Halton the services. Now there's the people that had toured with them go on all these different places and trying to assume he's got lots of lawsuits. Yeah well. I think that he has become a liability. Now that he's pimped out turned inside out it is time to cut him loose right right and cashing in cash. Turn in the lead the cargo. You milked it. Okay cut out. All the fine stakes. Meet parts all goodies right. I've been removed exactly so mentor. Asp away so poor konya anyway. So that's that's his fate so more to come. We'll just keep an eye on it. How about that flip. Though that we've got talked about last week What was it Coming to america yes Superior or inferior to the original. Well let's talk about the whole premise of it right so ideas that they're they're back in mundo moon. The i guess thirty years later. Roughly thirty years right and the whole premise is out that Hakim has Two daughters he does not have a son and he goes these eh. he's fighting against Wasn't raised three children. Three girls girls. Oh three girls okay. And and And he has a foe in the land of the moon data right and the fall which is played by nights and he does terrific larry. A terrific job is okay. I gotta come in to move. Anybody deserves some recognition in that. He was not only was he seriously. Seriously funny you walk. He was doing great man. I couldn't believe this is doing that. It was so funny. Oh hit the look and the way he do is mouth and all of this makes it is accent. oh yeah he really was so he and he was threatening. You know somebody like him leading Understand why they kept letting his ass into the castle on goes though i was just like what in the hell security about exactly. I agree with you. Just come up here anyway. I mean if he likes to do it. Well it's almost like that. He hasn't he already knows it. he's a threat. I'm not even going to try to fight this. And he's gonna stand near all dignified. It's like lil. What can i do today standing there. It's like here. they can take over everything right. You know they think in the movie. Was that the young son. Didn't turn out to be. I told them that the young son didn't turn out to be his and that he would fall in love with the daughter ran. That would have been a cool. Oh you know what i thought about. I thought that was going to be a logical apparently. Didn't take take that. Turn the hairdresser who is a very attractive young lady. Don't get me wrong. But she did not stimulate my lawns. What is my intellect I think mr opportunity. I think it would have been a nice little twist. If the turned out that the sun that he thought was his son fell in love with his sister and it was forbidden. You must not talk to your sister and it turns out that he's not really a son he's you know but he's already taking in a sense therefore he accepts him and his mother daughter. He's learned he's gone through gone through the processes of being a prince so now he could just be the husband and the wife of the queen right. You know what i'm saying daughter would would've been great. You know what. I'm saying but new zealand do it that way they wanna put leslie jobs out there. Who was hilarious. I loved her. She stole the show. And i really think that personally leslie. Jones is a goddess santions. A good looking woman in the nfc and they try and make our look like she's they're a rat terrier looking woman all the time. She always plays herself like that. You know what i'm saying but they there was a lot of beauty in that In what they what they brought to our. So i was really happy to see her You know you're looking good. You know saying she was a slut. In in the in in the film she was fan spanning the coochie odor that. That was funny. If that i don't remember that part but okay. It was hilarious. If you look at it again smell and then all right oh my herbals and then and then there was a smell of wait a minute. It larry so that was like your favorite part in the movie scene in a movie. That was one of my favorite things. Yeah that was one favorite parts. I fell over laughing to the point where i had positive. How about you l. lead. You have a favorite part Okay yeah it was very entertaining. It was very shallow. Yes very superficial. Yes yes do you think more so superficial than the first the original is more exempted because it was more like Like a modern day fairy tale. It was the bathers. Come on but the idea idea and this in the second one for him to come back to america and just being. I saw that yeah to come back thirty years later. And you go back to us saying they had. They had done the research behind the fact that he but heated. No see and that that's the breakdown. I'm talking about no matter what i did drugs. Whatever you don't you don't have any recollection that in the time you spent in this foreign country we porn people in that you had intimate relations with a woman. Well that's where the story breaches raw some reality because Allegedly simi yeah. His buddy will play by arsenio hall. You know Had kept certain things from him so that he was so new breed one night and he didn't know that he even slept with her okay and it was almost as if seamy it seemed like the first. They kinda almost eluded or semi alluded that he did nothing in it was him are whatever is right right. I thought i thought you know the the the original was far superior. The directing the lighting the film as opposed to digital video the The set design the dancing. Oh yeah the music right. I mean come on. Did you have to the choreography in the second one shit. Anybody could have done right. I mean literally it was left right left my of sweat compared to the first one when it came out with their who they was here winning they worked. I mean and then that's true. The whole ringlets pin pointed about. I wanted to hear. He's your want to see the brother. Just break all breakout. Oh lab and i live somewhere. He came out high but it wasn't him y- they did. He did sing but he that was at the wedding or something. It was at the end at the the introduction ceremony like they did the first time i think he came in and then i remembered so get off. I think they did the the. I think they did get off. They prints on right and then he he kinda started off and we thought he was about to do the same thing but it was. You know. yeah. I wanted to hear that. Yeah superficial dubbed yet just kinda wack overall Two out of five stars. I'm gonna give it wasn't terrible but there were some funny moments A two point three point three okay is out of five stars Dan oh nike stars to pretty pretty. Yea it it it took. I think i was probably forty five minutes well into the movie before. I really had a laugh. So i was just like. Oh okay i jones really kinda did it for me. I think she was the one that saved the movie for me Nobody else You know i thought at first you personally that eddie murphy's character was ultimately too shallow to really enjoy who's very flat a semi. I couldn't help but wonder why they kept putting shit around his neck and was like every every every outfit he wore was just you know like he was like the queen of england is unlike that they have to say was legitimate neck breed man so one thing about this i have to say in just the preservation over the years eddie murphy obviously has done work because he looked marvelous compared to semi. And i'm sorry are our city. All the only person eight here was arsenio. Okay even the person And i'll tell you her name. The played the the wife vanessa. Bell calloway vanessa val. Calloway oh utah. No not the wolf. That was funny to no not on when she was still going roof after thirty years. That was hilarious hopping on foot man one big gigantic asa legged. That's funny big old. Bubbas leg yeah. So i thought she The the person played the The original girlfriend the became the wife right right in the mother now emmy. She looked wonderful. I thought she she did. She looked and she she never. She was never really that fine to me in the beginning anyway. In fact i thought vanessa bell. Calloway headley's her name. Generally she was i. You know what i'm saying. I always like vanessa. Bill callaway always was like dude. You messed up when you left. Africa left that pretty f- find out thick asks women over there and got their little waif yup saying sorry about the skin tone nothing color as winston up but i mean. Come on you know. That's just do fight it in that system. I'm not comparing looks in that way. I just think that for the role of thirty years she. She just preserved. That's all. I'm saying. That's all i'm saying she was it. Must not forget. The premiere the cameo of james earl jones. Oh jail you know. He looks pretty bad but they said you know they were saying that. James earl jones you know unfortunate because of his age and health the they had to shoot everything at his house. I've been shot. Al yeah shoot. He wasn't very strong. And i thought that was really pretty bold for him to play that casket kidnapped casket. Almost no is like. Oh james it sounds like is the art imitating life or scaring me which way we going. Yeah that was kinda cool. Know what. I've enjoyed this life. I think i'm going to die now. That's that's how i can't go out right. It was a very kingly. Yeah yeah they did may handle it you know. So what about donna is. Do you remember much of seeing. How much looking to wait. Mock around one day here. Yeah walking around lakeland wanna know to be is okay. So have walk. John amos is eighty one years old. You guys eighty-one one. James earl jones By the way is ninety what yeah ninety. Nine years old know james. Oh yeah okay. I'll ride j. john. Amos was still trying to get in character roles. James era was already well. He was established thespian. Yeah you know everything from the spirit of all the big ship. Yeah yeah so fellow. And i love. I love that i'd never get that. It was powerful. Because i think he did in the play before he did the right before. Yeah and then Was nominated for it as for oscar and in the same role in win which we know. Why johnson bite bateman so it also featured louie anderson. Yes he you know. He's he held pretty well. Grace bouvier now. If you remember she was one of the roles petlars. Fancy fancy right right. You know what you know. What's crazy about her is that Nothing so anyways called mushroom so no but seriously though she You know you know what was in the film Who wasn't in the villain. That was what it was. Got me right. 'cause so glow wasn't there. Yeah that's why he was not and And neither was sister. Well neither was sam Samuel jackson remember when he tried to shoot the mcdowell's. Yep yeah you know. I could see him not being there. He went to jail okay but but they always can make as as the movies. They could made allowances. He could've gotten out of jail and repented and ended up in the moon. They felt sorry for him. He had a big part. We would just trying to break into show business. I think at that point. You know what i'm saying. That was that was that was early. Him yeah it was early but it was unforgettable. Yeah that little role was very unforgettable forgettable because they worked his ass and then we went james. O'keefe that's that's what i said. Well now we never really recognize him. Samuel jackson the play. Yeah right at that stage in his career. They were a hundred different characters. Right right the hit you in a gown. Yeah that's all i'm saying. Alexander them powerful always stood out for me. Her part was bigger hurts. His the girl sister the queen sister the little sister. That was the little slack. That was the first one when they ended up with solo. Guy those two. Yeah daryl her. What was his name. I can't really. Oh yeah i never liked it. But but at the same time it would have been funny to have him come back And to have her comeback maybe the maybe together or maybe they're doing everything they did a break the two of them up because they all want they been written in luke air for they will cost more money you obviously. They did not want to pour too much money a certain amount of money over but they wanted to do this under a certain budget that that was clear to me. That's what it looked like to me. Go overall yeah kinda did but they had a lot of camels. Had tracy morgan. They ll nail. Yeah kids say nothing. The whole movie right. She said she just was sitting there. I was like come on down here and she doing well. Thanks okay from united is trevor noah trevor annoying and Let's see they had Oh glasnost saying yeah. I'll gosh yeah that song as if they had a ton of people you know that's really what to me what the show was. We'll see that. That's why i'm not really. I don't consider considered an indictment of coming to america to to say that it was shell. It was to say that it was supervision because most american films are the vast majority and the vast majority of whom may make fat dollars. Yeah it's all about entertainment okay and you can. You can put up all kinds of shit and people will buy it and you get the dvd and on and on and on but the whole damn thing was just shot indoors. It just didn't it just to me. It was just it studio fill. That is a that was. Yeah shot in a studio certainly within the goal to the jungles an idea. But it didn't have that feel didn't feel of africa whereas the other one did you notice in other. There was more successful in giving that to do that. I was the first one yet Car i won. It was good director. I remember same data data. I can't remember who will remember his name. So one of the things. Though that i did appreciate you know when they put them in makeup as the barber and the the the the chicken eaten arsenio. You know the the patron in the barbershop and the old jewish gal. Don't leave your own so you know and the local mall. The boy's name name name clinton mom and then clinton his name is respect as vicious. Oh no kuntar. What's koa mohammed. Ali respect us vicious. That was it. And that's all but you know just those little parts you know and then Arsenio and they made sure that he had extra gums blacking. Pete combs one wrong and he's always eating. Nothing was ever. That's right that's right. I wonder who that got through. That third guy was in there. There was one guy that was in there that nobody ever know that guy. I can't think of his name. He was a good friend to eddie. Murphy eddie murphy talk about show. And he and he hired him to work with his production company. So he's been with eddie murphy for years and so. He gave him a cameo in that movie. You know the first coming to america. He became an icon. Just from that part. I mean isn't the funny part is nobody knows what that guy's name is. Nobody knows where he went. You do in the place so produced by george folks falsely falcy who's director. Oh but you know in the first one okay. The first director right. he's very very good. Film agree is a guy that did Beverly hills cop. Oh you did okay. So then i director would have been Was john landis landis their business so john landis didn't come back 'cause him and eddie murphy can get along after like a beverly hills cop three. They got into a fight or something like that. And they've since squashed it. But i don't think he can't if they brought down landis back it would have been a whole different film. Oh yeah. I'm sure what you know but instead they this time. It was craig brewer. Who broher craig. He did inflow. Yeah that's one okay. So that sounds like you're on a telling us You know That it's about that time but anything that you want to say about the Winding down and coming to america so we wind down on the the rating you said a two out of five. Alisa two point three out of ten. He's going to make it a t and just okay. You know what. I'll give enough the two points. I'm just going to say a plane three. Not that it's all that great. I mean there's some other things i'd give it three. But you know and the reason why i give it a three really has to do with the cameo not so much of many other people all the people that they packed in that movie some of the other roles of course you like to see more of a story but overall it was still good to see eddie murphy comeback. And you know. I think we wanted to see a coming to america to is of waiting for another friday's original. We're not going to see chris Tucker come back in in a q. Denture it's really bad. That's really too bad. I really feel sad about that But you know. Screw chris tucker you know for you know might well ice cube kind of waiting a bit too long here by all their cazes. Diane off writing eddie realize that you know what. Let me hurry up and get this. I don't wanna be like fridays and don't get something out there because people leaving you know was he also would would fridays. You had behind the scenes shit happening you know like the sister did played the neighbor in one of the earlier. Fridays lead do risk. Oh i'm leah nia long now felicia or laid across the street. The lady calls the streets the miss some okay. What about mistake and don't be top. Ding van i love me. Some is jenkins From me and i saw her interviewed and she was asked why she wasn't in the other fridays. The other friday. Okay and she said listen. It was a great opportunity. It was just a little fluff piece. Shot up in there. I did the best i could with it. She said you know how one man you know she said but it wasn't like i expected an ongoing kind of role. So am i orient. Aj jamal was mad because he didn't get into the second one you know saying i mean he was like ice cube. Give me dirty yellow. Pay me fifteen hundred for the first one and then you know in the second one you know what i'm saying when i after i had done all this great stuff you know. He said he was gonna work with me. And i ended up. You know not finding anything until down the street shooting over here. And then i went down there to the senate and they would like make you joe as out here. You know shit going on so remember one of the guys that stand out in first of friday's for me is the guy was like. Oh small gal him okay. All you could see what that's why you get three. That's why didn't get the next one. That's why ain't gonna be in this one. Because he ran his mouth such adds up. Sometimes you talk too much you go around town talking to get back to ice cube. You know what i'm saying. That's what happens sometimes. You just gotta keep their mouths well. Yeah because that'll get you out a few comedians. He challenge cube on a personal level. And you know and he lost. A lot of people didn't like that but people don't remember that cute put him in a coup put him. He talks about you but you forget even a cuban put him in the next friday q. Put him in a in the in the industry club movie in. Oh right. We'd be clubbing. That would put him now. But then you wanna come back and talk shit about. That's right because he was a bouncer. Wasn't your security security got stuck in a car door. And they started put a cigar in his nose. Burkey learning that was in. And you know he you know. His part was big in that he had a pretty big partner. I'm begging you pay fifteen hundred for that. Oh hell yeah so yeah. It does doesn't show about black talent to keep their mouth shut. You trying to say what did you say values. Yeah that's unfortunately it happens. What i'm saying is that you know just local black talent. There's so much talent in the hood that if you got a few months in the just know pull some people you know you can come up with something really good significant just. There's a lot of talent this untapped and that's just an hood. That's a real. We're not the mainstream in controlling. What happens in the movies and media and hollywood but when you know cube was able to do that successfully people. That was thirsty to do whatever. And even the small like we said miss jenkins. She did that a small role shown in the crotch of her her but and people never forgot. How you doing. Ms jinking no. I mean lines from that movie are memorable forever. Yeah just goes to show you know agent jamal twenty something years. Since that time he gonna made his own goddamn moving to say something you know. Nothing at stabbed himself in. If that's your field of endeavor and we expect you to put your ass in place right. Have yourself there okay. But don't i mean because the should i heard someone say about cuba's joe fuck. It asked right jack. Just go sit. Joe as down. 'cause i remembered him from strip club. Movie you mentioned you are wait a minute hold it. He wasn't another movie to exactly. Oh you need to sit down. Well we're gonna move on from that yes saw Speaking of entertainment so we have a couple of losses and you may recall a few people but anyway elgin baylor sports. He was i think eighty eighty two or something like that something like that and are you serious. Not that elgin baylor lakers. Oh wow he was he was he was he was saying early. Like oh my god okay. Yeah yeah he was major major ship. Okay very major elgin baylor. Let's see some of his stats are. Would he was able to accomplish as a achievement as laker. let's see he was drafted the nba fifty eight First round pick His playing career was from nineteen fifty. Eight to seventy one. This is a man that scores sixty three got it. Okay he board. I think in one Game he scored. I think it was The finals whatever like sixty points in a final. Like and i don't think anybody's done that There's a few things he's done but he's had a phenomenal career and he was just a huge elgin. Baylor was always the quiet one. Okay i remember going to early lakers games and you did seem interview very much. You know He didn't he would hang out with Youth organizations that he would get tickets for the game but other than that they never really you know and i mean my father told me to black. Why do black. he's black. Put no makeup on that blast. Okay but that but you know as i got older and i realize it was real dark skin go. Yeah and he was agree. Tap what you mean by that yet because rose darken. No he wasn't he wasn't there dark no get rosy about your complexion also elderly darkening me. He just said about black applied. Skin color is dead. Yeah but no but known. Elgin was dark dark room. What white folks you're. He's a dark complexion ladder and anything bay shit. Yeah he was very good on the court one games. So yeah he game he dragged you. Ask google and you'll be able to get covid knows you. So he scores seventy one points in one thousand nine hundred sixty which was a record at that time. Yeah and let's see it was a team record. That was not passed into colby. Did it in two thousand six. That's a long time. Forty two years right and he's four sixty one points in the game five of the nba finals still still today by a finals record. Yeah yeah how about that joe. You know joe. He'll be racking up shit and he was real lucky he was real. Loki an considered it. When you know late everybody looks at the lakers. Like say in the last ten years but they don't understand it back in his day right to do what he beat their fucking all all here's a. Just to give you idea. Christopher just pique my way can you see. Look like shaquille o'neal or some really okay. No center he play. Let's see garner center he was. Lsu shooter rebounder. Ford ford four or Jim so let's game straight up so So at least he was in ruin martin's laughing me the jacksonville. I t special and seventy one. Oh he was in rajasthan episode. And if you recall. And i know you watch this. The white shadow religion got killed on that kind of that was. That wasn't a coach. Was it now of the players. Oh well afro whatever. That's when it ends the consequence. I can't remember you can't kill the more he got shot in like a robbery at the liquor store or something like that i think the robbery licko star liquor liquor stuff they could still okay and then moving on So in power elgin king elgin yavuz koto after done. That's black more of what about things. You don always paid powerful roles like he did not compromise. He played powerful roles and so yes castaway he was living in the philippines. Yeah yeah it was. Eighty one eighty one lived longtime because he married a filipino woman and lived in the philippines. And you know that was it. But he was in live and let die. Lot of movies. in he was walking starts been nevada blood. That was a the richard. pryor movie. remember. I remember from richard pryor movie. They were working in a factory. Something i can't remember was the instructor the i can't remember the web but he but he was. He was like got in the car and he was just like okay so he was in. Do you remember the movie. Nothing but a man. We talked about nothing but a man ivan dixon and abbey lincoln oak. That's right. We talked about that again weeks ago. Then he that was nineteen sixty four. He was in the thomas. Crown affair the first one which the liberation of lbj jones do you remember that. Nineteen that was a heavy. One is a black movie and that was Yeah i just vaguely remember. But i remember was a serious movie Let's see he was across a hundred and ten th street. Maybe that's what it was. Now that would fit the blaxploitation right. Live and let die james bond. He brought turner. Time was the word boy. I love recent truck. Turner boy as me and i love when i was a little boy. Oh yeah that's right. That was isaak's truck turn okay. He was in Let's see monkey. So that was a blackest. Tation actually with sydney. I think blue-collar that's the movie with Richard pryor he got killed in painting machine used. That's right lock them. He couldn't get out. You remember that. That's pretty good. Yeah that also had a harvey cartel yeah tail in that movie. Yeah really good. It was like should have been oscar-worthy it was. It was very good too. Many blacks to relax um and harvey gadgil. So when a man he was an alien brew by baker rubel that he was in a fellow but there was no commercial release of that And then of these are on into the eighties of pretty kill. I don't remember that eye of the tiger wasn't a round tight movie midnight. Run and the running man. That was a popular film running. Man i remember that one he will. Yeah it was a yeah. We'll see he was a he wasn't a bad guy. He was a good guy he was he was he was ready. Was one running guys and it was him and And fortunately we're reading together running man okay. So that was one thousand nine hundred seven in midnight run. He played a special Fbi agent alonzo monthly midnight run. That was good. That was funny. Wasn't that was the one with deniro. Right cam deniro and it was Midnight run yeah. That was it. Was robert deniro right. Here's a funny movie comedy. Let's see american buddy action comedy starring deniro. Charles grodin koto. John astin okay. Yep and so. That was the end of the nineties. Amusing several fields only naming the ones that He was in a trip wire. Never heard that was lee pit. Oh that's who he played he was in a frady's dance the final nightmare. Nine hundred ninety one philippines. Okay no puppet laster remember puppet master vs okay. I think pulpit bassett was probably the last one scary scary movie. Yeah but anyway so we want to say rest in peace power and on that note. any other Do you have any other. And so on that note say anything about donald trump. He was sleeping nine. Forty two non s recovery. Alright so anyway. That's for episode of the vibe us. And we're all signing out by crew Be sure to like follow share in check. Yeah man out black act own.

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ET - Joe Bonamassa // Butch Walker

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

1:36:45 hr | 1 year ago

ET - Joe Bonamassa // Butch Walker

"The. Since one thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three Eddie truck has been the voice for fans of Rock, hard rock and heavy metal, a bestselling author host of TV's that metal show and seven national radio shows including trunk nation daily on Sirius. Xm Interesting Eddie offers the world. Is News making interviews passionate analysis, honest commentary, and who knows what else so welcome to the any trump podcast? What's going on everybody teddy year, and it is time for another episode of the Trunk Podcast, which is new every Thursday via podcast, one dot com via apple podcast and via spotify totally free be sure to subscribe and get an episode each and every week new ones going up every Thursday, be sure to check it out, and of course. Thank you to goody's powders, we. We appreciate all the support of goodies, and you have to check out their brand new product. It's truly a fantastic product. It's called goodies hangover, and well it's it's self explanatory gotta hang over. 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There's a lot of cool video on the OP as well if you are not yet a listener and subscriber of Siriusxm for my show, trunk nation, and all the other fine content, be sure to get on board. If you're in the US or Canada here on the PODCAST, you're only getting a tiny taste of what I do on a daily basis on the radio. Okay so. Long one -nother double dip. This week will start with job on the Masa. One of the most celebrated guitarist we have today. I've always loved how Joe has conducted his. And conducted his business, he is really done a remarkable job building a massive following around the world for his his brand of Blues Rock. Of course, he also has black country communion. He is a guy that produces other artists. He's an amazing guitar collector. If you're into that world, my God. Joe Has an incredible guitar collection and a real good guy. I guess I I got to meet on a Moscow when the first black country communion record came out. We've been friends since and known each other since and he is just I just watched his career. He started as a kid in a band called bloodline back in the late eighties early nineties, and when I say a kid, he was like fifteen sixteen in that band and to see the career. He's built now and the quality of what he's doing. It's just incredible. A really great story guy who did it his way. No compromise chased what he loved became a master at it and built an unbelievable career global following. Joe Joins US I this week. Talking about his career, a little black country communion a little pandemic talk. A bunch of different stuff. It was great to catch up with Joe. You'll hear that first and then second a guy that I did not know prior to the interview. You'll hear a guy that a lot of people have said to me all. You got to have some time. Be Great if you guys ever connected and that is Butch Walker. And Butch Walker is a noted producer and songwriter is worked with a bunch of different artists. He has his own solo career. He started out in an eighty s hard rock band in the late eighties. We talk about that. He's produced a bunch of different artists. He works in the world of Pop in the world of rock. He's very very multi-talented guy and it was great to spend some time with him and get to know him a little bit in an interview. Quite honestly I could've went way longer with if we have time because we were just kind of get warmed up on all the different things that Bush has done in his. His career, but it's a good starter especially, if you haven't kept up with the things that Butch Walker has been doing in his career, and we touch on a lot of that in the interview. You're about to hear so real long one again this week. Two big interviews we start with bottom Masa Second Butch Walker. And that's what's happening on the Eddie. Trunk podcast remember follow me on twitter instagram at any trunk. There's also a facebook fan page at Eddie trunk that I post stuff on and Eddie. TRUNK DOT COM is the official online home. We will come right back and get started with Joe Bottom. Awesome next on the Eddie Trunk podcast. The trump podcast. America's ready to get back to work, but to win in the new economy. You need every advantage to succeed. SMART companies run on net suite by Oracle. The world's number, one cloud business system with net sweet. You'll have visibility and control over your financials HR, inventory, ecommerce, and more everything you need all in one place whether you're doing a million or hundreds of millions in sales nets, we let you manage every penny with precision, have the agility to compete with anyone work from anywhere and run for your whole company right from your phone join. Join over twenty thousand companies who trust net sweet to make it happen net, sweet surveyed hundreds of business leaders and assembled a playbook of the top strategies. They're using as America. Re opens for business. Receive your free. Yes, I said Free Guide seven actions. Businesses need to take now and schedule your free product tour at net sweet dot com slash trunk. Get Your Free Guide and schedule your free product or right now net sweet dot com slash trunk. That's net sweet, an et Su it dot com slash trunk, net, sweet dot com slash trunk. This is the Eddie Trunk podcast. Welcome back everybody. It's Eddie Trunk here with you on this week, said he trunk podcast coming up in a bit Butch Walker, but first we get started with Joe Masa this week. Enjoy. Joe, how are you man? I'm doing great. Thanks for having me. Thank you for taking the time. We were texting a little bit last week and I said Hey, you know everybody's just kind of knocking around and figuring out what's going on in the world today it'd be great to get caught up a few minutes on the air, and I appreciate you doing it. So how is this whole thing for you man? You are a very active touring musician. All over the world. Were you on the road? When pandemic it? Yes we were we were in our last show. Technically was Milwaukee Wisconsin. And the next night we're playing Green Bay. And all the while we were calling ahead to the venue at seven more shows when this thing started to scale. And we were like. Are you sure you want us to show up? You know because you know. We need to know because it's. It's not like it's just I'm I'm not a soul act travel with thirty people and a lot of logistic. And the first sign that this thing was about to implode was. My crew set up the PA in the life in Green Bay and about an hour, and a half into the morning of the governor called the venue, and said you're done. And then we moved onto Minneapolis and basically set up the whole show in by five thirty the day of the first night in Minneapolis. We were done, and then we just we just went home. Home, and then our entire European tour, obviously got cancelled and our summer, and basically at that point we as a as an entity, decided to to kind of sit out twenty twenty, and and live to fight another day or years. They say we'll. We'll be back in twenty twenty one, which is insane because I've constantly on the road for twenty years and it's. A lot of people that are ro- dogs like myself that are in the same position. Going this is this is crazy not to be able to play live. It's crazy to just be kind of sequestered at home. And not have a mission, statement or plant, you know. What's? About your story and all the artists I've talked to since this is all started. Is You actually attempted? You had two shows. The day half ready to go that that got canceled, so you? You had one hit, and then you're like okay. Well, let's we'll still keep going and go to the next city and see what happens. Then you got to another state and then that got shut down, so you had to shut downs before you actually just called today. which is I think you know kind of unusual. I didn't realize the rollout because it hit. Everybody differently have talked artists who were in Europe when it happened just the timing of it and the way everybody handled it. After one being cancelled. I'm surprised you weren't like. You? You obviously weren't to Spook to say. Oh you know what I'm getting out of here. I'm going home right now. You even you tried to do another one. We tried to do another one. And the thing is if that's part of March we this was the middle of March. This is fourteen fifteen, the the the the amount of information that was available, obviously, the the safety of the fans and the crew and everybody is tantamount to our you know business, and and and me personally, but we. We were doing our very best to discern and like each state had different regulations like Seattle. We had two shows in Seattle. Immediately and they said don't even bother coming state of Washington. Even Tacoma's like but Tacoma was still on. But the out canceled, and you're like we it's what's you know nobody was definitive about? What like here's a policy? Go home. You know what I mean you know it was just like they kind of left to artists discretion they kind of left it up to the to the local authority mayor. You know, Stay Governor City Council you know Health Council of the city. And none of it was, it was very fluid. This situation and finally you know after hours on the phone. You just go, this is this isn't good, and we need to live to fight another day and we finally just said Okay We. We took the buses and the trucks and went back to Nashville, and was like and it was. It was over in twelve hours. And you know we were seventeen shows out of twenty four in and the difference of twenty four hours was incredible. You know because we played Milwaukee on a Tuesday, and got cancelled and a green. You know in Green Bay on Wednesday you know like well okay. There was fighting twenty four hours ago, but now it's like the world is ending, so it was very difficult as an artist. Because you WANNA keep you know the worst thing you can do say fans is canceled day of show. You know what I mean if you get sick or whatever? So if we had to kind of way all of this and then make a decision on her own. And at that point, the there was a lot of ansel playing there was there was bands that went on three four five six days after we decided to go home. Because you know, they were either in Canada or they're in different states, and then finally by the end of that week you know by the twentieth of March Twenty first of March the entire. Industry was shut down. And Joe in addition to all the turing you do around the world regularly, you also do an annual cruise, right? We do, too. We do to keeping the Blues Alive cruises. We did one in February that was great. And then we have, we have one scheduled for August which moved to the following year with the twenty twenty one, which we're really looking forward to be a tall, I mean come on, you know it's like I'm like such a man. And you know again. It's just me half to make sure that the safety of the fans is is is first and foremost, and now that there's a lot more information to decision making you know on. It's it's. It's a lot easier to think ahead. You know it's not easy because you know we have employees. We have band members crew guide. You know my friends in the music industry who hasn't been as fortunate career-wise. Myself are really struggling because their entire summer tour. You know where they make most of the money in the festivals then and you know. amphitheaters, or are you know blues fast or whatever you know, that just evaporated, and they have no source of income whatsoever. For the foreseeable future, which is you know which is really rough in a Lotta, people got caught flat-footed. You know because nothing like this has ever happened. Yeah well, you're right and and everybody. Every situation is certainly case by case I mean for me. even what I do I mean. I've taken a lot of hits because I'm on the road hosting stuff and out there and cruises and festivals. I'm supposed to be in Oklahoma this weekend hosting a festival and that's canceled, so you take your heads I? Mean I'm lucky. I'm not complaining I got this. Which is my anchor Gig? Thank God, but I think all the time and I talked to the to the fans they call. Call this show about this all the time. It's like every artist is in a different boat so to speak. There are some artists that live your detour show paycheck to paycheck. Some have been very successful, and they can tread water for a long time, but you think about the cruise you think about all those people that that work behind the scenes at capacity of putting on a show of of any kind of entertainment, and that's who you really got got a feel for, and I know you actually are doing something. I saw it on the homepage. Your website, so you're doing some sort of fundraising for those people right? Yes I came of this idea about a week after I got home. And you know I kind of started to just take stock in my life and career and I said you know when I was like twenty two years old and we were out opening up for George Sarah Good or bad company or Jeff rotel. You know you know gas with you know we would. We would leave New York City and deadheads in Tulsa Oklahoma wherever the first show was, and we go through about a thousand dollars worth of gas in hotels. And, I decided to start raising money for almost two hundred thousand dollars in the last week and we're giving away. A thousand dollars stipend check. And five hundred dollar gas card because when bands go to rescale and get back on the road. They're gonNA. have to dead head from somewhere, and it's GONNA cost them money to get to their first gig where they can start making money so I call it the fuelling musicians program. And we've had over two hundred act sign up, and in the last two weeks have given away fifteen packages that are worth about fifteen hundred dollars now it's not life changing money, but it just relieves a little pressure from the vows so to speak. Where they had that gas card in their pocket, and they can get in the van and they can they can. They can dead out and do shows when they're allowed to do shows, and you know so to me. The first thousand miles is not hot. And I. You know it's just something to do. Because I have been fortunate, and but also remember those days when when fifteen hundred dollars was a life changing event. You know in defacto tour support to keep us going on the road. You know to get her next show so merch and you know you're when you're when you're not making a lot of money. Playing shows in small clubs, you're living on T. shirts and CD's sales. You're out there in the lobby siding and that money that you get from those sales. Basically pays for hotels pays for the to ninety nine. You know McDonalds value near that you show up at the drive through, and you know and it it it it slowly it works. You know it's not glamorous, but it works. Yeah I've said that to. That's one of the tricky things about all this. When things get back to to touring, and even if you talk about Banter, say at the club level a lot of them make the finances work by going out to Merch meeting the fans signing taken photos with them. Maybe it's a paid, meet and greet. Maybe it's just being by Merch to spike the sales of the shirts, all of those that that extra money can be the difference between making it on the road or not or being a bus versus van, and the the irony of all that to me, Joe, is that all of that stuff? Involves Inter fan. A dealings meaning that you know thrown your arm around somebody and taking the photo shaken the hand at the merch mood. That's all contact stuff which you wonder about when we do get back to shows, even the smaller levels like the clubs. Will people even be able to do because it might be a case where it's like? No, you gotta come back. Your temperatures got to be checked. Goes. Play your show out the back door. You can't go out and mingle and press the flesh, because just not safe to do so. Those are all like question marks for certainly bands at that level. I would think. Yes and you know it is a lot of questions because even. Right now if if if there was a mandate thing, yes, you can go out and tour. You can do whatever you need to do. There's GonNa be a consumer confidence issue going forward until there are proof of concepts meaning that fans go out. People. Are you know seated next to each other? The meet-and-greet happened like like they used to. And and and until there's a proof of Concept Aka a vaccine of some sort or some sort of defense herd immunity whatever you WANNA call. There's not gonna be that level of consumer confidence where the fans are haunted. Stand with you, you know because because you're GONNA go well. This guy needs you know like when I'm on the road doing you know five shows six shows a week. I'm meeting. I don't know three hundred four hundred people a week in the lobby. You know and they're gonNA. Look at me as typhoid Mary going to be three hundred people a week. You know he's sick. You know versus where I was going Oh my God. I don't want to catch a cold because I. Want I gotTa Sing. But you know it. It's GonNa have to slowly read. People have to get confidence that that they go out to a restaurant. They go to a show. They go to both maybe 'cause. That's what part of the whole deal go get something to eat. They go to a show. They go to a bar afterwards there at three different places with people, and then of course seen one concert. You know until people are convinced that when they do that. The world's not going to end the industry. Itself is going to have a very hard time. Getting back to where it was two and a half months ago, and and it's and it's time is going to be the only real, not the no. It's going to be the only. For that is just the proof of concept in some time to see how it all plays out and how you know our immune systems deal with this new thing. That's now airborne. Last thing on their San. Juan talk you about a few other things so as a performer and as somebody that tours the world, and as you said yet. You have two cruises every year. You're all over the planet playing and built an unbelievable career audience and all that. And you've pushed everything now into twenty twenty one. What are you going to need to see as the? Performer. Job on Masa going to need to be told and see before you're confident going back out there again. Are you going to wait for a vaccine? or or would you be willing to do it before there's one? I'm I would like to see a vaccine and more, so I'd like to see the fan experience. Come back to where it's an enjoyable experience you know I was reading an article about how how Disney is planning on. You know slowly reopening their theme parks, and some of the things that they were proposing make the happiest place on earth sound like a nightmare you know. How do you tell small children that that are weighing waiting for the pirates of the Caribbean ride to stand six feet. You know lines that could take three hours to get in. You know that's not a very enjoyable fan. Experience and you're selling. The fans an enjoyable night out, and so there's some money you know, and and you know we get back to the core. Reason why we all do. This is to entertain into. Take people you know. Give them a a break in their daily lives. They just want to go and see rock show or whatever. It is until that point. Starts to get back to where it used to be. To me, it's not worth it's not worth forcing the issues that to me. It's a square peg around hall. Now there's going to be the frontiers men that are going to go out and I have to work and I don't care what it looks like and I'm not sure how long. How. That's going to affect their business and for how long you know, so we're just. We're playing a very. You Know Long Ball. Wait and see kind of kind of strategy because. Ultimately we want to keep our fan. You know and I don't want people to come up to our show in Cleveland Man. That was miserable. I to get my temperature taking it was like getting a physical, and then then I'm now allowed to sit. You know you know six feet away from my white it. That doesn't sound like fun. It doesn't sound like. The core nature of why we do this, yeah, no I agree with you I but I really think it comes down to for some of these artists whether they're willing to take a chance on doing something like that. Really you know what their situation is. If we're being honest, what what their businesses I mean. If you got these guys out there that they can't at the lower levels, they can't make making without being doing some sort of Gig. Even if it's weekend, warrior stuff, and for them that that go week to week and month to month on on money. Money they're either going to have to find something else to do, or they're going to have to throw a little caution to the wind and try whether it's playing a drive in movie theater or playing these shows a young artist on last week. This Guy Travis mccreadie. He did a show in Arkansas. He made news because he was just simply trying to do a show. And they set up these fan policies and everybody was six feet apart, and all that and I've talked to him about it and it just the review that came out of that show was like well. To it was two hundred. They sold two hundred tickets and an eleven, hundred cap theater and it. It felt cavernous empty. The VIBE wasn't there. So there's all sides of this. It's really sort of hard to understand and I think everybody since it's unprecedented is trying to figure out what works for them. Yeah and it's been be. You know it could be an artist. You know choice going forward. You know you want that you want. The fans have a good vibe, and that's the whole point you know. The fans are to me the the the last fifteen percent of a great gig. You know the ban could be on, and and the the crowd could be quiet, and and then the band energy goes down conversely the band. Could you know I've had nights? Where I'm like parable? I can't believe I'm making GONNA. Say, and but the crowd is so into it it. It lifts you up, okay? Let me. Shake this off and get into gear and the crowd. Is Part of the show. You know I don't think I don't know if people realize that it's the reaction, and the and the and the vibe in the room is fifteen to twenty percent of the entire of the of the entire show. Because it's just you know, everybody wants to create that moment in France and comes alive. You know where the crowds just electric. Why we do that, you know yeah, yeah, yeah, that's a great point. So, we're talking about all this pandemic stock again. It's a big question. Mark for everybody and Joe is said that as far as touring and playing. It will resume hopefully in twenty twenty one for him but Joe. Let me ask you in this very unusual time for you to have all of this time essentially pretty much a year at home. What are you GonNa do are you going to be working in the studio? Or are you writing or you recording? What is where's your focus going to be as far as having all this down time without being on the road? Well in the short term I'm producing a record for the Great Eric Gale Who's a wonderful guitar player. In one of my yeah, you know best friend. We're GONNA. Do that in September, and then we're going to. You know part of everybody's strategy to pivot. Our new record, which is coming out in in October, we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA set up sound stage in Nashville and we're going to get the band back together, and we're GONNA. Do a alive pay per view. Do the records in its entirety to kind of promote the record, and that'll be the false. Tour. And so you have, Joe. You have an album in the can then. I haven't album in the CAN. Probably, we've we've finished in January London. We recorded Abbey Road. Studios and so we're GONNA. Promote the record and you know do this live stream, and then I'm GonNa. Start another record in January because I still have material from the Abbey road sessions that we didn't get to. And now I have nothing but time to kind of write a follow up to that. And you know so at this point you know when we do resume touring. I'll have new material, so be like it'll be like a reboot of the act. You know what I mean because it's not. We're not just going to pick up the settlers where we left off and go okay. This is the show we were to do. In Green Bay one that got canceled. It'll be like a new you know. Be Almost two records in the can at that point before we even play a live show again, which which would be interesting because you know, give the fans of new experience, and and it'll it'll look. It'll sound different, and and you know. Again we're in the entertainment business in the ideas to entertain people and keep them interested. So! Are you feeling so then? You're feeling that barring anything catastrophic happening, come September, you're going to be comfortable traveling because obviously live in l. a. you're going to get to Nashville and putting the band together and being in at least in in in those spaces and even producing Eric's record. Are you doing it actually physically in a studio or you going to do it virtually because I've talked to producers who are producing stuff over like zoom for artists. How are you going to tackle that? We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA. Do it in the room. you know, and we're GONNA. Make sure everybody you know. It's GonNa. Be a very small group of people that are involved in it and you know everybody will sign off on you know Abyan healthy and bbn comfortable in the room and you know we have to wear masks will wear masks, and and and you know. Take take the most precautions you know you. You know the you know reasonable pragmatic precautions. You know they're not you know you know. Be reconciled with it and you know why you know. The studios are GONNA. Be Open in in You know I think in the next fifteen to twenty days in Nashville and they're. They're already doing some sessions there. And you know my my studio buddies, or they're sitting there with their gear masks, and and you life is slowly. Returning to normal you know in certain places in the country, and and you know still lockdown in New York and California and stuff like that, so you know that's that's the tentative plan, but again everything's flu you know, could all change in in twenty four hours. You know and you know in March when it happened, it was like a real life while this is crazy, you know, but everybody's prepared that all plans are soft until we actually actually do this, you know so I. Don't I? Don't WanNa, do zoom record I think I'm old school I i. I still think having kinetic energy in the room players playing. And playing music that not you know latent doesn't have latency. You know you're depending on your Internet connection, so we. That's the plan going forward now. If something happens, that's my you know. Rendered moot and we don't. You know we're not gonNA do it then. We'll just keep sitting it out and wait you know. Wait for a save time to do it. You mentioned a guy like Eric Gals who years ago I worked for his management when he was first signed to Elektra as a young kid. I think he was like fifteen sixteen and I know he's fallen on some hard times over the years I saw him not too long ago, though playing on the experience Hendrix tour and we reconnected a little bit and. Even back when he was a kid when when when I was first introduced to him like fifteen, sixteen, an immense talent just a great great talent, and I wonder like for you. You started super young, too. I mean that that bloodline record. How old are you on that? I recorded that record when I was four in the to my fourteenth and Fifteenth Birthday. yeah, so I was. I, was I was. I was just we were kids. You know airs a few years older than me, but we used to run together like you the club circuit. We're all you know. He was signed to Elektra and I. You know we were on Emi and you know we would do shows together in Alabama and Georgia and. You know he's been to me a cut above his creativity onto guitar. He's a monster. And you know my job is a producer for him is to get them some songs, and he has a great singing voice that you know I mean a lot of us. Guitar players get known for just playing guitar, but he's A. He's a great singer and my plan is. is to showcase how you know great singer and artists. He is total package so to speak versus just you know, deter you know. It's Armegeddon from track once twelve. You know I mean everybody knows the play you know now we're gonNA. Get Him you know. Let's let's showcase his writing and singing and the artists that that in their sales think to me is. One of the best I mean it's just he's terrifying. Good on on on all fronts so. Yeah, that's what I was. That's where I was going with that. I know that you had that long of a history with him. Because the the parallel I'm drawing. Was that you both started incredibly young, and and for people that don't know Joe Your your story with bloodline I? Don't remember exactly who else who's in the band, which is kind of ironic because i. don't remember the whole idea about bloodline is it was like a celebrity band? So at the time the vacuum out which I think was ninety four. You're the guy that nobody knew that was part of that band and now flash forward twenty five years. You're the guy. Everybody knows this part of the ban. It's funny of that. Yeah I, it was. It was funny because in interviews back now I remember you know you know you know radio deejays journalists asked me, and it's like okay, and and who is your father? 'cause we were in the the the band consisted of You Know Berry, Oakley, junior, whose father was very ugly from the allman brothers. Waylon Krieger father's robby Krieger from the doors. Eric Davis is probably the smiles. And then go, who? Who's Your Dad and my? You know you're a fifteen year old. His name is lent. Right there. You know like like he's not A. Clarity like from UTICA new. York you know works. For manufacturer you know. So you know it's one of the things you know it's. It's funny. You look at Twenty Five Years Twenty six years. You know back when you go. Long journey you know from you know. When when I was signed to epic records and I met Tom, doubt, and then I did solo records than meeting, Kevin Shirley and then everybody kind of collectively starts, remember my last name, and then my you know my association and you know being a member of black country communion. You know more of the Rock audience started to you know. Recognize my last name, so it's you know it's been a great. It's been a great journey and you know, and it's just to look back at it. Because I've had time to look back at my history and I was like. Wow, this is a pretty unique career you know like. I'm paper wouldn't have worked. You know if you told her back. In Ninety four, the Pudgy kid with the cowboy hat who will one day at the overhaul? They'd be like I'm not gonNA. Take that fat. You know I'll I'll. I'll take sides that against your best you know so. It? Just wacky how it worked out! Well you can say wacky you know, and maybe you're not comfortable saying this, but I will because you know I followed your career for a long time and and I think it's it's built on E.. You mentioned earlier your old school. I mean what your career is built on is old school values. It's been great and at the top of your game doing things the right way know. Know having great people around you, and it's not built on a one hit single or some flash in the PAN or some social media, scandal or nothing it's just built on hard work and putting the work in and touring, and and getting your craft to the point where it's in an elite class, and then building a fan base that has a trust in in what you're doing, I mean. It's it's remarkable when I get a lot of the British rock magazines and stuff, and I'm always following things and looking at things, and even though I don't know the venue or have never been to the venue I'll know that it's a prestigious venue and I'll be like damn. Look at Joe I mean. Playing here and playing, they're all over the world, and it's just so great to see because it's just built on your steadfast commitment to being the best, you can be having the best people around you and I think that that is not only a testament to the work you've put in, but it's. It's just a testament to the fan base that you built it. They've they've come a long and they're at the point now. Where like what you give them, they're all in on for the most part I mean and as an artist. That's got to feel amazing. Thank you you know the the thing is I feel fortunate? That I was able to build my core fan base pre social media. The old school way I mean it's total marathon, not a sprint, not a hit song, even though I have a song that my fans need to hear on the live side because they just go back that many years. And I feel fortunate that I'm not a social media. You know Looking for the right word, but I'm not I'm not a social media artists in the sense that people just didn't come out of nowhere on Instagram I was out there, basically selling brick and mortar out of the back of our you know out of the back of the band for many years, and that's how I built the core fan base, and you know it's also. For me, you know it's very rewarding to see that because you know I I believe it or not like of all the side projects and live records have forty three albums out. I mean it's it's you know off it's. It's it's. It's a strategy that we had just like you know servicing the fans that like this time music and you know they buy know everything from my new studio album to live at the Sydney. Opera, house and you know they just they. They liked this kind of music and I'm again very fortunate that they've come along this journey with me for now twenty years or more. And Joe Correct me if I'm wrong on this, but from my from where I sit as an outsider here, it's always seemed like in England. They've embraced the Blues and Blues Based Rock. At a larger scale then maybe here in America especially for. Guys doing it like when you started out of the gate, and even now like a very blues based rock bands like a band. I love like rival sons did way better and got way more claiming England. Even though they're from Long Beach California so do what are you? What are you pick up on that like from? You're a big supporter of the Blues and I know you've got. Keep the blues alive and all that stuff that you do. Why are you having toward so much? What do you think it is over there? That has built a base for that stuff. I would say between the the UK Germany, France. Spain Italy even Scandinavia there. There, there's an appetite for organic music. You know and they're alive. They're alive culture. You know they go to events where in America, early on, it was very challenging to get people out on. Tuesday night in Des Moines. Iowa you know where a concert in you know? BRISTLE UK? You know people that let me go. Check this guy out i. i read something in the. The you the newspaper. I read something in Classic Rock. Magazine, or whatever and all of a sudden you get a thousand people, two thousand people I've thousand shop, and you know, but started with two hundred people in a small pub. You know, but it but it it caught on quicker, and then when I did the royal overhaul video that the DVD in two thousand nine. PBS picked it up here in America and all of a sudden I'm you know Radio City Music Hall and without a hit Song on the radio and original. Leap British they thought I was British for like ten years and I'm like no UTICA NEW YORK. I'm like and it's just been you know again like acts like the rival sons. Sometimes you have to go find the audience. I break somewhere. You know, and then come back is is the trump in hero. You know where you'd be. You know be very frustrating to to try to like WHA. Really just need to be big in America. You know and we're GONNA. We're GONNA. Keep pounding pavement until people catch on, you know where you can go over to the UK which is a much smaller space. And but you know there's sixty million people there and if you can get some traction. Get media, attention and it all I it starts, you know the the it starts to scale, and it starts the snowball effect you know, and that's what happened to me. You know it was the UK Germany and all those like tours I would do. We went to thirteen in a row of their. You know what I mean. It was like you know you could make any money so in order to pay for the hotels. You're doing every night and there was a Bavarian beer hall somewhere in. You know you know outside of Munich. That would would would book you for two hundred and fifty euros, and it would be Kinda fall. In front of people you know, and and this kind of music you just gotTa. Get it in front of people, and if you can do that, and and and play with that unbridled enthusiasm and it, it will work out. You know that's why that's. Why did you know those guys like Tyler, Bryant, doing and you know? They they're fighting the good fight because they. We're not gonNA. Just you know concentrate. All of our efforts in America we're GONNA go find audience, and then come back. Is You know conquering heroes going? Where have you been for the last thing he goes well? We the working you've been we've been you know hustling and building an audience in territories that maybe aren't as quote. UNQUOTE ROMANTIC to to be big in, but your big somewhere. You know there's a big crowd of people they love music. You know it's a universal. Yeah. There are some great emerging I. Mean I'm really encouraged by where we're going with some of these artists that are coming up I, mean it's really hard for them. Because you got to put the time in, and you're up against a model now where because you know, labels are are or are not relevant depending upon the situation, but there are so many of these I think the problem is. They're just so much out there. It's kind of hard for the consumer to find. Find them and find out what's good, and what's not you mentioned? Tyler, Brian, I, don't know if you've heard. Jared James Nichols. I love what he does. Yeah there's so many there's so many of these great young players in an artist more importantly for me as a fan keeping it real because I despise the movement of bands playing a tracks and tapes I love real plugged in music, and I think a lot of these guys are going for that, and it's really exciting for me. I just hope Joe that there's enough people in the world where now I mean you. You came into the world with bloodline, Ninety four fourteen year old kid now in twenty twentieth somebody starting out there up against like literally everybody pump and stuff out there and it I think it's just hard to get a spotlight on it to number one thing I hear from people just like we just okay, there's so much. How do we find the good stuff and what's real? That's I think the biggest challenge today. Yeah it is you know one of the things you know we had jared James on our our crews in February, and you know it's quote, unquote a blue's clues, but he rocks harder than anybody, and and what's amazing to see is an audience that comes. Primarily the myself and Buddy Guy, and and you know some blues artists were just into you know jared James Nichols, and we had the the one of my favorite band of all time living color on on our heart crews have ury and they were. They were in there. You know are always like this is great. In the proof of concept is is that fans of live music? Fans of Guitar based Blues or whatever? They don't just listen to Blues Music. They listen to all kinds of music. They're hip to mountain hip to JETRO tall hip. To you know it's. It's not just one space and one of the things about you know. Breaking through in a very crowded field is if you do you do? And don't apologize for it. People will take notice and may take. But when you own your own lane, and then it finally kept his on. You own your own lane. You're not out there. Copying is like you said you're not out there. Going vocal sound incredibly in tune for a live gig on it, and it's like you see a Mac book pro somewhere on stage. You know like get out. You know. Because if you listen to some of the great live records who live at leaves, and and and you know francine comes alive, and you can. Just you know humble pie rocking the film of all those records. Harz a Lotta tune. There's a little pitchy thing here because it was real and the human the human nature of it all people. gravitate to stuff that's real and authentic and they don't necessarily are. Why they like it, they just go I. Love this and I. Don't know why you know now. What one great point! Well yeah, well just going to send the life thing it one of my all time. Favorite live records is strangers in the night by UFO and I I I interviewed Ron, never knew produced that once, and he told me in the Song Rock. Bottom Michael Schenker makes a mistake when it comes back into the riff, and he got in a huge fight over that. That with Shankar because Schenker wanted to fix it, and he wouldn't let him fix it and and I'm like, but that little mistake, which I'm not even guitar player I can just hear it. That's become synonymous with the greatness of that record, because so few of those records truly were live to know that that was actually how it went down is crazy to me. It's great and you know and there's a bunch of kids but a flying V in the room. Actually earn the Solo note for note in copying the mistake if you sit. Dot In time you know by the way. Did you know that I- i- addition for UFO. When I was eighteen years old and I didn't get the GIG. that's that's crazy to me. I don't so you did. You. Did you did Mitchell? Le Fonds. PODCAST and I guess you told this story and Mitch knows what a big UFO Fan I am. And he sent me a note and he was like. Did you know this and I was like? No I didn't even know that you lost the gig of anymore. I lost the GIG rightfully soda anymore. He was the right Guy but I did I drove out in Utica New York to Columbus Ohio go to Pete, Ways House and I sat and Pete Way Basement with Jerry Shirley from humble pie me and we went through all the UFO classic and Pete was the one Pete Way was the one that turned me onto free going. You're Vibrato is very much like Paul costs off and I go. What's the Paul Cau-, so he was responsible for opening me up to this entire new world of free, and that that really great British Blues. Rock that I was like. Wow, this is this is what I want to be when I grow up so. I didn't get the GIG, but I got A. Collegiate level lesson on the British. WHO's rock? You know the of the late sixties early seventies, so it all worked out and it worked out. While you're good joe feel. I didn't look too far I think. Honestly. Vinnie's so good and so right that. Makes Sense Yeah. For sure. Yeah, it all worked out for everybody. I think no, no, no, no question about that with man. I could talk to you forever, and I appreciate you taking some time we'll have to when things get back to normal and hopefully get out to la. Because I was going out monthly, we'll have to connect in come. Sit In and do do a whole show. If you have the time last thing before I let you go. You mentioned black country communion, which of course I love Glenn and Derek and Jason Everybody's staying busy with their own things, but do you have designs on wanting to do another record with? Anytime. We had on the books We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA attempt to record You know in in January, twenty twenty one The time line got push back so it'll probably be year from there, maybe at the end at the at the end of twenty twenty one but yet we're. We're still ban. We saw text each other and talk and stuff like that and you know. Glen I listened to Glens new track with the Dead Day. He's I thought it was great anything he could sing. He could say a recipe for lentil soup and I'm a fan. You know what I mean, so it's like. It's. Crazy, it's crazy about this. How about this one real quick? Which I'm sure you know saturated any had him play on his last record, but not saying. Right. Base great behavior. Joe Joe's like jogos goes. Everybody gave me shit because they're like. You Got Glenn Hughes on your record, or you're not having him sing with that voice. He nope. That's exactly why I wanted to do it because I wanted to you, Kevin Shirley said this to me. He goes if the guy wasn't blessed with with such an incredible voice at kind of overshadows base plank. He's a great player. Great Bay play. mean. He plays. He has his own based style in his own sound, but he is directly. You can trace his influence directly back with James Jamerson and Andy Frazier. He had that he has English. Jamerson thing and then a force that he just unleashes burn, and you go. Okay, that's fine you you know, but he's a very sensitive melodic bass player that is overshadowed because he has one of the greatest rock voices of all time, but you know. Those are Cadillac Problems Eddie. Hey listen man I gotta run. I appreciate the time. Hopefully we'll do more soon. Stay safe and keep me posted. If you need anything, you need to get the word out on anything you know where to get me and great great catching up for a bit Joe. I, really appreciate it. Thanks for having me. Anytime man take care all right. Thanks to Joe, Bonte Masa, great conversation with him, always good to catch up with Joe and a lot of cool stuff happening and he is working now on producing an album for Eric Gales. We were in touch recently, actually just prior to that interview and I'm going to be on Joe's podcast, which is called Nerd Ville, and I'll be on that coming up in the next week, or to keep an eye on twitter at trunk, and I'll let you know exactly when that's going to be airing. Okay, we'll back interview number two on a big podcast week. Butch Walker is next. This is the Eddie. Truck cast. Hey Hey hey, this nfl hall of Famer Ray. Lewis I'm excited to announce the launch of my new podcast every day. CRIGNIS Ray Lewis podcast. I'll be talking with friends. Family members ole teammates, athletes, celebrities moguls and guess what I'll be talking to you. Listen. This is all in the search. For everyday greatness, so I'm asking you to come along meal. This ride down low new. Of everyday greatness, Ray Lewis podcast every Friday. On spotify apple podcasts and all pot has one dot com. It's not what you have is what's inside of you? That accident spires greatness. Is the Eddie Trunk podcast. Eddie trunk back with you without further ado as I said earlier in the Open Butch Walker as the second interview this week. Butch is a guy of never talked to you before. We have a bunch of people that you know. We know each other mutually and all that, but we just scratched the surface on his incredible career, so butch Walker right now for the first time that I ever interviewed him. That's kind of rare for a guest here at least for me here on this podcast, so enjoy some talk with much right now. Hey Butch good to meet. You, too. I'm trying to trying to figure it out before. I did this. Have we ever met her I've ever talked to you before I can't tell. We've been in the same room with each other, but we never broken the ice, so. I've been I've been backstage at certain shows that you were backstage at. I'll always be like. Oh, there goes, but you know it's like you're running one way. I'm running another it's. Hard to stop, and and it makes the introduction but You. Know I've been I've been song you for a long time I'm a I'm a fan of your brain. Well. I likewise mammoth fan of what you've done for many many decades and continue to do and I knew that we had to have some. I know we've exchanged in email or text in the last year too, but I know that we have so many mutual friends in in various bands in the business that it just feels like I've known you even though we've never really done this before. Where are you now? Butcher you in La at the moment. I'm kind of. We're kind of you. Know sequestered here in in California, My kid goes to school here so he still doing school for the next few weeks. online of course but we're we're. We're out here on the on the west side. must studios in Santa Monica and luckily get to commute here every day and still work I'm in my space now, and it's this where I've been making my records for the last five years in this particular space and. It's good because I work a lot in I work a lot in isolation so This is nothing new for me in. You're one of those artists that you prefer to to do everything and work singularly by yourself and get a lot of your stuff done without people around. It depends on the project. Yeah, like like if I'm working like say with a solo artist which I do often and I'm I'm the band then. It's great because I'm just here recording everything myself. I! Kinda engineer. Everything myself anyway, so it's Kinda just a kid being left alone in his sandbox to do whatever, and so it's good, but when I work with bands and record like lives, full band set. Set up in here then it's. It's a little bit more chaotic, but we're in between that right now and I'd say that's a good thing. Because of just how nuts it's been you know so it's in. Everybody's been a little bit freaked out to travel or be in a small room with each other so right now, just finishing up a couple of records for people and and then I got a record that came out last week and And then I'm just you know getting ready to possibly dive into doing more green day step while they're sitting at home. Yeah. Well, I wanNA talk about all of that actually with you, because of course you worked with Green Day recently. You've worked with Weezer you. You worked with a as a producer and a songwriter. I mean a wide variety of artists in pop and rock and I. It's amazing and congratulations on your career man, what you've done is just simply incredible, but going back to the the production side of things, ju. Just before I was talking I was talking to Claus from Scorpions and he's in Germany in the record they're making now is with the producer Greg Fiddle. Men WHO's based in La and he told me that they were doing like zoom sessions. To for him to sort of listen to what they're working on and sort of produce from. Virtually from another country, have you found yourself doing that sort of stuff as well whether it's even whether it's writing which you do, a lot of songwriting people or producing. And it's mostly been the producing thing you know lately? And so that being said a lot of what I've been doing This is not this isn't really a new technique for me. Because even on the last green day record when we were in the same room with each other, you know billy. He's a very accomplished studio guy they all are. And so Billy has his own engineer Chris Dugan up in the bay area and a lot of times. We would just be sending files back and forth for songs I'd be like okay here. Let me put something on it. Let me try this. Let me arrange. It will do this, and then you would be with with the advancement of technology and digital and digital recording everything. It's so much easier. I the other day I did a session on on zoom that was like alive. Tutorial thing for a company called universal audio recording, software and You know they hadn't Lincoln from their computer. Where literally audio was feeding into my right into my multi track recorder and vice versa with microphones. You know in a fancy. Set up here and it can be done now. It's a little bit it's. They still got a little ways to go, but man. If you would try to do this shit five years ago ten years ago, it was not really even possible so it in a way that we're. We're living in a good time. I guess for something crazy like this to happen. If we still get a music done you know in. In recordings, but as a producer, do you do you find him? And I hear from people have different different thoughts on this both artists producers where some are like there's no substitute for being in the same room, looking each other in the eye, and the the vibe of just you know being on the floor and playing, and actually doing it like that, and then I talked to a lot of people are like. People on their records like I never even met the guy. So you know there's there's that world out there that wide as as a producer. What where do you fall on that? Way Prefer you know human. Interaction that's that's just I'm a people person I'm not one of those guys that grew up smell, solder my whole life and can't talk to somebody. I liked to talk. I like to communicate with people, and I love fellow musicians and artists in breathing in a room and getting shit done as great But you know there's plenty of times where I? Just have to do that way. I've made a record with somebody who couldn't. Couldn't leave the east coast because of some some help situations, and so in order to get the record donate had to be done where they would send me the vocals, and I literally would create the whole track, and then send it back and go back and forth until it was done and yeah, there was never hardly a a a setting foot in the room with the with the artist all on that record, but You know right now at a necessity I'll take it. I'll take whatever whatever it takes to get the product done and get the get. The are out I'm happy to do it however and explore all technical. Abilities right now. But you Walker is. My guest is new album, which just came out? It's called American love story. We'll get to that in a second, but butch I want to go back for a second here. I want to go through your career a little bit from my my. Audience because I'm sure you have a lot of them. That are fans, no, you and then maybe some that off the name. They just don't quite click, but. I want to start all the way early on because my audience. Being so into you know eighties, seventies based hard rock. You first came on anyone's radar in with your first band south gang that came in like ninety ninety one ish, if I'm not mistaken and that was really your first thing. Why do you think that band didn't go the distance? Do you think that it was more to do with just timing? Because maybe you were just a couple of years too late. The scene got smashed by Nirvana really quickly. Absolutely I mean you just answered the question? It's pretty much you know came out to La. We were kids from a small rural town in Georgia north Georgia mountains and we went straight to the sunset strip in eighty eight and. A year later we had our. We had a record deal with virgin records, Charisma Virgin records, and we were you know on our way, but the could smell. The clock was ticking because there was all this new surge of music and style shift in cultural change, and everything was starting to you know. When we were young, we were only like eighteen nineteen years old, so it was A. It was a it was a learning experience, but also we wanted to be able to at least get out into the world. What we what? We came out there to do, which was playing melodic, hard rock in a van that was influenced by. You know everybody you can think of at the time you know we were. We were equal parts. You know modern aerosmith in that moment in as to you know. Who you name, it Bon Jovi. Everybody that was on the radio or anywhere that was our influences, because we came from a small town where that was, all we knew was what was on the radio in in on MTV and we dove headfirst into it by the time we finished a record, and by the time we finished. You know making the big crazy expensive video with with the big video director and the whole nine yards that that was just like the tail end of. Of of a lot of those bands getting signed, and so we still we still manage to. Drain during the blood as much as we could for two albums and tours, and did you know we went full force? But I think you know. We were struggling internally as well as far as like being able to agree on things. We were growing as kids. We were just kids. We started. So you know that's a pivotal time when you're. When you're going in your early twenties, and you're mid twenties, and then you start you start just kind of figuring out who you are, and maybe that doesn't align with all your other members. So you, so you did what so many did at that time you literally up rooted small town in Georgia and moved to La for the dream right? I mean you went and you were looking for the MTV of that era and wanted to be part of that just like everybody else in you. But you went forward I. Mean that's A. That's a big thing I mean you. You packed up length for it, and although it didn't happen with that particular band it's. Gutsy Move I. Mean. I'm sure you went out there and knew nobody in had nothing right? Nothing I mean you know I. Tell People that all the time now, and it's not like an old man. Get off my lawn kind of way. It's actually it was awesome. Having no Internet and no you know no computers and no technology to tell you the future, basically until you what you were getting yourself into into, prepare you to teach you lessons like everybody. Younger generations learn on youtube now everything but We were out there just like we literally only have like a couple of friends that moved out there, and that's all we had to go on. Mike was to hit. These people aren't going. Hey, man, what? Where should we live? What do we do? Where do we go Howard? How are you promoting? What are you doing? Who Does your? Your who's doing the WHO's doing your band? Photos know global by was like who does your printing for your flyers? It was just all literally just taking it in our. Our little brains were just exploding with soaking up information at that point you know and it was I i. thought it was amazing. Because at that point being blissfully ignorant is what gives you the courage to do it. I think knowing too much now at my you know in learning too much on the Internet about like what you're about to get yourself into. You might spook yourself out of doing you know. That's a really good point. I never thought of it like that, but you're totally right. To refresh my memory with south gang was desmond child involved ever. Absolutely he was he. He was okay so when we got signs, we weren't we. We were really dead. Set me especially on trying to do whatever we could to get. Desmond child involved because he was my favourite songwriter that point, and like kind of like my became my songwriting mentor as far as how do how to do. He was the guy then. Yeah, he was the guy and he he still is the guy. He's the man I love him. We actually he was just. Just on the show recently, I just had him on talk about his career. It's incredible. Yeah, yeah, it is incredible and I mean the long story short. We we got him involved. He wanted to do the record. He wanted to executive producer and Co. write it and we were completely fine with that 'cause we wanted that kind of experience to go in and write. These songs were there even though when you're a kid? You think you already know everything but. I kind of knew we were still. Spring chickens when it came to Songwriting, we were too young and inexperienced, and so we go to his house every day in Santa Monica Funny Enough About Three blocks from my studio right now we will go with his house and we would We would set up there in the back room and just go through all these song ideas, and he was just a machine man. He would just like he was, and he would just yell at you and. And scream at you and tell you that sucks. This sucks. You Know He. He was definitely crass in and crude and honest and I love that because we'd never in our lives, you've been in the same room with another rider, little the biggest one in the world at the time, and so it was a great, it was a great boot camp and you know years and years later after a falling out. Of course you know after that record and. Never, speaking again real for years I ran into him with my family I ran into him at a airport. A you know at the. Airlines Lounge. and. Go into national and I see this guy that. Guy Looks. Familiar wasn't desmond as it was. But I was like what does that look like this? Guy Curtis that that that always answered the door when we went to Desmond's house. And how do I have that in my memory? That was like that was like ten years ago at the at knows like twenty years ago, and so. Whenever! I saw him need these. He had these two little little boys with them and then next thing you know I look over the distance. And there's Desmond Child, and I put two and two together that him in Curtis were now together. That was there that was their boys, and I walked over to Desmond and I was like. Desmond as you're not going to remember me, but it's it's butch. Walker, we did a record time he he interrupted me and got up, and just hugged me and said I've been following your career. I'm so proud of you blah. Blah Blah Blah, and it was just it was like it was so heartwarming for me to have that like rekindling and we. We went to dinner at their house that night with my family, Anna just got caught up and went to his story. Which I'm sure you heard plenty about, but like and it was a wild time and you just. It's cool that we kept in touch and and and rekindled that friendship. Friendship because he was, he was my boss man. That do taught me everything about right see. This is exactly why brought that up? Because I was curious about that. When I look at your career, you're an artist, yourself your producer and you're a songwriter that's worked with everybody from Taylor Swift to seven dust, so it's like the gamut. Green Day weezer everywhere and I I would imagine as an artist I, mean that's really what you strive for and what you're going for, and if you look Desmond's career, he's done the same thing. I mean from from Ricky Martin to South Gang to Aerosmith to whatever, and then now he's performing again himself he produces. Writes whatever so really it's. It's all consuming and I was just wondering if if that was an influence on you given how your career has progressed. Yeah absolutely I mean, it's set the rules right away. There were no rules in there were no boundaries about like who you could work with what you could like. What kind of box you had to stay in you know and between him and Rick Rubin I think those are the two guys that like. That proves to me that there. There's no walls man I mean you can. There's good music in every genre, and if you want to be involved in it and produce it and write it. And try to make something out of that and I think that's great I mean. I grew up on radio in that was that was like pop and rock? Metal all of it was the the bands that we were influence. When we when we moved to La, they were all just playing basically hard rock versions of Pop music, and so it just ruined it s it just made sense to me to be like. Oh, I feel like I, no problem relating and working on like this pop artist as well as this metal artist, or as well as punk artists. Because there's a you'll find, there's a common appreciation in all of those artists at they all love pop music you know in all shapes and forms. It might have a different haircut and different pair of pants on, but it's you know it's still pop music at the end of the day. Can you still hear me again? So you're so you're good. If if I take another twenty or so, is that okay? Yeah, man. I'm having fun. Okay cool. What are you working on now? I'm finishing up a record for a solo artist. Out of the San Francisco named Matinee and Senate just did a new wallflowers record. We just finished mixing and and I produced it, and then I'm getting ready to go in and do some more. Green Day. I know I. Know Matt. I had mad on when I was doing that metal show we had him on. WJR hard round. That'll guy yeah, and you and I both sit around and talk about it before we recorded lovely acoustic ballad. DEF LEPPARD tribute album. Yup he turned to Joe Yeah and there's that and then. You know the the craziest thing about the wallflowers. I gotTa tell you I was in an airport. And, speaking of running into running by people in the airport I don't know Jacob. Don't want at all, but I I guess he knows me. He knows he knows as much about like hard. Rock is as any of us. He's drunk, well-versed please. Tell him I send my regards because somebody told me that he told someone that he. wrote came up to Iran or walk by me in an airport, and I sort of like bloom off which I never did. Anybody all I can think of is the. You know and. The Hustle and Bustle Airport. I don't know the guy so it wouldn't have been like. He stopped me. I was just been like. It's funny that after I heard that story, somebody's again talk to him. And he he he was running or something, and I was just like I. do remember like ten years ago. I got past somebody on the curb of the airport on my. Kind of look like Jacob Dylan. It's like one of those things, so I love talking rock with anyone, so please yeah I. It was nothing that I personal at all will know and by the way no, he listens to volume a lot, and he probably listens to He. He's probably GONNA. Be Listening to this because he he's up I'm telling you he and I both. He's he's like me and Matt talking like Weasel Seriously. No all the same music, so yeah, well, I said there's definitely A. I'll tell you what we'll talk. Can. You can mention who you're working on records now with his goal, which is out of course hadn't. Well Yeah I was just finish up a record for Matt. Nathanson who you've had on on on your show before. He's even though he doesn't make hard. He's a huge hard rock fan. I Know Matt Grow. Early I appreciate that more than anybody to because of the same reasons, but i. just finished wallflowers record as well. That's GONNA be coming out and Jacob He's a he's also a big Fan and listens to your show, and also I'm sure he might be listening to this. As we speak well I. If that I hope that's the case because I was telling you during the commercial break. Somebody told me I don't know through a secondary channel or something that I encountered or walked past or something Jacob in an airport a while ago and didn't realize I honestly didn't realize it was him. And if I would've I, would've left to talk to him about his band and music in general, so Jacob. If you're listening, you'll get my info from butch. I'd love to have you on the show and talk rock with you any time, so. That is when you're running through airports and you're like. Hey, wait a minute. There's I was in lax this just happened. And I know Kirk Hammett from Metallica well, and they're a guy in the hustle and bustle of the airport. A guy walks by me. And, then he's you know. He's got a hat on and sunglasses, and he kind of bolts by me really quickly, and then like a minute later as I'm waiting for my Plano Mike. Kind of feel like that was. And I note on my phone and I know him well enough to text him and go. Hey, pro. Are you at LAX by chance? And he's like? Yeah. Why go eat just blew by me? Hell of disguise. He's like. Why are you say hi next time I? Go I didn't realize it was you till after you're down another terminal so anyway, that's hey. Times so many times air the airport Chaumphol Yeah I've done it before. Many times happened all time. So let me ask you about the band after. You had South Gang, which is marvelous three, which is interesting in that three quarters of the band morphed into marvelous. Pretty much, and here's what I find really incredible I love power pop, and I love what you guys did on that freak of the week. The minute I heard I was like. Wow, that is so killer. And in all honesty I did not really know South Gang and those records, but marvelous three. Yeah. I was just like wow. When I heard freak of the week I was playing on the radio. I was into it, but you guys pulled off something that tons of bands at that time were trying to do and really couldn't do and that is. You know as well as anyone. If you came from that eighty seen so to speak, and you were branded as that, which south gang was a part of even though you didn't have you know big success. That that was like a scarlet letter like you couldn't get arrested in the business if you're a producer if you are a writer, photographer and artist. I lived it when you. When that scene changed, it was like boom everything was wiped out, and there are a lot of artists who tried to do a reinvention come under a different name, a different look, a different sound, and have a career very few, did it? You guys did it with three quarters of the pet and got a major label deal at Elektra. How did you do that? It was really funny. Actually because we you know back point, the Internet was just starting to become I mean it was already in play, but it was still in the the. It was still in the infant. Stages of its of its relevancy, you know, and in ninety eight I. Guess people just didn't put two and two together or didn't care to. All, it shouldn't fucking matter right, but I agree completely at the same point labels you know, have a bug up. There is about a shiny new penny and make an be another youth obsessed and everything else that comes to so We were taken meetings left and right because of the week starting sergeant played on the radio from. Leslie Fram the program. Director of ninety on accident. LANA WHICH THE ALTERNATIVE! Alternative Rock Station started playing the shit out of it, and all the sudden all the labels that were avoiding US started like flying us out and offering us, everything to sign with them, and it was really funny. Because you know. We went and met with these labels like we met with Wien at interscope with You know universal and all these other labels before we decided on going with Elektra. At the time, and it was funny, because we had just sat in meetings with these people less than you know less than ten years earlier, for or getting sign woods shop gang. And of course, none of them recognized us no one we were still only twenty seven years old, or whatever ish at the time, but like that it was enough to be like okay a short hair now you know different different image completely, but at the same time same guys out of the Saint Free bandmates out minus the singer from South Gang. It was three of us, and we would sit in these meetings and it was so funny because they would you know I would be sitting there. Going okay would let me. Me Tell you what it's like when you get signed. What's going to happen every a band and we would just be kicking each other under the table going holy Shit I can't believe nobody knows we've been through this. And then some and it wasn't like we didn't talk about it in anybody ever like mentioned it and put two and two together. We'd be like yeah, that was us. You know and one one particular meeting was really funny with rich universal. When my buddy great hammer, who runs red bull records now. and I'm still really close with and I've worked with his. he was one of the kids at a college radio station used to play us all the time on when we were in south gang on the east coast and. He was like a college Dj and then He was so big into marvelous three by early on like he was trying to get. Doug Morris to sign us and Doug wouldn't touch us. He would not. He tried so hard he would fly us out hip us out and everything and finally when we when we had a song on the radio, and then of course ironically, Doug Morris, goes, go get him. You know so he goes in. He takes us out to dinner for like the tenth. Time Greg Hammers taken us out to dinner. He'll get a kick out of me. Tell the story. It's funny. I taught many times, but he's A. He's sitting at this dinner with me. Jason slugged from marvelous three also from southgate, but we've never brought this up to him obviously yet, and he we start talking about about like the old school metal days and he goes man. I was a DJ at a college radio station. In there was another band out of Atlanta because we were from Atlanta, and he goes. There was another out, of Atlanta, I so much. I had him on my show. A couple times I was obsessed with them and man. They were great. As you know the study like talking about how how Great Guitar Player was and all this stuff and I was. He. He said he said it was disbanded. Called South Gang and we're like. Yeah we. We've heard of those guys. And then, and then we're sitting there kicking each under under the table and I finally looked at him. Greg and I said Yeah. What was that Qatar players name? And he goes I. Don't remember I said it was something like there's something like butch. And then I think the basically was Jas Jason sitting at the table and saw at the table, and then he just looks at migos. You son of a bit and he decided. He liked. He lost his mind, but it, but it was all in good fun, you know. Because it was yeah I mean unless people lived that scene and I. You know I'm fifty five. I grew up in the business I. Started and right out of high school, and worked for labels and worked in artist management been in radio since the day I got out of high school, and and unless you lived all that stuff I don't think people can appreciate just how brutal and completely unfair. It was to any artist associated with that scene trying to. Do something different and and evolve in their careers I mean skid row became known as a been a try to ban called ozone Monday they called themselves and play. I mean everybody tried something Jason. Bieler from Saigon Kick wrote a number. One wrote a number. One Song with love is on the way and then a year later. The scene changes can't can't get arrested. He became something else. He had a couple of their bands under different names, but very few get any traction with their. Even it was almost like they had a supress and hide and be ashamed of the success that they had had before, but check. Check this out at this is the funny part is when marvelous, three outside and rock was at an all time high in the late nineties like all of us found each other, the bands that were the little orphans from from the hair metal scene, right? We found each other because there was plenty of them, and it's funny, ended up becoming really close friends with most of them, even working on their records later because I remember, we got on a festival with the guys from the band lit as they were riding, they were riding high on their single and I was like God. Why are you guys look so? To me, you know, and and in hit me and I was like razzle. You guys were in a band called razzle on the sunset strip when we were on the sunset strip used to pass you guys flyers out every fucking day. And they were like yes, and that was, and they remembered us to, and we that was a common bond, and then same with Jay Gordon for an Amir Dirac from orgy. They dot. Dot We played. We played twins of festivals with them, and that was some of the guys from rough. Cut James to hang out on the sunset strip before he was even he wasn't even a singer. He was just a guy with long hair and look cool and was hanging out in front of bizarre. He's every night and we would sit there and talk to drink out of our flasks and and then up. A little called Weezer. Because that was a band called Zuma back in the day icy them. They used to roller skate up and down the sunset strip with bath towels on and handing out flyers with sticks at Gum stuck to him for all the flyers that they're handing out to all the girls on the sunset strip. It was so funny, but that was rivers Cuomo. Yes it was all the same time. Even my manager was in a hair. Bundle my whole. Jonathan Yeah Electric. That candy. I don't know if you know about candy, but before those. Are you kidding me. That's like we I'm equal parts. Candy Electric Angels. That's my. Power pop and hard rock, yeah! Yeah, exactly you mentioned you mentioned rivers, and and it's funny because I've been trying to have this conversation with him and maybe one day it'll happen, but I've had multiple. Call this show and say he's a listener. He's a fan used to watch that metal show and he. I've read a bunch interviews and listen interviews with them. He's totally in the metal. And I have no ide- said he used to be a shredder like inveigh mount stain tribute and it was like. My mind. I got to have this conversation with this guy. He's another one, so it's. And if you think about it with Weezer, a pretty I've seen weezer live, pretty heavy band with that pop melody, but there's some serious guitar crunch in that band. Oh, yeah, man I mean. It was like it was like hard rock. pet sounds you know. It's like an and that's his influences. Is influences are like everything from from like a lot of like the eighties hard rock to nineties, grunge and also seventies. You know Beatles and cheap trick and. And Beach Boys and so yeah. He's he's a fascinating fascinating human being. To say the least I, bet, hey, before run out of time here with USA just going. You've made a string of solo records now, and and obviously the unfortunate thing about marvelous three's. It never really went the distance, and you didn't really have the huge breakout success with that band, either but then. Needless to say, you've had tremendous success in in the years as a song writer and a producer as a solo artist yourself. You've got a brand new album out now. Talk about this record because this is interesting that you've decided to do, what's essentially I? Guess, would you? Would concept record be the right way to to describe it? I mean I've listened to it all the way through I. Know you've got things that connect stuff and there's some some narration marrying. There's different stuff going on. Talk a little bit about this record. It's a really cool record. Thanks it's. It's like a power pop rock. Opera is what it is, so it's like I. Put out this record that sounds like all of the stuff that I was listening to on the radio in the late seventies early eighties that mirrored my childhood, my youth around my age at that time, and what I was also seeing around me socially. going up in a small of rural southern town, and so I made a record about it because I feel like there was some stuff that just needed to be talked about without you know without getting preachy or whatever it is, it's not a record. It's a very. It's kind of a bittersweet love story about hate and. So, I just made this record with these characters that were based loosely on people I knew, and also myself growing up in those experiences that I went through so yeah, I guess calling it a power, pop, or rock, opera or whatever you WANNA call it. That's kind of what it is. Have you. Have you ever done a concept or rock opera? SORTA vibe before if you've ever made a record like that. I'm. Called the rise and fall of Butch Walker in the let's go out tonight, which was just a? Play on the on the ziggy record and but it was not as much of a it was a theme, but not really a story. You know this is actually a story with characters and everything. There's lies in love and death. N- everything in so it's a it's a whole thing, but I you know I. Start I made the record two years ago and sat on. It didn't do anything with it. So I'm I'm just glad I put it out because I didn't even think I was going to put out because I thought it'd be a really strange thing for me to tour on because I've got a fan base that. That I I love. I love my fans. Because man, they've been Whitney a longtime through thick and thin, and it's all ages and you know. There's thirty years of of material that I call from when I play shows so just don't wear to go like oh I'm GonNa have this. This rock opera is GONNA. Be Weird if I take a couple of songs in just put it into the out of context with a bunch of her songs in its companies be played from beginning to end, because it tells the story that way otherwise it's got some pretty crazy lyrics. That would be making sense to people. I don't think so. Are, the divine intervention happened of this Pandemic sitting everybody at home on their ass, I was like well. I guess I should just put this out. You know because if I was GONNA have a weird time touring on it anyway. Maybe this just the best thing for me to do is release it and I'm glad I. Did you know I've been man up in getting a ton of a? Fan Feedback in. It's been all amazing in. People really appreciate the story, so it's been been really cool to hear plus I got destroyed on it. Yeah you're some killer Solos on it. Man I listened to. There was some distrust. I made a note of a couple of them that I loved there was. Well some of the tracks out out in the open faulk, it. Of course, it's just looking. Yeah Yeah exactly and I'm looking at your website and people can learn more at Butch Walker Dot com, but looking at the site and I. See this that there's a film you did a fill. Is this the full album with video to it? Tell me about the love story film. Yet it's it's just a all it is is kind of like a glorified music video lyric video. It's like a it's like a video video. Visualize her. Basically in every song is in order of the record and go, and has characters and kind of just gives you just a just a broad visual. That's not very. It's not like a detailed movie with dialogue but It does help piece the story together and Plus It gives you the lyrics at the bottom like a good old fashioned lyric video so that so that you can kind of you know, make sense of it because it does get a little this concept, a little tricky, but yeah, it's it's cool I'm people people really love it? So I'm couldn't be happier about it. You know I'm pretty proud of it. As a songwriter. How did you feel about writing something? That was one central theme all the way through versus each song being a standalone thing, is it easier or more of a challenge to look at something as a full peace or ten individual songs? It's hard I. can't I mean I can't imagine how hard it must be for people to actually write screenplay, or you know for for anything like Broadway musical or a movie? Anything it started just with the theme of me like I was writing songs that had a common theme didn't plan on making anything, but just a regular record, and I sent the demos to my manager, and he would just. Jonathan would say sounds like you're making rock opera concept record here I was like Oh, I wasn't planning on it, but I am now and so so I just started really concentrating on coming up with like a story and characters, and basing it on a lot of my experiences from my youth and. That's when it became what it did, but it would. There was definitely no reason to to do at the time you know and like I said I started on this two or three years ago and sat on it after about a couple of years so. Well, everybody can check it out now it's it's out now, and you can go to Butch Walker Dot com to see the film that we're talking about and learn more about everything that has that Bush has going on, and really in the time that we've spent here, which is about forty minutes. I mean just scratching the surface of your career and all the different people you've worked with and when I get out to L. A. and. And things get normal again like you said it was coming out every month. We definitely have to connect and hang out and I'd love to have you in studio. Sit In with me and my God. We could tell stories forever. Man I'm telling you. That's one of the reasons why I was done. We never got a chance to meet earlier because like I think. If we got caught up in an airport, probably miss our flight. Probably true I, I think so like I I'm only. This is only the start of where we could go with all this last thing and then I'll let you go of all the artists you've written songs with or for what's your biggest because we've talked about? We've talked about marvelous three and south gang, unfortunately, not going the distance, and not getting the big success, neither of them were commercially big successful that bans, but clearly since then you've had a tremendous amount of success working with other people. What's been the biggest one so far for you? Well the first thing I ever did was ironically one of the biggest songs, and it was a complete lark Kazai. Did they wanted to put me with a with a team pop girl to to write and produce songs for the record when I just come from doing basically metal and punk demos in my in my know garage, for for people grow all through the nineties, and then had the success with a with freak of the week, which was limited success, but enough to get on the radar, and then I started working with other artists like I did a song that got bigger at alternative for a band called s star seventy one, and then after that I worked with this pop punk band called simple plan and and did a song with him, and all of them were on this girl's radar, Averill Levin, and so they and they they hit me up about working with now is like well I never thought to do that, but but cheerless try. Try It. What the heck you know! And I got together in and Co. wrote a couple of songs and produce some and Nixon, you know. They ended up on the record, and the first one was atop tune called. Don't tell me and then the second one went straight to number one in that was a song called so much for my happy, and then all of a sudden I got a lot of calls. From a lot of pop girls, but that and then later in life. Also the fall out boy song my songs know what you did in the dark It's also called light him up that that was a that was a big. That was a number one song that I had Co written, and already had kind of had the demo for it actually before I even met with the ban about making the record, and it was actually in mind for somebody else, and they were like. No, that's us. We're going to do that. And and then that ended up going to number one and kind of putting that band back on the map which I couldn't be more proud of, and now we got Green Day. That their song that just hit number one. I was really proud of that, too, 'cause it's not every day that happens for a guy. You know writing and producing it. There's a lot of dry. Spell's in between, so it's It's been very spread out and appreciated too, so yeah, yeah, well, butch. I gotTA. Tell you man on all of it. It's you know again. This conversation was long overdue and for a long time. My audience has been saying you know. Man. It'd be great if he got butch on there every once in a while and I was like I love to. And then I know we went back and forth a couple of times, and then I saw the info about your record like this might be a good time and I was literally honestly holding off on doing it because I wanted to do a full show in person with you in the studio in. L., A. and I don hopefully that'll happen soon again and once they get back out there. We'll still do that, but at least wanted to kind of touch base and check in with you and. Have Yawn and just give a little overview on your career, which is truly incredible and I congratulate you four so thanks for the time. Thanks man. Thanks for having me. I love your show and always been a fan of listening to you. And so it's all stuff I love you know thanks I know like I said we got more to do. We're GONNA. Get to it for sure so good luck with the new record is well and good luck and say hi to all the clients you're working with. Many of them I know on the ones I. Don't send out my best. They're all welcome to come on any time and. Again I appreciate a be safe there hopefully I'll be out west. Soon. Okay take, care brother. Well thanks to Bush great visit with him. And thanks also earlier to Joe Bonte Masa and thanks to you for listening subscribing each and every week to the Eddie Trunk Podcast, it is greatly appreciated, and of course thanks to Sirius, Xm, all the interviews you here on this podcast originated on my daily radio show trunk nation, only getting a taste of tiny taste here on the podcast. If you're in the US or Canada, please join me for my daily rock. Talk Show with all these interviews. Interviews and a whole lot more everyday live to four PM, eastern time on Channel One of six volume, and of course replaying every night ten to midnight, eastern and full shows on demand anytime. You want on the Sirius Xm APP. Thanks Kate Eras Ari. She produces this podcast for me every you guys have yourselves a great week. Listen on Sirius Xm to me every day and be sure to connect on social media as well and I'll catch you next Thursday for a new episode, Take Care. Ohio.

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BONUS: Conversations 7

The Lady Vanishes

35:58 min | 2 years ago

BONUS: Conversations 7

"Hi, I'm Alison sandy soil. Bronze label and welcome to the seventh edition of conversations. Sally is taking a much deserved break today. So we, we are wishing a well, and we will hopefully be joined again next week when she's feeling better. But we are joined by editor in chief of the lurk career, Australia in France, while victime did I pronounce that right, Francois. The perfect also. Not quite. A lot better. When you say it, so I thank you for joining us, won't you Francois invites you. We're going to completely ruin your language here, but. Nah, thank you so much for coming on board with us. Sorry, I just wanted to we wanted to get you on here, obviously, because we've been talking a lot about you'll publication lately. And this, this is something that you've been doing for three years, can you tell me about the Likud area strategy and being the oldest foreign newspaper? I understand foreign speaking newspaper industry. Leah. I'm very the breadth of the your investigation bring you to local Kellyanne because local your history a threat. Each was launched eighteen ninety two and I just said, he's to the longest running for eight language newspaper straight massive newspaper twenty seven years old, and it was very from themselves integrity, the French-Speaking community Australia, and exposing also the best of French culture lifestyle. So that that's very important here. And the story of the amazing because thanks to some off because of the newspaper decrees to the French, French belt's gonna the consolidate your friends use the Jacobean sunnier as the official all after prayed. So, you know, during the World War, Two, the newspaper was the only one to say, okay, we are again on and now we all official newspaper install in. So we've ever read over the weekend, we speech from a child to gore to the friendship and community until today as you said, we, we, don't the newspaper three years ago, only digital versions, and we, we have no effect because we have Steelers is. Of the issue because these newspaper, he's reading such reminding of the French culture, you know, strata that's terrific. Well, Brian, can you give us a background at how we will lead to liqueur area? And everyone to check out the, the whipsawed, it's, it's a great to newspaper. And of course a very topical for strands at the moment with the women's World Cup and ESL bodies, breakthrough winning the French Open, but now our interesting Likud Australia, goes back to nineteen ninety four. And since we launched this podcast. One of Ellison is tracked down actually through the national library which keeps digitize dot cons. We'll publications in stride yet tracked down a personal personal advancement placed in the courier Australian in December nineteen. Ninety-four. Bonjour f-. Kill a forty seven year old man toll Brown haze single cultured sophisticated looking for a woman for a relationship with the view to possible marriage. Now that obviously jumped out at us because the name kill is extremely Ray. And of course in naughty, naughty full before Google. It's one it's ninety simply wouldn't have come across in mopping. He only mentioned anywhere ever in Austria. Of these nine before I costs. And of course, it's the nine that Marian Bonte chose to change her identity to a month before. She disappeared in nineteen ninety seven she Chines tonight floor, Bella Natalya Marian rim kill so inlet data at us now we've been drawn to get hold of the institute. New Francois for a number of months, but we haven't had much luck fondly. We got hold this week, and it's just a position to maiden told me can you tell us the previous on album is still alive and deny Cape? Pipo records of who might have placed ends with the old print version of the newspaper. As you said, all your cards. Cheese has their leaking. Okay. So I have a copy of the addition of the Don. Default. So she wants to one not, you can have it as a original one. I'm gonna come down straight. After these just up the right among place. I'm gonna come down straight up this and grab a copy perfect because he talked to increasing in this capacity. I don't really own, if you can you can see we was protection history. So it was chess or done, and you can feel so people walking them in some men could help and also the story, I both the brand we've I'd be. He cool three years ago. We don't share with super. All the fusion. So we brought to the widow of the former owner of the Rideau is still alive. So the for the former the former run a has pasta why. Yeah. Unfortunately. The newspaper between two relevance for them seventeen. So we still have the details of this lady, and we will try to, to contact her to see if we can do something. And I think that the owner was before has been the director that you can see that the name of the on the newspaper in the bitch sitting probably the connection together, and maybe you feel it he'd we'd have some recall of classified. So what was it? Do you know what the back in the nineties, and I realized, you know the last three years in its own line now? But back in nineteen note the distribution was it was at just in Sydney. No, this region. Was in Sydney mainly all of all around us. Yeah. And you could write for overseas to issue on the fussy fish, or even Europe. So this story. The newspaper and this is what we try to do again this year, we have thirty percent of our radio coming over from France, Belgium, Switzerland Canada. So this, this is the objective of also inform. People abroad. What's happening in a stray? They want to come here to raise. So I want to come here to, to do a business endeavor relatives in Australia. So was it subscription only back then all what, what's the no? So there subscription you pay for your subscription. I quite quite cheap and distribution through different library here in Australia. So some big library, NewsRadio yet they had every week or every month in, in the shop, you could buy. So it was quite throughout the issue was not as big a can expect I think, but I'm not sure it was between two and five thousand copies. Fees. Ed francois. Because it struck me as an unusual thing to place in personal advertisement. But I simply looking for wife how unusual is that top embarrassment in the in the print edition? That was quite common. Each other newspaper in and we've seen through the story. That's a at the beginning of the sensory nineties. There was some message. Okay. Both is coming from and on all you have these family until you the only way to recall, the what's happening. Yeah. If they are there or not messages, okay, I'm the family of this lady would like to know if she went arrived in Australia. So there was always this type of connection, and the newspaper is, is trying to create bring a bridge and create this connection we've over the people. So we had a lot of, of classified is like that. It was for Puteh and you said. There's a lot of friends ads like that. I've seen on the same pitch. You have a lady fifty years old, but on the thing. So looking for softener to threat. So that was very common guy. Well, it's very interesting how you got into it as well. 'cause your actually technically not French is that correct day of Belgian? Belgian French speaker. I'm just I'm just two kilometers from the, the French go. I'm over most French depend on the two. Well, end a bit of a sterling because you've also got married in the strategy. Yeah. I, I was lucky to the my wife and Australian eighty in Russell Tovey illegal. So, of course, that's very way phones. Very near Luxembourg. We'd just returned from Luxembourg in the lettuce in beside of living of the lady Venice's you can hear about troop there, and how we treks down a person we were looking full with the name rim kill. But. What I'm really looking forward to it saying if the widow of the former Arna has kept records of who might have placed that advertisement. So we'll what we bite at breath. And we'll all listen to snow is as soon as you find out French wall, and she's living fitness. So it's quite quite close Capitol Hill. We give you all the details on. I hope that she can help. You're gonna she doesn't have over each child. She helps to say okay, I know people who had to whatever have pretty. If you've listened to this story, you know, it's about how unusual is this case, the disappearance in Marion Bonda? What do you might go? Using story. I just heard about it for few weeks ago, because I received some message from France and ill thought we all speaking about the Korean with choline does the broadcast, and so I take note of the story, and I think it's very emotional, and I, I would like to know what's really happening with dismember tumor number we 'cause we don't know if he knew something if anything that was very interesting. And I hope that we would have a rookie end in this story. Thank you very much. Number of things upon their advertising from Luxembourg and Huxley. We'll be able to bring you some, some of those onces say, stay with this France-Soir because we're going to go through some of the other aspects every week, we will update will we do update our listeners through conversations on where we're at. And, you know, we obviously episode eleven which is just fame published on Monday had a very strong response from audience prime extraordinary, and I think we're up over two billion listens. Now, I think that half of Ellison is in the United States and Europe is really has crossed all borders and has peaked the interest of all lines groups of because it is such a unique Kayce this, this been an upsurge in for want of a better tune trolls, on social media Ganley for whatever reason onto get online and get nasty. But we're more than have we big enough ugly enough to, to handle that. It's. Fair on Sally of gotta say, she's she's had to deal with this for twenty two years. Bicycling hoffy lawf-. And if you can imagine just the hot Bryk, and the, the, the difficulty in living with not knowing what happened to your mom to disappearance, baffling and disturbing circumstances. And to feel that you're not being listened to, and that you're not getting the hill that you deserve if it will mom mom, if we'd your mom anyone listening, if your parent, ask yourself how far would you go to find out what happened to him on Sally's been living with this, and she really has pulled himself out there, and unfortunately, that means she's vulnerable to the idiots who feel it's their job to tear other people down and tell the difference, eight Brian, they some people that and criticism fine if people when I just I look at our new growth out or whatever there's a respect for why to base is paper that just Kate going, and going. And so in, in the woods villain, generous bay NAS to each other. That, that's all we're, we're not Gary. I'm pretty sure that was Jerry Springer. I know it's. Every show noticed if each other, and we're not getting anything out of this. We will die jobs. We're doing this because we want to help Sally, and because it's an it's an astonishing story, and because we think we can, we already have found a number of onces, and we've ruled things out. We've come a long way in the non months, we've been looking into this and we think we're going to find out what happened to marry him, we think we're getting closer and closer to finding out, so please Benassi, which other be respectful, and, and hopefully Selley will gather a self and bounce back next week because she certainly shouldn't have to put up with any of the nonsense that we've seen by and, and to other people, you ego to remember, it's a story ta to Sally. It's her life Cy as as Brian just said, you've got to be respectful of that. I mean, this is she's put it all out there. Taking a big gamble on finding her mom through this this avenue and it won't happen. I have an eight we weren't, they less than three months. So, you know, for. Us to have all the answers in, in less than three months is impossible, but I can tell you now there is some stuff happening and some information, coming forward that, you know, even develop it's in the New South Wales civil and administrative tribunal and acro. Neil inquest -application that is going to go a long way into this. We talk about a lot because it's still before the hearing, and it has made the documents haven't been lodged in an cat. But yeah, there's a lot coming so stay with us. Plus, we have the petition at change dot org. So please go and sign that we've got more than half out. Target already I think we've got quite a six thousand haven't we run. And we're hoping for ten thousand signatures, and that's to get marrying Bata put back on the missing persons register listeners will recall that Marianne was taken off the register guy to go. But it's almost decade ago because the police investigating this New South Wales. Police have made the determination the resting on the assumption that Marion chose to disappear and he's not one has not been in any danger. Now, this as we've shown is remarkable assumption, and frankly, doesn't match with the evidence. We've uncovered so at the very least having him back on the missing push individuals to triggers, a whole new protocol, the thing, that's that's confusing. The issue is the report think three weeks ago that the New South Wales museum. Police unit has been suspended because of the. Lack of action on a number of long term missing cases. I think a report in the News Ltd pipe is talked about boxes of binds lying around that hadn't been tested against deceased people. And they issued a statement since the place signed, they conducting bronze review to work out exactly what form the new missing persons bureau will take. With sort of hamstrung a little bit body bureaucracy in the south wells police around what they can and can't do at the moment, we hugging that will be resolved soon, and I can't help us because a good place offices lot, detective, Gary Sheehan. And he's been on the case for a decade, who I think genuinely does want to help and does want to help us get onces. But it tastes it. He's, he's handed by legislative and supervisory restrictions on him. So he's hoping that we breakthrough that bureaucratic wool, and that we once again, get the help that the place can do prevent people long. Sally. And I just want to just touch on that as well. I may not settling again. Not can't talk about we the the tribunal. But. I did get a little bit of a hint of something that Gary hasn't been up to tell us that may be forthcoming when we're able to discuss it after the hearing or informal agreement which hyping to Mike as well. So I will say how we guy, but I'm gonna move on to question from all Ian X Victoria police officer, which I thought was a good one to us. She says hi that has investigating Sajjan done our mess. Check on the phone number listed in the advisement from f- Remco. I'm not sure if it's cold the same thing, and you South Wales. But in Victoria, it's essentially a search on a phone number that should provide who owns it. They dress of where it was listed to dight said it was in order, etc. From memory wasn't a payback that was listed as the address and the ad because place should have done a such similarly to the phone number. So of course out the answer is we don't know because new cells place point. Tell us also because way discover that at one discovered that Ed Troy. Rolling through the national lumpy mistrial. So I placed wind aware of that. And as I site, such a unique nine doesn't exist anywhere in a strike that we can find and get the nine Marion judges. Hold it at a Finney pretty good. We'll creatine it. And that, that is an irresistible laid. So it's on the list of things we're offering the place to check. But as it stands, they sighing way appreciate the coverage that the seventies poed constellation advantages and all the work you'll doing to help Sally understand why her mother chose to go missing, which is heard pulse diamond, but away are happy with the investigation that has been done, and we will leave this in the hands of the tweets hit investigators who are the experts and no further action will be taken. Now, that's that's obviously. Deeply frustrating for us and. It's heartbreakingly frustrating Sally because we've got a list of some very simple checks that the place only the police can do. And we've asked him to also range out today counterparts in the United Kingdom and Luxembourg to do some of these simple shapes because those requests sliced shakes can only come from the New South Wales police and the answer is not we don't think we're gonna ball, the we're not gonna do it off, frankly on a metal lost to understand the activity and I'm a huge fan of the police. I do a wonderful job by. Whatever is causing this inaction is something that can be resolved very soon to everyone's satisfaction because there are a few simple things that can be done that could take the loan Y towards finding the answer Celine's looking for one thing, I will say is I know that Gary, Shane is listening to the podcast. We, you know, he has confirmed that you've gone, and I know also that he knows about the ad so. I don't know whether any action has been taken as a result of it, but I have been cooling, that number we have been calling that number a lot and hasn't had result. But from what I can understand is that it's Abella number because I rang like I've changed digit slightly. And I've got a gallon of business. I that seems to be what we know so far. Navarine soi is I mean, you've you mystery fan is something that would have paid your interest. Anyway, do you think other than the connection to Correa? Australian. Do I, I was thinking of something even if it's not official health news think, because as I said, before we are more than thirty percent of radio from Belgium, and France and somber as well. So maybe we speak about your, your education. What the case you couldn't open some those? So I don't know that could be useful in maybe you can have some some context and formation about a story to be good. Good to do an interview with Sally. So we'll, we'll check with Sally, if she's up forward and maybe you can do with Enron something full Kuti, Australia. And that would be wonderful way, would appreciate that. Thank you, France. That's very kind of. And hopefully, you know, obviously people that didn't know listeners who went aware of this publication can stay tuned by getting a subscription with you, is that. How you doing? Subscriptions will people just go online. No. It's just just online so feeling good newspaper. One vault with a French and English, I would say in, in English it's easier than look we were to. Right. L A. You come, and then you were right on on the newspaper. It's free. So we want to do it was also the had the yamba your phone for our mission is to, to, to bring the connection between the two communities mean we don't want to, to subscribe, the payments for all the information yet, so it's totally free. There is no premium subscriber. But if you want to help us, we are walking on the huge and message project. He's the book book ready team history come on three between from metro yet kind. And so you would have a two hundred fourteen pages, cutting Ed, you shouldn't we voted picture of the original article, so that could be something amazing. And we are planning to, to launch in October. That, that's something that I think it's much easier to, to showcase the friendship between two communities. Speaking of interviews, Alison, the other media now becoming more and more interested in the lady vanishes, obviously, we face it, the podcast and the story on seven news. And if people wanna see what happened in lots of big Goto, seven news dot com, that I you forward slash delighting vanishes. And you can watch the twenty two minute story showing the trip we took and just you can say just from watching that, how taxing zone on Sally, the titular just an extraordinary trip that we, we spent in the UK and Lunxembourg and other media round becoming more and more interested, which is great because it wasn't our audience and introduces us to more people who can join the army of listeners helping us on all this mystery. And today, just a moment ago actually on spoke to Christmas on radio to GP. He have listened to this. There's no doubt that the public's fascination with true crime stories his strong as went outside of the public on the world. Particularly when. It comes to podcasts. Now, he's been a lot of time lost you following and speaking with those involved in the teachers pit podcast by Hedley Thomas from the strategy, and as many of my colleagues did, as well this new podcast that's making wives. And a lot of people are comparing the two it's cold, the lady vanishes, and if you thought there was a lot of mystery and unanswered questions in the teachers, pay white did. Hey, this one it looks into the disappearance of Gold Coast, mother Marian Bader who hasn't been seen since nineteen ninety seven. She was an incredibly passionate and successful teacher. She was even nine best teacher in Queensland shortly before her disappearance. She didn't quit a job. Suddenly, she sold the Hon and decided to head over to Europe for a year long trip, a decision who two adult children supported Marian was single, but had been married and divorced three times. It was a dream to travel to Europe and she wanted to rot on the express, but shortly into her trip, she stopped making contact with her family, not long after her passport was reported as re entering the country. Now Marion's due to Sally is never given up hope she spent half alive trying to find out what happened to a mother at in particular, using social media weapons and techniques to do so, and Nash's hyping, it by going public in this podcast. She may finally get some answers because I tell you what, there is some answered questions, the police in particular need to respond to the light vanishes is a podcast by seven news, produced and written by Alison Sandri had presented by Brian say mobile, all the twists and turns associated with this investigation, probably too many to mention in an interview, but we'll, we'll give it a shot interest. Save more than two million downloads Cy five. Otherwise, the lady vanishes, which gives you an indication of how compelling it is seven years, investigative journalist bronze Simone joins me on the lawn right now. Brian, thank you for your time. Chris, it truly is an incredible mystery you withdraw into the story following Iran twenty Joni looking for your father. Is that right? Toronto ward of the state and Masa had a number of similarities. Marrying Bonte, for instance, when I found him by going on enough, right with Andrew dance authentic, eventually by going through public campaign like Sally's trying to win these phone calls. But I discovered that he changed his nine four times. Mary net four nines maiden name was marrying Wilson. My father's name was Raja will, and there were other spooky similarities, but yeah, said, it's one of the reasons I've down was asked to join the team McDonald's in sandy and heels as the teachers pick going public with these mysteries and bring up some answers, which I guess, is what Sally is hyping full. What does she think happened to Marian? Selley don't know, none of us know, we're hoping Marion's we've seen to these right now. And then she reaches out Sally fees that she might have been foul play. She doesn't believe that she chose to disappear. The police have assumed that, that she chose to this, because she changed to nine date, Paul several weeks before taking that FIFA Janney naughty, naughty seven. But the, the extrordinary thing about that is the nine she chose how you naked. He's back in nineteen ninety seven pre Google in here resistible not to believe that she was directed to choose that night but was flora, Bella Italia Marian rim kill rim. Kill about one hundred mimic goals on the planet, and it's such a random time and such a ticket nine that recently led us to Luxembourg, which is down one of the leads on covered in through this investigation. So have you got any idea as to wash it would change your nine before going on this journey? Well, there's a number of theories as the brace have. Aimed for a long time that she tries to change off and walk away and start a new law, under a new identity, which some people where if you people do now, having said that whilst nightside, I've ashamed that, but I've also went and said to Patty because I go to, to phone crumbs. Stop is ten years ago that she was mooted and buried in a panic. And so I went up to show how suit I our about that at something, and there's no evidence to support that assumption. I have never saw naked and under their own protocols. You have to physically sought some owner have a distant if or a coronial funding to assume that they are no longer missing. She saying to me in a real hurry, didn't she brought she sold the house for listen? It was worth. They when she was advocacy. She sent postcards and birthday presents in my regular Kohl's. Stop stop very abruptly. You did. And you know, really. The behind you was contradictory to someone who is willfully onto disappear as you say Mike in Kohl's in visiting taking to restrict down down a man during Roger drew out for dinner and Tom bridge will down to broaden before simply vanishing, and then someone kind back to a strategy the Diop's she lost to Doha on August. Second nineteen ninety seven under these nine floor Bill era, mckell under that possible that possible. It has never left the country since that's what police tell us now a number of things might have Chris, she might have been acting under the coercion of. I did person or group. That's one of the lanes, we've investigated in the poed confidence, one of the strongest leagues we've uncovered out millions of listeners have joined down Fitch, and I've uncovered some unbelievable evidence, including an advertisement placed in a French train newspaper, naughty, ninety four five, Mr. Aram kill now. It's, it's, it's the prevailing theory that she might have been acting with another person who. Was ineffective controlling hit, because when she did come back to his dry. She or someone using her onto entity drained almost one hundred and twenty thousand dollars from, hey, come Bank account by going everyday for three and a half weeks and taking out five thousand dollars a day long. What would you do that? Why don't you just say twenty three transfer the whole lot? Well, wouldn't it be logical that if you only transport transferred five thousand at a time wouldn't ring alarm bells, and you could do that without being notified and alarms going off in the Bank? Well that that's, that's one theory. And it's been with and potentially the reason why. Yeah. And then it emerged that she changed the name to this remedy kill, and you followed that through as well, the possible reinjuring the country, there's nothing police customs can do to match. What CC TV footage? They might have it customs with the die in which she might have come back. This is this will happen. Rod on the cusp of the all pervasive nights, your social media, the internet, and CCTV. So it happened just before all of those things where commonly used the Bank where she might with girls head CCTV only. Switch it on during a robbery. So, you know, we've been constantly being confronting that top of the other thing, too close. And you mentioned this, and you're in charge that we've been offering the place to follow up on very specifically. Introducing Bisi checks, based on information strong information we've uncovered, and since we began this uncon-, New South Wales police has suspended, the missing persons bureau. It was reported in the News Ltd type that a number of longtime missing cases hadn't been effect. We had been lift lying there with my work them by now. They've released a statement saying they're undertaking branch review to work out what form the new making prisoner beer. I will take. So we're in a bit of a limbo at the moment, she's issue on. Missing persons registered. All she was taking off. Sally says the daughter cell, he says she wasn't informed when Marian was tiger all the investigator detective Gary Shane since he did till her and all this. I take the Gary Shane has very genuinely cared about these guys and done everything he can to pine too lit Sally. And I know that he he's bound by the legislative and operational requirements of his job. He constantly do whatever he likes, but he's as passionate at any of us to find out what happened to Marian. It's just that there's really slow and no movement from the police on these kinds of the moment. And that's going to change. Yeah. Okay. So what you got failed. Do you think at the end of this series of podcast and collecting all of this information from those who are listening? Do you think you'll find out what happened to her? I think we will Chris, and I think we're getting very close to finding the answers that cell. He's been looking for twenty two years. I want to tell you more, but on January, I'm whiting on chicks. I've been speaking to someone. Tonight. I think we clause listening, and hopefully, we can bring you and all the millions of people listening. The answers are fascinating stuff, as I said, MO twists, and turns than with say than any of the other true crime podcast job well, done to you in the team, and we'll catch up and keep people up tonight on at thank you, Brian. Thank you mine. Just quickly to petition to get married in back on the missing persons register on change dot org. If they want to go into turns dog'll, said, full, Marion Bava and found a fantastic. That's great idea. That's the first then you put police in a position with I have to ask questions about certain links and tips that you receive which is gripe Brian. Thank you for that. Yes. So that's a very important step change, O Marian Bata, if you wanna go there to sign a petition to put some pressure on police to put her back on that missing persons register, and then it's incumbent on whatever happens to the missing persons unit in New South Wales that they look at the case again, especially as they Bumbad by tips and leads coming from the podcast, laddy vanishes, so to podcasts by seven news, the light, eventually already two million downloads. So true crime across the world people fascinated and I think that's also went to were wonderful base in Brisbane Cy, thanks very much to two GB of cool style. They helped other podcasts, including the teachers pit in, in terms of rising awareness about their investigation, which is a big part in, in helping to solve. That's terrific. That's really good. Brian, and end mowed down on doing that. I mean to Jay has a very wide audience in Sydney. Amber has been. Nike. Yep. Sorry that. Well, yeah, I think it was full base in Brisbane, but yes, that's terrific. And speaking of, of the media Knicks, wake, we'll be joined by Coney hall Halsey pulled Kosta and host of the popular Australian you sorry. Australian true crime sorry Michelle Michelle Lori. And she's a big fan of the lady vanishes podcast, and obviously does amazing work acelle on a astray and true crime and showcases so many amazing stories. True crime stories including snow town recently, which is probably one of the most famous. But anyway, way buoyed by the news that she will be coming on to join us in to discuss. Obviously, her Tyke on the podcast information that were presented in the podcast. And the case in the disappearance of Marian. But also to join us as we go through all the, the new information that will have the next week. And don't forget. Don't you get to keep the questions coming and keep the tips, coming on Facebook Soldano side at every male, the lady vanishes at seven the woods dot com that I you, I mean, one of the tips that we had the other day was someone who looked in to how you would go about obtaining Lunxembourg citizenship, and the possibility that if that's Marion went down, she might have had to impossible. And that might explain why she was out, well, someone using that nine zero to come to a strategy the passporting spot in two thousand and seven and never left the country coding to police about if the person who you kind you don't that possible had another possible. What issued in Luxembourg? I could've travelled out bicycling undetected on that second document. This is the kind of information that's very valuable in Mikey show that we look at all possibilities, and tens of what might have happened to marry and so I keep the tubes. Coming questions coming. Thank you so much. Thank you. France, while for joining us for really appreciated 'em. We look forward to you getting back to us. About the widow of the former arena, and any information you can provide in relation to that add, a we are, so grateful, and everyone tuning coming wakes to get the answers that we will once Francois hasn't it? So we'll get you on again. Thank you so much. Messy. All right. Well, thank you. We'll we'll see you next week. Hopefully, we Sally back grow into thank you. Thanks. Well.

Sally Brian France Australia Ed francois Europe South Wales Luxembourg Marion Gary Chris Sydney Marian Bonte Google official News Ltd Marian Brisbane Marian Bata
6/7/21: L.A.s youngest Black and Latino residents are least likely to be vaccinated for COVID-19 and more news

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

05:14 min | 6 d ago

6/7/21: L.A.s youngest Black and Latino residents are least likely to be vaccinated for COVID-19 and more news

"This is the l. a. Times brought to you by oregon. Pest control don't let bugs ruined the moment. Oregon home is where the bugs aren't. It's monday june seventeenth. Here's today's news. Low clouds will break for some sun. With a high of seventy. Tonight will be partly cloudy with a low of fifty nine our top story in troubling sign rates of covid nineteen. Vaccinations among la county's youngest eligible black and latino residents are significantly lower than for other racial and ethnic groups among people sixteen and older only forty one percent of black residents and forty eight percent of latino residents in l. a. county have received at least one shot by contrast sixty three percent of white fifty nine percent of native american and seventy one percent of asian american residents are at least partially vaccinated. The disparities are contributing to the increased chance of infection. Hospitalization and death among black and latino residents from covid nineteen officials are expanding efforts to make shots available across the region. Scores of mobile vaccine sites are being positioned in places hardest hit in the pandemic including workplaces schools. Churches and senior centers officials are also moving to set up clinics at gathering places such as universal city walk beaches museums and other sites in state news. Gun control and california officials have condemned federal judges decision to turn california's at thirty year old ban on assault weapons in his ruling friday. Us district judge roger benitez compared the ar fifteen semiautomatic rifle to a swiss army knife calling it good for both home and battle a are fifteen have been used in some of the nation's deadliest mass shootings including one in las vegas that killed fifty eight people in two thousand seventeen. California is one of seven states plus washington. Dc that ban assault weapons state attorney. General bonte called the decision fundamentally flawed and said he would appeal in other news when wildfires tore through giant sequoia groves in california's sierra nevada region last year researchers estimated that hundreds of towering trees were killed now almost nine months later experts have revised that figure tenfold. A new draft report puts the toll between seven thousand and ten thousand trees that totals up to fourteen percent of the world's natural population. The findings startled scientists because sequoias are naturally adapted to thrive in fire. The tall trees feature bark. That's up to two feet. Thick branches that reach above flames and combs that release seeds when exposed to a burst of heat however as the effects of human caused climate change and aggressive fire suppression combined to drive bigger wildfires. These ancient giants are increasingly. No match for the conditions. Ecologists are seeing on the ground now that the snow has thawed teams of researchers are starting to go into the field to verify the reports findings. The report is expected to be published this summer after it undergoes peer review in business. The city of long beach has taken back control of the queen. Mary from the ships operating company amid concerns that the eighty-seven-year-old vessel has not been properly maintained. The city announced on friday eagle hospitality. Trust the company that held the lease to operate. The ship filed for bankruptcy protection in january and agreed to surrender. Its lease agreement long beach. Mayor robert garcia said the city would be fully engaged in the preservation of the historic landmark. The former ocean liner turned. Floating hotel has long been a challenge to operate. A two thousand seventeen study recommended that as much as two hundred eighty nine million dollars worth of renovations and were needed to keep parts of the ship from flooding. According to court documents and inspection reports the queen. Mary needs twenty three million dollars in immediate repairs to prevent it from potentially capsizing and finally in sports. The clippers are still alive in the nba playoffs yesterday. They beat the dallas mavericks. One hundred twenty six to one hundred eleven in game seven of the first round series at staples center luka doncic had forty six points for the mavericks but it wasn't enough as the fourth seeded clippers advanced to the western conference semifinals to play the top seeded jazz in utah. Tomorrow call he. Leonard was an assist shy of a triple double for the clippers. Finishing with twenty eight points ten rebounds and nine assists. Paul george contributed twenty two points ten assists and six rebounds. While marcus morris added twenty three points for these stories and more visit l. a. times dot com. It's a good night to stay in. Because it's the season finale of mr right that no one saw coming. I didn't for any of this to spend the night with termites will dylan follow his heart or succumb to a swarm of termites. Curl up on the couch and find out tonight. When all the molting termite larvae will finally be revealed. Don't let termites ruin the moment organ homes where the bugs aren't.

la county roger benitez General bonte sequoia groves california swiss army oregon Oregon Mayor robert garcia long beach sierra nevada clippers
Women in Applied Sport Psychology: Making your way as a Neophyte Practitioner - Dr Francesca Champ (Pt2) - Meaningful Sport Series

Physical Activity Researcher

45:03 min | Last month

Women in Applied Sport Psychology: Making your way as a Neophyte Practitioner - Dr Francesca Champ (Pt2) - Meaningful Sport Series

"This is the physical activity researcher. Podcast a podcast for researchers of sedentary behavior physical activity and sports join for a relaxed dialogue about research designed practicalities. And well anything related to research. Learn from your fellow. Researchers useful and relevant information that does not pay into formal content limited space of scientific publications. And here's your host. Welcome everyone this is the meaningful sport. Podcast and im your host not gotten meaningful. Sport is a series of discussions on the y and how involvement is sport than physical activity can be an important part of a life worth living. If you are interested in the theme you might also want to check out meaningful sport dot com there. You can find podcast. Show notes read a blog and access many resources for further explorations of meaningful sport. So hi there. And welcome back to the second part of our conversation with dr. Francesca chump from liverpool. John wall's university in the first part of our conversation. I'll main focus. Wilson understanding identity development of talented athletes and we discussed friends ethnographic work where she spent three seasons in a professional football club as an applied sport psychology practitioner and a researcher. And so today. We will focus on her experiences as an applied psychology practitioner and some of the challenges that could be related to gender and being at the early phase of of sports psychology practitioner career. And some questions about professional identity as well that certainly going to be interesting as well and so welcome back from. Thanks for finding time and as we started exploring these topics maybe just tell us a little bit about your own professional aspirations. So has it been a dream for you to work as a applied sport psychology practitioner. Good question Yes but i guess only came about So you i'll tell you a little bit but my history and i guess web is. I'm beijing came from so us I transitioned to you. The best say. I was really show about what i wanted today so at the time that i moved to university. I'm actually playing in the top league. Manchester city women And i've been all three or four years at that time. So i kind of went to university bucket talking about the identity in the last section. Think it's probably a folded into the exactly not re-met of somebody who had a really strong pops exclusive identity. And the only reason i went to university was to be sport because i felt like i had no alternative to about moment in time. The women's game wasn't where is now and there was no professional contract so it was almost. I am going to have to get a job at some point. Were also my interested in sport was the only thing. So i did. Sports science I thought he was progressing. Through my first and second year. I'd say my correa within women's will probably became a little bit more turbulent and it was at that point alongside studying sports science that sports psychology start emerged as something. That was very interesting to me. And i guess i then adopted the mindset of if icon being athlete if i can't dedicate myself to becoming a full-time professional because i wasn't the opportunity to do so what's the next best thing. And i guess the next best thing for me was to operate in supporting those plays or supporting other individuals. Become the best they could be and so it was sport psychology and therefore i think given the hands on nature. The i'm very practical very sporty and very constable being in a sports environment being embedded in environment as a practitioner is something that yeah i guess. At that stage. I started to dream off and it became my ambition. My sole focus to develop my skills set and developed my abilities to be able to operate and support other individuals with capacity And you started doing your research work in your applied works so you did this wonderful. Three year at nor fee applied sport psychology practitioner and researcher at the same time. And you mentioned in the first part that when you enter this environment that you were pretty much the only woman around there in addition to the cook as well and so i mean you certainly an insider to football being a player yourself and being immersed in that environment for such a long time but when you entered the men's gaming the different roles or young woman working in sports psychology. How how were you received. it was incredibly challenging and i think it hit me harder because not only did i feel like i had the contextual knowledge of football because of my own experiences in my background but i come from a footballing family too so my father my cousin my brother all of which progress through the warning system and two of the most successful in making it pro. There's like i've been around these guys all of my life. I know what they're like. I know that characteristics. I know the personality i can handle them. I can handle the environment. I guess then when i went in it was an obsolete shock for may i believe the i was prepared and i believe that i'd be able to overcome those challenges without too much difficulty ready for. I think it was very very different. Sorry the first time. That i met anybody from the club was joined the interview and that was actually a really classic experience because this individuals very much into sports psychology demonstrated the need to support players identified the potential value of me as an individual into the environment increasing diversity on then on my first day. I kind of got in the Everybody looked at me as though i was an alien on. I don't know whether that was. He's how they get everybody that's new and in the environment or whether that was just may being a female and being young being different and within probably hall phenomena I was sitting in physio room having a conversation on. I was approached by a senior member of staff. You said that one of the first players recently being through a divorce Problems with addictive behaviors and could also out on. I was almost done at that point. Okay the first thing that is demonstrates may as a lack of experience and familiarity with the discipline on bloomberg on pops misconceptions around what sport psychology as. What my role is. I'm capable so that was the first thing that was really challenging and hot then on face the tension the bottle of saying. I don't feel comfortable doing in unemployed. What with the academy is a senior player. Second menas malt within my experience. So i i don't feel able to support an individual through got the moment but also on your first day. You don't want to let one hundred ready influential. See me if they go within the cloak and so by saying no to what would be the impact of my relationship with him. So that was my. That was my first experience. I guess then from the there was is not necessarily well received in. They were quite friendly to me. Gene unruly apart from one individual. Who would make everybody. A co petit. Rav of the may in. It took me about three months to be made a petit by this particular individual. A really ready. Well with the pass. And so i. I think it was jobs for them. It was a huge shock. Tapani position with the environment working directly with players as a female. I think being young was the second thing that they ought to overcome so many of the staff. They were experienced middle-aged males who had been in the game for a long time and the discipline. Who something that was also alien to them. So for example. The i team captain asked me. I was able to read. His palm genuinely did not know. What's psychology was on wounded. If i know worried befitted we can. And i thought i said i thought he was mocking. May and it turned out that he wilson he was being deadly serious. He just did not understand what discipline was around. And i think those misconceptions they really shaped my early experiences. So for example. I brought a paper around doing a session parents on what sport psychology as. I'm in my role. And i was questioned on my agenda as to whether i would say aim is questioned about my age. Whether he was mature enough to support the child. I think that came through. They associated maturity with experience an expertise. Unfor- may not ready challenging. Because i it was almost if i was ten year old about question have been asked if i was a female. I if i wasn't a female wouldn't have had questions around auto fills to work with the male players. It wouldn't necessarily. It doesn't matter whether you're male or female educational qualities in your caracteristics. I think i was judged in a particular way because of wijetunga. And i think that as well so i delivered a similar session to the coaches and the staff and as on one staff or i was told by one staff member. Keep anything confidential in this environment and the reason you don't keep anything. Confidential is because as coach. My managing might job depends on results on that for. I need to pick the strongest eleven each week so for me. It was organized. How am i going to navigate my way through or of these misconceptions through all of these challenges. And do my job do. I'm here for because i've been faced with. I had a million barriers pope. Before i can even get to that my fight. Didn't mrs already been george without me delivering anything so yeah i think but what is really important to say is the the ways in which i was received with regards to who i am was dot was fine coaches and that was by currents. That wasn't the case was players at all. I think wealth plays were little bit confused to begin with on. They did ask lots of questions around sports psychology. I think they were intrigued. I think they were entrusted icing. They wanted to engage so very much. When i worked with plays on a one to one basis or one way in which i got to know them was. I got picked up from the train station the same way as a lot of the under eighteen state and we all got it cooled the scholars bonus and it was raised to twenty thirty minute. Bus ride to the training ground from the train station to gather and it had gone from being all of the lots on the boss having the bonte to watch the now major positioned within the middle of them. I'm trying to figure out how to behave in front of me. And i think over time. Probably refu- weeks of being the most as with them. I started to integrate in those conversations. They started to find their feet. So behave in more of an authentic and more were not true way and we had some of the conversations that allowed me to kind of set my who wallis within the environment what. My role was entertain. Not buying and so. I found that. I would almost very well received on a once worn in a group basis with the players which was contrast into the staff and the parents. Yeah so certainly like depends a lot also who you are working with. And and so you talked about in. Some ways is triple disadvantage. So we'll money in that environment than it's being a young person at the earliest part of the career and then it certainly about the disciplines as well so sports psychology has been also like you know thought about you know it's only for people who have some big problems or an so forth but so we can maybe talk about all of those three but i would maybe like the start with the gender elementary it. So sport psychology. I think as a discipline. We are not very good at the gender as much as we probably should be doing. So based on previous work on applied sport psychology and gender. What what do we know about women's experiences in these environments and is being a woman. Is it the barrier candidate. Also have some advantages for for your work show. So i know the previous research from emmy and not a lot of that is around on the barriers that females face when entering operating in school environments as folk psychologist on. I think the first thing is as far as around even -taining those roles in the often rosa given to males even if they have experienced because they often need to better fit within the sport environment. And i think that's exaggerated when it comes to male sports as well because that's questioned mock surrounding like for females for example for me. How will you work with the boys. Holly conduct yourself. What you level of professionalism. Is there anything that i have to raise. Question marks around with your own conduct or perhaps with the conduct the athletes that you work with how do we. What's the dynamic with you working with male athletes in on your own. Especially if they're the children's with sixteen or below. So i think the entrance is the first barrier secondly than when we all attaining row secondly number one we do attain. The entrance is the second barrier. I think because we're females people do which i think this can be taken one of two ways so the first as negative and not might base for psychology is deemed as a female discipline generally. Because it's a carrying profession. I'm sorry it's the hawks more feminine. I think that's negative. Because one with an employee operate in role dot conflicts with the ideal prayer or the ideal awfully in many coaches views. So for example. She's being born and she's going to be too soft she'll make the place to soft shomali cocteau cuddled them. It's all about caring like actually. I want a sport psychologist committed. Make resilient make them took on. I think in not sentence you would. Almost i think the barrier that we face is that sporting environments bleeds. A male would be better position to do that because mental toughness is germany. Conceptualize is a male characteristic or male trait. So i think that's one real barrier we face with regards to how we practice on the other hand not might actually be beneficial and i think the me it worked in a positive way so i'm of what mark nasty says Around sport psychology been seen as a carrying profession to a female might be somebody that plays a more likely to open up to they. See you as more of a supportive carrying a nonjudgmental. Figure answer it. Works as a positive and i actually did hopped experience so i found that being a female was a positive for the players because they opened very quickly to me. Why felt that. It was a barrier with the staff because the stock perceived me as somebody that was just gonna make soft players even softer and so i didn't have those traits to make them over to make them more resilient i think so i do think being a woman brings its own challenges and for me. I was ready ready conscious of that particularly after the first session. Iheart with the parents. And the coaches. So i i very much. Every time i was going into the club i saw about what i was wearing are so about where i was sitting who i was speaking to. What my body language is like how i wore my hat on in the first instance. I think i tried to do is almost portray myself as more masculine. So i tried to moscow or high my feminine traits in the i time ahead opened wired boggy tracksuit because i thought made me fit in an reflection. I'm not sure that was the best approach. But i think a neophyte practitioners for females. We face a number of challenges that we have to sink about that. We have to reflect on that males. Don't face that masdar even have to consider they can get up in the morning. They can go into the club in the truck sue. They don't have to think about why they sit. They don't have to think about how much time spending with one particular individual simply because of that geno simply because of the sex so we as women we we face a range of unique challenges around who we are how we construct us often how we all perceived or the identities of the people prescribers. I'm and i found that incredibly challenging to begin with. Yeah you started already talking about the sports in ways that you would maybe try to appear less feminine so i thought maybe just from from theory perspective on anaemia article you're writing about Using gender performative approach so maybe we yet hope just a few words about what that means and how that can be seen in in practice anaemia research. Yes show so for me. i'm i've kind adopted. Gender performative is a term from judith. Butler which kind of says the perspective of weather whip wounds male or female. That shouldn't determine our behavior. Actually we learn to behave in particular ways because of society because of the socio cultural context in which we exist on. I think when. I described the way i tried to train myself as being ryan bogie truck su That's almost me trying to fit into that particular environment. By engaging in something that's traditionally seen as being more mail. I'm for example as well so i would. If i was a fundamental hurt all like struggled a little bit with the situation. I would very much moscow. Those feelings i would never go into the club and somebody said how are you may be. I'm not too great today. Actually i was offended by this yesterday. Or i found this experience. Ready challenge in. It would be fine. So i put on a brave face i would try and demonstrate is psychologically talk but i. I don't think that's necessarily the case just the a practitioner. I would argue. The a number of individuals within the environment will also during the same so as we mentioned in one not all players within the environment actually all these masculine individuals. He'll all really strong who all Able to moscow the physical and emotional pain. But they will. I think they will pay trying to portray the identity exactly the same staff. Some of the staff were these old horror. -tarian dominant vegas the they portrayed themselves to bay so i think within the environment what you hot was a number of individuals male and female that were behaving in ways to try and fit within the dominant culture in the club so we were performing and identity as opposed to Necessarily be as opposed to being who we are. As opposed to being male or female. We were performing what we believed was most appropriate and not environment and what was most appropriate and not environment. Where more traditionally musk's giving characteristics and yet so hopefully not gives you kind of a little bit of understanding as to how that wasn't the case initially may with regards to the people's behaviors are is is very blinkered and i was ready quite an i thought everybody not environment rose masculine. They were intimidating. May purposefully they were engaging in these behaviors because that's who they were. I only radium reflection over significant period of time. I started to see things differently and i started to understand people cops deep laco to say this individual may engage in those behaviors because in their own challenges because of the armed conflict their own conflicts with their identity and who they have to be to survive within the environment. And it was. I think i not to empathize a little bit. More an honest on whilst this journey was really difficult for me that will also males existed within the environment. His journey was equally challenging. Because they didn't just line with the dominant cultural values and beliefs of the organization. So was i think as females. We have it ready. Difficult pro. Definitely more difficult males. I don't think that males within that environment also have raid easy janney. They're awesome have tensions conflict in battles that they have to face overcome to I think it's really an important aspect that we talked earlier. In in the first part about young players and all insecurities they facing and they can be de-selected selected so easily or the injury can be read really like the fatal that they never come back to play after that. But i think we always have to remember that. Everybody has an insecure place. The coaches can be very easily replaced as well and them to the they. They have to keep winning to keep their jobs as well. So it's not just. The players and coaches are making their life but the coaches have a difficult life trying to stay in their own job as well. So everybody's end up same yeah situation. Yeah absolutely and i think that's something that i wasn't aware of going in. I think it's because i was so hyper focused on me and my experiences. The i didn't open myself up to the struggles that manages and other staff within the environment were facing. It's only ever longitudinal reflection that i started to see not an actually now i view coaches and iv support staff in a very different way. I think i'm more empathetic. I only wish. I could have been like the iran as opposed to tarnish in everybody with this label generally also what comes through in literature about early career. Practitioners that it's very easy to be very self conscious about a what are others thinking. Am i doing the right thing. Should i do something else and so forth. So maybe you're not paying attention and unreligious like you say trying to understand things from those other people's perspectives because you are just really so concerned about yourself and how you are doing in that environment. Absolutely yes and i think. That's that's probably as well a function of the short term nature of course that staffer housed on the significant challenges that stuff face on the results oriented maitre van violent. So i knew that my contract there is a practitioner research contract my my status or my position within the organization and was very much dependent on how successful the Were in progressing through to the i team on the of the i team. Each season for vary unstable and everybody else was very unstable's unstable so they are in a constant state of uncertainty. And i think that does make us hot now. Lines island's on ourselves and hawks alibaba of ignorance towards others around in the environment. So i again. I think that's a function of the organizational culture within professional football. Yeah a you shared a lot about these early experiences and a little bit like a shock landing to this new new environment but you worked there for three years is actually quite a long time so maybe just continue to story a little bit about how things will done where you discouraged about this early. Start on an and so on. Yeah yes shoe I think kobe after six months. I was totally beaten up by the whole situation. I'm not with plays auteuil. It was really difficult. Because i was developing stronger meaningful relationships with players and i was working really while at a group level at one level with players and i felt like i was really valued or them facing these continual daily challenges with the staff around how i was portrayed the opportunities. The is given because of sports psychology discipline. Every day was a battle to get that contact with the players on it was. I felt quite dejected and rejected from the environment. And when i mentioned earlier around things being a tick box exercise at this point i was absolutely a hundred percent. Shoulder is only employed to satisfy the each appea- guidelines and regulations so to maintain that category two status. I'm not in that ready. Challenged me my identity as a practitioner. Because how does this conflict with. I want to be and horizon myself. As as a practitioner opening my professional development in it a little bit like a stunted worse in ghana with blunt converse which was challenging south. What was hugely positive. Because it provided me with the opportunity to grow and shape myself and shake harari operated but that was then within the constraints of you've not got time to see players tonight because they have their physical training. You can't see players now because they have that lunch. They have an education session this afternoon. So you can't see a player and it was. It's always a battle to prove. The discipline was worthy of being included within the program. And also at a broad level. The i was worthy of having plays time so not necessarily to sport psychology delivery from me as a practitioner. The art has the ability the personal qualities and characteristics. Make a difference with the shape. The journey positively in some white. So i think that was a real tension for a while and then i started to find a happy medium so the sports science and medicine team and the recouped of changes a number developed a stable team. Not stable team stayed together for around eighteen months and it was already modern forward thinking team while all of this will were either working to a couple of working part time towards a masters but we all fresh from yes she might at the uni system or academe area and we all wanted to positively introduce what we've learned shape the journeys of players using i guess more modern methods so we saw the value of sports science beyond just coaching. So i found a little nation. I found a little bit and a home within the sport. Science and medicine team and i developed a really strong connection with the education officer as well so over my conflict with coaches still remain to some extent i developed a good relationship with the eighteenth coach in the eighteenth assistant. They very much more into war. I was doing. I work with performance analysis to opposite on feedback from gains with regards to emotional control sent aspects of behavior on. I go through these clips with the coaches around to keep players. Offer support engaged in psychological profiling. I think things started to significantly settled down. And that was probably a european until about two to two and a half years in. So i did find a happy medium and i felt i was developing but then we faced a significant period of turbulence so at that time the fussy manager unfussy system. Austad jobs The underwriting manager the enright system manage change the what sites medicine left so did the scientists so did the two physiotherapists so kind of a moment in time again it was like the next coaches shocked. Me or is the net shock in every single person that i developed an alliance where on those closely with just left the organization in currently across a period of two three months. There was just this moss exit on fought like a k now. Why i'm hot. Air back to the drawing board. And i found that last six months probably more difficult than the first six months in the organization because i felt like all of the heart works. I don all of the relationships. I developed all of the progress. I've made individuals it combat. Come into the organization and they had the views these stakeholders hot two years ago. So i just taken a huge step rock. And i felt like almost at not time. I didn't have the time and the energy to invest any mole to work. I had previously because i knew my time was coming to an end. Shortly a new. I just got to get the end of the season on i think reflecting now i almost just disengaged and i felt like okay. I work with the players dot relationship with the press. The stock the i went ready. While with of now environment. I don't have the resources. I don't have the energy to buy again. So i'm just gonna keep my head down and i almost distance myself and my identity as being a part of the organization and just accepted. I'm happy to liked outsider. I'm happy not to fit in. I will most canine comfortable. Without which i wasn't previously i so very much wanted to be a part of that working team and i said very much to fit within the organization on it got to the point now where i did fit. Everything changed again. Like armored k. Now i don't feel the need to align myself with the behavior on the attitudes of the organization. I'm more comfortable in who i am. I'm a little bit more experienced. Hoc- like i have pruder abroad in my identity. I have other sources of meaning from a professional perspective. And so i'm okay if i do face those challenges our i'm not gonna fight against them and i think that's how i it. The organization failing mike. The relationship i had with players was really strong. And i still communicate with some of them now. on i still have a really strong relationship with some of them now but my relationship with the staff. The new stuff that came in. I guess i didn't invest time and energy and getting to know them and getting to change the sections on sports psychology. And i think unfortunately that's probably than continued to now in the kluber caught one or two sport psychology. Somebody who's in the environment since the only been very short term appointments on the revolving door of sports medicine team has continued. And i'd say the operates duration that a sports science or medicine team member within the nation is now won't season so almost i feel a little bit regret. I didn't try harder for the legacy of the program and the legacy of the discipline within that cloak because players really needed it. I didn't have the talk and energy up. Have anything left to give thumbing sense. And i mean after that after completing your you had full time lecturing positions in in three different universities. So did you continue doing some applied work on the side or are you planning to do that in the future. Yes so i it's It's really interesting. May for while on rosen embedded in professional football. So i i actually went and worked with senior male players on a consultancy basis so i developed a network of clients that i worked with sorry much distant from the professional football club and from the professional football organization and i found it almost gave me the break. The i need it and it's only reading more recently. I've been almost wanting to get back in and embed myself back within not sporting environment that professional environment and so in november. So yeah and dr beginning of november. I was appointed is foreseen psychologist liverpool. Women and that's been really interesting in the. I've gone back to being unvetted at least so it's one day a week. I'm embedded within the organization on improbably supporting athletes. A good three to four days outside of that one day so i feel like although i may need one day. It's quite a lot of engagement with the athletes with the staff. Feeling like paul of that clip environment again. Paw got for boo kucha. But what's different. Is that this time it senior. So the it's different challenges in a different perspective on its female athletes as opposed to mail. I'm i'm actually really. I don't know that it's because it's a kind of break from kadena -demia I'm really really enjoy the hybrid role. I really enjoy imposition within the environment. It has its own unique organizational and cultural challenges with regards to psychology delivery. My found it a lot more. I've found stop on players significantly more receptive to me and my role immediately. And i haven't had to face any of those bottles which has just been it's been amazing roadway right. Yeah so. I mean you've shared about your your journey and moving from from being a play. Oh sell to being practitioner at practitioner researcher as well and all those challenges you had early part of your practitioner journey so maybe just reflect a little bit since topic is on meaning so what. What are the types of meaning that you get from working a practitioner at sports psychology practitioner. And why why is it meaningful work for you. Despite all these challenges that might be the eh. i think the meaning i take for me is making a positive difference to somebody's life to somebody's experience and thought sometimes conflicts with the results driven nature of working at i see metro book for may seeing somebody in a better place and they were two three weeks ago or even six months ago is hugely rewarding on i because of my own journey a professional yet as a professional performer. I think i know what i went through a knowing that i had no support networks and trying to balance and manage what it means to be in that environment. What it means to be a human with old van. The added pressure that they have of being an athlete. Knowing i yeah. I take meaning from knowing. I'm somebody that ad they can confide in. That's hopefully empathetic and that certainly doesn't judge them. That's that's a listen to them and that will always be there for them. I think that's why you're my meaning having oppo making a positive difference to that that life. I guess Yeah yes as you mentioned on what you talk about the new ride thing as well the in this kind of environment. They're on so many people who really are there for them as people and not just in terms of like you need to perform next week or yeah you're in a different role compared to coaches for example. Yeah it's it's really been a very interesting discussion. I think from from the first pot to come back to that discussion. We talked about the concern for these young people who are not going to stay italian. Pathway are who who will then become these selected and you talked about working towards for them to have some kind of experience in football that they can cherish and they can find some value from that then may be up some life skills that they can take with them and and that would be part of what you want to achieve cer- practitioner as well. So i'm just curious. Do you ever hear about the stories of these young people who because after they leave the academy than they are kind of gone. So do you have you been able to stay in contact with Any of them. Some of them after david. De-selected on do you know how their stories continued from there. Yeah so. I guess that's a really interesting question and i think i've been really fortunate in the yes. I do with some of the athletes on the fact that they've wanted to stay in torches meant so so when you say about meaning just the fact of having performa that you worked with three four five years are just send you a tax to let you know how doing means so much to me. Probably more than they think it does and they probably descended it without even thinking about it. But that's it's huge. And so i just give you two examples one of which Went through a huge period of trauma within the organization so ripped his aco came back from the rupture rewards acl is mc l. at tours meniscus on hot to around the son of the cartilage in his knee removed. I didn't was actually released from the club. Before he completed his rehab at the age of eighteen we managed to get through his functional skills which is the equivalent of gps's i'm because he didn't pass any gps's so he he had nothing other than those functional skills qualifications. He had no idea what you want it to be. He likes the environment broken and he left the environment. It coincided with me leaving the environment to which was really difficult for me. And i didn't know where he was going to go. His hosts for science and medical team has changed in the months leading up to him leaving the environment so he was working with new physios. He was welcomed with useful scientists. He knew that his contract wasn't going to be renewed so we knew that it was time. Pressured him to get back into a place where he knew had never played competitively again but took place where he could at least be athletic in gopher or go for a ruin or able to play as he said i wanted just be able to play for all in the garden with a kid when i have a son or when i have a. That's all i want. Now from this club. I need committed to the club with the ambition of becoming a professional footballer so For me when he left. I continued officer paul For while and encouraged him to pursue hops coaching career or something similar and i got a text from him. I'm probably two to three years after. I finished working with him. And it was just simply not like a fron. Just want to let you know. I've got my first job. Coaching in the community with already popular or a really high profile professional football which. I won't say on that it. It just said after that full stop thanks robbery and then like a football emoji and thumbs up and it was nothing more than not but i guess just marry that. He navigated his way to a new opportunity to something that he wanted on me. Got in. the end was huge for me. I'm and was ready reassuring. And i guess the only the other option the give you as one player who was already educated young prior. I'm who wanted to pursue different pathway to the sports science betak that plays were loud. He was released at the age of eighteen. Went onto play part time completed an undergraduate degree in sports business completed a master's degree and is actually now some form of sports media and journalism on young players pathway and the need to support young players in developing careers or developing alternative sources of meaning outside of just become a professional footballer and he draws upon his own experiences and again for me that's hugely rewarding to see just that he will look back on that journey and although it's one of pain and one of sorrow and one of pop's rejection is using that platform now when he's using some of the things that it wasn't able to do to shape the experiences of others based on probably a lot of the conversations that mean him hot during that two years when he was he scholar although both of which ready saad stories when you think about it and the experiences they pottering credibly traumatic on negative. We check their wellbeing for a long time to see now. I five six years on that. Both riding is you have me. It sounds ready kranji but does mean the world to me. Yeah thank you for sharing the stories lie. I think it's so important to be able to really like hear those stories about what happens after that because quite often it's like you know when when the players these selected and they go on and you know what happens to them those ones that we don't know i guess that may be the outcome may be very different in that. They may have experienced mental. How they. I don't know why they'll be working what they'll be doing. So i can only give those stories because that to play frequently in touch with me bites. Yeah the unknown slightly concerning on. I think it should be something governing body level to truck these players. Nigerian longitude longitudinal lay. Yeah yeah absolutely and for researchers to do work on on on the standing the that much better as well. Yeah yeah yeah. I think i've taken enough of your time. I really enjoyed this conversation i had the from. We had the pleasure to work together. And i i enjoyed it immensely. But even like after having a lot of conversation before i i again learned a lot. And yeah it's it's really lovely to hear about aldo's meaningful things that you shared as well In addition to the dark sides that we started out with so yeah. Thank you so much for the conversation. Thank you give me the opportunity. It's been ready locally to chelsea. Thanks for joining us this week. On physical activity research through pawtucket. If you like the show makes you never miss an episode by subscribing. Follow the show on twitter. This podcast is made possible by listeners. Like you thank you for your report. If you found value in this show we would really appreciate rating apple podcasts. With ever apple us or if you root in real old school way seem to tell a friend about the shope. It would be great help us. We have a fantastic lineup of guests forthcoming episodes so be search to kim. Thank you all for your support and have a great day.

football Francesca chump Tapani wijetunga bonte moscow shomali cocteau anaemia mark nasty ryan bogie John wall liverpool Manchester city Lines island harari wallis beijing bloomberg Wilson
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Feliz Dia Novo

03:36 min | 3 months ago

Ao permitir que o outro brilhe far voc brilhar ainda mais

"All our sympathies. gmo phillies Jere polis is set to get through your sit. There capacity was disowned call. Coupla florida was his saint jacques. The mice was it. You recycle see against florida swazi. As the gone be nice who toldo that. Put the similar four and with legaue give us a table at keeping contact. He hit mecca the opportunity daddy. Sos gone the wrong doers. Synthesize do as the day as boas do volt digestible. Was those posters. Balls to say and muslim dea but skies fanatical enters the noise. You know difficult saw a conic died. The kuala border the pope the competitor and give us a fis valley. Cpu style but is soup economies fish shadowy now fica guar data traffic via apple. Move the weapons for the swamp average on the supercell music. But i see beer. Eat them. But i meet you boost. Duda palabra cheviot. Jackie does not thrill care for as authorities see door quiz league. What about your via. Solis as farmers and we did die. Mas nuclear debate viewed the murder so as the towards us farmers fires deficiencies viva la dealer to source. Stand up the stomach. But he's as soon as a scoreless operator scored his responded resorts salt. Mom lucky luke placebo. So my look at placineau compacting half bushel zia aerials fuzzier bussey despite guy by going by going half as deferrals new moon. Sabic saint pre-start world. But as you get bored half as kyw's faisal seventy yeah through moore to give us amir tekoa fuss selling damage. Severe styling either. Who volatility for swire together. Such so key was said daddy decibel sonoko sag fujio three dollars. You're asaba to two billion equity in his speed up to you. My leader abdul diversity can know of it up a similar scene. No seghal beer. No avail hoop. So the allowed defining myzone episode of mizo migliore miso dea but seeing more subtle mundo somalia. Some peculiar will set the mill. York look saint stay the same position going ocado idea via the kennedys so procedure sped over. Say the set you me as dame bubbling tempo. Bonte geology simply unfair. Lease jia novel.

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We DONT Need To Talk About Ghosts: Christmas Dont!

We Need To Talk About Ghosts

27:12 min | 6 months ago

We DONT Need To Talk About Ghosts: Christmas Dont!

"Live a girl. Goes with kevin. Used us hello. Everybody merry christmas. It's wednesday which means it's the eve of christmas eve yes. It is jingle bells jingle bells jingle vowels. I'm with backup. You may ripping celtic ben. Things such as that in the background because she is literally doing rap of presence as we speak i am roughing violence all the presidents. How guessing on with tusk okay. I'm noon anglada though. I'm glad about it too because you don't seem too happy to be interrupted and now i think my from presents is one of the things i always sit down with us. Jessica kill it right to music at about four minutes. And i'm just like oh. Yeah she the last couple of days. You've taken over for me because i've just staff and you have more patients. I get into a bit of a mindfulness set with. I'm going to wrap mind tomorrow I'm not looking forward to it as well. I am alright with a ball at a technically will be in work. So that's kind of why i'm not looking forward to as well as so guys. We russian this episode. I said that this would be somewhat of a christmas extravaganza bit of ally. Because i've been absolutely manic with work. But don't you worry everything that i promised you. We'll still take place so on june on sundays episode which will be a twix mus episode. Yes that's the could cut of paper. The twix episode between christmas and new year will be Will have a boneless nicole and we'll have a lot of stories which you guys have sent in and talk to write out which due to get an used to all the listen to call in. We have another to read out so we're gonna do all them on sunday and we'll have a bit more time to say hello to you and spread the but this is a mini christmas episodes so to speak beca has been doing her. Usual charitable work that she does with the charity. Kind recall cost. Join the initial lockdown. We went out and on some food deliveries for the charity known as kind and liverpool I've seen. I've now got into back into full time work on. It's very busy and haven't been able to assist becca but you've just been packing more hampers avenue for people. Christmas appeal that we mentioned the sponsored walk. Oh yoga's very kindly donated. People don't need to to so appeal. Obviously ahead and i went to help out with compass. We're both going to go well. We talk to shane and probably know about things about extremely heavy. Yes so i went. There bake huge warehouse and it's a proper operation this loads we do and we just wallover. Thousands of isn't it isn't it down by where we recorded the halloween special a few years ago. Yes vulcan studios. One of the women's august really. Yeah one of the women saw in the way just telling me there's no you did implying that it's the play along becker. Why images hearing this now. I'm the lions guys. You're not gonna tell us about becker. Fuck is also the one of the women who helps shirazi she. She she was telling me ice. She's all this the so what happened. Was i went to help onto the main parking days. Were on friday and saturday. When they've got like the most people go down and they they they're days earlier to do like the getting because the literally got like politics politics on politics story of things coming in and the boxers ready in the morning basic. Absolutely yeah exactly and so earlier in the week when there was a small number of in their foot. This will new rooms. It was there and it's called tracy for their sake of called the trick. Let's call. Let's go hera tracy because got forbid she gets the mail no she hasn't expressly given promotions talk about rights. Okay so just in case am yeah okay so take time she said to me so about it and so she said there was like some volunteers like no. Not you know few of them that i. It's obviously warehouse in the middle summit. Fredin southie advise after wants to wrap on to this kind of just like you know like brief sort of new before they start around and she's woman a hand with kelly bonte didn't because volunteers every she'll be noel. The volunteers allow them privately to whatever. She's gone this woman this. It's so she's a whiz about women like she's like the bumbling going welcome to the woman who stood right next to you there. The woman punk sta those known. Savelli what you're talking about. And no one else has seen. She called the roll lines and they thought she was wanting to nemo. Roy super will like what she she weyrich set. You'd probably like mitt. This eash and bombed kelly hair and she said she looks like she was like she was there for more like modern looking to obviously wasn't like yeah knowing victoria. She said she was like rock. Soccer's sushi's Volunteered and she said honestly seora soltero. Clair's on no one else or isn't that interesting so little christmas ghost. I'm worried about this warehouse. It was down by volume. So it's on the dock road where all the old warehouses are what the warehouse was. I don't like historically what it was in the past like it was an old warehouse. Was it you know what you know of liverpool was like an old dock warehouse warehouse and it's part of like a bake also collection where basically you could walk through the warehouses through a few different streets. You don't mean it's that big so is done by the By the shankley not shop. The titanic hotel. Okay where the sugar silo is. Nola choice five okamoto's by very interested in the very interesting surprised when she said i'm just gonna go. She didn't say no. You didn't know. I mean christmas likely to stablest talked about previously. Christmas is ball's historically a time for ghost stories guys on the facebook group of mentioned that we should smoke we. But you know it should be brought back as a tradition of when some of the songs isn't it But one of them says like it's time for go stories union. I'm chilling and full getting skirt. Why are you me. I obviously didn't guitar lean towards me from your general direction is solid from sorts of minstrelsy. Carry around instruments with me. I understand why did just by an accidentally accidentally all christmas plans are going to foolish guys. You hope that. Becker trying to come in. Then you hope that yourself pretty good so i'm going to be doing. I got phone call from the guy who runs the charity. All m. just. If i'll do some drop off the toy sloughed. Nice guy is lovely. I wish i could do that. With but sandra yeah. I'd like to it. Was you know it was a know that you think i only done that. Food drops over could try and because of podcast at the same time. Well that was a benefit. But i like that of knocking at a door and saying some toy speaking. Lots of really. Nice i mean is an interesting one altruism do it do nice things for the people because the feeling gives you or because it's the right thing to do the right thing to do is tell our pocket. There was no good for you. And i was getting. I was knock heavy those authors that the guys donate it's all as honestly the remains the huge stuff on the you literally need to men like two people to carry it even when you put your in like. I'll bet you know. In the very short every single person heart to do a two people carrying a real chair. No one lifts noam alcatel's lot. Yeah exactly am and you've got to stack them like administrative carefully very strict because allies. Just go through the so big. Wow like it's really impressive. So thank you so much for joining says it. Yeah definitely trump cards. See that. I think that's why i don't do. More charitable of. Because i been doing it because it'd make me feel good not the reason to do not. We'll get chilly. That's just an everyone wins situation. If you're something god's something happens on you feel good. That's perfect. I get the when diag- my god will be like joining done that too that you felt good. That's not a reason to do something. But you still don't go so otherwise you could not do it. You could not good. When i will you come with me. You cannot occupy them. Because i probably just go okay. God talks to power play. Like if i agree to that to go point pm. So i'm not gonna. That's hardly the christmas spirits that we were aiming for this episode. Just the could be a christmas gift. Store yeah so. Speaking of christmas goes stories. Of course the woman in black was aired on atv back in the ninety s early ninety s. It went down storm. That's just come out on video you talking about. It wasn't a video on dvd. All back. but i also rain one of our listeners if she could rustle of any sorts of christmas soul to move very good back is front of blue net beckham show. We can all be happy with that if you could see any christmas. Ghostly sorta stuff and cheddar could rummage thank you very much. And she came across a nice little websites off a guy who calls himself. Michael the ghost guy which seems legit. And he's talking about christmas We'll just talk about that back and selling it. You can tell me your opinions neighbors catch just come in celo beautiful lance sheer so beautiful. She's got more presents than anyone under. She doesn't see them obviously. Yeah so michael go. Sky says christmas is a time when family and friends get together to celebrate the warmth of each of this company accurate statements in introductions michael would go sky. It's a time when friends and family dropped by this. Sounds like it's more describing. Chris for people don't know what it is just literally around with. My doctor made a better a japanese. The japanese take something to make it much better and small normally. I want me to come back smaller. Better oh Some of the by some expected some not to share and love and friendship to shell of infringing. There's also another type of guests that may combine unexpectedly might not be sick killer. Welcome they are. The ghosts of spiritedly ceased friends and family died in knock crossed over. There appears to be more supernatural activity during the christmas period than any other time the golden to michael ago scott. Many spirits do not crossover because they want to stay behind and be close to their friends and family because christmas is a time when families get together and these spirits. Don't want fomo era of missing gov. We've been contacted by people. Because if feel like i'm being pushed out of grandma's favorite chair or the presence keep moving from the trade or my deceased favorites ornaments keeps falling off the tree even though it securely fastened these people have a car off the dinner candles keep blowing out for no reason. The higher frequency of these minor happenings and other more intense experiences. All were caused us to believe that. There's a high incidence of ghost activity. This time of increased activity also extended into the new year celebrations. Some of these visitors may not be friends or family but it just opportunistic spirits looking to connect with a desirable entity be it positive or negative. We believe that the spirits travel freely around looking for a place to rest and attached whether energy or the house of the person feels good to that. We've removed spirits who died many decades before in places halfway around the world from the place where the family sorry whether it finally removed spirits haunting house. Don't necessarily have to be previous residents of the house or have even been part of the family. That's living there now. Even if the spirits had been part of the family or a good friend ghosts or the energies attached to a house or a pass can negatively affect their feelings sometimes with behavior and can be a major nuisance when attachment occurs. the host past can experience influences attached to the bound spirits thoughts emotions addictions or strong habit patterns even physical feelings of the bound spirit such as authorites or another ailment. They make filter to the host pass for any of the occupants of the possessed house or building. So if you notice that you have a few ghostly goings on over the season. Welcome them love them and wish the merry christmas. And if they're not too disruptive let them be part of the celebrations but one celebrations are over. It will be a loving gesture to help them on their way to finish their journey. May your life before with love and laughter today and for the many days to come to you all michael the ghost guy asia and also that the once it's all over send them on the way. I hope you enjoyed on our festivities but can you kindly back off now. Nobody wants to go see in january. I'm all for the go. Sleaze of december yeah. It was a common theme that Ghosts ghost stories would be told james christmas stories a hobby. I think of course. Scrooge never scrooges christmas story the most classes christmas ghost stories scrooge. either you know. I don't like i don't ritual emulate things like that you know. Just you know what's coming over it so we only know what's coming. Such a good story is that don't you don't like any sorts of religion. Go to church because you know he's going to rise again. In easter sex the spoiler same story every fucking year fertile. Yeah there's just something to formulate about it like oh this past those presence walk. Could this be like no enough. You think the ghosts of past present future a little bit like live love laugh. I didn't like i hate them. A live live. Las vegas put on your kitchen live of laugh. I don't know what it is really about. The christmas thing not into really any any of it rose even the bill murray scrooge which is effing amazing watched half. I have to sit there every year. What actual excel at least twice two times too many well. I'm in love busted. Actually what we'd love. Actually you see new thing every this stuff. It's so many different countries. Different things storylines new just same saw a million times just again know all of you gotta be especially what emma thompson gets cheated on. Od she finds the necklace. Let's all other good cry and that other game that other game with the The cards. I'll try kid tonight house. I know you've got a fella move card. But i actually love your move card. Isn't the tweet you cheating on your felli dick. She's not she's she's not cheating through. Let's open the door. And i seen no no she no. She's cheating through Emission because she hasn't said she did she say when fellas carlson's no it's some guy because look for me because he says saito housing is. She's the cycle going. 'cause he's just going to say on those calls. I was just shocks me. interrupt me. now he's guys best mate so that could be anything like say. Housing is academy secret president. Anita mcglynn artisan no. She didn't think that she let's be honest now. Anyway and also also what does she say at the cow when it was at the door. Kelvin's an agenda. What you mean couch. How many times have you seen it. It's not christmasy you yoga. It's the credit looks christmasy film. I don't hugh grant going door to the youngest prime minster. Excuse me she cecchi terry. Ugandan got to think for fox. I mean like a floppy fringed. Act screws me. Who have you ended up amita east of flock one. Nope you've just started wearing pony which which is a bit of a coin off. Get me flopped. Back you're gonna go on. The world. Wants the flop movements with leon. Moving swiftly So what what are you looking forward to most and keep it goes live christmas. Christmas spirits are. That's nice that's nice though. I bought myself. Christmas presents tonight. A nice line play with jin. Oh you mean spirits of the alcoholic. Variety cautious no interest rates. Any other kinds. Well let's go. Have you reach about surprise presents. No fam forty to walk digestible. What did it no one. Seeing the film twenty three no one even the people in the film. Twenty-three having the from chocolate i suppose why would you see it here. I mean you watch me in film was meant to be stupid. Addison copied from court of justice. It was meant to commence a camera thing. you like. Pretty coasties the stores this all this weird like squeezing your hands and everything. So this'll be. It doesn't mean the doors open cops for those who don't know the story. That film film stars don't die in liverpool. Which i think was oscar-nominated julie walters in billy elliot julia. I was an extra in it. And we went to see a toll. Becker the bit that i was just about to make my parents in and it sends us. My parents was on the cutting room floor to you. Jeff and maybe maybe tamie. Shaver fucking moustache. Aside bans in the moustache. Macy's coffer for today's love about my fail film career. I am looking forward. I'll be pathetically on the back. I've bought a couple of scary looking books that i i'm going to jump into the christmas period. It's if we get the is often think. Oh christmas and you think all holidays for because what's going on in my work situation at the minute because in an event industry would load to constellations loads of exchange blow to refund. I'm not going to get much of break really sadly what scares this. We're going to stay into pocono. Yeah i know. I got so often the lesser into my boss. Please and say please amend this. Kevin needs to be full of the christmas spirit. So yeah on sunday. Of course we will be doing a proper full length. Episode will be asking. How you christmas gem you want to respond to. What are you laughing about. Over and yeah. I sincerely hope that you have a splendid. Christmas goes back occurring with erupting there. If you go to the guys in regards to them having a wonderful christmas do everyone full-time on two different this year. And that's okay. I'm just. I was trying to be positive about him. Make the best with what you've got that's all you can do be how you how you envisaged it but you can still just make it nice feazel. That's a very good point becker. Actually it's speaking to one of our listeners. By the medium of facebook ono solo by the medium of email through the day and i won't say the person's name because it's yet but they were basically saying due to the ongoing situation with covid they literally just because you know the with the restrictions change in every day yesterday owes near stable very this week. They've just found that the daughter won't be able to join for christmas law on the plan. The big lovely family and new devastated about bought they with the same email. Said you know the the after a few hours that donald perspective wise that you know people have gotten much worse and all the other very good outlook but it still doesn't make it any easier decided. Just try and make the best with what you've got like for example if he used to having a big family thing and you contrast funding thing and he started about that little things that you can do that will make it as good as it can be just for you so like maybe christmas eve. You really liked christmas in any you lock something you know if that's what you make it as good as you come for you. Yeah that's a good point and listen the thing. Well see the thing. The thing about this year is says this now me do not actual jerry springer piece. The thing about this year is everyone's in the same boat. And i know that some people are in different sized boats and different conditions based on same storm. Bromo same storms. Some people just more protected than others but we all are in the same storm and which is going to write this year off k. Enroll right off together and if you add anything that you can take from. It's all good for you fair. And if you haven't don't worry brightest guys are on their way at some points and a guarantee that this time next year you'll still be listened to awful about ghosts just hopefully without a mask. Roger grid is a universal term face. Now okay well an brown face. It's not the time to do it because we'll do this on the sunday. One which is just before new year. Of course. But i do want to thank you all for this this year after all your support. They've shown jerem what's been insane if everyone in the world and you know like backwards you're talking about area you've still managed to do. Things like supports the charity that we went on and help us by hampers for people which is just fantastic disappointment. We release the book. Young owned approaches being absolutely amazed to the podcast. You're not just good. People asked people and i sincerely me enough from the bottom of my swinging brick. So okay then you wonderful people. We will speak to you on sunday for its swift smith special. Hold the people that you love close if you can if you can't zoom the people that you love and don't worry we're going to get through this together and father christmas. May he pay you a visit and get you something very nice. And if he doesn't pay you visit then you've clearly be very not unusual recommend lunging alive jin three go straight from the elves mouth where off to wrap all cats. The neighbors cots gift ship. She has no idea what's go. She doesn't know what christmas is. we do. Need to show the true meaning of cadmus. Okay then guys. We love you all jingle bells before you know these things anyway so struggle to win things which bodes well for you. If you split means will never happen. It'd be drugs four surely points today. I haven't done a christmas panther this year of in the last two years after the almost to you. That's a shame isn't it. Don't worry it will be back next year. You look you look at things and that yeah have a fantastic christmas. Everyone and we will speak to you at twix smith kitchen. Someone doesn't overtook mrs. And you think it's like a chocolate bar celebration. It's period in between christmas and new year 'twixt the took smith's okay then guys i've rambled too much. It's touchy by from me and see the neighbor's cats if you'd like to say goodbye. Goodbye com com secret. By or way. I don't get the cockpit so she speaks. Okay then people. I love you all touchy jingle bell by.

anglada becker vulcan studios shirazi hera tracy middle summit kelly bonte Savelli Roy super weyrich seora soltero liverpool titanic hotel noam alcatel michael beca okamoto becca Becker Nola
Thor - Put a Korg in it

For Your Reference

48:45 min | 4 months ago

Thor - Put a Korg in it

"Kiana friends and lovers. Welcome to the second reference day gus station and essentially what that means is because our italian i defied hlinka's not just movie wise but also food wise. We do like to go to the cloth napkin sort of establishments sometimes even with a champagne. Charlie urgency so welcome. This is going to be a month long celebration of tantalizing tyco. Why today tastes owns again. We said wink is welcome. Friends and lovers We have covered miyazaki as. I'll i referenced. Gus station we would employ you to digest What we covered in our first year of podcasting also. Welcome you along the journey. He interestingly enough We did have the aim of covering here modo torah for this particular reference. The gas station. But i came across some really interesting information about taika and i just wanted to quickly share that with you guys just so you're aware of it. We talk about diversity. A lot in front of the screen behind the screen Taika tell some very inch la personal stories as well as big blockbusters as we're getting through. Today he worked with screen australia when they were filming. Thor ragnarok in australia to help get internships with indigenous talent in australia to get involved. We also see shari saban's who plays and as guardian mother. We also see stephen oliva from black comedy in the beit shortly lived. But very much delightful. I just want to read a quick court from taika in regards to this. Whenever i do my films. I make sure we try to get any locals. Who might be interested in the film industry to come along and get some work experience. Just sit around on set and see how it's done. Because i never had that opportunity when i was a kid for an us. And that's exactly the way to do it. I'm very excited. You know. I do feel and i'm very excited to see many more films. Many more hurtful awards to come with titus career but why not celebrate him now so stop in friends and lovers and delight yourself without month long celebration. Let's get on with the station Skull friends and lovers welcome back to the year reference caused go got katie and not stretch those bockel fingers for our freaky circle. Rendezvous with thaw ratner rock this week. Very nice who as you would have heard from the insurer. This is our very special reference. Diga station this is what we cover tyco's filmography. Interestingly enough. I think this is the second time. Only that we've covered a marvel franchise but also when covering the franchise or early covering thor ragnarok. But because we learned even in the most comic book of sense we did watch the first to just to help us feel the difference and be able to say distinctive styles of taika in this film. So let's over the stats. We have direct of tyco whitey. We have riders of pinson. Craig kyle and christopher l. Joost there was also a very nice stanley film. It was released in october of two thousand seventeen. It has a very champagne caught budget of one hundred and eighty million dollars. He's very interesting. Aside from the intro that we gave at the start of the reference diga station. We do feel like this first tasting. This first course is really a way to get the pallet ready. It's the most accessible Obviously as we continue through tyco's filmography the budgets will be completely different We have a worldwide gross of eight hundred and fifty three point. Nine million denial. I think i'm in the wrong law. We have cost of chris hemsworth. Tom hilson cate blanchett. And a whole slew of some specific Star rose in ragnarok particularly so welcome. Welcome welcome a you have made it just in time for your reservation at the reference degaulle station. If this is the first time you a dining al verbal podcast today We usually go through a filmography in this case we seem to be going in the theme of directors but it could definitely change in the future and we like to talk about common or recurring themes throughout the filmography. In this case. Full tyco whitey. So before we get to the specific themes let's go into general first impressions because this is the first call. Feel free to give your first impressions of taika as well And also you know. This thought franchise and then ragnarok specifically spoilers paulo just in case will own dietary requirements. Aren't you reckon. Exactly i think i was fatigues from four especially of the. The dog world came out. I watched it on a just sucked the life out of me. So when rug moore came out. I think i took about a year before i even watched it yet so to. This is my second rewatch and loved it. It's the best of the three by a distant mile. yep could see tyco's qualities shine through. I think we get to the themes kind of see the patterns and it was really fun. I didn't. I didn't feel like i needed to look at the time to see how much times remaining flowed through. It was really interesting to just hear different accents. As well call was specifically fontana larry's spring the bringing the q. Humor can you talk about accents and talk about how beloved colombian even noticed that was even realize those from the fact that he's a kiwi that voice the have manmade. Yeah because you didn't even notice it. Until i told you. And he's still kind of didn't believe me cold by odds and listen to his voice and he was just It was our boy man. There boy In question Mice are when it comes to tigers. Walk one of these introductions to me at least was his walk on hot for the people which was an office hit. And it's one of the things i was like bringing home to cater to have to watch you know One of the best movers in sixteen mile opinion. Oh cute enough. That is a course later on in the reference daego station to if your nest Let's let's from my first impressions. I've heard about boy a lot And maybe i need to give my cod back to someone. Because i still having watched it and knowing that we were going to cover tigers filmography. I was like okay. We'll let me just watch it with a bunch of his films together But yeah so it was. It was in my brown circles. But i just never got around to it. It was one of those. What i thought whiplash was gonna be like guaranteed quality when of our wanna tap into it but hopefully it doesn't disappoint me in the same way. Obviously i'm aware of tyco also at the same time if you've watched an interview if you've watched him except an award You get the gist of him. And it's very clear when he creates a film even a blockbuster like thor ragnarok specifically in regards to the full franchise You know we've we've been around for a while we also existed while endgame came out so you're probably wondering way that episode is it did not get lost to the gods Kt swingset better than our t. And that's why we don't have side from black panther. This is the marvel movie that we've covered on our podcast. And you know th there's a formula to it and we'll talk about the film specifically after we talk about the themes. I'm not necessarily a fan of marvel just just as a goto sort of Point of entertainment Thought this was definitely the best out of the franchise. I would say okay. So let's get into the themes we also put the feelers out there to al patrons if they wanted to contribute say you'll hear some feedback and some contributions in regards to that. So let's talk generally about the directing of tho- ragnarok. How did you feel about the directing who said this was the better thal by country. Molly opinion We could see tigers qualities. Shine through in this on just elevating the story to a level where every every sort of similar short it was either it nails this comedic effects of sometimes seem cheesy. If it's all it's all can tho bossing bonte or having bonte willie For me in regards to the directing elicits boss shaky cam. I don't really notice the difference in directing. And maybe that's just something i need to refine my with. I feel like there are a lot of Fundamentals to directing And in regards to the dialogue and how that matches the grandiose nature of as god and how we transition into sokoto this so many different worlds that which reversing and i feel like the directing really followed that i feel like with taika such a great guy and he's a lot of fun to be around. Even if you watch a lot of the interviews behind the scenes on set he is. He is a whole entity of energy. Right i feel like tyke is kind of like that funtasia that you have in school either. Way the work's going to get done. It's just you enjoy the process more when you have someone like tyco around so in regards to the directing. Maybe we'll see more of it in his more personal Or more sort of inshallah sort of films but for for a film like this to me. Yeah it it. It ticks all the boxes. Yeah i'm not sure there's an extradition too much. On what like disobeys level to this kind of movies of where the story and the action sequences and trying to meet this auto base level expectation that suspicion especially for the sort of a wide audience rates is trying to care too. there's a level of give or take yep and like you said. I completely agree in his more personal projects. We get to see more of who we is director compared to what we saw on ragnarok fault of tyco anything like that. It's just about all the project faces and the scale of which marvel is in the entertainment industry and what people expect to fall much By thought he he did quite well. He did quite well. He brought in new talent which was interesting to see either talent on a global stage. Exactly exactly and those something leftover from at least we didn't see in the last two movies so it was. It was really exciting to see and hear all right. Well let's sync. How non vampire. 'cause we're not in the shatters yet teeth into the themes that we have for tigers filmography grab. You'll school cod friends and lovers. We are starting off with the turn. Tiger is known for his taika. Quick 'isms pointed on the podcast And having an eccentric sort of turn we have our lovely patron ben Chiming in comedy as a way of dealing with harsh reality. So how did you feel in regards to the turn of Rock and whether it met these quirk 'isms it did. But i wouldn't put it down as taika quality especially in this movie because i feel like all marvel movies. Follow this sort of formula where they don't wanna link on anything to emotional cause in one line you have this sort of emotional buildup or emotional senior emotional line and then it will be followed up by a quasi one liner comedic quandary for something that s just. Yeah you could have lingering very but that's an emotional burn stopper exactly exactly. Yeah exactly. it's it's within the scaffolds within the structure of marvel so who's to say how much of it is tiger and how much of it is I do agree. I feel like it was the intersection of the popularity of marvel and the marvelous -ness of tyco. I'm going to so that show marvelous. Tyco white wash me win. All the wolves. Alex ball stain on it as well. Because you know even watching the first thought movie. It was a little off center. It was selling very traditional norse mythology but there was still some you know offbeat sorta moments particularly with jennings and also natalie portman. not an. She's still speaks to an existence in the marvel universe but they are So so that tone was already brewing. Before taika came along but it completely crescendo rd in general so i think it was a perfect marriage of marvel and definitely better executed whereas in the ali move is found sort of offset on putting odd. I it was. That literacy will similar those those sort of weird. It didn't feel corny. Some of the hill too corny. Okay inasmuch as yeah. It's a blind mob movie. I'm not saying that it was bit. Corgi wasn't it. Yeah yeah. But what what i will say turnley about four ragnarok in particular was it worked it worked absolutely. And i found myself giggle. Giggling every time coca came on the screen And the reason why. I started to identify a while. We're watching the film. Was it not to say that. It's only geared towards koa sasha stralia audiences and maybe even brittania and in some cases. But it's nice to have things that we can understand right. There's a lot of the times when you watch films even within this film look at me. I'm calling it a film. Take away my sinophile credits. If i have any but you this so much americanisms that we just get used to consuming. So it's nice to have you know even the spaceships named after holden. 'cause which austrailia ustralian the commodore most famously for orgies. I'm sure there's a fact sheet somewhere in the world great it out us nerds But it was nice to. Have you know that niche sort of comedy and the reason why it hits even hot all win. You know tyco cole was on. The screen was because of his accent as well. It made me feel great. And that's why. I'm very excited to continue on with boy. And what we do in the shadows and hunt full the would of people. Because that's exactly where it's going to hit on exactly. I don't remember when we're just watching before even call came into the screen. And i think you had gone down a bit in july. Not sure about this movie called came in and you really it's up. You lit up immediately and do you know. It's a gift on a curse because every time seoul was talking. I just imagined taika saying to chris. Hemsworth You know what i mean and kind of what i was enjoying. I could also imagine taika impersonating the incredible hulk right and while we're on this i don't know i. I did in the early days. The first year of podcasts. I did find a way to go on my rent. About mach ruffalo. But what i will say about mark ruffalo is i only want him in two instances him as the actual hoke and spotlight. That's the only time i want. A witness mapra flirt. I think he's done some solid walk outside of mauled. Oh yeah absolutely. But those are my preferences You know like. I said i prefer you. I only prefer those two parts of mark ruffalo. let's move on to the storytelling of thor. Ragnarok sir taika usually has a central of belonging sir shadows to smoke and mirrors patrons. All of those films have a common thread of her and finding your place in it. Do you think that hit the mock rag knock. I think One of the biggest things at least end-run drug is as good isn't the place. It's the people vomit law seem between thorne odin of my god. Eventually we're going to get to tenant and you're going to hear how i feel about ten but our friends in love is when you're watching something usually it's dialogue sometimes. It's a visual cue. But something will happen in a film and you'll realize that this is not for you you might enjoy it to a degree but you realize that this movie is not for you and that whole sequence after desire and earn really thinks he's saying something you've only got one eye but even with bo fis you could only see tall fool succession for call. Suzy saying in that same on tho had just lost his by the like. But i don't buy harbor county defeat. What do you mean. You're the god of hamas which is interesting because It was up until then been fully reliant on the hammer with other how he barely could do sheet. Oh so it was like a full suckled. Realization of who thought is partners character in this wall so definitely finding finding he's belonging in the wall in the cosmos and fully embracing it in regards to the theme of belonging and finding his way her literally the through line of this film even interviews with taika. He does talk about you. Know because there's a lot of annoying interviews asking. How do you think you can direct a hollywood film right. that's ex- all of them actually sound like that. They all sound like fucking dog. So you know tiger. We'll talk about. He always tries to strip it back to you. Know keeping it simple. And where's the emotional attachment and still trying to make his way back home. essentially I didn't have that emotional attachment. But also i wouldn't expect taika to have that responsibility because i didn't have that emotional attachment from the first movie anyway. But i feel like that. Same definitely gets all the ticks off for sure. Let's move onto characters. That tiger has in his filmography. We have childlike. Wonder sir holier from the contrarians. Podcast talks about precocious kids and paul mentions the lovable fool. So do you think we. We ticked off any of those mocks. Definitely the lovable fall in cog you don't think also lovable fool or you think it's attractive. There's like there's like a graph the more attractive you get the less goofy yet. And that's the problem with ryan reynolds. It's like the classic rock episode. Where we have jon hamm flooded. Why have john. How not doing thing wrong is stupid as by the wild. Tell him in a bubble Yeah he's in. A bob and i think that goes back to what you were saying earlier. Like soul thought that the hammer and the loss of it was his whole power right or he's all identity just like such an attractive guy any sort of revealing of having a personality or lack of just shrivels human the sun. Maybe he just can't handle that. Yeah maybe so. Yeah but i. I definitely think that Knocks it out of the park. I don't think we really had kids in this so not so much. Precocious children in this regard. Well we don't know how old kogas june brother the next characters that we have in tyco's filmography is a father son dynamic. Oh we get epson bounds in this. Yeah the pretty much all just about reconnecting with auden and trying to dead him back to god because his exiled for whatever reason and it's very interesting to see that even in the fragile state auden was in You know there's a lot is still ma stover that it. He didn't really tell his children about yet because if helo wasn't there then the his to get swept off. Wait until we have actual film talk. Because i have a lot to say about that whole story definitely. I think it was definitely mad. Oh absolutely absolutely and you know there's sorenson is also lewke and erdan I think i i. I don't know where else i can say this. But we recently finished the history channel series. Vikings so watching the full franchise after finishing the masterpiece series. That is vikings. four did feel like the kids version. The very watered down version even though we did have stellan skarsgard because i was wondering why we saw him in the first and then it kind of connected together because these were the the ridiculous child stories. He was told as a kid. Another trademark of tigers filmography is. He makes some sort of cameo. And i think we've kind of already touched on it in caucus isn't it. Yeah absolutely so. We've definitely met that one as well loss name before we get to the actual film real people. So this is ben makes another appearance and he talks about real people as fantasy. Figures are Josiah rabbit most famously with hit law. I don't think does any room for that. In this model you do have four and odin and you know even the valkyrie as well but that existed even before thor ragnarok so i would say in this particular instance will there is of the themes and Continue to cape your recyclables scorecards because we will continue on with the courses of the station. Now we're going to continue on with the film. In general i care. Where do you wanna stop. Because there's a lot that happens in ragnarok there's a whole we have the opportunities to space section With gladiatorial battles in space with jeff goldblum otherwise known as the grand mazda will have the essentially all of the norse law You know of odin and hella. Thor loki scourge. If you're nasty in some instances also we have idris. Elba making a reappearance as well and i just wanna say i was. I was paying attention. And trying to point your attention to shari stevens and you busy looking at it. Just look at me. i'm a true he sure you sure. Where do you want to stop my love. The biggest one of all for all right I think this was a moment in full story away from the fucking relationship with bloody jane. I cannot stand in movies to man especially in superhero movies. Come on. That's all people here for but i think it's also you would getting some trigger moments of tarzan and jane. He had like a moth a moment. Just couldn't do this. It felt like at addi me where they just met in like two seconds and then the best friends. Oh yeah 'cause generals going on in the fos- movie that been to known each other for five days. These fucking attractive. Do you forget the power of attraction my love no. I just felt like daisies. I could not our so glad those no nonsense in ragnar. I think that's what mitt elevated elevated the story line a bit more because now focusing different now really focusing on thaw and outside of all destruction we're focusing on him finding himself as his own person. You know where he belongs who he is and he doesn't even realize it is the waiting to exhale for putting much and you know what's you what's really weird when he gets exiled in the foster. It's more about him. Not knowing who is a possum right and that how out argue that in-drug rock. He found himself a million times more or knew who he was more than in the fast moving because in the first movie was just a matter of getting some mange jay from between mangin and he was like. Oh yeah make. I'm all he'll come on hamas looking all the birds ridiculous. Jesus who wrote this. Yeah so definitely adding some more writing chops or at least people who wrote better end. This helped a whole lot more. But i i think it's also a matter of priming the public for superhero soda movies. Because even the i thought it is very cut and dry. It's very straightforward And in that way it makes it the weakest of the series. Because why don't you just go and watch vikings or even just one of the opening sequences an american gods were. They betray the vikings as well. Like it was a very inferior portrayal of viking. So you i. It wasn't hitting all the marks in that sense and emotionally. We didn't catch but also at the same time of seoul was very early. As far as i know in my limited non existent knowledge of mcu. So they will probably keeping it very safe in regards to their perch and then as everyone it to love marvel paying fifty bucks one hundred bucks at the cinema. You'll continue to pay fifty bucks one hundred bucks more for the limited edition. Tho- copy you. Know what i mean and i think the foster was just super nondescript and to the point where thank the hama had more corrected had mohammed development in the movie series. Anything the hammer was pounding more than four was. Yeah jay or can you say about all that. I think we get to see him evolve. It was very bratty. He was very emerges from prince of egypt and he was brought in the fall absolutely at least to get someone who has a semblance of responsibility who knows He yaas to do better not only for his people So it just made the story a whole or more enjoyable for me. Yeah and i agree with that. But i think that's just more the prime ability of the people's langley we'll need to be More likely to be able to enjoy it. You know what i mean like. People aren't ready to look out of the debt corners shady corners of the world to say they like on me. You know what i mean like. Now it's generally accepted that you know. I it's fine to like superhero movies and you even have a-list Coming onto marvel movies and also at the same time. We're going to see more specific. Sorta stories Shanxi first so. We're seeing more different of stories but at the same time i don't think it would have been able to have been delivered earlier in the marvel cycle. People needed to be ready for it. Maybe so maybe so. I could see some sense in the I think what was interesting things in this as well as farting fighting scenes. The early fighting i cared about was the loss war the way he talked to raden even from what i could see. It was by led zeppelin but it was called the immigrant song. So you know. I'll need to do some research. Process will be greeting me. What do you need to immigrate if you if as god was inside of you all the time to close the space will But i do need to give some kudos to chris hemsworth even though i do remember him as kim in hermit away he had very controversial storyline. And i guess this just talks to how the times were because this wasn't very contra vast seattle but he was a young guy and he was with an oda gal was like the early two thousand so that was controversial For herman away. But we're not getting into a little towns. No caught me kocsis just yet so. I'm not talking about Chris hemsworth acting ability. But i will say he really came into his own as though there are many more years to come for. Chris hemsworth So i guess it depends on what sort of consumer you all whether this solidifies him. As though many times when. We'll watching the i thaw and i just saw him sitting there as chris. Hemsworth on the six cents i talked about bruce willis and how i could say acting. This could just see. Chris hemsworth sitting breaking coffee cups. Look i didn't see full there but maybe it was just working out the kinks but in any case when we get the full ragnarok as fully in his element you know even having teicher at the helm as well was probably a great experience for him him and the best scenes i will say him and called number one moments for me in the film then him and the hulk and then the last battle but not really the whole battle kind of just where he gets the thunder and he starts zapping people with his immigrant. Song stopping. It sounds a molly mix of i. I definitely came to enjoy his performance more here. Because i felt like now he had fully realize his role in he fully realized himself in the role and everything just seemed more those this cohesion about everything that he did. Yeah and how interactive is cost. Pay will be the hulk vol kore- i think part of the has to do a lot of good directions that Tag i was doing at the helm. Can we pull some sip on the concrete for vol. Stag are ray. Stevenson are titus polar. Black bed you didn't want to believe that he was killed off right. Just thinking those knife. Through the chester decorative. I am just like he's he's too much and i'm i don't prescribe to you know that whole masculinity but he is a whole man and you yet to fight me on the fact that leave your in plebs you'd sit there watching golf. Gladiators big being ripped off me to perform goes. It's been a law since we've reference plebs. I'm glad it's back on the. Because yeah but i wanna talk a bit more about burden and hella specifically and i think this comes to mike gripe with i guess mainstream films in general but i guess sal refined my battle today to the marvel sort of films You know it's available and consumable for younger children. I think that also brings a misconception. That all superhero movies of kids. Because i remember. We went to go and watch batman versus superman. Even joker and kids were in the cinema with becomes a whole problem. But that's a whole parenting thing. And i'm not gonna parent any children. Even the ot tells me got children all over the world. I'm not parenting. anyone right. But in regards to the whole perch to marvel is it is edgy. You know they even talk about the word g so i guess that's a fun discussion for parents when they get home but they just get to the line without crossing it. So it is consumable Across a lot of demographics Around the world but also what that means is. You can't really dive deep into real pain. You just talk about the suffering of people and then you just do some stupid joke or the ball hits you in the face. When you throw it against the wall and it really inhibits the ability to be able to dig a bit deeper. And that's exactly the fault that i see not in my stars not in your stars but it's the vote that i say in these stars right lucky and hella in particular what really bothers me and what i don't really castle in film Characters that just come off very one dimensional specifically in regards to them just being evil right then being scornful and You know we haven't really captured mulan at least not main podcasts. On our patriot we have In regards to where that just doesn't work right. And i feel like even lookie from the start. He was just the brother that was in the shadow of tho- so naturally you're going to bring some sort of resentment right even before lewke knew that he was adopted. He had that back for that. He wasn't that blonde hair. Blue eyed all norse gods thaw so you know. It's american nice eagles in everything. Blood eagle if you're vikings nasty So i guess just focusing loki for a second. I didn't really buy into the fact that he was email right. I didn't really buy into that. I just saw him as a brother with a successful sibling while he did try to kill people in avengers so that didn't happen in the first thought right so i'm saying as we build the lewke sort of character that was even that vulnerable moment that they had in the elevator with was like we don't need to see each other off to this and you know if you have that scrutinous. I even while watching a marvel film. You could see that. Lewke had a sense of vulnerability about him and that's not actually what he wanted. But like you said we don't leave in a sense. We don't live in a world of wonder ability in this which is weird because i think when you mentioned about hella and odin. There's this rich story. Oh yeah absolutely. They rushed it off. Where where in i can point out to movies. Like blockbuster. were fully embraced the villainy all those processes don don especially women. How villains like kill manga hellos coming from that perspective mate. We killed people for this. They'll build got with golden towels golden flaws chairs from stolen fucking. Golly where do you think came from full exactly. Think of privilege came from now. Now that i've done all that. I'm older now i can just switch and be like. Oh now i'm all good novel about. I'm a righteous king. He's right off. Hello was fully writing a reaction here in wanting to conquer the because that's how she was she was she was born to do. She's born with cate. Blanchett was giving me body audience. Can i say wow. What a woman. I'm not sure how. I felt like she she. She did well in the role because she excels she's can excel blanchett. Constancy blunt sets desalegn started. Iraj does in the night away. I tap into your inception james. My life we live in edmonton world anyway. But what i was saying. I really obviously yeah. She's great and she tackled it. well the but it was interesting saying her. Switch up to something that leaned into comedy. Maybe that's just my lack of breadth In regards to my blanchet viewing but hella yet -solutely absolutely and again. I guess it's very easy to blame it on the rating and to blame it on the mainstream Accessibility of the film. But let's be real and we talked about this prince of egypt episode. Maybe someone needs to stop us. Maybe we're supposed to have a conversation you know. correspondent to the rating. But we go all the way there if you nasty friends and lovers but let's talk about it. Civilizations would not one through fanfare and goodwill they will one by overthrowing people with power. And that's exactly what odin and hella did in that particular instance. There's nothing really wrong with that. If we go back to the series of vikings we had regna who wrestling love and peace and power in the tv show but he was. He was when he needed to be. But you had roller. Who was the right hand man. And he didn't really have a sense of what was too but he was the guy that you go to when you need to get done. Roller was hella in the vikings right four blocks which is a german series that way currently washing and we're going to cover on the cost. We have a bus and we will have ali ternan hamady in any case you have to do. I see that is there for the violent sort of actions that maybe you would take but they take it even further and then your the more discerning leader that makes the decisions and that's who earn was right but his hands on free of the blood. And i think that's part of it because if you listen to a lot of hellas dialogue albeit very spa us you can see that. There's a lot of hurtful because she was just doing what was agreed they were going to take just because ordering got ta doesn't mean she all hallows house to back off. Yeah exactly it was. It was ridiculous that it was just slipped under the rug. And now we had this villain who start really valid. She's being gas live byron. Father men parents can fuck you up. And that is the tagline. If ever we've had one aside from being flicking daily because it's good for the doctor. Wow yeah but i do feel like there was a lot more to hella than just her being bad while i really do feel like they leaned into energy in blockbuster was killed along than they did with heller on the just made jala just like just about which wasn't nabet kill manga kind of just became another villain like going. Listen to our very first episode of the podcast. Because i did have qualms with the way that they vilnai's kill manga because if i was a kid in the nineties in oakland california and i was left oakland yeah donald glover give us an atlanta but then again you're a creative genius so you can do whatever you like and we'll follow you But yeah i will definitely go on a rampage much. Like you'll manga as well but we've come to find that i am the one with the swift sword on this podcast. The through parasite be it through l. b. through many of the social commentary films And allegories that we cover on this podcast but yet hella definitely had a lot of layers to her. And i feel like it was kind of swept under the rug. I guess to deal with other storylines Yeah but she definitely deserves a lot more credit than she was given on the film. I think another character that i wish we got a bit more not necessarily screen time because we did see a lot of valkyrie but she did come off very one-dimensional like i don't really care for the characters that are really like stubborn and and the world is against them because you know just by the device of the film even without knowing later on the avengers endgame for example you know that. She's going to join their team. So why are we doing this back and forth especially because we have no rounded out sort of dimension to her which we laid get to seeing the film but it was just all of her gruff sort of interactions with a necessary to me. Yeah she came off really weirdly up until we started to see more of our and out this understand that i think once we saw the vision. Yeah boss look dasa forehead. As she we saw she had gone through and she started opening up being more of a character. The weakest dot liking resonating meeting with like rosalie from twilight. Well tori reminded me of the whole tour. But yeah like i just. It's always the classic sort of tortured hero you know. It's beaten to death by now. It's interesting that a name valkyrie either. 'cause isn't valkyrie. The name amentities not necessarily all the remaining one. So she's embodying all of the volkers. Okay odin welcome. All under the rug made as we are expanding the cost. I do wanna give a shout out to rachel house who plays topaz who you kind of say on the right hand. Side of the grand mazda. She finds a very nice way to explain slaves because the grandmas doesn't like it. I think it was prison as we've jobs Yeah also shot out as well because we recently saw her in seoul as she is also in huntsville the world of people which will be on course in the state station. St you have any other cost. You wanna shout out a fake dotson. Shot to luke ramseth. Who played thor in the play. I thought you meant the the heads of keenan thompson for missing now. Yeah and then. Also matt damon Was also in the play as well right so i just wanna bring a point here. Love ask you a question okay. So how sutra that. The guy that dole fights beats the start. Then who ends up destroying osgood of the end or probably killing heller in the process So what was your take on that well just to clarify. I think the prophecy was he was going to destroy god and in the process destroy hell though was the only way helical get destroyed. But we have okay. So there's this tunnel flame apparently stolen from such a and you know we. Hello walking down the corridor. Whole walking down the corridor the vault and saying how things are like air not stroud wake week and then she ends up eternal flame. She's all now. This is true pao for someone who knows all those artifacts could. She knows the he's still plays better than anyone else. Yeah absolutely. I just feel like there was a loophole. Where where you can't have hell knowing all this and then walk past the moscow and be like that doesn't play a part in my or doesn't pose a threat to me because war all it also goes back to the point that you were saying with though because he knocked those antlers off flight in two minutes no apparent to the theory. Is that or at least my thinking. Is that the startling will move. When fights him his weakened state because he does have they tunnel flame or some shit so but he saw beating him at a fraction of his power so by the hand of it is full blown. Paul argument. isn't that angle. Your argument is that heller. Should've nerd should've known she of helen on insecure episode. You'd have been selling only nice. I love that Season five on the way friends in love for sure. Yeah it did feel weird. 'cause i dunno i at first i thought it was going to be the power of friendship that was going to defeat hella But it became very cle- especially when scourge alcohol urban know how to really pretty. He actually had a pretty cool Sort of jumped from the ship was like for us. God and then he went and then he started shooting everyone with his rifle until he really easily got. Stabbed ella Sorry it was made very clear. That helo wasn't going to be defeated that waiter. The paul hierarchy in this is so messed up like black clover like it was similar to pacific rim and it was similar to more dole We have we have audience saying thor. You're stronger bates putting all his effort by into a bloody and does belly scratches. Hello he met philosophically theoretically not literally or. Apparently zachary levi. Chuck was in this movie. We'll see elle's good fun drought. Wow i did not see him at all. Who who like any first tasting of a wanker data station all of our paletta urban not just our mouths. And we are ready to indulge in all of the delights. Usually this is where we do for your friends. But because this is a set curated Sorta dig station. We have some very tantalizing films for you to divulge in. Thank you so much friends in lavas joining us on this. Mammoth ragnarok ish Episode today and thank you for continuing to join us on a month. Long celebration of tantalizing tyco. Why did he taste -tations. Oh stations yes. I couldn't get the rights to the temptation. It's going to be called mycole instead. I'd go for that asca. Kool g day. How dare you trivialize. Thank you so much if you want to. Continue to hold the banner of arts on twitter and instagram. Where app for your wrath. Put us and email podcasts. Dot com and we're also on apple cost of you like to leave a rating on review and we'll see you on the next causal this reference the gas station chow.

taika tyco chris hemsworth vikings hlinka Thor ragnarok shari saban stephen oliva bockel Diga station Craig kyle christopher l Tom hilson degaulle station fontana larry australia bonte hella
Episode 5  Retirement Planning Part 2: Retirement Fears

The Financial Heartbeat Podcast

22:48 min | 2 years ago

Episode 5 Retirement Planning Part 2: Retirement Fears

"Welcome to the financial heartbeat podcast with Mike cloudy in this podcast. We talk about overcoming the challenges families and business owners face in their financial lives. We discuss big and small life events, the implications. And how to plan ahead and control. What you can let us help you redefine the retirement. That's in front of you into a better one. Now. Bonte today's episode. Hello and welcome back to part two of our podcast with my clock. You dating. Now, we're going to dive into a little bit different of territory with the second part of the podcast. We're going to talk more and more about some of the biggest fears that people have in retirement, so Mike why don't you kind of give us a little bit of color here and give us some direction on where we're going today. Well, yeah, it's interesting because when I sit down with people I sit down with people on a weekly basis. In fact, I just got done with an appointment a little while ago, where I have a business owner that is talking about retiring, but. He's going to do at half time, which is really cool. He's hired a salesperson now to be in his business, and they're going to actually allow him to step back. So he's going to do less selling, but you know, when we sat down, and we talk we it always there are basically four major fears that people have and I actually liked to add a fifth year. The that doesn't make any lists. But I think it's really important, but the four biggest financial fears, especially as living too long. My healthcare costs are gonna go up prices are going to rise too much. And then I picked the absolute worst time to retire in the market crashes, and Matt when you look at those four topics, and then the fifth topic I like to talk about which is a huge fear of retirement is what the heck am I gonna do, you know, people laugh what I say that Matt. But I think there's something to that. You know, what am I going to do tomorrow? What am I going to get up and go accomplish? I mean, especially and again, I do a lot of work with business owners, Matt. And bottom line is is that it will most my business owners the businesses their life. Yeah. So what are they going to do that once they retire? Well, I love that. You talk about that, Mike because I think that's one of the things that separate you from other advisers that fifth point right know, living too long healthcare costs prices rise in the market itself. Those are all very valid concerns. But but some of them are a little bit more of a not necessarily a an outlier, but what is really important is is so many of your business owners identified that's part of who they are as a human when they wake up tomorrow, and they don't have to go to work. You can only do so much fishing and so much golf, man. Right. Well, and that's really it. Because again, you know, part of heart of like this person. I just talked to. I mean, he gets up in the morning he goes in. He gets his people ready to rock and roll. And they go do their things, and he solves problems in the answers phone calls. But then he takes his half or and he goes on has breakfast with a bunch of different business owners at other places. And like you said it's not as much fun to go do that. Probably once you're retired than it is now, but that's why I think it's so important that when you're getting ready to retire, you really sit down and not only do you have to take financial inventory, but you have to take a personal inventory and say, what am I gonna do? Now, I've got all kinds of people doing all kinds of different things. But the biggest thing that I see when people are happy in retirement is yes, the first couple of weeks or the month or a couple of months, it's like being on vacation, Matt. But then one day you wake up and go I'm really not going to go back to work. I think you have to have a plan for one that day happens because you know, heck, it's a concern. I have my golf game, isn't that good? And all the other problem here in urine Michigan. I'm in Wisconsin. Is right now I got him out in the snow behind me. What am I going to do in the winter? You know, so I think it's really important for that business owner to to do it. And in a case like this. If you can figure out a way to stay involved in your business where you're not hurting your. Business. And in this case his partners are excited that he's going to be around. But he's going to get to do the part of the business that he thinks is fun. And he's there to out his expertise. But yet at the other hand he's going to let other people go. And that's the other huge thing though map for a business owner is if you do go into that sort of a style you've gotta step back. You gotta let other people do their thing. You know, we've referred to that in the past like the sage roll the old man in the corner role or the old lady in the corner. They go to to ask questions, but other than that, they're really not to involve. But I think it's interesting that you use that as number five because it's actually very closely tied to number one. So many people are afraid that they're gonna live too long retirement, Mike, but. If you don't have something to retire to your life span is greatly reduced right? That's the biggest thing. I mean, you know, I say to people all the time man by goals too. Heavy retire by choice, one time only. And you know, people are always like, well, of course, you don't want people. No, no, no. You don't understand? I've had a ton of people that have retired by choice. One time. Matt go back to work. You know, because it's like my God I've done this for a few months now, I'm border. I'm ready to, you know, mice boatswain I-, blah, blah, blah, all the different reasons. Sometimes they just wanna go back because it's fun to go back and have a place to go and have people to talk to, you know, have a have a purpose in life. So I think that that's really really really huge. Now what happens on the flip side of that though? So let's say they do have something to retire to. How can we protect them from outliving their money? Well, that's a huge issue in a lot of it is by having. Very good income plan. You must have a plan, and that's one of the biggest fears that people have is that, you know, first and foremost, one of the things that you can do to make sure that you're not gonna outlive. Your money is really have a good spending control because we're I see people making their biggest mistakes and retirement is they come in with the spending. You know, like a set of this is what I'm gonna spend a month. And then they don't realize that those first few years, they're going to spend substantially more. That's why you hire someone like me to be part of your team. Because the first thing I'm gonna do when I look at those numbers is I'm probably going to start multiplying them a bit. Or I'm going to recommend that we build some extra cash or some extra money in a pot slept. When you do find that cool thing that you want to do the one time that you don't go into your long-term assets. The other thing is I think it's paradise that we figure out a way that we protect a base income amount. We need to make sure that we have guaranteed income income that's going to be there. Take care of you. You know, once you're retired. And it's going to cover your essentials be as if that income is going to be there every month. No matter what happens whether that's through your pension through social security through some sort of you know, it can be a whole bunch of different vehicles. It can be just putting money basically having maybe a tenure amount of money in a very safe liquid type account. Bottom line is you have to have a plan. So that no matter what you're not going to live your money. And that's why we sit down with people and one of the things we do as people retires. We set up incompliance, Matt. And I think that's really important. So that you know, where your next paycheck is coming because the one thing you give up when you retire is a paycheck. Absolutely. You know, the wealthy the Uber. Rich have those plans in place, and I know that you have the education in the background to to walk your regular Joe people who are business owners or people living in your community through some of the same techniques for that income that not. A lot of other people know about so I just wanted to highlight that because Mike I've known you for awhile. All right. The next thing that we have to plan for which is absolutely terrifying to me because I've aging parents is healthcare costs what in God's name. Do we do about that? Well, again, there's not a ton that you can do other than you have to be diligent, you know, every year. Now, the biggest thing you have to understand is that if you're going to retire before age sixty five where you can get on Medicare that you really have to have a lot of money put away to take care of those healthcare costs. Now, the good news is once you turn sixty five you are eligible for Medicare. But then every year you need to review your Medicare coverage, you need to make sure that it's going to work, and you need to make sure that it still fits wear you're out, and you know, having that will help sort of offset those healthcare costs the other thing that you have we talk with our clients about as long term care whether or not you if one of yours if you're a husband and a wife. You're going into a nursing home. Do we have you covered for that? What sort of protection is there? And we certainly can talk about that. And then we again in your income plan build hedges in to help pay for that health insurance as the costs go up. Inflation is something that I know a lot of calculators take into a take into account right there. Some great financial planning tools that help with this. But you were just talking about doing some multiple -cation. How does one even have an idea on what inflation or increases in cost of living are going to be has there been a consistent average over the last fifty years? Well, you know, a lot of people use four percent, honestly met. I it really depends on the the area you're in. And then the other problem with inflation is what they count do. You know, Matt that the consumer price index doesn't actually even put fuel or gas or any of that unit. You know, they typically don't even have a whole bunch of things that they take out all the volatile things. Well, isn't that sort of crazy? Matt don't you have the stuff that's going to go up in the index will absolutely in the fact that, you know, gas prices just within the last ten years of fluctuated by SoHo much, oh my. Goodness. Yeah. You never assure. I mean, it could be four dollars or it could be two dollars. But bottom line is again what we try to do. I try to build a fortified percents sort of factor in. So that you know that every five years no matter what you're going to get a raise. That's how we build our plans. And then we sit down we talk about do we want it to be three percent. Do we want it to be four percent? Do we want it to be five percent? It's really up to you and me to talk about and figure out what makes the most sense. But again, you put that into the plan and a lot of times what I'll do mad matters show people a couple of different shots. I'll show you what a two percent looks like. But then also show you what a five percent looks like. And that shows you how much money you have to have before you retire to say stay at that same standard of living that you're currently out. I also like the fact that you can run multiple scenarios like if you sell your house, if you buy a second house, if you downside your house, if you don't buy a new car every three years, I love that you have the opportunity to run a lot of those scenarios because. A lot of people don't know what's going to happen. Tomorrow. Let alone in twenty years. Well, and in this document has to be a living breathing document. I mean, I got a phone call recently from a client who had bought some property, and now she bought through an inheritance got a farm that's next to her property and she wants her daughter to move into this property and her daughters gonna buy it from her over time and payer, but we needed to come up with some cash. So that they could fix it up. You know? Yes, we were able to go in and we put the plan together because thou she'll get some different income from her daughter, and we're able to figure out. Okay. It makes sense while I'm not a big borrower and retirement. But in this case, it made sense to go borrow some money because it will allow the daughter to move into a house, and then we'll pay the mom income. Plus it keeps that property in the family. And that's one of the things we do mad is we sit down with our people as life happens because the one thing I'm sure of. Is whatever we plan for tomorrow. Matt do you think it's going to happen? Exactly. That way. Oh, man. I wish that was the kids. I've done this a long time. The only thing I'm sure of you know, I was just saying that to my wife. I mean when I look at you know, where my family is. If you had told me, my daughter, Alison would be, you know, who went to Carroll university for theater arts management major man with three and a half years later is now an assistant brand marketing manager at Sartori cheese in Plymouth, Wisconsin. I yeah, I wouldn't. I mean, the the point is it's been a fabulous journey, and she's learned a tonne. But we don't know the one thing I'm sure about life is I don't know where it's going. You know, you can have dreams you can have hopes you can have emissions, but you have to have a financial plan, and you have to have a person that you're working with that as your world changes. It changes you the plan has to change. But I think you also need to have an adviser that there's times I'm going to say, you know, we can do that. But understand by. Doing this. The live too long now comes into play these. I think you hire me to be very direct and very honest. So that three years out of all the sudden, you're saying jeez. I need two thousand dollars a month because I bought this. That's gonna have an effect on your plan. And I think you have to have that honest conversation with your clients. I love that you talk about the gogo slow go, and no go, would you mind telling everybody with those three things are well. Yeah. In the early years. It's gogo. You're going to rock and roll. And you're going to be seeing people, and you're going to be doing things that you're going to be traveling. Now, I'm help I'm hoping a lot of my clients will do that before they actually retire and do that while they're working a lot of companies now are letting people take longer vacations, even if it's not paid, you know, so you could do some of the Gogos then the slow go is where you know, you've done the traveling. You've got a lot of places, and, you know, here's here's the example. Like you. I had a client who you know, he and his wife they would ever year go to Florida. It was they would have fun. They would travel. They always love to go. And we always meet about October because they'd be gone in November. And I'd see him again in April about seven or eight years ago, I called them, and they said, you know, Mike, the good news is we found something out. And I said, well, what's that, you know, the temperature here stays at seventy two degrees. And Matt you're going Mike, you live in Wisconsin. During summer is not seventy two degrees. But it is inside their house. And what he said to me is, you know, Mike, all of our friends that we went to Florida with the we did a lot of them are gone. You don't we'd rather stay with our family here. You know, we don't wanna go anymore. So we're going to stay home. Now that didn't mean that they still couldn't go do things that didn't mean he didn't go play cards every week. It didn't mean that. They didn't go out to eat. It didn't mean that they came. They lived about twenty miles out of town into town. All the time. It just meant that. If it snowed. They didn't go. Yeah. Now, unfortunately, he's in the in the Nogo mode right now, you know, his wife is passed, you know, and now he's an assisted living. And so in the early years, you go go, you spend a lot of money in the middle years is sort of the slow go where you don't typically spend as much, and then the Nogo time is where you actually spend a lot of money because on your typically in some sort of a system like a system. Living where he spending about four thousand dollars a month. And again, the plan has to work to make all of that work. Let's talk about more about the cash flow aspects and debt help us understand how those play a part in having a successful retirement. Well, the first thing I told everybody that I've done this for thirty plus years one of the things I've seen especially with my clients. My clients are general regular everyday workers. You know is if you can go into retirement with as little debt as possible that that's spectacular. I mean, that's exactly what you want to do is have as little as possible. His think about if you've got that mortgage payment that you're paying a thousand or fifteen hundred dollars a month every month, and then that goes away that really helps your cash flow because you know, if you're paying a thousand dollars in a mortgage, you probably have to make about fifteen hundred dollars by the time you pay taxes to do that. So if you can be as close to debt free as you can when you retire. That's huge. Now that doesn't mean you may not have a car loan or may not have a little own here or there or you might have to use a line of credit once in a while. But if you cannot have a big debt, you know, that's really gonna help. Because if you've got those bills paid for obviously need a lot less money to live on. And then what we do is. We just build a plan, which I think is I love the income. The the software that we have and we build a whole bunch of buckets with different expectations and different plants. But what I like about it is like in the first ten years. Matt for me to hit my numbers. I need to earn. Oh, two percent or less item line is we are very very very conservative, which I think is is important, you know, in the top interest rate that we're projecting is is is I think in in most cases seven percent, you know, and that's over like a twenty five year period. Bottom line is we're not going to be super aggressive, and we have some vehicles. If you. Say Mike I want to have guarantees. We've got ways that we can do that with income. So we can build a base plan. That is one hundred percent guaranteed. We can create a private pension. If you want us to now, do you have conversations with people who are really looking to exponentially decrease their expenses, and maybe leave the country or go to move in with their children help help us understand some of the other auxiliary things that you talk about when it comes to a successful retirement. Well, I've had a couple of clients talk about leaving the country, but you know, most people in Wisconsin consider leaving the country like going to Minnesota. Hotline is that is really certainly worked with people in that scenario. But that's not something I run across all the time. I have lately though, but having a whole bunch of my clients, either moving closer to grandkids or moving in, you know, I have one client that they're they're they're son-in-law actually built or bought a property and remodeled it and actually is their parents are renting from them. They live about oh about twenty miles away from them, and basically the son in law because both he and his daughter are professionals. And I mean, the daughter and the daughter was a part of this. I mean, they they talk about the son in law doing it. But bottom line is they wanted them to be closer. And they said, you know, why do you want to own a piece of property anymore? Why don't you just sell your home move up here rent from us? We can use it from a tax standpoint. And it really worked well for everybody. I was a part of it. I worked with the other folks financial. Adviser there. I mean, my clients worked with me, and we put together a heck of a plan that worked really well for everybody. And it was really cool and the key in my clients are ecstatic because now grandma is about twenty minutes away from grandkids the clients are ecstatic because you know, one of the toughest things, and and my wife, and I growing up not having family nearby as what you do Matt. And you've got little ones or had little ones when all of a sudden it's two in the morning, and it's like, oh my God who's going to take care of her kids because they're sick. Yeah. Mine mine. Mine are much like yours. They're they're definitely not as little anymore. But oh my goodness. Do I remember that? And we were in the same situation where we weren't close to family. And we you know, it would have been just great to have grandparents near by all right to ramp up today's podcast. What are some of the like like just kind of wrap this all up in a great bow for us? Well, I mean, you know, so what can you do to have a more sex successful financial retirement set realistic spending limits. I think that's huge have a well-defined income plan for your buckets. This is a big one do not get hijacked by other people. And I bet you met your what what does that mean elaborate on that all of a sudden, you know, somebody calls up and has a great idea of how you should lend the money or how you should give them money, or, you know, I'm all about helping your kids or helping your relatives. But you can't do that at the expense of your own income. So don't allow yourself. To be hijacked, and then really make sure you understand how you're going to be spending your money, especially early on because it will be more than you think it's going to be. And that's why I think it's so important to sit down to help create a plan, and what we do again, I loved to work with people three four five years before retirement. So you can get used to us. So we can get used to you. So we can get your assets. Put in a good place that we can build this plan with some experience over time. We really get to know each other, which I think is is just a great way to go. Mike. Thank you, very very much for walking us through the sedan thought. This was fantastic any any other closing thoughts before we wrap up today. Well, just give us a call at seventy two one six four two. We'd love to sit down. We never charged for an initial visit. We will go over exactly how we work. We'll talk to you about what the cost with the fees are. But we're going to also give you a whole bunch of great ideas. And in we really wanna be your financial coach. That's what we're good at. That's what we do. And we'd love to be part of your financial teeth. If you have not subscribe to the podcast, make sure you click that subscribe now button below that way. Every time Mike comes out with a new podcast will show directly on you're listening device. And if you know somebody who could use this information, it's very very easy to just cook the share button and send this as an Email. See you share it on Facebook or any other social media or even in a text message. So for everybody at cocky investments, this is Matt Halpern. And we'll see on the other side of the Mike very soon. Thank you. For listening to the financial heartbeat podcast with Mike cloudy, but the subscribe button below to be notified when new episodes become available. If you have questions for Mike, please call him at six zero eight seven eight two one six four to visit his website at WWW dot cloudy, financial dot com or stop in for a visit at six thirty five. Second avenue south on Alaska. Wisconsin by four six five zero securities offered through Securities America Inc. Member FINRA SIPC advisory services offered. Through Securities America advisors Inc. Clunky. Investments and insurance does not give legal or tax advice. Fluffy. Investments and insurance insecurities. America inc. Are separate entities.

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Sila Series - An Overview (1/5) | Bhante Bodhidhaja | 5 July 2020

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

1:02:14 hr | 5 months ago

Sila Series - An Overview (1/5) | Bhante Bodhidhaja | 5 July 2020

"The following presentation was recorded at the newberry. Buddhist monastery victoria australia. Please visit our website at n. b. m. dot org dot a u good. So let's move. After paying homage to the buddha dharma and sangha with our chanting to and dhamma talk for this morning. I was hoping to talk about sealer in the next couple of talks. So we kind of. We'll see how that goes. I thought it would be nice to talk about all the different aspects of see like the five precepts that we keep as a basic requirement is buddhist and to hopefully go really into depth a with each individual precept. But when i was looking at this and starting to think about it. I realized that today i might maybe just be able to do an introduction into seila is because it's yeah it's quite important. It's quite a big topic. So sealer very often is translated as virtue or as ethics or as morality. What i really like to call it. I've also heard as a translation is the word habit and the word habits ordered conditioning. They are actually very very close to each other. In the way i think about it. And of course when you talk about sealer we are developing the wholesome habits the wholesome conditioning and then sometimes it's also referred to as character. What how a person behaves. What a person eats but of course we don't want to get too attached to his self because that's something we don't really have been his them. We talk about selflessness so it is a habit or a conditioning. That has happened over time. And that kind of conciliate consolidates were into something. We could col- colloquially character so see means how we think and how we behave in this world but it also means how we feel inside. And i would like to stress that part of it because i feel that is really really important experience. I remember jumper. Molly often really comes down to feeling how we're feeling inside. What the feeling is that. We are spreading into this world. What the feeling is of the people that they get when they are in our presence or in the presence of whoever of animals evolved beings as well and of course also people who have heard me talk. I'd like to talk about habit. But also like to talk about inclination where the mind inclines towards and badly something we can kind of mold stumping. We can condition with. Am this beautiful quality of seila and in the sutras. There is one really nice ceuta that talks about the tree which is leaning in one direction. And because it's leaning in that direction when it actually will be falling it will also falling in that direction in that specific soutar talks about the monastic or the practitioner. Who is leaning towards a practicing the full path and therefore leaning towards navonna. But and this time. I would like it to stress in terms of the mind states that we are creating and that will be there for us in the future. Not just in this life but also in future lives to come. So that's a kind of a little introduction of what might be what definition of salem ip. And because i like to look at it in terms of a habit. I would like to talk a little bit about how we can develop habit. And how does habits con of can remain and stay in place so one important thing i when we talk about habits very often people only think about bad habits and they say i have this bad habit and i can't get out of it and it's all automatic and it's ovo but don't forget habits are also positive you also have positive habits and that's what we're trying to achieve with seila that we developed and put a habit in place and that it becomes at automatic and so on stage and that we just react or we. It's like a reflex it happens automatically and it's something positive so please please are also realized there is those positive habits so we tried to get rid of or let go off maybe a better word that an unwholesome negative habits and developed a positive ones so one thing that is really important also buddhism. We talk about faith which comes first. Maybe another word of faith could be inspiration. Really nice talk or we re to ceuta's or we see a nice example in the world and we go like. Wow this is really yeah. That's that's the right way to go. That's how i would like to be myself so we get inspired. So that is the first wonderful important step but usually with inspiration. The inspiration expires at a certain time. It has like an expiry date and do can't keep it up so it is important to expose yourself and get as much inspiration as you can but it can't be maintained that easily so you use it as a springboard and then the next step that comes eased the intention so it goes a little bit deeper your reflect about what they see la businesses. All why you're doing it and you develop an intention which is a little bit more of commitment that you really really wanna do something and if you really really want to do something and you really really committed to that then the next step of course is the action because if we are just thinking about the beautiful unicorns and rainbows and how we should be treating each other and we might have the best of intentions. We don't really act then. It doesn't really work so one of the things that i wanted to talk about a little bit later. But maybe i can bring it in now is with those precepts. Even if we don't feel in a certain way we can still act if we have enough. Mindfulness if we have enough distance we can still make sure that this mental energy. That might not be that good at a certain time doesn't escape through our body and through our speech and i think that's one way of practicing ceelo of practicing the precepts is to kind of protect this energy of floating out there and getting even worse and kind of falling back onto us later down the track so inspiration intention and then we are acting. We are becoming active and we actually doing something. And if we repeat that action then we have gone through the whole cycle. Because i was a primary school teacher in the pulse. I do know that reputation as the way we learn so in the classroom we would repeat the certain actions and we learned but it doesn't have to be in the classroom where you're kind of trying to have something a little bit artificial at times even in life you know if kids little kids want to learn a language. They want to learn to walk if they wanting to learn to talk they have to repeat they have to kind of practice. So that is the next step right. So those four steps i have a few quotes from. Bj fog which apparently wrote a book tiny habits and i've listened to one of his interviews and one thing that he said really kind of makes sense to me and the quote there is. It's emotions that create habits not repetition. It's the emotion your brain associates with that behavior. So it's like another layer on top of that so it doesn't mean what after said you can put it all out the window but what really kind of makes a habit stay makes a habit. Become automatic is when it ease connected with emotions when it is connected with positive emotions. Not just the kind of inspiration that is there for us. Ford blip but an emotion that gets stirred and that might be like a mood or something that stays with you for a longer period of time or that kind of gets triggered every time when that behaviour comes up and that is actually what can get get you hooked in in the worst cases to some of those substances or whatever it is because there is some kind of positive emotion that east connected to those bad habits. That's what kind of us into the habit loop there sometimes so we have to make sure that we do the same thing with a positive emotions with positive habits that they are connected to an emotion and then as i said before that's also a quote from him. Habits are essentially acquired reflexes. So what a reflex dozen the body is if you have pain in your leg or in your hand because something is hot for example in your burning your hand the reflex makes you pull back that hand before you can even think about it. So it's not something that goes all the way round the finger into your brain and then thinking oh yes all hot better hand back. It's something which happens very very quickly. And that is what happens with presets with seila at a certain stage as well but of course it needs to be developed. So that's kind of like the arch but then another nice quote. I couldn't find exactly the quote. And i couldn't find exactly the person who said it but it goes like this just like the shell does not change its color when it is exposed to fire so to the noble one does not let go of virtuous behavior even if put into testing circumstance est. And that's really what happens When does habits have been established so strongly that as we were saying before they become part of you there interview ovan with what is conditioning process. What this character of this being is and then it becomes very very natural in a few ways how we could think about one way to think about it is that it is a protection and i had a little picture for myself with my powerpoint. I have my private powerpoint here now but you can imagine this. I have a an umbrella which protects us from rain so please think about seila think about the precepts as a protection so it keeps two out of harm's way it makes sure you don't get wet. You can shelter and with the rain. The problem is that if you don't have an umbrella and if you don't have the right clothing which would be which protect you do get soaking wet and now mao yet already starting to get a bit wetter out here. Newbury's you have the rain going sideways and backwards in all. Directions doesn't just come. And even yesterday i was walking down to to the whole here in the morning for breakfast and thought i you know you don't really need an umbrella but because it was so so wet outside. It wasn't really raining. But when i came down here i was. I was quite drenched. So it has glad i could take off my to layer and put it on a on a hook to dry. They're so careful if we get to. Where if we are not protecting ourselves then of course we can get sick and that's the same thing which happens with seila with virtue it kind of knows at us and over time if we own a careful it is something which can pull us down if we don't have that guard if we don't have that protection up the other way i like to think of Of it because now with the rain maybe we're containing all like negative. Stop for a stuff. That is one one sort of defilement. I also like to think about in australia in summer. We have a lot of sun so people have to protect themselves. So see is like sunscreen. Or it's like your sunglasses or it's like your son cap that you're putting on. There's nothing wrong with the sun. The sun is actually important. And it's good. It's should be there. But if we expose ourselves to match to the nice things and those developments come up again how we relate to these things and then we can get caught out and one of those things also. I like to mention here is a wise person even if they get burned one time even if they have sunburn or even if they really wet it does not mean. You don't put the protection on the next time so please learn from those situations and put on the protection next time even if it has gone wrong and otherwise that i've heard John talk about these things out to john. Brown is that it is like an investment. So these days you know. I don't know if people are with the financial situation at the moment if they're still willing to invest in in like houses or stocks or whatever it is because they have realized how uncertain as but was always saying to people for example in singapore that were quite interested in making money with these kind of things he was saying the comma. The good come up. Stock market is something which never crashes so. This is an investment which really makes sense and ease like building or like a home for us in real life. It's wonderful if we have a home where we can go shelter. We can pass it onto our family. But this home in buddhism that we are creating through having virtuous behavior is much much longer lasting. So it's not just a house that you buy in this life and when you die you have to kind of give it to your pass it onto your family. It's like a home that you are creating in this life that you will have access to in a light from life as well. So in those terms these investments are different than of worldly investments. And much less prone to this whole kind of fluctuation that we are experiencing now another way. We could think about it. It's like an insurance when you go to sign your life insurance or your car insurance or your house insurance or whatever it may be you know. Even if they're eased disasters in life and they will happen and we have learned in the last couple of months quickly. They can happen sealer east like an insurance policy. It is actually something which can carry you through those difficult times as well so if your house gets flooded if you get sick if your car is old you will get a new car. Nice model that you have kind of invested in that have paid your policies towards in your next life so it something which carries all over many many lifetimes and that is something which sometimes children into wittily. No and one story i wanted to share with. You is a four one friend of mine. She went to A teacher training college with me. Her name was sonya. And she had an aneurysm in her brain and she died when she was very young she died when she was twenty five and She wasn't like my closest friend but we had quite Quite a lot of interaction during that time and even after the teacher training college and so i had contact with her family. Of course. The family was devastated. And i actually thought of this. Because i i heard in our community in general in australia but also in our community. There was a suicide which happened recently. And that's something which is kind of similar in terms of the age group. It was a young person that That died so i was really impressed. How children all her class. She had a first or second grade country member and dealt with that. So i was already wearing at that time because i was part of the house community in germany in behara almost like car and keeping precepts and then even when i would go back to switzerland to visit my family i would still wear white because i just got used to that so i came into the family and they were all wearing black first of all. Because that's kind of the way of expressing their sadness and the reef and i felt myself apologizing to kind of explain. I'm wearing why. Because that's just what i'm wearing is. It's not a any any statement or anything. And i came into at situation. Not as sad as devastated. They were but i was very happy to just be with them to listen to them to try to care for them and connect with them as much as i could. But there wasn't quite that emotionality. That i was maybe wishing for they could see that i moved but maybe an in a different way day were and they showed me a rose and you know the things that were left over which which happens when these deaths are quite sudden but what they also showed me. It's the letters that the children have written in for her and that was just so beautiful. Those children they they. I don't know if you can say they took it light-heartedly your day. Just they had a completely different approach so they thought about all the wonderful all the good qualities sonya had that they experienced in the classroom that they knew how they knew her and that was basically bringing her seila her virtue out and putting it on a piece of paper and having some drawings and things but what really struck me there when number one was beauty and that was actually something that brought tears to my eyes and i was quite quite happy to have tears in my eyes to kind of it was fitting to that to the situation but it was tears of joy. It wasn't tears of grief it wasn't tiers of of of loss. It was the tiers of seeing her beautiful qualities being some bad written about by those children and one of the other things. That was really nice. I don't think any of these children were buddhists but a few of them were saying we wish you a happy next live. Are we kind of wish. You have a good life wherever you're going. So they had this idea of that is carrying on somewhere and that whatever she has established in this life especially in her heart in her mind in terms of steeler is something which will carry on which will be the air for her which will be a protection which will be that house that that i am talked about before yes or one. Other way of thinking of seila that apparently adjourned cha was using when he was going to lay people's houses and doing the ritual of blessing them with holy water. And that's something which hopefully you can. Now imagine in your mind. Even you don't have the pictures for it. He says water has four wonderful beautiful qualities and they actually fit in very very nicely with as well and one of the things that are jumper. Molly has done a few times. When i was sitting and being his hoop tag or going to like his attendant or going to lunch with him to pursue splicing since co on was that he talked about this. But that he said the water data sprinkling on you guys is actually just a symbol for something. The real a blessing. Ease the blessing that you develop in your heart by keeping seila and that is what will really give you that power in that blessing right so we have the first one. The first quality of water is purity so whiz the precepts we purifying our model and it means very clearly. We'll using water to wash our clothes. We're using water to clean in the kitchen or wherever it is. Water has this quality to dissolve the things batter dirty or that are defiled. Not that nice and to make them pure to make them clear again. So that's quality number one quality number to ease the coolness. We don't really now now. We would want to have hot water thinking winter very nice. We have our own showers in our cookies but usually in australia. It's pretty pretty hot especially in summer. And you know those defiance can be described as a heat that is created in our bodies in our minds and that seila that walter can actually come us. Right down can cool. That's right down so that's another quality of the water there then. Of course we know with the plans like the little trees here behind me. I i don't know if you can see then we have two beautiful body trees that are in here because that's i. They wouldn't survive but they need water. They need water to grow so it is a quality of prosperity so we become prosperous if we have a lot of seila because that is the water for our plant to make it progressed to make it grow and then the last quality each the cohesion of the water so if we have water droplets on the plant kind of see how the water collaborate call or whatever the word is it builds a little droplet and also when we wanna make bread for example and we have an flower. And it's you know all over the place and it's dry and you can't use it for anything really at least or you can have a call from every breathe in but if you add water into it it starts to sign things together. It starts to create harmony so to remember. I tried to put those four quality is as the four. Ps so now. I is purity of the water. The second one is pd for power and that was the coolness so we have power over the situations. So they don't overpower us. We can cool things down and then the progress is the next one so we grow. We prosper and last one to harmony is lost. Pete which is peace right. So the next question i have on the screen here is why see dealer. I hope i've given many many many many reasons so far. Why see but one of the reasons that came to me. That is quite quite specific to buddhism. That i've talked about it. A little bit already is also verge to ease. What makes us human. I don't know if people realize that we are here. Because of virtue if our virtual wouldn't have certain level our rebirth wouldn't be in the human plane so when we think about it in this way it should hopefully encourage us to at least maintain the status quo. And make sure we stay here and we don't fold down into lower realms mentally or even physically later down the track but it also means if we are becoming human if we are If we are humble if we stick to this humanity and behave like a human being we can even go higher. We can be like an angel we can be like data we can improve our status service so to speak and go to different worlds In the buddhist way of thinking about this now some people who have maybe a full finding my or who were thinking in the back of their mind. While i was was talking will say. Hang on bounty. I mean yet. Short fair enough. Virtue has brought us here but didn't put say and fettered by craving and blinded by delusion we keep on this wheel of rebirth and that is what really brings us into existence. Yes that is correct but see is the first very important part to cultivate to practice at who actually work with human existence with what we have been given in what we have achieved so far so of course some some ara that i was talking about there is the perpetual wandering and of course we want to get out of that perpetual wandering. It's like this huge ocean where this little ship and if you don't have any see it's like you don't really have a rather you have nothing to help you in that situation but seila is what keeps afloat. And what gives you direction in your life so that is kind of the first step you as all the out there will know we have sealer. We have samadi and we have to see the first step and seema has to be really solid. It's like a and the ground. We're building a house on and then we can add some which wobbles and then at the end we can add the roof but if we do it the wrong way round. It doesn't really really lost and doesn't work so one of the suitors. I wanted to refer to ease cold similarly with water have printed here for myself if people wanna have look at that. It's good irani kaya st- seven or in the book of the seventh and it's number fifteen so it is called similarly with water but on john brown and a lot of amongst that i've heard talk about this like to talk about it the seven shipwrecked sailors sailors so in ceuta. It doesn't tell you how those things got into the water. It just tells you what happens when they actually are in the water but let's assume they were on a ship on some stage now. They are suddenly thrown into this water and there is seven ways of what happens to them that i wished to read to you here so this is from a john sutarto's translation from ceuta central. And i think john has also put the link there for people if they want to go and have a look so because these seven people found in the world are like those in water. What seven one person sinks under once and stays under one person roses up then sinks under one person rises up then stays put one person rises up then sees and discerns one person rises up then crosses over one person rises up then finds a footing. One person has risen up crossover and gone beyond and that brahman stands on the shore. Still i would like to specify specifically focus on the first couple here but also mentioned the rest of them so the first one goes straight down and basically drowns and that is a similarly for the bad karma for unwholesome actions that have been performed and that can pull us down. That's what i was talking about before. So that would be an existence that comes up. That is unfavorable. That he's not that. Nice then we have the second lawyer who floats for a little while and then goes down so that means we have a person and now here i am. The buddha talks about qualities that have been established in that person at least for a short period of time. So that's why they're floating and those qualities are faith and then we have. He oughta two very important qualities connected to the precepts and connected to seila so. It's moral shane. It's conscience basically as i joined bramante. Sorry urgency charta here translates it so you are realizing it doesn't quite feel right when you're doing something you're saying something or when you're even feeling something so you have a feeling of of of shame. More of even a little bit of guilt not in a bad way but just in a way where you realize this is not. This doesn't feel right like when we are touching something which is hot and we realize that's not good and then oughta is the fear of comic consequences the understanding that what we do how we act. We behave how we feel has consequence so there is a fear connected to that and understanding that. If we're not careful we go down the wrong path. If we are careful we go that the right path so it has two sides of course always and then. We have the energy that i was talking about before as well. The cheetah's starts to build. You have to inspiration. Which is the faith the energy and then mindfulness and some are not mentioned in the suit up. But i guess they're implied because it usually comes in a pack for five and then there is wisdom so they are practiced but now the problem is even though there practiced. We are not diligent. We kind of forget about it. We get pulled all over the place and through all sorts of other things and we forget and then that means we can't maintain it and that's why this shipwreck sailor even though the word is positive qualities and they weren't strong enough to hold onto strong enough to make that person float so the person unfortunately also goes down. The third one floats on the surface and remains. And that's what. I was kind of alluding to before we have seila. We have this wonderful opportunity to be here as human beings so let's at least maintain it and try to even if we lose it that's fine. It happens every manion to get back on the horse. Get back on the bandwagon. Whatever it is back on the train the train of thought but the train of train virtue and then maintain it and practice it so we can actually stay afloat so that was the third one and then the fourth one remains on the surface and now because that person has remained on the surface and long enough steeler has been established. A power of salas starts to give rise to the power of meditation. The power of somebody of collection of clarity. Then we can actually turn around and see that dry land and that is the step in ceuta for distri mentor so it needs a solid basis that we can stand well that we can swim on an all go go under and then we can have a look around and see safety and that's when the moment happens when we have seen we can't go back anymore we have seen. We can't see it anymore and we will eventually start swimming. And that's what the next one is number five is swimming towards the land and that represents the once returner who is on the way to safety. The next one is number six. That's the person who is standing in the surf and waiting to the shore. So they have. That's solid ground on the day of for the first time now and they are reaching the surf there and that means that they have reached an sorry that is the non returner guess who has reached a surf and then seven of course is the last stage daddy's full enlightenment. That's our hunt who has reached the shore and as i jumped from likes to put. It is sitting on the coconut tree and having a cup of tea for english. People know if this is going to have a piece of cheese or whatever or maybe nothing at all just just chilling enjoy once that has been achieved so what the quote that is true attributed apparently too loud too it was attributed to some people on the internet that it was really confusing but i think the oldest source if you're kind of going back is out too but it is in line with what we were talking about and i'm sure you have heard this quote before that kind of shows that process quite nicely so watch your thoughts they become your words what your words they become your actions watch your actions they become your habits what your habits they become your character what ch- your character it becomes your destiny right so I'm not quite sure how we doing timewise. We usually stop around nine nine forty five for for questions. Sorry i kind of forgot to mention that but is there already questions being asked no questions just listening. No one there. People are too busy with hearing all this stuff sunday morning. Maybe maybe let me carry on for a little while. Because then i can finish that arch before we go in the next talks into the individual lamb precepts so in buddhism. We talk about the three doors so we have volition. We have the the the the the energy of thought or the movement of the mind to want to call it which kind of come through the first door. And then as i said before it kind of escapes or it transforms into the two doors. The door of speech and the door of action. And that's how come he's created by volition by an intention that we have if things happen unintentionally. It's a bit of a different story there but if it's intentional and the energy is there and that energy kind of carries out into the world and then of course people will know we have these qualities in our hearts that we called three roots at. They are greed hatred and delusion. That's like the route that we tried to avoid. And then we have the opposite of those which is very often people. Don't talk about it as the opposite word you know they say logan does mojo and in polly. It's all by others. I'm ohio which he means own greed non hatred no delusion but i like to actually find a word which is the opposite like generosity kindness and wisdom. And that's what seila really means. Maybe let's have another quick look at one of the suitors that i wanted to go through also to back up what i was speaking about aids uncle to ronnie kaya ten hundred and seventy six and it's cold with trente. We actually have a monkey. Culture spo- Let's have a look at that Suitor what i wanted to talk about is dead ten wholesome or unwholesome courses of action that dasa aku solar or kusala come. They appear many many many times in the suit us. But this time. The suit that i would like to point you towards is to route ten hundred and seventy six and that basically tells you bad chinda trended smith's from the mangrove and he asks the buddha and how to become pure. How purity is achieved and the buddha asked him how he is practicing and he talks about the practices of his teachers to what they have told him that. There is certain rituals that you should perform and it says here you know you should greet the sun and you should touch the ground and you should bay is like they bay the indiana's rivers even these days to purify yourself and the buddha says well if you do that or if you don't do that what you carry really purified is your actions. And then he goes into the Impurity and purity that is achieved through the three fold actions by body fourfold actions by speech and threefold actions by mind and that is basically what the precepts are about. It is a little bit kind of broader there but it goes through of course not killing and harming not taking what is not given no sexual misconduct not lying in the speech sector talks about melissa speeches. Well har- speech an idle chatter. So that is part of those ten not part of the precepts as such and then he goes into the mental world as well where we talk about desiring something in a very very strong way wanting to have something or having ill-will very strong way so that we wish harm upon other beings and then one very important thing in here is as well number. Ten is wrong view so it is very very important to develop the right view and that basically means having an understanding of karma and rebirth that tried to allude to before as well so let us maybe just go through the five precepts 'em in a positive way and let's turn to the question instead of coming so even here i really like to talk about the precepts in their positive manner so of course we are abstaining we are abandoning certain qualities but we are also developing positive qualities and. That's what i would like to talk about in the next talks in the future. So the first precept would be developing harmlessness and that is actually something which goes right across the board for all the precepts. We are making sure we're not harming ourselves. We're not harming other people and bad. Especially in the first precept means that we have respect for all living beings and that we have compassion for all living beings. In the second precept the positive part means we have gratitude for what is given freely to us. We care for things that are have put have been put in our care. Things are also being like our children and we have generosity which is the opposite of crosby and wanting is actually. Giving the third precept. Is all about french. Kip about trust about fidelity and then the next one number four is about talking the truth truthfulness honesty but through that also reliability which is a very important quality to develop and allow one. I really liked to talk about in terms of mindfulness and in terms of having clarity having that pure mind that we talked about So he can see things clearly and we don't fall into breaking some of those other precepts. Okay let's close here for now for the talk today and see what we have for the questions. Thank you bonte. Yes we have. One question coming online The question is as i get serious about the buddhist path what should be some initial actions are should take to rectify a lifetime of an instructor door selfish living whole okay so wonderful. You're getting serious fighter in a in a in a way that your understanding why you're doing these things and that your hopefully being inspired as i was talking about it before what has happened in the past. We can't really change. That is one of those problems spo. It doesn't really make sense to go there with our minds too much because very very often what happens. We just started to get negative. Start to get down on ourselves. We might even get scared or whatever it is. So that is not really. What will give us the energy and the that we need to jump into action so i would rather try to look forward. Tried to look to what you are trying to develop and to try and really get into that instead of trying to get into this past stuff trying to rectify things. Of course it is wonderful to practice forgiveness. It is wonderful if some of those people are around and you can have a chat with them and you can tell them. I've changed my ways. Or i've thought about a few things that have happened in nepal. Ston how that might have hurt you or man has definitely hurt myself to try and clear that up but in the end. It's with forgiveness. It's the letting that happens within our own hearts. And i have seen unfortunately too many times that we are way too harsh and way. Too strict with ourselves and strictness and harshness is not really what helps us learn. It's like with the kids in my classroom. If i would be fierce and if i would be kind of telling them if you don't do this or if you don't do that you will have this kind of punishment. They might do what i ask them to do. But they do it out of fear and they forget it. When they're out of the classroom they forget it years down the track after being in my classroom so what i'd rather try to create an atmosphere where they can get exposed and feel the positive things and really want to develop those and then once they're starting to develop them. I can kind of stand by their side and encouraged him be the code. Give them the material to learn. But i can't make them learn one other thing that we talked about as well During the online retreats that i was giving is if you just kind of see yourself as a little child who is trying to learn to walk on this path of virtue now and as you know with those little kids it doesn't really work falls so many times but they have strong determination to actually learn to walk and they get up again and they try again they try again but they don't really get really like On their own backs or they don't really get angry with themselves. They just keep on trying and i wish that we could have that kind of Way of dealing with the other thing is also if you are a parent looking at that child. Children are usually kind of cute and if they make a mistake or if they fall over it's kind of cute but if you make a mistake and you fall over you kinda feel like oh. I'm so stupid. Oh did i do that. Oh i'm such a bad person so try to get out of that mindset and see if you can Look at yourself like this child who trying to walk on this wonderful path and just keep on going keep on going and other good thing is of course to hang out with people who have these qualities already and then you can encourage each other Become part of a group. Listen to talks. Yeah whatever whatever helps. I hope yet this clarifies the question. We have one not yes. Okay thanks the next question. Online is a heavy defilement. That i'm aware of. I've tried to get rid of it but after a few months even went on. I'm aware of it a slip up. How can i have become this. Yes again and bravo wonderful. You are aware should know. There is a defining. The biggest problem is if we don't know about the land and that's also one of the questions that came during the retreat where a person was saying all this thing and it happens again and again and i kind of know where it comes from which is wonderful so if you kind of get an understanding wear conditioning comes from so. It's like a computer. That has a certain program on it. Now you can't just take the program off the computer. That doesn't really work. So you have to put in antivirus program that replaces that one habit that you had there before. And what happens very very naturally. Is you have the one program which worked for so many years and it's very normal that you slip up and get back into old habits because that's what habits do we know. They're repeat repeat themselves. They're like reflexes. You get a certain trigger and bang. You're back into that situation again. So of course. What is mindfulness. And you're all ready practicing that because you're realizing oh i'm gonna close. Oh it's happening again so in that space. That's where other program comes in but you can't just let go of one thing and not have something else which replaces so. What would it be happening. Is that the old program was running at an eighty percent of the time we tried to lessen in and less than sixty percent fifty percent and the new program to kick in in its place and to replace it and that one is going up forty forty percent fifty percent sixty percent seventy percent whatever and dane at a certain stage you have the new habits so so established that the all habit is not needed anymore but very often when deferments come up what i've kind of experience for myself if i stop if i listen to what is happening within me there is always something content there is all the way some Not very nice feelings in my body or some thoughts are racing or some sports that are negative. So that is what i can really work with and if i can have kindness and compassion towards whatever is happening within me and sooth stat then that is the replacement of the habit that i had before so the habit is basically soothing me out of a situation that i don't really feel comfortable and now we have to change the substance. We have to change the medication. We have to change the thing that we are using the emotion that we talked about before that can soothe smooth. Give us back the power coolest down. Give us a clear head So yes don't don't be too hard on yourself there as well keep on practicing exchange yourself with other people who might have similar problems then you can help each other and one thing that i also feel is very nice is once you become a mentor in a certain role with another person. Then you have a responsibility that is not just for yourself but it's also for for a wider kind of then that will make you stop and think it's also okay to have a certain commitment that you make but it is if the commitment is made with a group of people it's like when people get married they don't just get married somewhere they they fly off on on an island get secretly married and come back. It's something you do in the community something you let of course to partner know but then also you let your family your your friends the community out there and that can actually be something which gives you accountability. That gives you this moment to think. Oh i promised something not just to myself because sometimes for some people it's hard to keep something just for themselves. It's like for monastics here. We have our monastic roles that we keep every two weeks. We have confections like we will have tonight and you open up to one of your friends in the holy life and you discuss these things and that can be really helpful. I feel okay. Who ten o'clock up one more that. Keep coming okay. Next question dante had he maintained positive. The what's how do you maintain positive thoughts. Yes that's one of the things we talked about in the retreats. And that's one of the thing. Well i haven't talked about positive thoughts in that respect but one of my questions. I had that i all-star brown is. How do you maintain mindfulness. And mindfulness is basically a positive clear. Mind and he said don't destroy it. It's such a simple such simple answer but such deep and profound honor actually because if we have gained something and we don't valley do it enough then we will just throw it away and the ones we start throwing it away then we start feeling bad about ourselves and we saw a bad person. Oh it doesn't matter now. I've already done this. I have another bucket of ice cream or whatever it is. I don i wanted. But that's kind of how operate and it's really sad so try to to stay on that wave as described it in some other talks as long as possible. Ride it out riding it out until it gets really really flat. Share it with all. The people am do good things out there. And that will really boost your your positively and then the other thing is as we were saying with the emotions. That's what really keeps your practice and your habits going when they are. They're really feel that emotion really let it sink into you so very often even in monastic life over here we come to a new place and we got lots of things to do. And and and and you're mindful decreases every now and then but then when you go back and when you sit and when you meditate really really appreciate and really really reflect nikolai. This and all i have to do is sit down for a couple of minutes. Let go be kind. Be gentle be compassionate towards myself and other people and then he starts to rise again. It's it's there it's it's it's like the home is there and you can always come back. You can always come home so what you really need is. Mindfulness is remembering it. Getting back in touch and especially for ourselves now. We have the rains retreat coming for three months. And you guys out there. If the question is from auburn a lot of you guys are going in to stay at home. Orders or even in hard lockdown. And and i don't want to minimize nat. Of course. I know it's a difficult situation because you're put in that situation without actually wanting it yourself but try and make the best out of it. Try to understand what the monastics are. Doing here is a stay at home order for three months for the monks here. And we're doing that. To protect ourselves from the default moments which are out there and another thing which i would like to give you. We destroy these things with the news for example as well. I've been watching myself reading up on the news and watching the news. Because i want to be informed as well but there is a limit it starts to suck you in it starts to drag you down and you become an have a negative mind and i have these apps that i have for positive news. There is an app called kind world and it only reports on the kindness which is happening in the world and when we listen to that i have a positive mind. It's much easier to meditate much more balanced. I'm friendly towards myself. I free to other people ask myself. Why do i watch nearest. Why do i have read. You know so. Not limited limited and really feel. How is it feeling when you're exposing yourself to things and if it's feeling good not good in a kind of greedy way but in a wholesome way carry on doing it build on it. Develop it if it doesn't feel good. Get the information you need and run the effort to long okay. What was that last. Question is one thing. Okay but we finish out for it What makes a purposeful life especially with children being pushed to play video games. What makes a purposeful life especially with. Children pushed to play video games. Her aunt i. I'm wondering who pushes whom you know is it. Is it the media there or is it the world out there that pushes this to you or or your peers or whatever. I guess it comes to a little bit of what i was talking about before. Of course the world pushes and pulls but with meditation. We learn as i said before. Stay at home to stay in safety to stay in the shelter to create an oasis. And that's what. I was trying to encourage the people on the weekend. Retreats that we've done together to create that and to come back to that where you can really recharge your batteries. These kind of things. Of course there might be some wholesome wholesome games out there or there might be some things where you're learning something for a little while once you get sucked into it and wants to deform and star to play around. Then they start to play around with you and you're not playing with dan. Rather have your internal video game where he can be playful with your mind where he can be playful with your emotions yet definitely. It is very very difficult so with children. What might work is to develop rituals to develop environments and atmospheres that you create for yourself on your cushion and that you create for your family as well that you have family time where you just sit. Sit down together hang out together Reflect on what has happened to two different people in the family Talk openly about feeling so wendy's things kind of her is with computer games or with problems out in the world that the children feel comfortable to to share these things with you in a similar way. I've heard stories of parents who had really hard time. Meditating a really hard time establishing that habit but when they consistently and win the children really picked up on it and saw that they are becoming more peaceful. There realized they are creating this space in the house. Which is like the peace. And i've heard of Examples where there were families with two kids and they were kind of fighting or and when when a fight started. One of the kids would run towards the meditation. Matt and kind of sit on the meditation met to is this. This is this piece sonia. No i don't wanna fight anymore. So they kind of get get a feeling for what you are establishing and then starting to tap into that so you're establish it for yourself that you can tell tap into a shit for for your children at their instead of watching video games. What was it called and there was a program from. Cbs news with poll because hartman is his name and it's cold kindness. One zero one so he does programs in the united states. It's called on the road. And he usually goes out into the community and shows virtuous behavior that is happening in the community. And because of the lockdown he has created a program for kids and for families where he talks about virtues and how they can be developed and rather con of. Do something like that. Sit down as a family and and watch that and get inspired and have those. Those nice feelings cursing through your mind and your body instead of. Yeah it's it's race lewis. Energy that gets created through your. I remember as as as as a youth boring school we would have like play. Playtime awhile video game time and we would be. What is it playing street fighters or something and get really into it. My fingers would hurt. You know you just. you're dry. Bush every buttons. I mean there's different moves that you can do. You know you have to do combinations. But because you don't know it just push it like really hard and after five or ten minutes. I just felt so bad. When i stopped and failed into myself and i was like why am i doing. This could be doing much nicer stuff. Okay i long answer. I hope this helps one. Okay let's do another five minutes but we'll have lunch afterwards. Story montana. no. I haven't questioned probably more a little bit more of a comment as well. I'm with the precepts. I kind of have my body's without talk a lot about repentance breaking i kind of had my own. Why of repainting saifi. And i find that kind of gives me a positive mindset. So would you. Can you sort of comment on matters at something that gets spoken about a bit by. What's that spiking at all by the buddha role repentance. I'm into word repentance for me I don't know. I found a standard completely has has having english is my second language but if it comes with a bit of baggage connor where you feel. You know should be doing that. But of course the buddha encouraged for us monastics. As i said that we understand we have over to overstep the line and that we reaffirm that we recommit. And that's what we do. Every two weeks with the monastics. We have a set of roles. We confess those roles. But it's not like we we. We get cleared by goal or by someone. But we get clarity within ourselves where we go like that been really makes sense. It didn't make me feel nice and one of the biggest problems too. I feel with those things is shame hiding it not wanting to deal with it not being open and that's i think what the repentance part as i understand it is all about opening up if there is forgiveness you open up to someone else and say oh sorry really didn't feel feel riot and Can i make a good again nor you know. Can we be friends again or whatever and you're doing that internally as well you forgive yourself you forgive you conduct your give forgive conditioning for for working in a certain way and say like let's let's condition this a in a different way and see how it goes. That's good thank you all right. Wrap up good wonderful so what we usually do. Is we pay respects to the buddha massanga and today especially because it is the domino day we pay special respect of very nice steep. Bow to the dhamma today. Yes so the monastics who are doing talks here usually also do a meditation on monday night so that will be tomorrow at seven thirty and maybe we can talk about feel feel that kind of oasis standard. I was talking about a little bit during that meditation together. Okay let's pay respects to put up.

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Episode 8  7 Things You Should Know Before Starting Your 401(k)

The Financial Heartbeat Podcast

21:30 min | 2 years ago

Episode 8 7 Things You Should Know Before Starting Your 401(k)

"Welcome to the financial heartbeat podcast with Mike cloudy in this podcast. We talk about overcoming the challenges families and business owners face in their financial lives. We discuss big and small life events, the implications. And how to plan ahead and control. What you can let us help you redefine the retirement. That's in front of you into a better one. Now. Bonte today's episode. Hello. And welcome to another financial heartbeat podcast with Mike cloudy today. We are going to continue on the 4._0._1._K Caversham that we had from the last podcast. But today, we're gonna talk about the seven things that you should know before you start your 4._0._1._K now. Mike, a lot of people think that the whole 4._0._1._K thing is is really overwhelming. Are we going to address some of that today? Yeah. I mean, I think the 4._0._1._K's are a great tool for a lot of businesses. And I think you could I've got the seven things you should talk about with your 4._0._1._K's. But in reality, this is a seven. Things that you should can talk about for, you know, any real retirement plan, and it also whether you're a couple of person shop or you have two hundred employees a lot of these rules will apply and the biggest thing, and I work with 4._0._1._K's on a regular basis is to have someone that can help get them initia- down to manageable pieces because that's what we do. That's my job is to help simplify it to help. You put a plan together that will help you. But then other key Matt is to communicate it to your employees into the folks. So that they realized this is a very big and good benefit. Well, let's talk about the purpose of a plan at south. Let's let's break it down to its essence. Well, that's the first and most important thing. Now is the primary goal of the plan for the owners to put away the most money and max it out or is the goal to have the lowest possible cost to the business. I mean, and that's a huge difference. Because if the goal is for. The owners to put away the twenty five thousand assuming they're over age fifty and then the Macs the profit sharing out which can be up to like roughly fifty five fifty six thousand dollars. You're gonna have to if you have employs put some serious money away for your employees to. But in some cases, the 4._0._1._K is there because you wanna have a plan because all your competitors have a plan, and you're not so worried as a business owner about how much your going to put into it. But you wanna have a plan that's competitive with your employees. So that your employees have a plan, and then some people just want to have a plan to have a plan, and they want their costs to be as low as possible. So for instance, in that case, they might not even offer a matching contribution. But that's where we really sit down with a business owner, and if you have a plan already, I would sit back and say, you know, doesn't make sense are we meeting the objectives of the plan. And that might have changed. Let's say you started a plan ten fifteen years ago when your business was just star. Meeting, and you you're putting in, you know, a nice contribution as an owner will now you're making decent money in a specially with some of the new tax laws if you can put some extra money into the plan and maybe bring your tax blink down. It can really help you on a tax standpoint will then you might want to shift, and you might need to be refocusing where you put some money, but you may want to know put more money away as an owner. So then there's things that you can do to tweak your current plan to make it work better. But I really believe that you need to start by saying why do we want the plan? What is the purpose of the plan? And you know, and then what are we willing to put for resources towards the plan? There are thousands of plans. There are hundreds it scenes. Thousands of stocks bonds mutual funds. How complicated does this need to be? Well, and again, it depends. You're going to hear that a lot. You know, we have one of our largest employers in our area that. Has a whopping nine different investment options inside of the plant. We have other plants. I I'm thinking of a plan right now that has about ten employees that has an open architect, Matt. And they can literally invest in anything in stocks, bonds mutual funds. They have a very small amount that that has to be invested in the rest of it. They can basically go into a brokerage account us. So again, it depends on how complicated you want to plan to be. But there I think it's really important to have someone like me or or good adviser because we can sit down and talk about who your employees are. Because if you have a plan that they're not going to understand that they're not going to appreciate then it's in some ways, it's not worth having the plan. Matt. Liability is also a big issue. Right. The the shoot and people think. Okay. Well, then explain that. Because I I actually wasn't aware of this before we were preparing for the podcasts that there was a substantial liability issue. Well, I mean, you know, depending on who you listen to as an owner of the plan, you are responsible as the business owner, you are really responsible to make sure that this plan is in the best interest of your employees. And there are some rules that you have to follow the good news. Now is you can actually outsource a lot of the liability. I've got one plan. You know, where the folks are like all the time talking to me and saying, you know, we don't want any liability. Well, the only way to have zero liability Matt is out of a plan. That's out what they wanna do, obviously. Right. But what we have done like with these folks is we've sat back and said, okay, we're going to hire some fiduciaries. In one of the fiduciaries is a three thirty eight in. There that fiduciary will actually pick the investments for the plan. So you will not have an investment committee. The three thirty eight is the fiduciary in that case, you can also hire a three sixteen fiduciary. And then they will be responsible for all the notices. They'll be responsible for making sure the contributions go in once they get the money from you on a timely basis. They'll make sure that the money goes to the right accounts. They're going to make sure that when somebody terminates that they get the proper notices. They're going to help you calculate. They're going to calculate the vesting schedules. They're going to do all of those mechanical things in some ways are an offshoot of your HR department, which a lot of my businesses really do like. And I think that it's important that you understand do you wanna three thirty eight and do you want to three sixteen and a lot of the people when I talked to that. At an existing plan. I'll say, well, we'll tell me about the fiduciary protection they have. And they don't know at all what what the have. And then the other thing mad is there's something called the three twenty one. That's what I am in most cases an adviser. And that again says that I have a fiduciary responsibility. So you know, I can advise the plan, but I can't actually make decisions for the plan where with the three thirty eight that they are going to make the investment decisions with the three sixteen. They're going to do the paperwork. They will sign off that the person is terminated after they checked with your HR department three twenty one one is much more of an advisory which I liked to be because then it's my job. I will go out and do something called benchmarking plan. Matt. And what that means is that I'll go out now say, okay, let's see how your plan compares against all the plans like you in a universe. And we'll see what the costs are what the fees are won't will be able to. A breakdown and show them where they fit inside of that universe. And that's really important because if you ever do get audited from like, the department of labor because those are the folks that will sometimes audit for one case, you know, it's good to have all that in a file because then you're protecting yourself as the employer and your can show that I am doing my level best. Because again being a fiduciary doesn't mean you're perfect. It just means you're putting your best effort forward in my opinion. And putting you know, the plans interest ahead of your own interests in there, and you're taking care of your folks. And and so I think it's really crucial that people that run for one ks when I hear, oh, I'm just the signatory on it that they understand what why ability they're taking on. And that the good news is for not a lot of money. They can typically allow someone else to have a good chunk of that liability. How is this different than who is going to administer and host the plan? Well, who's gonna? Administer and host the plan. Typically, what that is is like a trust company or an insurance company or a large platform like TD Ameritrade. They're going to be the folks. So that's where the assets are going to be held at a, you know, and there's a tons of difference things with that. But typically, you know, some of them will be the fiduciaries we have one company that will be three sixteen of three thirty eight and they'll host the plant. They will do it all then we'll of other times, we'll have opened architects where we will actually, you know, use people from, you know, from different places different third party money managers will be the three thirty eight. And then we might have TPA PA. That's the three sixteen teepee as the third party administrator. And what they'll do in a lot of times mad as they'll do the testing because we don't really I don't really talk about that a lot but testing is really crucial, you know, in a 4._0._1._K a nominee to get into the weeds a little bit here. There are certain rules that you have to. Follow for an owner to be able to participate in it, and the TPA's and a lot of cases, we'll do the testing, and they'll make sure that your plan fits with an all of the rules that the department of labor in the IRS has for it to be a 4._0._1._K. And so, you know, again, what's nice having me is sometimes I consider myself sort of the interpreter because I can sort of talk to TPA language, and I can definitely talk the business owner language because that's what I am. And so when you put all that together, Matt, you know, it can work really well, and I can help them get a great plan designs that we can maximize what you know, what they want to accomplish. But yet do it in an affordable way. And then the nice thing is we work with so many different platforms that you know, depending on what your goal is. That's depends on where we go. You know, if somebody wants a very simple 4._0._1._K, we might go more to like a mutual fund platform because it's easy and. And typically, they're very low cost. If you have someone who wants a real open architect, a real robust plan than you might go to TD Ameritrade or something like that where they have a lot more options. And you know, again, I'm agnostic. I I'm I'm just gonna go where it makes the most sense the number one thing that employees want as a benefit is healthcare. But number two, it's the retirement plan. So how do you as a business owner figure out what sort of match you should have? Because it seems like there that's a little nebulous also well because people will do all sorts of different matches met they will do matches that are, you know? I mean, extremely rich to no match at all a lot of times plans that we like to talk to our employers about we like safe harbor plans because the nice thing about safe harbor plans are as an owner your typically able to put away more money, and you're not as. Beholding to having your employees. He's put as much money into the plan, the formulas work safe harbor can be great. So a lot of times. We'll talk about to somebody as if you can if you will be willing to put in four percent and the employee is willing to put in five percent, then you have a safe harbor plan. The other thing though to remember was safe harbor plans is the vesting schedules than are different. I don't want to go into that. But the neat thing is a lot of times. I'll see a five percent for four percent. But you know, I I had a company that they could only really do a small match. And I can remember the employee was saying to me because they were doing, you know, ten cents on the dollars. And I said, you know, so you're willing to walk by on every dollar that goes in a dime. You know, think about if you put twenty dollars in it. Oh, and and you have twenty times that's now. Two bucks. Will you walk by two bucks? Going down the street. You know bottom line is even. A little bit of a match Matt can really add up over time. So you know, any sort of a match that employer can put away as great. But again, we go back to my first question is what is the purpose of the plan? And we really figure out what are we trying to accomplish? And that's how we figure out the match now profit sharing. So you were just talking about some people who are wildly generous. Let's talk about how profit-sharing can or may be incorporated into the plan. Well, the first thing you have to decide is is it something that you want. I mean, it's a purely discretionary item the nice thing is you can look at it every year. It isn't something that you have to do, you know every year if you if you have a bad year, and you can't do profit sharing. You can't do profit-sharing. It's not going to affect the plan. But the nice thing about profit sharing is that will allow the owners to typically put a good chunk of money away inside of the business. Plus in a lot of cases. Depending on how you can structure it, and we have some really neat things that we can do with profit sharing. You can also have different categories of employee's. And so a different level of employ maybe employs that have been with you for twenty plus years. You know, they will get a higher level of profit sharing than someone who's been with you for five years, maybe employees that have hit you know, their goals. They can get a higher percentage of profit sharing them people who didn't hit their goals, it can be structured a ton of different ways. But the neat thing is is that if you have a good third party administrator or a good program that will really allow you to test it. There are ways that you can manage the money to really make great. So that the people that have helped your business to grow you can really reward. And I've got a lot of my business owners that really wanna do that. I had no idea that there was that level of flexibility in in 4._0._1._K's. That's that's remarkable. Now somebody this is number seven, right? Right. So somebody has to be able to communicate this inhuman people language for the normal people to understand, right? And I think that is the biggest mistake that I see I will sometimes see a very good plan, and I will end up spending time explaining to employees how good of a benefit they have. And they're sort of looking at me like deer in headlights, Matt, you know, it's like, you know, you have a six percent dollar for dollar match way us that what everybody house. No, that's very good an old, by the way, it's a safe harbor plan. So you you're one hundred percent vested right away. Really? Yeah. And they didn't have divest all the, but they are o k and by the way, you got six thousand dollars hypothetically for compliance folks that are listening, you know, in a profit sharing. And you know, and it's like, you know, I've had people literally when I've taken the statement. So because I liked to get a statement for the first quarter from a client because that shows me if there's profit sharing is traditionally that's in, you know, it's going to be in by the end of March and an out point out somebody, you know, you got to thirty eight hundred dollar profit sharing contribution. I just did that this month, and the person looked at me and said, we get profitsharing, obviously, there's a failure to communicate there because you need to be able to people need to know what they're getting in the plan, for instance, if they're making fifty thousand dollars and there's a five percent match. You know, I'm saying to that person your getting twenty five hundred extra dollars going into Europe. Count. That's twenty five hundred dollars that your making. It's not free money that's part of your wages, but that's twenty five hundred extra dollars at this company is investing in you. And I think that it's important that the person talking about the plan stands up and explain that to people and explains to people that, you know, this is good the other thing in and I mean, I'm happy to let you talk to some of the folks that we work with is that we act as sort of a financial back office for a lot of employees. We've helped people, you know, realize should they buy their forestalls because how that conversation happens is they call up and say, hey, I'm going to buy a house can cash in my 4._0._1._K. I mean that Matt I get that question all the time. And the answer is in most cases. No, you really do not want to do that. And then we explain why because of penalties and costs even though there are some ways that they can get money out of their 4._0._1._K, you know, sometimes for I for buying your first home, but a. Most of the time by the time, we're done. It doesn't make sense to do it because of the cost and. You know bottom line one. We look at all of this. Is you need to have someone. That's there that communicates that talks and explains just how good this plan is for the employee's. And how it is just a spectacular benefit. And you know, we're recently changing a plan. I'm not afraid to explain to people. Why we're making the move how we're going to save them money, and how they're going to have a better plan because what the employer is done, would you mind going back through the your seven case? No, not prominent. So again, the seven really important things is first and foremost, you need to figure out what the purpose of the plan is then you have to decide how complicated we want this plan to be how much liability and the other thing I should say. There is how much helped you wanna have running the plan who's gonna minister planet hosts the plan, you know, who's going to be the face of the plan. What sort of match are you going to use house profitsharing going to be incorporate? And then most importantly, how are you going to present this year employees, and then what's the ongoing communication going to be in most cases, I wanna talk to those employees at least once a year, if not more because I think it's very important that people communicate and people talk about, you know, their 4._0._1._K's, and you need to constantly be telling people just how good it is. All right. Any any other closing ideas or thoughts or statements that we need to go over just kind of wrap today's podcast up. Well, and again, we talked about four one case. But let's step back. If you're a smaller business, a simple IRA might make a ton of sense and or sup or even a payroll deduction IRA when you call our office at seven eight two one six four two we're going to sit down if you've never had a plan, and we're going to say, okay. What makes the most sense for you to have a plan what sort of plan, should you have in all I think that's where you start. And then we determine, you know, simple for one cave sap all those different things. And then we go forward. Now, if you already have a 4._0._1._K, and you just like the checkup give us a call. We're happy to take a look at it. We can benchmark it. We can look at what your costs are. We can talk about what your fiduciary responsibility is. And you know, if. It's a great plan. We're going to tell you that if we can help we'll help, but you know, that's purely up to you. And again, we never have a cost in that situation. So give our our office. Call at seven eight two one six four two and we'd be happy to talk with you. Thank you, Mike. Well, have a great day, Matt and hope everybody out there has a wonderful profitable day. If you have not subscribe to the podcast, make sure you click that subscribe now button and blow that way every time. I come out with a new podcast directly on you're listening device. And if you have a moment quickly share this with the business owner that you know, because a 4._0._1._K is not only magnificent benefit to your employees, but can also benefit the owner. So for everybody Kalki investments and insurance is Matt Howard. And we'll see on the other side of the Mike very soon. Thank you. For listening to the financial heartbeat podcast with Mike cloudy, but the subscribe button below to be notified when new episodes become available. If you have questions for Mike, please call him at six zero eight seven eight two one six four to visit his website at WWW dot cloudy, financial dot com or stop in for a visit at six thirty five. Second avenue south on Alaska. Wisconsin by four six five zero securities offered through Securities America Inc. Member FINRA SIPC advice. Serie services offered through Securities America advisors Inc. Clunky. Investments and insurance does not give legal or tax advice. Fluffy. Investments and insurance insecurities. America inc. Are separate entities.

Matt Howard business owner 4._0._1._K fiduciary Mike cloudy TD Ameritrade administrator Bonte Alaska Wisconsin department of labor Europe Kalki investments Securities America advisors In PA America Securities America Inc
#110  Jitendra Malik: Computer Vision

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

1:42:04 hr | 11 months ago

#110 Jitendra Malik: Computer Vision

"The following is a conversation. Would You Tundra Malik a professor at Berkeley and one of the seminal figures in the field of computer vision, the kind before the deep learning revolution and the kind after. He has been cited over one, hundred, eighty, thousand times and has mentored many world class researchers in computer science. Quick. Summary of the as to sponsors on new one, which is better. Help an old goody express VPN please consider supporting this podcast by going to better help dot com slash LEX and signing up express VPN dot com slash legs pod, click the links by the stuff. It really is the best way to support this podcast and the journey Emma on. If, enjoy this thing, subscribe on Youtube Review It with five stars and Apple podcast supported. Connect with me on twitter LX Friedman, however, the heck spell that. As usual I'll do a few minutes of ads now and never in the middle that can break the flow of the conversation. This show is sponsored by better hope spelled H. E. L. P. Help Check it out a better help DOT com. Slash lex. They figure out what you need match with a licensed professional therapist in under forty eight hours. It's not a crisis line is not self. Help is professional counseling done securely online. I'm a bit from the Dave Goggles Line of creatures as you may know, and so have some demons to contend with usually on long runs or all nights working forever, impossibly full of self doubt. In May because I'm Russian But I think suffering is a central for creation. But I also think you can suffer beautifully in a way that doesn't destroy you. For, most people I think a good therapist can help in this. So least worth try check out their reviews, the good. It's easy, private, affordable, available, worldwide. You can communicate by text and you time and schedule weekly audio and video sessions. I highly recommend the out at better health dot com slash lex. Show is also sponsored by express VPN, get it at express ups, dot com slash lex pod to support this podcast and to get an extra three months free on a one year package of been using expressly peon for many years I. Love It. I. Think Expressing Peon is the best vpn out there. They told me to say, but it happens to be true. It doesn't log your data. It's crazy fast and easy to use literally just one big sexy power on button. Again, for obvious reasons, it's really important that they don't log your data. It works on Lenox and everywhere else too. But really why use anything else shout out to my favorite flavor? Lennox. Bonte Matei twenty four. Once, again, get it at express ups, dot com slash flex pod to support this podcast and to get an extra three months free and a one year package. And now here's my conversation which Tundra Mallock. Her. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six, see more papper at MIT. wrote up a proposal called the some vision project to be given. As, far as we know to ten students to work on solve that summer. So that proposal outlined many of the computer vision task, we still work on today. Why do you think underestimate and perhaps we did underestimate perhaps still underestimate how hard computer vision is. Because most of what we do envision, Reduan consciously or subconsciously and human vision in human vision. So that gives us this that effortlessness gives us the sense that always must be very easy to implement an a computer. Now This is why early researchers in the eye. Or, wrong our. If you go into neuroscience psychology of human vision than the complexity becomes very clear. The fact is that we are very large part of the. CEREBRAL CORTEX is devoted to visual processing. And this is true in other primates as well. So once we looked at it from a neuroscience or psychology perspective it, it becomes quite clear that the problem is very challenging editor take some time. said, the higher level parts are the harder parts? I think vision appears to to be easy because. Most of visual processing as subconscious are on contrast. So we underestimate the difficulty that is when you are. Like proving a mathematical theorem or playing chess. The difficulty is much more evident. So because it has your conscious brain which is processing. And Various aspects of the problem solving behavior. Whereas envision are all this is happening. It's not in your awareness in your. It's operating below that, but it's still seems strange. Yes. That's true. But seem strange that as computer vision. Researchers, for example. The. Community. Broadly is. Time and time again makes the mistake of thinking. The problem is easier than it is or maybe is not a mistake. We'll talk a little bit about autonomous driving, for example, a heart of vision task that is. It. Do. Do. You. Think I mean. It. Is it just human nature something fundamental to the vision. Problems we we underestimate. We're still not able to be cognizant of. Problems. Yeah I think in the early days it. Could have been excused because in the early days. All aspects of I, regard as too easy. but I think today is much less excusable. And I think why people fall for this is because of what I call the policy of the successful first step. Many problems in vision had. Getting fifty percent of the solution you can get in one minute getting to ninety percent can take you a day getting to ninety. Nine percent may take you five years and. Ninety nine point nine nine percent may be knocked in your lifetime, one of those unique division. It seems that language people are not so confident about so natural language processing people are a little bit more cautious about our ability to. To solve, that problem. I think for language people intuit that we have to be able to do natural language understanding. For Vision. It seems that we're not cognizant. We don't think about how much understanding is required. It's probably still an open problem, but in your sense, how much understanding is required to solve vision. Like this. Put. Another way. How much? Something called commonsense reasoning is required to really be able to interpret even static scenes. Yeah. So vision operates at at all levels and there are parts which are which can be solved with what we could call maybe peripheral processing. So in the in the human vision literature there used to be these terms, sensation, perception and cognition. which roughly speaking referred to. The. Front end of processing middle stages of processing and higher level of processing. And I think they made a big deal out of out of this and they wanted to study only perception and then dismiss certain said problems as being court cognitive. But Really I. Think these are artificial divides. The problem is continuous at all levels and they'll challenges at all levels, the techniques that we have today. They work better at the lower and mid levels of the problem. I, think the higher levels of the problem court, the cognitive levels of the problem. Odd. There and The in many real applications we have to confront them. Now how much? That is necessary. Will depend on application for some problems. It doesn't matter for some problems. It matters a lot so. I, I'm for example A pessimist on fully autonomous driving in the near future. And the reason is because I think they will be that zero point zero one. percent of the cases where it quite sophisticated cognitive reasoning is called for. However, that asks where. You can. First of all, they are much more dad robust. So in the sense that. Rates. Editor is not so much of a problem. For example. Let's say you're doing image such here. Trying to get images based on some some some description, some visual description. We're tolerant of errors that right I mean when Google search gives you some images back enough you of their my. Drunk. It's okay. It doesn't hurt anybody. There's no, there's not a matter of life and death but. Making mistakes. When. You're driving. At sixty miles per hour and you could potentially kill somebody is much more important. So, just for the. For the fun of it, since you mentioned, let's go there briefly about autonomous vehicles. So one of the companies in the Space Tesla is were with Andrea Kathy and Ula. Moscow. Working on system called autopilot, which is primarily a vision based system with eight cameras in a basically a single neural network multitask Newell Network. The the call it Hydra net multiple heads. So does multiple task, but is forming same representation at the core. Do you think driving can be converted in this way to. Purely. A Vision problem and solved within you with learning. Or even more specifically in the current approach, what do you think about what Tesla autopilot teams doing? So the way I think about it is that there are certainly subset subsets of the visual based driving problem which are quite solvable. So, for example, driving inferior conditions. Is. Quite solvable problem. I think there were demonstrations that going back to the nineteen eighties by. Ask someone called take months in Munich. in the nineties there approaches from Carnegie, Mellon approaches from our team at Berklee. In the two thousand protests from Stanford and so on. So. tournus driving in certain settings is very doable. The challenges to have an autopilot were under all kinds of driving conditions. At that point. It's not just a question of a vision or perception, but really also control and dealing with all the edge cases. So. Where do you think most of the difficult cases? To me, even the highway driving is an open problem because it applies the same fifty, nine, hundred, ninety, five, ninety, nine rule, or the first step. Fallacy the first step of forget. we fall victim to I. Think even highway driving has a lot of it's because to solve autonomous driving. You have to completely relinquish their the fat help of a human being euro is in control so that you really going to feel the edge cases. So. I think even highway driving is really difficult, but in terms of the general driving task, do you think vision is the fundamental problem or is it? Also. Your action, the interaction with the environment. The ability to and then like the middle ground I don't know if you put that under vision, which is trying to predict the behavior of others, which is a little bit in the world of standing the scene, but it's also trying to form a model. Of the actors in the scene and predict their behavior. Yeah. I glued that invision because to me perception blends into cognition and building predictive models of other agents in the world. which could be at agent could be people that agents could be either 'cause that is part of the task of perception. Because perception always has to. not tell us what is now, but what will happen because what's now is boring, it's done. It's over with. We get about the future because we acted in the future and we care about the past in as much as it informs what's going to happen future. So I think we have to build predictive models of of. Of Behaviors of people and those can get quite. Complicated, so I mean I. I've seen examples of this in Actually. I mean I own a tesla and it has a radio safety features belted. And what I see. these examples where let's say there is some. skateboarder. I don't want to be too critical because obviously this is these are the systems are always being improved and any specific criticism I have maybe this. Six months from now. Not have that that. That particular failure mode. So It it. It had a, he had the wrong response because it couldn't predict what? What this skateboarder was going to do. Okay and BEC-, because it really required that higher level cognitive understanding of what skateboarders typically do as opposed to a normal pedestrian. So what might have been the correct behavior for pedestrian? A typical baby ever pedestrian was not the. Typical, behavior for skateboard. Right. Yeah, and. So so therefore, to do a good job there, you need to have enough data. Pedestrians also have skateboarders. You've seen enough skateboarders to see what? Have what kinds of patterns of behavior they have? So it is it is in principle with enough data that problem could be solved, but I, think our current. Systems Computer Vision Systems need far far more data than humans do for learning those same capabilities. So say that there's going to be a system that solves autonomous driving. Do. You think it will look similar to what we have today. But. Have a lot more data perhaps more compute, but the fundamental architectures involved like new while indicates that Tesla autopilot is neural networks. Do you think it will look similar? In that regard images have more data that scientific. As which way is it going to go I look what I would bet on so. This is my general philosophy position on how these learning systems have been. what we found currently, very effective in computer vision with in the deep learning paradigm is sort of Tabula Rasa. Learning and. Learning in supervised way. With lots of what's happened Larisa. Saying. Says that blank slate, we just have this system is. Given the CD's experiences in the setting and then it lands there. Now, if let's think about you driving, it does not Tabula, Rasa learning. So at the age of sixteen in high school. Teenager goes into goes into drive class. A now at that point they learn. But at the age of Sixteen Holiday Visual Geniuses because from zero to sixteen. They have built a certain repertoire of vision. In fact, most of it has probably been achieved by each to. Write. In the in the spirit of age up to age two, they know that the world is three dimensional. They'd know how objects look like from different perspectives they know about a collision. They had no about common dynamics of humans and other bodies. They have some notion of intuitive physics. So they they're built that up from their observations and interactions. In early childhood, and of course, reinforced through. The growing up to eight sixteen. So then at age sixteen, when they go into driver or are they learning, they're not learning a fresh, the visual world. They have a mastery of the visual world what they're learning is. Control. Okay, they're learning how to be smooth about control about steering and brakes Oh for the learning sense of typical traffic situations. Now the the that education process can be quite short. because. They are coming in as visual genius. and. Of course, in their future, they're going to encounter situations which are very novel. Right. So doing my driver Ed class that I may not have had to deal with a skateboarder I'm not have had to deal with a truck driving in front of me. WHO's from? The back opens up. I'm junk gets dropped from the truck and I have to deal with it. But I can deal with this as a driver, even though I did not encounter this in my driver just and that he's an I can deal with it because I have all this general visual knowledge and expertise. And Do you think the learning mechanisms we have today can do that kind of long term accumulation of knowledge or do we have to? Do. Some kind of you know in network the the work that led up to expert systems with knowledge representation, you know the broader field of what of artificial intelligence worked on this kind of accumulation of knowledge. Do you think you'll know can do the same I think I. Don't see any in-principle problem with neural networks doing it, but I think the learning techniques would need to evolve significantly. So the current, the current learning techniques that we have. Are. Supervised learning. You're giving lots of examples. Bears and you you learned functional. Mapping. Between them. I think that human learning is far richer than that. It includes many different components. There are there is a a child explore the world. And sees, for example, I, child takes an object and manipulates it in. His or her hand, and they forget to see objects from different points of view and the child has commanded the movement. So that's a kind of learning data, but the learning data has been. Arranged by the Child And this is a very rich kind of data. The title can do radius experiments with the world. So. So, there are many aspects of sort of human learning and these are being studied in. In child development by psychologists and they what they tell us that supplies learning is a very small part of it. There are many different aspects of learning. And what we would need to do is to develop models of. All of these and then Jane Nar Systems in that with that kind of protocol. So new new methods of learning. Some of which might imitate human brain, but you also you talk of of mention of the compute side of things. The enters the difference in the human brain or referencing MORAVEC Hans. Mar.. The. So Do. Do. You think there's something interesting valuable to consider about the difference in the computational power of the human brain versus the computers of today in terms of instructions per second. Yes. So if we go back so this is a point I've been making for twenty years now. And I think once upon a time, the way I used to argue that we just didn't have the computing power of the human brain computers were Why not quite dead and? I mean, it is A. Well, known a tradeoff which we know that that that neurons are slow. Compared to transistors but but we have a lot of them and they have a very high connectivity whereas in Silicon, you have much foster devices, transistors, switch it on the order of nanoseconds. But. Usually smaller. at this point in time I mean, we are now talking about two, thousand, twenty, we do have if you consider the latest. And Hawn amazing computing bar and if he look back at. Has Marwick rex type of calculations, which he did in the Nineteen Ninety S, we may be that today in terms of computing comparable to the brain, but it's not in the of the same style. It's a very different style. So I mean, for example, the style of computing that we have in our GPO's is far far more power hungry than the style of computing. That is there in the human brain or other biological the. Entities. Yeah, and that the efficiency part is we're going to have to solve that in order to build actual real world systems. Of large-scale. The me ask sort of the high level question step. Back how would you articulate the general problem of computer vision? The such thing exists. So if you look at the computer vision conferences in the work that's been going on, it's often separated into different little segments breaking the problem vision apart into the segmentation route. Three D. reconstruction object detection. I don't know image capturing whatever. Benchmarks, reach. But if you were just sort of philosophically say what is the big problem of computer vision? The such thing exists. Yes. But it's not an isolation. So if we have to. As what all intelligence Tasks, I always go back to sort of biology or humans. and. If you think about vision perception in that setting. We realize that perception is always to guide action. But. Section in our for biological system does not give any benefits unless it is coupled with action. So. We can go back and think about the first multicellular animals which rose in the Cambrian era five, hundred, million years ago. and. These animals could move and they could. See in some late and that two activities each other because were. How does movement help moment helps that because you can get food in different places? But you need to know where to go and that's really about. Perception nor seeing a vision is. Perhaps, the single most perception sense. But all the does are equally are also important. So So perception and action kind of grow go together. So early, it was in these very simple feedback loops which were about finding food are waiting becoming food if there's a Predator running are trying to. You know eat you up. And and so so. So we must have the fundamental level connect perception to action. then. As. We evolved. position became more and more sophisticated. because. It's many more purposes. And So today we have what seems like a fairly purpose capability which can look at the external world and building a model of the external world inside the head. We do have that capability. That model is not perfect and psychologists have great funding pointing out the ways in which the model in your head is not a perfect model of the extended. They. Create radius illusions to show the ways in which it is imperfect. But it's amazing how far it has come from. Simple perception action loop that you're exists in the you know. An animal five, hundred million years ago when we have this, these very sophisticated radio systems Vegan, then impose structure on them. It's we as scientists who are imposing that structure where we've chosen to characterize this part. Of, the system as court model of object addiction or this Martier of Three D. reconstruction. What's going on Israeli? All of these processes, he's running simultaneously and And they are. Simultaneously because originally, there was in fact to help. Guide action. So as a guiding general statement of a problem, do you think? We can say that the the general problem of computer vision. He said in humans, it was tied to action. Do you think we should also say that ultimately the goal? Of Computer, vision is to sense the world. In a way that helps you. Act in the world. Yes, I think that's the most fundamental That's the most fundamental bubbas. we have by now hyper award. So we have this vision system which can be used for other things, for example, judging the aesthetic value painting. And this is not guiding action. Maybe its guiding action in terms of how much money will put an a near our auction bid, but that's stretched. But the basics are in fact in terms of action, but we have. We evolved really this hyper. Hyper world visual sister actually just to sorry to interrupt. But perhaps, it is fundamentally about action. You kind of jokingly said about spending, but perhaps. The capitalistic. Drive that drives a lot of the development in this world is, is about the exchange of in the fundamental action is money. If you watch Netflix, you enjoy watching movies using perception system to interpret the movie. Ultimately, your enjoyment of that movie means you'll subscribe to. Netflix. So the action is this This extra layer that we've developed a modern society. Perhaps, this is fundamentally tied to the action spending money. But certainly with respect to. Interaction with trump's. So in this whole economic as role. When you're interacting with firms, he does become. It does become that. That's what else is there. Now's a rhetorical question. Okay. So To deliver on the division between the static dynamic. So, much of the work in computer vision. So many of the breakthroughs the you've been a part of have been in the static world. In the looking at static images and you've also worked on starting, but it's a much smaller degree, the community's looking at dynamic video. At. Dynamics is and then there is robotic vision which is dynamic, but also where you're actually have a robot in the physical world interacting based in that vision. Which problem is harder? It's the the sort of the trivial I. Of course one images harder. But if you look at a deeper. Question there. Are we What's the term cutting? Cutting ourselves at the knees or making the problem harder by focusing on images. That's a fair question I think Sometimes. We weekend simplifier problems so much. that you have e- essentially lose of the juice that could enable us to solve the problem. And when could reasonably argue that to some extent? This happens when we go from video to images. Now historically you have to consider the limits of. Imposed by the competition. Capabilities we had. So if he many of the choices made in the computer vision community. through the. Seventies. Eighties nineties can be understood as. Choices which were forced on us by the. Fact that we just in taxes to compute enough compared. Now, enough memory nine Nov harder. Exactly. Not Enough, not enough compute not enough storage. So think of these choices. So one of the choices is focusing on singular images rather than video. Okay. Questions Storage, and compute. To focus on, we did we used to detect edges and throw the damage. Right, so you have an image which has to expect to six pixels and instead of keeping around the gray scale value. What we did was we detected edges, find the places where the brightness changes a lot. So now that. Now, and then throw away the rest. So this was a major compression device. and. The hope was that this makes it that you can still work with it and the logic was humans can integrate a line drawing. And I. Yes, and this would save us a competition. So many of the choices were dictated by that I think today. We no longer detecting edges. Right? We process images with coordinates because we don't need to. We don't have that those computers sections anymore. Now video still understudied because video computer still quite challenging. If a university researcher I, think video computing is not so challenging if at Google or facebook or Amazon. Still Super Challenging I've spoke with the EP engineering Google head of Youtube search discovery, and they still struggle doing stuff on video. It's very difficult subduing. Except using techniques that are essentially the technique than in the nineties, some very basic computer vision techniques. No. That's when you want to do things that scale. So if if you want to operated the scale of all the content of Youtube, it's very challenging and simulations when facebook. But as a researcher you you have you have more opportunities. You can train large networks relatively large video. Him Yes. So I think that this is part of the reason why we have. So, emphasized static images I think that this is changing and over the next few years I see lot more progress happening. In Video I. Have this Jenner, excitement that. To me, video recognition feeds like ten years behind object recognition. And you can quantify that because you can take some of the challenging video data sets and. Their performance on action classification is like twenty percent. Which is kind of what we used to have around Two thousand nine in object addiction. You know there's like about ten years behind. And It'll take ten years to catch up is a different question. Hopefully, it will take less than that. The ME. A similar question already asked, but once again, so for dynamic scenes. Do you think. Do you think some kind of injection of knowledge basis and reasoning is required to help improve like action recognition. If. If if If. We saw the general action recognition problem. What do you think? The solution would look like another way? So I I. Completely. Agree that knowledge is called for and that knowledge can be quite sophisticated. So the way I would say that, but -ception blends into cognition and cognition brings in issues of memory and. This notion of Schema, from psychology, which is Let me use the classic example, which is You go to a restaurant. Right now the things happen in a second order you walk in somebody takes you to a table. Beta comes. Gives you a menu digs, the order food is eventually. Bill is etcetera. Etcetera. there's a classic example of air from the Nineteen Seventy S. It was called. There was the timeframes, ends, scripts, and scheme. These are all quite similar ideas. Okay, and in the seventy s the way the eye of the time dealt with it was by hand coding this. So they hand coded in this notion of a script and the radius stages and the actors, and so on and so forth. And use that to integrate, for example, language I mean if there's a description of A. Of A story involving some people eating at a restaurant, there are all these inferences you can make because you know what happens typically it. So. I think this kind of This kind of knowledge is absolutely essential. So I think that when we are going to do long form video understanding. We are going to need to do this I think, the kinds of technology that we have right now with TD CON relations over a couple of seconds of video, it's very much they led to us short-term with your understanding. Not that long term. undestanding longtime understanding acquires notion of. this notion of Schema that talked about perhaps some notions of goes intentionally functionality and so on and so forth. Now, how will bring that in? So we could either revert back to the seventy s and say, okay, I'm GonNa Hind Code in. A script. Awed we might. Try to learn it. So I. Tend to believe that we have to find learning ways of doing this. Because, I think learning ways planner being modal robust, and they must be learning version of the story because children acquired a lot of this knowledge by sort of just observation to at no moment in a child's life as A. It's possible, but I think it's not A. Typical that somebody that the mother coaches a child through all the stages of what happens in Estrin just go as a family they they. They go to the restaurant, they eat come back and the child goes through ten experiences and the child has has got a Schema. What happens when you go to restaurant? So we somehow need to. We need to provide that capability to systems. You mentioned the following line from the end of the Alan, turing, paper computing, machinery, and intelligence that made people like you said, many people know and very few have read were where he proposes the turing test. This is this is how you know towards the end of the paper instead of trying to produce a program to simulate the adult mine why not rather try to produce one which simulates the child's. So, does a really interesting point and if I think about the benchmarks who have before us to the. The tests of our computer vision systems are often kind of trying to get to the adult. So we're kind of benchmarks, should we have what kind of tests for computer vision do you think we should have that mimic the child's? In Computer Vision, Yeah I, I think we should have those and we don't have those today. I think the bottom of the the challenges that we should really be collecting data off the type that a child that the child experiences. Right. So that gets into issues of privacy and ends on and so forth. But there are attempts in this direction to set sort of tried to collect the kind of data that a child encounters. Growing up. So what's the child's linguistic environment? What's the child's visual environment? So, if we could collect that kind of data. And Then develop learning schemes based on that data that would be one way to do it. Think, that's a very promising direction myself. That might be people would argue that we could just short circuit. There's in some way and sometimes We have imitated We we have not had success by not imitating nature in detail. So they usual example as airplanes, right? We don't build flapping wings. flapping wings. So Yes. That's a that's one of the points of debate in my mind I I. I would. I would bet on. This this learning like a child approach. So one of the. Fundamental aspects of learning like a child is interactivity. So the child is to play with the data said is learning from. Against the select I mean, you can call that active learning you can get. In the machinery world, you can call it a lot of terms. Would your thoughts about this whole space of being able to play with the data set of select what you're learning? Yeah. So I think that I believe in that and I think that we could achieve written in two ways and we should use both. So one is Actually real robotics, rights or real. Physical embodiment of agents. Who are interacting with the world and they have a physical body with the dynamics and? Moss and moment of inertia and friction and all the rest. and. You learn your body that are what lands that body by doing a series of. Actions. The second is that simulation environments. So I think simulation environment are getting much much better. In My in my life in facebook research. Group has worked on something called Habitat, which is a assimilation environment. Averages of visually photo realistic environment of You know places like houses or interiors of radius urban spaces, and so forth, and as you move, you get a picture, which is a pretty accurate picture. So. I can now you can imagine that. Subsequent generations of these simulators. Not just visually, but with respect to you know forces and Mosses and haptic interactions and so on. And then. Than we have that environment to play with I, think the the. Let me state. One reason why I think this active. Being. Able to act in the world is important. I think that this is one way to break. The. Correlation versus Causation Barrett so. This is something which a great deal of interest these days. I mean people like Judea Pearl, I've talked a lot about That Tara neglecting causality and he describes the. Set. Of successes of deep learning as coveting. Right because it's but. I I. Don't quite agree by a troublemaker. He is by causality is important, but causality is not. Is Not. Like a singer silver bullet? It's not like one single principle. Many different aspects here. And one of the ways in which one of our most reliable ways of establishing causal links and there's the way. For example, the medical community does says randomized control trials. So you have a you, you pick some situation, and now in some situation, perform an action and for certain. Others you don't i. So you have a controlled experiment, the child is fact performing controlled experiments all the time. Right right. Okay, small scale. Small scale, and but that is a we that the child gets to better than refinance causes of martyrs of the world. And my colleague Alison Gopnik has together with a couple of others. Court has has because the scientists in the crib. Differing children. So I liked the part that I like about. That is the scientist. Wants to do wants to bill cosby models and the scientist does control experiments and I think the challenge is doing that. So to enable that, we will need to have these these active experiments and I think there's could be done. Summoned the real world and salmon similar. She have hope for simulation I. Hopeful Salacious. That's an exciting possibility if we can get to not just photo realistic but. What's set called life realistic? Simulation, so you don't see any fundamental. Blocks why we can't eventually simulate the the principles of what it means to exist in the world. I I don't see any fundamental problems that I mean. Look. The computer graphics has come a long way. Right? So that in the early days back, going back to eight, thousand, nine, hundred and they were. They were focusing on visual racism, right, and then they could do the easy stuff, but they do stuff like hair or fire and so on. Okay. Well, managed to do that. Then they couldn't do physical actions, right? Like there's a bowl of glass and it falls down chatters, but then they could start to pretty realistic models of that. And so on and so forth. So the graphics people have shown that they can do this forward direction, not just for optical interactions, but also physical interaction. So I think of course, I'm of that is very computer intensive but. I think by and by with find ways of. making models. Evermore. Realistic. You break vision apart into one of your presentations, early vision, static seen understanding dynamics, understanding, and raise a few interesting questions I thought. I could just throw some some you see if you WANNA. Talk about them. So early vision. So it's what is it the he said Sensation perception cognition so is this a sensation? Yes. What. Can we learn from image statistics that we don't already know? So the lowest level. What What can we make from? The statistics basic. So the the variations in the Rock pixels, the textures and someone. Yeah. So what we seem to have learned is is that. There's a lot of redundancy in these images, and as a result, we're able to do a lot of compression. I This competition is very important in biological settings, right? So you might have ten to eight photo receptors and only tend to the six fiber optic now. So you have to do this compression by factor, hundred is to one. And and So there are analogues of that which are happening in. artificial neural networks. Earlier, she's earliest, there's a lot of compression. That can be done in the beginning. Yeah. Just just the statistics. How much? How much? I saw. The movie to think about it is just how successful these image compression. Right we we and there are, and that's been done with it older technologies, but it can be done with there are several companies which are trying to use A. These more advanced neural network type techniques for compression both for static images as well as for for radio. One of my former students has a company which is trying to do. Stuff like this. and I, think I think that they are showing quite. Interesting results and I think that's all the success. That Syria, about image that sticks in video statistics, but that's still not doing. Compression of the kind when I see a picture cat. have. To cat another semantic kind of completion. Yeah. So this is this is a lower level lighter we are we had. As I, said yeah that's focusing on. to linger on that a little bit you mentioned. How far can bottom up image segmentation go and in general? What? You mentioned that the central question for scene understanding is the interplay bottom up and top down information. Maybe this is a good time to elaborate on. That may be defined. What is. What is bottom up or top down? In the Computer Vision, right? That's Today, what we have are. Very interesting systems because they were completely bottom up how the bottom of means. So bottom up means in this case means feed forward neural network. So starting from Europe pixels, start from that OP excels and they they end up with something like that or not a cat. So? Our systems are running totally feed forward. They're trained in a very top down way. So they attained by saying, okay. Does the cat is a cat, a dog visit Zebra, etc.. And I'm not happy with either of these choices fully we have gone into. Because we, we have completely separated these processes. Right. So they so I would like the the process. That is what do we know compared to biology? So in biology. What we know is that the processes in. Debts time, at run time. Those processes are not purely feed forward, but they involve feedback. So, and they involve. SHALLOWER news networks. So the kinds of neural networks we are using in computer vision here resonate fifty fifty years. But. In in the brain individual's cortex going from the retina to it, maybe we have like seven. Eight. So they're far shallower, but we have the possibility of feedback. So they are backward connections. And this might enable us to to deal with the more ambiguous stimuli, for example, so that The biological solution seems to involve feedback. The solution in in artificial vision seems to be just feed forward. But with a much deeper network and the two are functionally equivalent because if you have a feedback network, which just has like three rounds of feedback, you can just unroll it and make it three times the debt and created an totally feed forward way. So. This is something which I mean, we have written some papers on this team, but I really feel that this should this team should be pursued further how some kind of recurrence mechanism. Yeah. Okay the other. That's so I. I want to have a little bit more top down in the. At this time. Okay, then at training time P, make use of a lot of top down knowledge right now. So. Basically, to learn to segment and object, we have to have all these examples of this is the boundary of a cat, and this is the boundary of a chair and the boundary of sense on. And this is too much top down knowledge. How do? Humans do this we manage to. We manage with far less supervision and we do it in the bottom of way because for example, be looking at a video stream. And the Horse. Moves. And that enables me to say that all these pixels are together. Yeah. So get stalled psychologists used to call this the principle of common fate. So. There was a bottom up process by which we were able to segment out these objects and we have totally focused on this top down training cigna. So in my view, we have currently sold it in machine vision this top down bottom up traction. but I don't find that solution fully satisfactory. And I would rather have a bit of both in at both stages for all computer vision problems. As you segments. And the question that you can ask as. So for me, I'm inspired a lot by human vision and I cared about that. You could. Just, a hard-boiled engineer not give them. So to you I would argue that you would need far less training data if you could make my life researchers and you a foot for. Akeso the then maybe taking a step into segmentation that exceed understanding. What is the interaction between? Recognition you mentioned the movement of objects. So for people who don't know computer, vision. segmentation. This weird activity that we that, computer. Vision folks have all agreed is very important. Of drawing outlines or on objects versus abandoning box or an classifying that object What's what's the value of segmentation? What is it as a problem in computer vision? How's it fundamentally different from detection recognition? The other problems? Yeah. So I think So. segmentation enables us to say. That some set of pixels are an object without necessarily even being able to name that object on knowing properties of that object. So you mean segmentation purely as a as as the act of separating and objects. From It's a BLOB. Of of the united in some way from his back. Yeah. So entity fixation if you in making an entity out of it and. Beautifully. I So I think that we have that capability and that is that enables us. Do as we are growing up to acquire. Names of objects with very little supervision. So suppose the child, let's posit that the child has the ability to separate out objects in the world. Then when the? The mother says. Bottle are. The cats behaving funding today. The. Cat suggest some object, and then the child subtle does the mapping. Right? Right. The the mother doesn't have to teach. Specific object Labor's by pointing to them. Week supervision works. In the context that you have the ability to create objects. So I, think that To me that that's a very fundamental capability dead auto applications where this is very important. For example medical diagnosis. In Medical Diagnosis you have some brain scan, I mean some. Some work that we did in my group where you have C. T. Scans of people who had to matic injury and what what the radiologist needs to do is to precisely delineate radius. Places where there might be a bleeds, for example. and. There are needs like that. So that's very practical applications of computer vision where segmentation city, but philosophy Kelly segmentation. A neighbor's the task of recognition to proceed with much vico supervision than required today. And you think of segmentation is this kind of task that takes on a visual scene and breaks it apart. into. into. Interesting entities that might be useful for whatever the task is. Yeah. I need some antics free. So I think I mean it blends do it involves perception and cognition, it does not. Does Not I. Think the mistake that we used to make in the early days of computer vision was to treated as purely bottom up perceptual task. It is not just that. Because we do devise our notion of. segmentation with more expedience, right? Because for example, that objects which are non rigid like animals or humans. And, I think. Understanding that all the pictures of our human are run entities actually quite a challenge because the parts of the human. They can move independently. The human says clothes. So there might be differently colored sites, all sort of challenged. You mentioned the three Rs of computer vision, our recognition reconstruction reorganization. Can you describe these three, rs. Interact Yep. So so recognition is the easiest one because that's. What I think people generally think office computer, vision. Achieving these days, which is Labels. So is this a cat? Is Dog is there's A. Q. Are I mean you know could be very fine grain like specific breed of dog. Or a specific species of bird or it could be very abstract like. Adamant, but given a part of an image or a whole image, say put a label on that. Yeah. So that's that's recognition. Reconstruction is Essentially. It, you can think of it as in was graphics. To think about it. So gothics is your, you have some internal computer representation. And recommended. A presentation of some objects arranged in a scene, and what you do is you produce a a picture, he produced the pixels corresponding rendering of that scene. So Let's do the inverse of this. We are given an image and we tried to. We. We say hope this image arises from some objects in a scene looked at with a camera from this viewpoint, and we might have more information about the objects like their shape maybe that deck hsieh's may be. Color etc, etc.. So. That's that e construction problem in a way. You in your head creating a model of the external world. Okay reorganization is to do with essentially finding these entities saw So it's organization argued about organization implies structure. So I, that in in perception in psychology. Perceptual Organization that. the the world, not just an image is not just as. Is Not internally represented as just a collection of pixels, but we make these entities. We create these entities objects whatever you WANNA call no relationship between the entities as well as a purely about the entities. Could be about relationships, but mainly focused on the fact that there are entities. I'm trying to I'm trying to pinpoint what the organization means. So organization is that instead of like a uniform. Grid, we have this structure of objects. So segmentation. Part of that. So segmentation gets going towards that. And you kind of have this triangle where they all interact together. Yes. How, do you see that interaction? In a sort of Reorganization is yes. Finding the entities in the world, the recognition is labeling those entities. And then reconstruction is what filling in the gaps for example, he. Imbued some three D. objects corresponding to each of these entities. That would be part of because adding more information. That's not there in the raw data. Got It. I mean I started pushing this kind of view in the around two, thousand, ten or something like that. Because at that time in computer vision that distinction that people. were. Just. Working on many different problems, but the cheated each of them as separate isolated problem. With each with its own data's. Try to all that and get good numbers on it. So I wasn't I didn't like that approach because I wanted to see the connection between these. and. If people divided up vision into into various modules, they would do it as low level, mid level and high level vision. Corresponding roughly to the psychologists notional sensation perception and cognition. and. I didn't that didn't map to tasks that people cared about. Okay. So therefore, I tried to promote this particular framework as a way of considering the problem that people in Computer Vision were actually working on and trying to be more explicit about the fact that they actually are connected to each other. And I was at that time does doing this on the basis of information flow though it turns out. In the last five years or so. in the. Post. Deep Learning Revolution that this, this architecture has turned out to be very Conducive to that because basically in these neural networks are trying to build multiple representations. There can be multiple output heads shading common representations. So in a certain sense today, given the reality of what solutions people have to this. Do not need to preach this anymore. Death data, it's part of the sedation space. So speaking of neural networks, how much of? This problem with computer vision of. Recognition can be. Reconstruction. How. Much it can be learned end to end d think. Sort of. set it, and forget it just plug and play have a giant data set multiple, perhaps multi modal, and then just learn the entirety of it. Well, so I I think that currently what that end to learning means nowadays is end to end supervised learning. And, and that I would argue is too narrow of you of the problem. I would. I like this child development view, this lifelong learning view one where there's hadn't capabilities that are built up, and then there's certain capabilities which built up. On top of that. So. That's that's what I. I believe it. So I think. End Learning. Supervise setting. For already precise ask to me is Kind of as. Sort of a limited view of the of the learning process. Got It. So if we think about. Beyond purely supervise look at back to children, you mentioned six lessons that we can learn from children. of be Multi Moto being commendable. Be Physical, explore, be social language. Can. You speak to these grabs picking one? The find most fundamental tar. Time today. Yes. So I mean I should say to give due credit. This is from a paper by Smitten Gaza. and. It reflects Essentially, I would say common wisdom among. Child Development People, it's just that. These This is not common wisdom among people, Computer Vision and the I and machine learning. So I view my role as. Trying to bridge the world's. Two worlds. So So let's take an example of a multi-modal. I. Liked that. So multi-modal canonical example, there's Child interacting. With an object. So then the child, the child holds the ball and plays with. So. At that point, it's getting a touch signal. So the touch signal is. Getting as the notion of three D shape, but it has passed. And then the child is also seeing a visual signal, right and these to. Imagine. These are two entirely different spaces. Rights. One is the space of receptors on the skin of the fingers and the Tom, the palm. And then these map onto these neurons fiber add. Getting. Activated somewhere. These lead to some activation in. So Madison City Cortex, I mean, assimilating will happen if we have a robot hand. Okay, and then we have the pick says corresponding to the visual view, but we know that they correspond to the same object. Right. So that's a very, very strong cross calibration CIGNA. And it is self supervisory, which is beautiful. Right. There's nobody assigning a liberal. The mother doesn't have to come in assigned label. The child doesn't even have to know that this object is called the ball. Okay by dogs, the child is learning something about the. World. From this signal. I think tactile and visual. There is some work on. There is a lot of work currently audio and visual. and audio visual. So there is some event that happened in the world, and that event has visuals. Signature hand has a auditory signature. So that is this glass on the table and it falls and breaks here the smashing sound and I see the piece of glass. Cook. I've felt. That connection between the two. Right, be people I. Mean. There's become a hot topic in computer vision in the last couple of years. There there are problems like. Separating out, multiple speakers. which was a classic problem in In addition, they call this the problem, also separation a cocktail party effect on, but just try to do it visually. When you also have. Become so much. Easier and so much. More used. So the Ma, the multi modal. I mean, there's so much more signal with multi-modal and you can use that some kind of weak supervision as well. Yes. Because they are cutting at the same time in news time which links to right. So I just heard moment t one, you've got the second signal in order to maintain a certain signal individual domain, but they must be causally related. That's an exciting area, not well studied yet. Not. Yeah. I. Mean we have. To, work at this but but. Much more needs to be done. Yeah. So so so so this this is a good example be physical. That's to do with like the one thing we talked about earlier that that there's a embodied world. To mention language use language. So no Chomsky. Believes that language may be at the core of cognition of everything in the human mind. What is the connection between language envision to you? What's more fundamental? Are they neighbors is one the parent and the Child Chicken and the egg? Oh. It's very clear vision which is the parents of. The fundamental. Ability. Okay. So, is comes before you think, vision is more fundamental language at A. And I it a, and you can think of it e that in Filon Jenny or an entourage. So if I large any means if you're looking evolutionary time. Right. So you have vision that they've looked five, hundred, million years ago. Okay, then something like when we get to maybe like five million years ago, you have the first bipedal primates when we started to walk, then the hand became free and so then manipulation they ability to manipulate objects and build tools and so on. So forth, he said five hundred thousand years ago at the. First multicellular animals, which you can say had some intelligence. Rose Five, hundred, million years million. Okay, and now let's Fast forward to say, the last seven, million years, which is the development of the Hominid, line, right where from the other primates, the branch which leads onto modern humans. Now, there are many of these. Hominids but the the ones which. People talk about. Lucy. Because that's like a skeleton from three million years ago, and we know that Lucy walked. Okay. So at this stage, you have the hand is free for manipulating objects and then the ability to manipulate objects build tools. And the brain size grew in this area. So. Okay. So now you have been relation now, we don't know exactly when language errors. But after that after that. Because AIDS have I mean. So I, mean Chomsky's correct in that that it is a uniquely human capability and we. Primates. Other primates don't have that. But so he developed somewhere in this heater but developed. I would. Argue that it probably developed after we had the stage of Are Humans I mean the human species are able to manipulate. And hands-free, much bigger brain size, and for that, there's a lot of vision has already had had developed. Yes. So the sensation and perception, maybe some of the cognition. So we so those. So that. The world. So de. So these. Ancestors was you know three million years ago they had. they had spatial intelligence. So, they knew that the world console objects they knew that the objects were insert in relationships to each other, they had observed causal. interactions among objects, they could move in space. So they had space and diamond all of that. So language. Builds on that substrate. So language has a lot of I mean. I mean the NE, all human languages have constructs which depend on a notion of space and time. Where did that notion of space and time from? It had to come from, but -CEPTION and action in the world religion. Now, will you referred to the? Spatial, intelligence. Yeah. Yeah So. Deliver a little bit will mention. Touring and his mention of we should learn from children. Nevertheless languages, the fundamental piece of the test of intelligence that touring proposed has what what do you think is a good test of intelligence. Are you what would impress the heck out of you is fundamentally. Or is there something envision? I think I i. wouldn't I don't think we should have creating test intelligence. So, just like I don't believe in Iq as a single lumber. I think. Generally. That can be many capabilities which are coordinated perhaps. So, I, think that. There will be There will be accomplishment which are visual accomplishments, accomplishments which are. accomplishments in manipulation nar robotics, and then accomplishment in language. I do believe that language. It'll be the hardest nut to crack. Really. Yeah. So what's what's harder to pass the spirit of the turing test like whatever formulation will make it natural language? Convincingly, natural language like somebody would want to have a beer with hang out and have a chat with or the general. National scene. Understanding You think language is, but I, think I think I'm not a fan of the. I, I think tooting test that tooting as he proposed a test in nineteen fifty. was trying to solve a certain problem an invitation. Yeah, I. Think it made a lot of sense then. Where we are today seventy s later. I think I think. We should not worry about that I. Think the Turing Test is no longer the right way to to to channel research, and in a because it takes us down this path of this Jackpot, which can fool as for five minutes or whatever. Okay, I think I would rather have a list of ten different tasks. I mean I, think that tasks, which are the tasks in the manipulation domain dusk. The navigation does individuals in understanding Docs in under reading a story and onset questions based on that I. Mean. So my favorite language. undestanding task would be. Reading a novel and being able to answer arbitrator questions from it. Okay Right. I I think that to me. and. This is not an exhaustive list by any means. So I would I, think that's what we where we need to be going to, and each of these on each of these axes, there's a fair amount of work to be done. So on the visual understanding side in this intelligence, Olympics, we set up what's a good test for of one of many of visual. Scene Understanding. getting such benchmarks exists No, there aren't any I I. Think I think essentially to me I. Really good aid to the blind. So suppose. There was a blind person and I needed to assist the blind person. So. Ultimately, like we said, vision that AIDS in the action in the survive new world. Yeah. Maybe in the simulator world. Maybe easier to measure. Comments in the same related world, what we are ultimately after his performance in the real world. So David Hilbert in nineteen hundred proposed twenty, three open problems in mathematics, some of which are still unsolved, most important, famous of, which is probably the Riemann hypothesis. Thought about and presented about the Hilbert problems of computer vision. So let me ask what do you today I. Don't know when the last year you've presented that. Two. Thousand, fifteen. But versions of. Your kind of the the face and the spokesperson for a computer vision. As your job to the state with the problem. The open problems are for the field to what today are the Hilbert problems of computer vision. Do you think? Let me pick pick one too, which I regard as daily clearly unsolved, which is what I would call a long form video understanding. So, so we have a clip and we want to understand. The behavior in their in dumbs off agents. That goes indenture analogy. and. Make predictions about what might happen. You know so so that that kind of. Understanding. Which who goes away from atomic was your action. So so in the short-range, the question is Are you sitting? Are you standing? Are you catching? Right that we can do now, are we even if he can't do it fully accurate leave if he can do it at fifty percent maybe next year, we'll do it at sixty five and so forth. But I think the long range video understanding. I don't think we. We can do to. Today and that means so long blended to cognition. That's the reason why challenging. As he has the track you've done understand entities if to understand the as Jesus, you have to track them. And yet have some kind of model. Their behavior. And their behavior might be. These are these are agents. So they are not just like passive objects that they agent. So therefore, we they might. They would exhibit goal directed behavior. Okay so this is this is one area. Then Allah will talk about the understanding the world in three. Now this May Sima Better Cal. Because in a way we have been able to three. D. Understanding even like. Thirty years ago. Right. But I don't think we currently have that each ness of tweedy understanding in computer vision systems that would like. Because So let me elaborate on that a bit. So currently we have. Two kinds of techniques which are not fully unified. So they are the kinds of techniques from multi view geometry that you have multiple pictures overseen, and you do a reconstruction using stereoscopic vision. Structure, promotion. But these techniques do not I totally fail if you just have a single view. Because they underlying on this. This multiple very. Okay then we have some techniques that we have developed in the computer vision community, which tried to guess three d from saying of use. These techniques out based on. On a supervised learning. And they're based on having a training dime three d models of objects available. This is completely unnatural supervision. Right, that's not a cad models are not injected India brings. Okay. So what I like, what I would like would be kind of learning as you. Move around the world notion of three. Yeah so so we we have our. Succession of visual experiences. And from those we saw in as part of that, I might see chair from different viewpoints on a table from viewpoint, different viewpoints and so on. Now as part that enables me to build some internal representation and then next time I just see a single photograph. It may not even be of that jet. It's of some other jet and have a guest of what it's td shape is like you're almost learning the CAD model kind of. Yeah. Implicitly, I mean implicitly I mean the guide model need not be in the same form as used by computer graphics. Hidden in the representation, it's hidden in that presentation, the ability to predict new views and what I would see if I went to such and such position. By the way, a small tangent on that, are you uncover? Are you? Okay. Or comfortable with neural networks that do achieve visual understanding that do for example, that you this kind of three d understanding and you don't know how they. You don't know the report, you're not able to interest, but you're not able to visualize or understand or interact with the representation. So the fact that they're not or may not be explainable. I think that's fine. I to me, that is so. So. Let me put caveats on that. So it depends on the setting. So first of all, I think. I the humans are not explainable. So that's a really good point and so we. Human the human is not fully explainable. I think there are settings where explain ability matters. And those mytalk. These might be, for example, questions on medical diagnosis. So I am in uh, setting where. Maybe the doctor, maybe a computer program has made a certain diagnosis. And then depending on the diagnosis, but upset should have treatment DEO treatment be. Right so now. Is that computer programs diagnosis based on. Data, which was data collected off for American as who are in their thirties and forties and maybe not. So relevant to me maybe element you know. CETERA ETCETERA CETERA I mean, in medical diagnosis, we have major issues to do different, plus so we may have acquired statistics from one group of people and applying it to a different group of people who may not share all the same characteristics. The data might have there might be edited bars and the prediction, so that prediction should really be taken with. A huge grain of salt. And but this has an impact on were treatments. Should be. Picked, right. So there are settings where I want to know more than just. This dancer. But. What I- acknowledges that the. So. So so so I in that sense expandability and interoperatability may matter. It's about giving at bones and a better sense of the quality of the decision. Wa-. I read I'm willing to sacrifice in deputy abilities that I believe that They can be system, which can be highly performance by which are internally. Black boxes. Had in, that seems to be where it's headed. Some of the best performing systems are essentially black boxes. Fundamentally by their construction are blackbox history each other. Yes. So the nice thing about the black boxes we are. Is So we? Ourselves are black boxes, but we're also the those of us who are charming are able to convince others like explain the black what's going on inside the black box would narratives stories, some sons Newell. Now, I don't have to actually explain. What's going on inside? They just have to come up was stories real or fake that convinced you that they know what's going on. And I'm sure we can do that can create those nearer those stories nearer networks can create those stories. Yeah. In an transformer will be involved. Do you think we will ever? Build a system of human level, super human level intelligence. We've kind of defined what it takes to try to approach that. But do you think will do you think that's within our reach? The thing that we thought we could do what touring thought. Actually, we could do a year two thousand, right? Think. We'll ever be able to do. So I. think that to answer one question. One answer is in principle. Can we do this at sometime and man says, yes. Taken onset pragmatic. Do you think we will be able to do it in the next twenty years however? and to that band says, no. So i. of course, that's wild guess. High I. Think that You Know Donald Rumsfeld is not a favorite person mind, but one of his lines is very good riches about known knowns. Known. Unknowns an unknown unknowns. In. The business we are in that are known unknowns and we have unknown unknowns. So I think with respect to a lot of what? The. Case in. Vision and robotics. I. Feel like. We have known unknowns. So, I have a sense of where we need to go and what the problems that need to be sold out. I feel with respect to natural language. Understanding, and high level cognition. It's not just known unknowns, but also unknown unknowns. So it is very difficult to put any kind of A. Dime frame to that. Do. You think some of the unknown unknowns. Positive in that, they'll surprises make the job much easier. So fundamental breakthroughs, I think that is possible because certainly I are being very positively surprised by how effective these deep learning systems have been because I certainly would not have believed that in two thousand ten. I think. What we knew from the mathematical theory. was that convex optimization works when there's a single global? OPTIMA and? This great innocent techniques would work now these are. Non. LINEAR systems with non CONVEX systems. Huge number various overpower tries what betterment dries and. The people who is to play with them a lot. The ones were totally immersed in the Lord and Black Magic. They knew that they worked. Well. Even though they were really, I thought like everybody know that claim that I. Hear from. My friends like John Koon and so forth and now. Yeah. They feel that they were comfortable with. What he says community as a whole and. Not. and. I think we were to me. That was a surprise that they actually worked robustly. For the wide range of problems from a wide range of initialisation on. and. So that was that was set any. More. Rapid progress than. We expected. But. Then there's certainly lots of times in fact, most of the history and. When we made less. Progress at a slower rate than we expected. So. We just keep going I think Modi regard as really unwarranted. These these fears of You know, Agi in ten years and twenty years and that kind of stuff because that's based on completely unrealistic models of how rapidly we will make progress in this field. So, I, agree with you. But I've also. Gotten a chance to interact with very smart people who really worry about existential threat survey and I as an open minded person sort of taking it taking it in. Do you think. If A. Systems, in some way, the unknown unknowns, not super intelligent ai been ways. We don't quite understand The nature of super intelligent will have a detrimental effect on society. Do you think this is something we should be. Worried. About are we need to I allow the unknown unknowns to become known unknowns? I think we need to be worried about the today. I, think that it is not just a very. We need to have when we get that. I I think that. Is being used in many systems today. and. There might be settings, for example, when it causes biases or decisions, which could behind for I mean a decision which could be unfair to some paper or it could be as have driving cars which kills up at a student. So. Systems, are being deployed today. Right, and they are being deployed in many different settings, maybe in medical diagnosis, maybe driving car maybe in selecting applicants for an interview. So I would argue that van these systems make mistakes. There are consequences. And the AD in a certain sense responsible for those consequences. As all I would argue that this is a continuous effort. It is we. and. And this is something that in a way is not so surprising about all. Engineering and scientific progress which are great. Power comes great responsibility. So as these systems are deployed, we have to worry about them and it's a continuous problem. I don't think of it as something, which will suddenly happen on some day in two, thousand, seventeen nine for which I need to design some clever trick. I'm saying that these problems exist today. Yeah, and we need to be continuously on the lookout for. Worrying, about safety biases, risks right I. mean the ever served driving car kills a pedestrian and they have. Right I mean. This. Ober incident in Arizona. Right. It happened. Right? This is not about Agi. In fact, it's really dumb intelligence which along killing people, the worry people have with Gi is the scale and I. But I think you're one hundred percent. Right? Is like the thing that worries me about ai today. And it's happening a huge skills, recommended recommended systems accommodation systems. So if you look at twitter facebook youtube. They're controlling. The ideas, the we have access to the news and so on, and that's a fundamental, a machine learning algorithm behind each of these recommendations. And they I mean my life would not be the same without these sources of information. I'm totally new human being in the ideas that I know are very much because of the Internet because of the within the recommend those ideas. So as they get smarter and smarter, I mean, that is the Agi. Is. That's the the algorithm that's recommending the next Youtube video should watch. Has Control of millions of billions of people. That that algorithm his already super intelligent and has complete control, the population, not a complete, but very strong control for now, we can turn off. You could just go have a normal life outside of that, but the more and more that gets into our life. That Algorithm, we start depending on it in the different companies that work on the Algorithm. So I think you're right. It's already. It's already there and Youtube in particular is using computer vision. Doing their heart is to try to understand the content of video. So they could. be able to connect videos with people who would benefit from those videos, the most, and so that development could go in a bunch of different directions, some of which may be harmful. So. Yeah. You're right the threat story I here already thinking about them. On a philosophical. Notion. If you could. Personal. Perhaps, if you could relive a moment in your life outside of family. Because it major, truly happy or was the profound. Moment the impacted the direction of your life. What would you go to? I. I don't think thinking moment, but I look over the long haul. I feel that I've been very lucky. Because I feel that. I think that in scientific research. A lot of it is about being the right place at the right time. And you can. You can work on problems at a time when. They're just too premature in a you'll beat, but your head against them and and nothing happens because it's The requisite, it's are not there and that times when you are now field, which is all pretty. Mature. And you can only. Solve curricula upon calicoes. I've been lucky to have been in this field which. For thirty, four, years. Actually, thirty four years as the professor at Berkley. So longer than that. Which? When I started in it was. A. Little crazy. Absolutely. Useless, field, it's. Couldn't really do anything. To when it's really really. Solving, a lot of practical problems has. has offered a lot of tools for scientific research. Because computer vision is impactful for. Images in biology or astronomy, and and so on and so forth. And we have. Have made great scientific progress which had real practical impact in the world and I feel lucky that. I gotten at a time when the field was. Very young and at a time when it has. It's now. Mature, but not fully matured meets mature, but not done I, mean daily Instilling A. Productivity is yes. Yeah Yeah I think people five hundred years from now. Would laugh a Yukon? This field mature? That is very possible. Yeah. So but you're also lest I forget to mention, you've also mentored some of the biggest names of computer vision Peter Signs, and they I today So many questions that could ask, but really is what what is it? How did you do it? What does it take to be a good mentor? What does it take to be a good guide? Yeah I. Think what I feel I've been lucky to her. Had Very, very smart and hardworking in creative students I. Think some of the credit just belongs to. Being at Berkeley I could go through our top universities are blessed because we have very, very smart and capable students coming knocking on our door. So, so I have to be humbled enough to acknowledge that. But what have I added? I. Think about it. something. What I've had it is I. Think what I've always tried to. Teach them as a sense of picking the right problems. So I think that INSCI- in the short-run success is always based on. Technical. Competence your you know your quick with Matt or your whatever I mean. There's certain technical capabilities which make for short-range progress. long-range progress is really determined by asking the right questions and focusing on the right problems and I feel that. What I've been able to bring to the table in terms of advising students is some sense of taste. What are good problems? What are problems that Davos attacking now as opposed to waiting Dennis? What's a good problem? If you could summarize if is possible to even summarize like what? What's your sense of a good problem? I think I. Think. I have a sense of what a good problem which is There is a British scientists, in fact, Ivana Nobel Prize pita. WHO has a book on on this and basically because? The research, the art of the soluble. So we need to certify and. Problems which are. which are not yet sold. But which are approachable. And he refers to this. Sense that there is this problem which isn't quite Saudi, but it has a soft underbelly. Someplace where you can. You know spear the beast. And having that edition that this problem is ripe. Is a good thing because otherwise you can beat your head and not paid progress. So I think that is that is important. So if if I have that and if I can convey that to students, it's not just that they do great research while they're working with me, but that the continue to great set. So in a sense I'm proud of my students. And their achievements and their greater said even twenty as after they've seized being my student. So some part developing helping them develop that sense that the problem is not yet solved, but it's solvable cut. The other thing which I have average. I. Think. I. Bring to the table Is. A is a certain intellectual Brett I. I've spent a fair amount of time studying psychology neuroscience, relevant areas of Applied Matt, and so forth. So I can probably help them see some connections to dispatch things which. They might not have otherwise so So the smart students coming into Burke Lake and be. Very. Deep in this and they can think deeply meaning very hard down one particular part, but where I could help them as the. The Shallow Brett. Show, very, they would have the the narrow debt. And but that's that's somebody who. was beautifully refreshing to hear you. Naturally, jumped to psychology to computer science in this conversation back and forth that that's a it's a rare quality. I think it's certainly for student is empowering to think about problems in a new way. So for that and for many other reasons, I, really enjoyed this conversation. Thank you so much as a huge honor. Thanks for talking It's been a pleasure. Thanks for listening to this conversation which attend your Malik, thank you to our sponsors, better help and express VPN. Please consider supporting this podcast by going to better help dot com slash LEX, and signing up. But Express ups, dot com slash leg spot, click the links by the stuff. It's how they know a saint you and it really is the best way to support this podcast and they journey I'm on. If you enjoy this thing subscribe ign Youtube Review Five Stars and Apple podcasts support. Patriots on a connected with me on twitter at lex Friedman don't ask me how to spell that. I. Don't remember myself. And now let me leave you a some words from Prince Mishkin, in the idiot by dusty Yankee. Beauty will save the. World. Thank you for listening and hope to see you next time.

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EP02 - Living Your Best Life

Perspective 5 Podcast

46:15 min | 4 months ago

EP02 - Living Your Best Life

"Scoreless goal fun. Fun fun radio living no sir swoon. In grand right right The fear that welcome welcome. Welcome to the family. Fox created by five light. Monday brother projects challenge the social constructive. Society all go in raleigh individual perspectives of live. Light light of respect and love. Beggar y'all tastic check. Yeah yeah we back we back we back another instead. We never went really. But we're here. You know i always yes. Yes yes yeah we still here. Yes moma silence give. Thanks always amen. Nice back to the ruckus you know tapings another topic another conversation discussion. Another link-up another enlightened moment therefore number another buildup. Get me chatelet salton. Some bonte everyone. Who's anyone who's eunice yet. You're going to be rich powerful. 'cause yeah 'cause you're you'll be. We're sending them vibes to enrich. And i don't mean just in money you get me everything. Every ten reached enriched. Yes roll cool. Let's not waste time and you know what we're gonna do Let me kick you off. Once is the royal corps at night on no introduce myself to call me links signal mr smooth in schmidt to flex me you know i mean my brothers and you know what is charisma. We using the talk and we will the woke. That's what we do right now. Yeah definitely big up big up. Yeah love to see you always year mr your skin. Yeah you know me. Yeah egos swerve them. Curve bosa started laughing it someone my mind today right. Oh come on. S miss chef loss of his apprentice. Jin yes sharon as much as we could Share the load share with them The and to my right we have. Missile was going on khattab. Aw kebabs think. Judy knew vice president. Knop start pulling himself. Razzie can choose a minimum wage. Yup i take the twisted perspective on everything life. My brother just what you see different whole has done. Yeah i different and it makes it sound interesting and we wanna hear that komo analysts. So that's everybody does us perspective five. Yeah and you're gonna keep it kicking off with You know you don't know what this one is pre interesting you get me off season. You know subjects that a lot of people who are free will connect with this and We'll talk not so this one able to come about today's Living our best life okay. Privacy in the social everywhere. Everyone's exactly wants to live less. It would prompt the question. Then what is living. What is what is living your well. Your best life from looking at outside in the autumn didn't have the same experience so it must be different levels to have in your best live. Yeah exactly different priorities. And that's what. I'm looking for all living the same life but also saying is the best life but you know when thinking about this living your best life. His woes at drake sunk yolo correct. That's when that's not slide here in this talk about living your best because you only live once and blah blah blah and you only live once is to you one. Yeah unless you unless you unless you wanted them was. He was people there. That believe in reincarnation. Subway might live many lives so you can't really say that really and truly kate deaf only scary could we don't know what's novice. Yeah we don't know what happens after no one's been there and combat. Noah's been there stayed long enough. Whoa i understand us. Come back and tell well if you if you will. It depends what again. What kind of perspective you're looking at from because if you're religious yeah then you i'm saying he says you're in heaven or hell so them sir you get what i'm saying. You know what i mean always lack. Who different one. You know what. I mean not one there psalm. Sandy so is leaving. Your in. Your life are now some people say living. Glad i've had. I've had them different I'm my view. Living your best life here is like i mean. Some people may say that's boring or what whatnot whatnot you get me. But they don't get it. They think some people living their best life is like you know. Maybe you know literally do what they want so eat what they want. Drink what they want here. Lay down with you they want. Yeah that's part of my view. I wanna let go responsibilities now for me. No yeah on opposite like you live your best life eating what you want drink and what you want and laying down with one eight investment repercussions right repercussions. Yeah plus plus i like to. I like to follow the universe with laws because their dad and people don't observe these things and the way the society seems kind of put things right now is like is. They're trying to take out those universal laws and make up their own kind of law. So it's like. I will say to my brothers. Yeah and the you know. We're having a drink here. Not don't drink you get me because our call does the steel body it damages your cells. Damage your liver can mash up your judgment. Easily perspective right gone from say don't eat certain foods though starchy yet because when you eat those foods or what whatnot damages your body yeah especially with starch starch dossier because it coats your organs in like you know like a flame film kind of message get coming from so therefore it's like if you have an apple by that year 'cause you build up you buy apple and then you leave the app and it starts turning not oxygenating kind of thinks run. That's literally what happens with these When we eat certain foods because that's what gluten does it coats your organs and then that's where it starts happening inside your body. You got him saying then. You got the mucus buildup you coming from so now from my perspective living my best life is eating clean healthy food. That's my best last. Yeah yeah it's not having some people say you don't want to have not only is makes me sick. Yes and this even even eaten. It makes me feel sick. 'cause i wanna know what it's made of coming from santa's radia right saying because i know how especially you know. That's why i had to even stop them rave him. 'cause it became a choice of you know i mean am i going to the moon in and train mahar this year. Or am i gonna be at this rave where everyone's gonna feel tired the next day and blah blah blah blah. You know what. I like feeling good. I like feeling healthy. a lot. more like my brain's point You get what i'm saying. That's kind of was that for me. What was leaving my best show to you. That's what's living your best life and and again you know. I'm going gonna claim that. Come the strongest man when it comes to woman woman the woman thing you get what i'm saying i liked having discipline of you. Know lame with that woman and that woman just because she likes music issues available because again i started learning about things like seminole retention. Yana stan what semen retention actually does to your body especially as a month because it's like a life seat you get them saying so it's like the mall we hold hold that sperm inside of our body you get the more we take in the nutrients in we're building we're building right that's why it's important. It's the seat finco by your seat. So you dot concept Shaft martin had you wanna going to yours off can just to make it. Clarita muscle do universal laws. That you're talking about you understand so hobie topic. We'll probably to ask some point and you give us a couple of examples. Just have fill in a grasp of the concept of universal laws. Yeah basically is like you know what i mean. It's you call even taking the right things vibrate if you eat that piece of shit. Then you're gonna come land piece of shit basically saying is gonna get you know what i'm saying. That's how is how you think you get. I'm saying it's like everything's gone. Try slackness and stuff like right. It's more debt rican. Gone one when we can pull out many examples meeting about looting today and he just mentioned something on the train. This data to the train station and i miss the chain. Exactly what he said. I bet you you buck to the drake. What happened bob. The existence trained chicken bones. I'm burning seven chocolate. Combat nurse who laws like basically is like you know what i mean. It's like we're under same vibration. How will sit in months one month year could be walking in this room right now and it could be like you know nice on embraer and then it's like we probably respond to him. Nice and calm blah blah next my walk in there and he's his own doc. You get me and everything's dock wherever everywhere we can through that you got saying so. He slept energy. That you bring y'all coming from. We might respond to that guy. Brings it lives here. Of course saying bringing it's dark energy we just want to come into my electro magnetic field when you find out the science about it. Your vibe is affecting my bias fair because we're electric minnesota. oh you're into the science it Well we can do that another day. As well showed on the comments. I wanted to a different aspect Leaving your best life because we shaft minded catch up on a two and there was this. A substance abuser came to shop on black man was lying down in the in the sidewalk up just relaxing chilling care like us on his sofa about society's rules right you that meet. He was doing what he weighed in the moment so for him he was leaving his best life. That's it. I do wanna put out yet. Guy meant that he didn't care about respect for how well we was trying to let your magnetic field crashing. That's a physics. He's appearance like bro. You can tell he wasn't even see. That's what i'm trying to say. That's a man who given up on life. You want living his best birth to me. He was living his best. Life felt that one is an old fable about a kings prince that He had the power or position. The money everything. And he didn't lighter responsibility away from his position as prints yeah and he became poor on whatever. Obviously this journey because no financial bind can became. The town's beggar became the town's everything that we call negative and whatnot by one point even lost the opportunity to replenish his clothes so he went a stage through life where he was completely naked in town but he had to make a conscious decision at some point. Do i care about people's opinions Do people's opinions really affect me from being the state law. I wanna be fill freese. I'm being me as true to me. With what access of around me in that one moment the endless damage. So when i say everyone had a different experience but still claimed they come to the same level of enjoying life yet. Because everyone's going different view. He came from the high class. And is i must say. Sold wasn't jelly witty. He was i've aboard create access and everything came quick. He didn't learn lessons along the way how to grant boost from. Yeah he wanted to learn a lot from a different aspects so he walked away from all of that to learn to live from the advice we know servant coming off to you and he wanted to learn things don robert and somebody doing for him for him. He was happy to get them experiences. That was leaving his best life by the. Then you have the safety of knowing you can go about taking them when you read just story into the things you've done in between. I just summarize with a true story. Yeah you often does movie based on this as well. Yeah if Was this story agent Thinking medical rainier. Yeah i'll maybe maybe. Because i remember i remember from the side. I remember stories live. You've got his life. Because i don't know maybe like you know we've been might be in the world that he was in pink from somebody's view he would have everything that somebody was aspiring to. But yet he didn't joe in not environment exactly button again. I'm richard doesn't necessarily saying he wanted to learn life lessons. Robina have the benefits for knowing somebody who already go. Everything collected one umbrella exactly and for him. He was more content knife off. This is even funny that you say that because this one is the day or even on the instagram and These guys will joking about. Would they suck a month off for ten million ten ten million ten million pounds. What's stopping this is what they said roku nuts. There's no price to that is wrong. You couldn't even you shouldn't even be putting out there all right. This is what they put down my breath and up commenting now. Housman even can let you get meat. And i see i'm thinking even young boys is trying to steer them in the robbery. I'll couldn't believe attacked. I even i even got told that raw Mom do that and think of all the lives you can save an jobs you can do and rare for ten million wherever i said what i said. He fucking excuse might. I'm african. i'll say african word yet. That's a mud. European green greek greek island as this and for money. That's what the motivation was. Apple is people who are willing to push push negative agendas on the some without be living their best life an even if even if it's a seed even if the destroying a fishing line is about who's going to catch that whole crab i couldn't believe what for saying this is then people kind of design these questions to ask. A certain people already have a gist of what kind of background. The what kind of socially acceptable hoop from. Yeah who knows alone. Influence social tiny. Gordon social. Now your your attracting when you throw things out like that really and truly know who you're trying to eat tip five podcast and yet social standards. Some people say but that's leaving your best lifelock can get the ten meals always saying best last year we are saying for you to be able to live your best life that you need to have that money back in. Is that what we're saying. I don't think so. That sounds like a person wants to get spoiled and anyone that doesn't understand the actual work for why president because he had odor wealth. I need still wasn't size fighting his position. So what is living. Your best life i know is different for everybody though. Because what is living your best life. You know what i mean. They know me. I 'cause you know that. Line when i say cause yo all you need to do is give me one farm a lotta. Why i'm leaving my best life hundred hundred i don't wanna be paying tribute to the land. Sorry i wanted to be able to buy the house and the land achy comes with you people. Go look into that yourself. Yeah i i want to have that writes And just make one payment often. Just leave me in a corner world. You get alone janas so so it's just like you see those pictures they say. Oh you got this big mansion How would i wanted to technology and then okay so they say internet who just notice Technologies might have to take. I need my corner of the world keeps stepping up. Not one one sec that links that one. How would you suck on for ten meals. So would you know so. Would you live in one of those those mansions for six months milton mill. Why rely on the internet with them. Things i realized from y'all living there from i grew up in the west indies but yet my family was in england so the pound is big. I'm conversion over this. I didn't live a normal upbringing as the rest of my friends was brilliant. I i'm looking at my boys. I maybe five or ten. I'm just saying economic access that you get right. I'm where everybody falls in that platform You understand me. So i guess i lived in a gated community at one point where my friends was living in both houses to Concrete house versus border. And these things for and i was really young because i started to question. Why vindamme mongo house let me. And then kinda thinks so. I'm more willing to be in the trenches. My boys to be honest so instead of being the cbo you wanted to be the country but not necessarily country koto can urban suburban and rural right. Yeah i'm country. Drops on the rue had a glimpse at that life as well and i want to incorporate in a future wise said. Give me a farm. Because i know i know about grandma own produce about living off the land. I'll leave the same thing. I lived in okay. We had house land aeneas in the backyard. there was the corner where there was a. How do you get house with no. How do you get sorry people. How do you get bhai house with. No land moved to london. And do you go because we know that coming up. Yep stop at you saying only encountered them things. When i got here we didn't know about tv license because he's funny. You're saying because like you said. Yeah how you buy a house. We know he was like opposite violon than the house. Bill house wound. Now you're gonna come. You got compared with your health. Yes of the european upbringing. Yeah So my aspect of incorporate in order different things that i picked up on my life journey which showed me how to be more in balance with the world in regards to my energy. I don't really we built under that tree infrastructure so we go survive on it. But i wouldn't wanna be paying the government for it. I'd want me not. I've got my line. I can get wind energy. I can get solar panel energy. I mean i can get access to energies everything even in the war. When i played with the war car. 'cause citreon civic honda. Think one of them down hydro fusion cells. You fill up your car. We war why are we still using fossil from umbro him. Yeah then patterns got pushback. I'm sure that was ten years ago of their agendas bro. Yes so there's different ways a harvest moon from everything. So i would want to be reliant on me in my setup if i've got more than i would want to sell it to the grid so that somebody else can get access to energy as well. That's more balanced view for me. That's leaving my best night. Take juanita and give of question three a news because because you to slightly off at south saying about him keeping worldly things like the internet would you go either. Dj decks is you a dj. They were asking about our intimate asking about internet. His shoes pay. He's cameras can use my dj. The internet i'll make sure download before get there another. Download my music first. What questionable essential. So what about all the new tunes that you might wanna get. You might go out and about. Ross but you get. I'm only there for six. Months cannot touch on small lonely rhythms desolate. I didn't know nothing. No okay cannot touch on the gone. As long as you have an address that could get deliveries. Now thank thank you the red house red house in the woods hand every two weeks to send me that meme card has sent it by drone. Wanna see no people. I want no mention my there. You go all right sequel this stuff that you guys talking about About living Rural laugh right living. Your best life marvel before i get into that. Before you get there is a turkish really detach name for his mother a philosophy. Which is i think it turns out to be dairy. Farm philosopher Former philosopher or something along those lines the story line this movie is this guy that lives in turkey wed waivers is is close to the equator. Don't always nice and sunny. He lives near the sea so he can fish. Many needs to of wes got one. Cow produces his moog He chickens maybe. Yeah carpool chickens. He's he's a small of land where he has his garden. Go as tomorrow's. Yeah he's a small lives in any so content with of course he's he's gone to university. He studied philosophy and everything. That's that's how he's living. Life ended up choice. A very rich A corporate businessman Calms sees this flow of london. Says you know what i want to buy. The i want to build up. I wanna build my hotel up. Saying i wanna i wanna take over that portland. Yeah so they come to the gay no. He doesn't even go there. He sends someone to make do with him. says too. Oh yeah. I'll give you a ridiculous amount of money for the slow land. A represent his kind i interested they get to the To to this guy is causing to say y'all if you do this then they're saying that they could offer me and if they look off to me i could go get married and everything cassette my life. So come on. Do this for me like help me out kind of thing as well. It would work out for you. Guys though says no no calms tennis stage where the richmond divorced my name so he comes with his yacht to that paul to see where he's he visits this guy. Couple of days back to back And the guy sums philosophical point in. You're always for example. You're always looking at your watch call. You see the shuttle you'll wear on your is holding you back from your best life kind of thing by the end of the movie. My son is giving this guy has given up his entire life he divorces wife he gives up all these money and everything goes by. It's the same kind of player alonzo. Muros be free and he's living his best last. You know perfect. That's why i mentioned responsibilities. The higher you know corporate ladder in more weight on your shoulders therefore you represent more and more people own. Let down everybody. So he's only money's you. I liked that story. I love that story because he changes view changes view. The more natural way of living is the more balanced with vitamin. And maybe we've been yourself robert and having handouts. I believe it's more about being balanced and more in tuned with the earth. You look at nature you look at the animals. If to say the plants animals they grow an live. Eat die all within the of ross rotation if you wanna say predators do not overkill by the lions yeah they don't overkill they kill enough for them to eat enough to survive never intelligence right muscles one time if we had a conversation with dolphin wide open because of the most intelligent species coming out a war then monday find out about the giants squids and they really good at problem solving What's documentary hollywood. Gauging intelligence they were trying to say the original ancestors might have had the same accident says computing power that we go in the modern brain now. 'cause i'm not judging by the size of the brain. No i live. We did then we should sit down and have a conversation with a blue will cause looking has my civic privately and then look how long they live so imagine how much experiences on side though You guys already know about the dolphins and the puffer fish pufferfish. On group of dolphins game pufferfish blows up each basically known of draw on the puffer visions and to next opening. Yeah yeah high off the indo gang rape as well as source said last time. Oh that's the tribal dole rhythm. No more they get pufferfish deaf. We've now we don't. We don't go with the pufferfish expands. They each basically no on the pufferfish and The kinda you know how people would smoke and possibly around they kind of do that would be the pufferfish right and getting high for the toxins from as far as i know from what they're trying to save their species of monkeys do sign similar as well not show fruit i defined in africa with remember it was recently. That's meant to be the only poisonous iraq that's out there. But he learned from his evolution. He goes liberals on this iro wherever route. Bub block guest this than any just himself with it over the poisoning the card that he needs to secure him from relatives in medicine. Gangs more you the apes because they actually in the stone age this humor in medicine as well still like to talk get to find out what best best left brother bro. A really tough question goes when you're talking about life. Life is very expensive initial complex. Simplify it for us to put as simple as will roll off the fruit. The hardships of through under lessons of learn. I've found my best life. i've found my most liberating life from when i got married through woman. I love her khufu food. One hundred percents excursion of energy. Exactly that's why he's meant to be so beautiful thing. That's why i say like living your best life ain't necessarily year lane with this woman that woman that getting a good connection without not that the earth sent sent you got that's right and it's beautiful man because he brings out the best of you brings out the best to you and where somebody else rather than yourself. Different drive oklahoma goliath. When when i initially the mobile kid i mean. When are kind of you know. That was the same kind of thing is like. That's where my best life. I agree with you buy things in life. I was a better person is saying firemen. On i was on things i was living in abundance of that kind of coming from lyles living world from. It's nice it's beautiful. You know i find it on one aspect Having a lady in your life in his own pushes food that responsibility on the over aspect when you're there for each over when you're both intervene and you end up. Elevate yourself and so where you already have your own personal growth. You go that time to nine pm. Yeah definitely i want to. I wanna ida female in my farm scenarios won't be because you take the time you get me half two thousand nice point in time when i was really from it because just especially when you turn into a different thing was she was a woman Any kind of say you only get for your demi life right. Follow had minor is just talk. I know i'll be relieved. That won't for relationship topic. We revisit that one. Have you heard you know what i think engine room. Yeah cabins whole baseline is made everything to the web. Like my don't work with a key. No more not least magnate few cups. Oh hold on let me see. Let me hear it from his mrs. What went ahead of the least woods is about to say the most up around moments to open my mind all right cool so my best life well to make make sure you're in the camera and every ten years we wanna get you talk so my best campaign. gmc them north kingstown. Become a cover up soaking mig links. You genera some shaath munn perspective. Five podcast at the dog so to start is a three. Don't twisted join the movement. I'm i'm a family man so my family. My family around the is my best life partner. The dr given me peace alive. Long car sold a panel and i'm blessed you blessed done. I like this idea. Filling your car rewards. So why are we doing. Jake is illegal here so slowly slowly slowly since the information do yourself because you know what it on that don't have money in money. That's exactly what i'm saying. It's okay might being imbalanced all. Yeah women that we don't need to be plugged into that mental construct to be happy. This is what conversations about personal relations on buckley's and when you did not him off your closer to living your best life you got so i would want to be more imbalanced with the world when we're doing. Our transportation wishes elvis speech. You shouldn't pay for us getting around to do what we do. Because that's just a man construct outside of the mine construct is that show world guy on. What are we having on that. I just had the first lock down. cleared up smoke in china through the for example. Aji the see what you're saying about the war finger and all that kind of thing it makes perfect sense you got. I'm saying now it's the most abundant thing in the universe hydrogen. No why are we not using it. It's bessemer tell you why we're not using it. Yeah because we already know. Yeah you said you got certain companies. Yeah big big big oil companies yet. That don't not want to start on because you're gonna start fixing their prophet then if you look at even how societies be major been indoctrinated not even think of that way we can boom so even you just even say not coming. Everyone's gonna what was he talking about known even though the elliott to can look book. Because even when you go into the curriculum you. Even you're not even emiss- only can i just say something is a disgrace that they charge you for access towards her. You know for laws more than seven days your body starting anything. I feel anything comes from. It's not but if it's not by choice zip is designed so then. Why are we not. Where can we in design. So then bro. Equally he conned. The question is like what these people thinking about. The people who charging for the war knew that regularly. What you thinking comes in his his thing the in this country. Yeah They have this thing. Could in government Richer richer companies and ritual folk lobby against accents and bills and things like that. In other words they could pay son Politicians and impedance nicotrol legally push push free privacy policy now. The only way we the people could do is if you do it. Through a crowd fund and there are certain called. Funding agencies are trying to do certain things but the crown to to crowd fund for. These kinds of things would be difficult. Because i'm gonna show me. I wanna i wanna i wanna know some successful crowdfunding where the people done. There's one grieved code the believe they will too. Good more project Yeah they try to keep an eye on government is doing. We've been the legislation that they've already said souls day overworked at the moment because they roll up. Crowdfunding is the same people who coming up with the whole idea. Yeah if you want to lobby against us. Proud fund outside looked money just being gonna bill. Yes that one got funding. Come on dude. Soros asked all of sudden get funding by coincidence that got funded all of a sudden policies. the blattman. The firmly to that another time on no one state of arrested individuals just clarify just to clarify. George soros helped fund right. I'm out racist hand out anyone's looking up information stateline. A racist one. I think asked to freedom because by the time we get access to information most. I've you can't do anything by freedom of information whole freedom for mason. You understand the real meaning of the word that you use is the concept of way. Encapsulates mean there so why you labor just that like all the job not see any kind of prejudice. I just couldn't racism Germ but we all different things. Because it's agenda because he's raised because ethnicity. Sorry i'll stop sane. Range is now competition. I ceasar than even if you wanted to take race would then. Wouldn't you take racist. I like not question. Those kristen leisa question has already braid in a Linguistics modern timing understand. That's call history. Not wanting to go. Both of them cannot tell them to stop on. I was Doing a bit of research into the ideology right wing ideology and boy pushes free because no the enemy kind of thing. One on does not what's going on. Is you hate me while you hate. And there was evidence. Those evidence to suggest We've kind of authoritarian government pushing for if they were to get rid of all the minorities what would be left would be their own people losses classes so the next group of people are going to be going full with beat a lower class but then hire clause doesn't end and it would just go on and on and on until refined to just a small group of people And then what happens. But that seems workforce. 'cause you know they got what he's not going to be policing us very getting them ready. We can leave that well for our dog boyd. Nobody seemed a robust immune go sides android before yet. We'll carry it can carry tins Do that for them over. Everything's pushed by military. That's where it starts in chaining. Y'all what's going on in london when i'm telling them listen to the perspective five pot costs if you don't get to know look in on shelter to older audience. That's listening audience. Everyone supporting the movement. Get me neo. If whenever you get up to this point 'cause and you feel like you can put in comments anything you want to hear us debate about. Yeah i wanna. I wanna question to the to the facebook people. Then what is live your best latin awesome. Your chromebook saw is not a right or wrong choice in this. Is this your personal. Definitely my we all face but we all instagram. Yeah by across all platforms. Of course you name it on a five port. 'cause dunno does stop stop it. Stop stamps outta time. Step out time. I guess his conclusion. Tom okay boy was about to say. Everyone has their own view perspective. Everyone has a personal frequency wished. Happy of vibing as long as you sir needs be yes something that's also gonna talk you onto the next couple of weeks. We're going to talk about. No i self hotel. Dissolve that had personally fate. We meet a hundred percent. And i chose to be single at that time because it was all about me first time in life so i definitely weighed in on that one. Yeah just To re clarify instagram on facebook. His perspective five costs five. Common am five all's going to see You know for we go like again. You know living living your best life ya is not necessarily you know doing things that will kind of damage you get me so for me. I'm gonna goes control through saying that. Like yeah there's a rat way and there's a wrong in you get me so we balance at the university and we've been a balanced to get me and if it's damaging you and it's not if he's not helping you to evolve on the spiritual mental and physical level then you'll get all i'm saying you aren't necessarily living your best. Life is increasing energy energies. The worst the worst definite living your best life is still based on your own perspective definitely. Yes because we live in my best life may not coincide what you think. But as far as i'm concerned as long as i'm happy you know closet to freedom and i'm doing you any harm I'm not harming anyone else and now digital recital manage respect. Whatever you wanna sit my and sit yeah. So that's what makes society so 'cause one piece of land why sold upon us. Oh farm take us out with this to can find it on facebook. Instagram anka spotify cost break might use and bdo public follow our facebook and instagram. Hbo's livestreams and updates. He's leave a rating and review share perspective. Check check one two one two also at this point one. Let's finish shout out to twenty-seven customs. They did on graphics designs. You can catch them. Instagram at twenty-seven underscore customs customs with a k. Email them on ask twenty seven customs out outlook dot com cheese sauce perspective five myself mister twister links chef chapman confidence oops.

sir swoon bonte royal corps khattab Knop Yana stan Shaft martin don robert Housman komo janas milton mill eunice apple Bill house yolo Jin schmidt raleigh
Season 2 trailer

The Open Podcast

01:22 min | 1 year ago

Season 2 trailer

"No. was there just please holders? They Common Dicko. Friend. Hi He. Had guys. One while Queasy Ossoff. Son Bungee. Child. Ceylon Lico. Candidate. Is. Degree tonight. No, that's this is the podcast I am I am yet to welcome into the second episode Disney episode will be exploring topics relating to education US Bonte on just spreading light on Nov must especially. Would try to extend our boundaries in Disney absorbed into or chocolates once again. I am we now I hope to cut you guys listening Kaci guys. Dream in a country is telling people about these podcasts are to up data content on try. Our best will get audio quality sock.

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