35 Burst results for "Bono"

"bono" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

07:21 min | 4 d ago

"bono" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Bono and welcome back to breaking bread with Bono from celebrity table 30. In the entertainment capital of the world, and the legendary bootlegger Italian Bistro in Las Vegas. My special guest today Danny Falcone and one of the most respected Musicians that has ever performed in this community and what he's sharing his story in his journey, I should say, and we lift off prior to the last break. About doing the world tour. Now you got this job with Tom Jones. And you have to be somewhat. I'm sure your dad was extremely proud of you. But you must be somewhat mesmerized. Like Oh, my God. Look what Look. What's happened? How quickly Yeah, it was pretty overwhelming. Yeah, going from playing and lounges? Yeah, it's all of a sudden being on tour with one of them. Greatest singers of all time. Sure, sure, so, Yeah, it was. It was really quite something, huh? So you traveled all over the world? What was? How long were you with Tom? Just two years Just over two years with him. Mhm. And what was was there something else you are aspiring to at the time? No, not really. I but, you know, my grandfather fell ill and I was very, very close with him. So I took care of him and they were going back out to London on tour. And I said, Listen, I just can't go. I got to take care of he was. I knew he wasn't gonna live show longer. I just couldn't bear being away. So instead, Italian thing is just it's in our DNA man. I love my family. Sure, so I didn't go and Again. The grace of God, man, Gerry Lopez came to me and said, Listen, I'm putting a show together at the Mandalay Bay with Ricky Martin's people Now Jerry has been a guest on breaking bread. Okay, He's been on my variety show has been on breaking. Britney is told his story. So Jerry always had a wonderful reputation in this community is on it not only a wonderful singer and musician, but he always put the best best best of every everything together. He's an icon, man. Everything You know, and Jerry came to me and I didn't know him too. I knew his reputation, but I didn't know him personally to well and he said, Listen, I'm putting this band together. I would like you to play trumpet in it, but I was making a lot of money with Tom Jones. You know, I was the youngest. Yeah, and I just said, I just can't and they were kind enough to let me stay home and so on so forth. And he just kept after me and kept raising the bar to the point that I just couldn't say No. Yeah. So I took the job and then left with Tom Jones. Um, and that was my beginning. Really? Of it wasn't very much long. Very far. From then. About four years from when I met him till I joined Santa Fe and the bad city warrants. Really? Yeah. And but we had a relationship the whole time. I love Jerry is like a brother. I don't think anybody that you know you meet Jerry automatically like him, and his talent is is that's in another category. But From a personal standpoint, he's got a just a great soul. Great. Yeah, Yeah, totally. And and so from that job that job Santa Fe and the fancy horns has been launching point for all of us to get Bigger, you know, high profile jobs because it's a showcase of what we do best. And people come to see it. You know, we've had everybody in there, you know? Let me just stop you for a second. For those who haven't heard the story of Gerry Lopez in Santa Fe and and the kind of impact he made in this town. He always surrounded himself. Him being remarkable musician and singer surrounded himself with the best people. And what you're saying is, is that Everybody got a chance to use that as a sort of a launching pad. Yeah, it just, you know, because if you said you were with Gerry Lopez in Santa Fe, people automatically new man, that's a great band. You must be a great musician, and it everybody got a chance to go on their own direction. And yet, that's remained in, uh, sort of a home base. Oh, yeah. Stove to this day, man Play here, of course in the Copa and, uh, Yes. And Jerry was always been so supportive of his guys and trying to get their mother work, You know, so we would bring in like, for example, That's how we started our horn section all got hired with Bette Midler, uh, that came in to see her rmd came in. He was invited to see the show sauce and hired the whole horn section for her new show in Vegas and her tour, So we did that for two years. Then you went on the road with her as well. A little bit we did in Chicago. We did a lot of TV shows with her shit. Run all that kind of stuff. Then after that job ended, Celine Dion, her husband and musical director. Were invited to come see the band. They came in. Rene came up to me, kissed me and said, This is exactly what I want for Selena, would you? Would you be a part of it and her for those of you who don't You know, realize how long her run. It's Caesar's was quite quite a remarkable almost 10 years were with her. They made that she made that that concert venue. Yep. And that held gosh, I don't know how many people but she was 5000 and sold out almost every every night. Yeah, it was unreal. She sets the record. Yeah. So, Yeah. And then we went on tour with her all the time, you know, was it people always like to know the You know the inside? Yeah, I said it was her personality was, you know? Was it easy to work with us? I think she had a great respect for musicians. He did and I'll tell you she was the most she treat. It was Renee. I mean, don't don't take her late husband, Rene. Of course. Such a gentleman glassy. Yeah, man. Gentlemen he didn't care about. He wasn't a numbers guy. He wanted the best for her. Yeah, he nurtured her from the time she was like 15 or 16 years old 14. Really? Maybe even 12. Yeah, he but he treated the musicians with such respect. We always flew for Class when we go, you know, we had five star hotels. He had these catering. It was like Wolfgang Puck with the Cade refer for the tour. I mean, honestly, so it wasn't like, okay, you get a bag of M and M's here. Here's your bottled water, and we felt there's a cookie stars. Yeah. Oh, I mean, he treated us, you know, and they bought us. You know that Xenia suits and you know it was the best of the best, and it was just the most unbelievable decade. I'm so thankful. I just had my Children. And it was just in a crowd got to bring them to Europe. They came to Paris with my gosh. All right, was it was the best man Just the best time so thankful for what? So now you've you've worked. I think the list if if you were to list of performers that you work, you know an integral part of being They're in their act. Who would you? We went from Tom Jones to Paulette Midler. Selene Palanka got was, thankfully, with Lady Gaga. How do we know bringing back the great American Songbook? Is that what she's going to do on this next tour? Yeah, we just what we did. We did a year of it here. Mhm. Um, you know, sporadically, right, And now she's coming back, And apparently she's only doing from what? I just heard an announcement. She's only doing the.

Danny Falcone Bette Midler Lady Gaga Gerry Lopez Paulette Midler Selene Palanka Europe Celine Dion Britney Tom Jones Paris London 15 Chicago Las Vegas Rene Tom Vegas Jerry Renee
The Murder of Freda Burnell & Florence Little

Casefile True Crime

02:52 min | 4 d ago

The Murder of Freda Burnell & Florence Little

"Hours earlier freida burnell had been skipping down somerset straight into abbott o'leary's bustling ten santa. This saw little freida in her black button. Boots red cap and brown coat all by herself didn't raise any eyebrows. The coal mining town she called home was small and locals trusted. Each other freida was running an errand for her father who was in need of some fade and poultry grit for the chickens. They owned he had promised his daughter. A penny as a reward for buying. This applies on his behalf at around nine. Am the bill at the top of the front door of mortimer's store jingled as freighter rented the shops specialized in livestock supplies. And while they had the chicken fade free freighter requested. They want any sex grit. Only loose grit frieda said she would home to oscar father if that would suffice. And if so she would come back but she never returned by light afternoon. Habita- leary's locals were assisting police and the bono family in trying to locate freida somehow during her journey. Home from mortimer's store. She had vanished without a trace the following morning a local worker finished his shift in the minds and begin the walk back to his home as he approached. Abbott o'leary's tan center. He headed dan narrow. So i'd alley where he stumbled across a hessian sack discarded in the mud. It clearly held stomping. The co worker examined the sack closely. Inside was the buddy of eight year. Old freedom no her remains had been dumped just to nineteen majors from her house. Freed i had sustained gonna blow to the head but it was the cord still wrapped around her neck that it caused her. Death at pace of cloth was stuffed inside her mouth and her wrists and ankles tied behind her back with the road. Her attacker had also attempted to ripe her. The shocking murder rattled. The typically carefree townsfolk freebies. Funeral was held on the straight outside her home to facilitate the lodge crowds of mourners. That wished to attend. They circled around her smoke. Coffin this sense of loss tinged with fee as they wanted who among them would carry out such violent and disturbing crime

Freida Leary Freida Burnell Habita Mortimer's Store Tan Center Dan Narrow Mortimer Frieda Oscar Abbott
"bono" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

06:08 min | Last month

"bono" Discussed on The Science Show

"Here's a puzzle requiring some lateral thinking. How would you control parking without parking meters leaving it to drivers with just one absolute requirement. Answer insist they leave their lights on. This was the brainchild of edward bono. Of malta we heard from him last week. He died in june but he lives once again in this conversation about his life from the science showing ninety ninety seven i was always curious i was always making inventions and trying things out and in fact when i was at school or two things that haven't won is i was the only boy with his own to the chemistry of orange. She's had good anytime segment. I was a school is about eleven and is a boarding school. I opened up an underground root through the shelters of the school through the middle of ago school. The shelters option to the town about half mile away. I devised all the keys and the maps and so on and the big boys sixteen seventeen years to have to come off me for my maps and my keys and permission to use my escape route to get into the gill school. No no no. Just on the way wouldn't been coaching improper behavior to get into the time. I'm going to have a beer. Well when such a person got a place at oxford to just about the most aristocratic college christ's church was that's a confrontation taking on at the high level. At all. in fact. I was elected to be president on these scottish reeling club even though the place was full of genuine sleds and so on on probably because i knew more pretty girls than anyone else did and they wanted those girls coming. Dodson's country club. What was your secret benefiting in in such an alien place simply not to start assuming that you're not gonna fit in. I think expectations set a lot way. You reading psychology. From the beginning. I was reading called. P p p which is psychology and physiology and you can do philosophy if you want instead of his algae. So i was reading that at that time only twenty. I think maybe thirty people in the heart of oxford were allowed to read psychology and it was very restricted. They're not much bigger. I enjoyed it. It was a little bit disappointing. It was a set amount of emphasis on rats and mazes and town rather than real people. But every experimental of course actually called experiments icon. You graduated them what happened. I'd already done medicine and mortar as a doctor. And then i graduated to them at the radcliffe. I did a d phil. Which is the oxford equipment. A phd in control blood pressure systems behavior. And so on. Then i went to saint thomas hospital and then went from there to cambridge university to help with presser iva mills starting the clinical unit. Then when i went that would just two of us. When i left those off of eighty five and then. I went to harvard for a while. And i came back to cambridge and so on only the most wonderful ivy league places. Well happened that way and it seems so far to be a conventional rise through the ranks of a medical doctor winded lateral thinking. Come in several. Things happened from psychology. I was interested in thinking. Then the key thing was in medicine. I was dealing with the complex system behavior circulation respiration sodium excretion endocrinology. How all these things interacted. So i developed some concepts of self organizing systems. Then in medicine is working with computers. This is way back this nine and sixty four the ibm. I think was seventy nine. Four hundred fifty but from medicine came the idea on self organizing systems so the key book was the mechanism of mind which i wrote nine sixty nine and that book was rather ahead of its time in fact probably the leading physicists in the world professor mario man at caltech read that book and he said it's interesting. You talk about these things. Ten years before mathematicians daughter looking at chaos theory stable systems on stable systems on etc talking about in my book and that really was the basis for then saying i'm dealing with creativity. What is the underlying mechanism. In the mind pattern forming a symmetric pattern the needs to cut across patterns provocation. All these things. So that's how it all developed. Then i started writing about it and then that part of society which showed the most interest was the business community because in business. You've got to think in many other parts of society political even academic. It's enough to defend your point of view improve your right in business. You can prove your right to blue in the face and go bankrupt next day. So there's a reality tests are business is always said. We need new ideas watcher during of interest to us. Because if you read my first book there's not a mention of business in it and so then. Obviously i developed several strands working with business working in education and also developing further ideas. You've got a tremendous feel for metaphor. It seems quite extraordinary. The rock logic and the water logic. See the hats and the very term lateral thinking. Is that the key to. It is see indirectly in what you say. Yes because i'm dealing with the perception side thinking now traditionally we've always put emphasis on the processing side of thinking. Mathematics logic on the perceptual side of thinking is extremely important. But we've always neglected and it in real life and visit david. Pagans at holland's has done research with cheese says supports what i've always maintained ninety percent of the mistakes of thinking almost takes a perception not logic. Now if you're dealing with perception you've got to deal with it in a different way and if you onto illustrator relationship or possibility then a metaphors way to do it. Back to business. Apart from the money goes businesses. Prepare to pay. Do you find it. Not frustrating having to do essentially pouty piece for the next hotel full of people in power suits rather than exchanging ideas in the academic way with your world is. The answer is no because the more you talk you find simplisafe better ways of explaining something you clarify things for yourself and as always amount of interaction i mean for instance. Far more interesting for me to be working with one particular corporation.

edward bono gill school oxford saint thomas hospital presser iva mills malta Dodson cambridge university phil harvard cambridge ibm mario holland cheese david
Women in Voice Gains 501c3 Status - Dr Joan Palmiter Bajorek Founder of Women in Voice - Voicebot Podcast Ep 215 - burst 04

The Voicebot Podcast

03:26 min | Last month

Women in Voice Gains 501c3 Status - Dr Joan Palmiter Bajorek Founder of Women in Voice - Voicebot Podcast Ep 215 - burst 04

"I made this by accident like it was. It was so crunchy bootstrapped since twenty eighteen summer of two thousand eighteen but the community was organic in a we built ourselves on you know twitter and linked in and medium and instagram and so forth but last year we got approached shortly after seeing us and people said like i'm interested in getting way more involved. How can we give you big checks. How can we support you in your mission and like we didn't have a bank account set up. You know what i mean like. We were communities stuff. So my team and i kinda look at the future and we want to be here in five years and what sustaining -bility means for our org especially as people come and go you know depending on the time that they can spend so we. We committed to pursuing nonprofit status at least in the united states to start with and getting that five. Oh one c. three. It's no joke. Anyone is a nonprofit paperwork. Dang it is not easy we had pro lawyers etcetera etcetera But that stabilizes us as a formal org. We have a bank account. We've got paperwork We to have a nonprofit you have to have a board of directors for an interest is other people. Baber work is fun stuff. But a board that checks in that we're living in to our mission that were using money financially responsibly. In i have to say for every dollar that's spent y we spent it in certain ways But we have a phenomenal board of directors and a huge tons of advisors which are also on our website Of people who you know give time and expertise to routing decisions. that work makes Let's see board. Yeah so. I mean the. Irs is super backed up. We were shocked. We got it so quickly which frankly is a huge commendation to are pro bono lawyers But yeah came in the mail. Just let's see january. March april thirtieth. It says on the put the paperwork on my wall. I'm so freaking proud of it. And the irs has given status so we are fish that's great and so with funding. It really changes the nature of it. Because it's it's still an all volunteer organization correct. We actually paying a few contractors. Oh you are okay and so is helping you scale the organization exactly what it also helps us with retention you know. Volunteers can come and go. Because it's again voluntary but when we pay contractors you actually have a deliverable give to us and we were numerous you with. Dollar signs are using contractors using them to organize events or for marketing activities. All of the above and we have very few that. Are you know. Full-timer are working more than that. But we have the first person we hired is our head of events and she's been promoted to our chief events officer but i hope we've seen we have were hosting a big inaugural summit this summer for women voice very excited tons of people signed up. Please anyone on this call When women voice dot org can sign up for a summit free tickets but like to really scale bigger events and to have more of an international presence rather than just a chapter more siloed approach.

Portland Instagram Last Fall Five Years Twenty One Chapters About Thirty Minutes Women In Voice 501C3 Technology Women Organization Non-Profit Baber Twitter United States Bono IRS
"bono" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:56 min | Last month

"bono" Discussed on The Science Show

"And this is a sideshow on aren coming from an inner city coffeehouse in elites ville. Well not exactly in a city nor town actually. The population here is only four hundred. Ninety seven mostly parrots and i can see cattle grazing from my window and the coffee comes from a well. Actually my kitchen doesn't know what to call it. Beige i suppose tastes like sheep. Drench fit all of which reminds me of the passing of edward de bono. A maltese born thinker. With as many degrees as ductile debono died just a few days ago. And here's an event. I shared with him in northern queensland long ago and my apologies to david rutledge of the philosophy zone on our in the stories about tae a student who goes to his professor and says that he wants to study philosophy and the professor said yes. That's very good but do you understand what is meant by philosophy. So students said yes of course philosophy to do with truth meaning the purpose of life and important things like that so the professors had. Maybe that's not good enough. He said i'm going to ask you a test question. Suppose you have two people. One of whom is clean and one of whom is dirty. Which person would give a bath so tunes. That's pretty obvious you give a bath to the person professors had. Maybe but that's not philosophy that's logic let's try again clean person dirty person to which one to give the bath student. Again insists on the dirty person. Professor says no. Let me explain. The clean person is more motivated to be clean. That's why that person is clean so boss means more to the clean person so give a boss to the clean person. That is psychology. He said we'll try one more time. He says clean person dirty person which want to give the ball. The students has. I'm totally confused. I don't know what you expect me to answer. I don't really know what you're asking me. Professor said that's fine. That's philosophy it would bono with one of his typical fables to demonstrate effective thinking. This is what he's trying to show now. Philosophy caused does have its value. But what i'm more particularly concerned about is thinking. The second reason for that story is that in fact huma is the most significant function of the human mind. The reason isn't it tells us more about the information processing system in the brain than anything else. I'm not going to tell you another story. Which has quite a different implication the stories about an englishman who arrives at rome airport and is met his italian host and the host takes him to the car and they drive off and they come to traffic light which is center red and the italian drive straight through so the englishman's a little worried and he says to his host said do not see the red light and the host said yes. Of course he said. I saw the red light but italy. Red light is just an opinion justice suggestion say they drive on. They come to another red light and italian drive straight through and the third one by this time. The englishman is virtually panic stricken then they come to a green light and italian slams on the brakes emergency stop and english nearly goes through the windscreen and he said why did you stop at a green light. So the italian said well. Don't you see how they drive in italy. In other words you get caught up whatever. The system is the logic within that. Cyst edward bona with me in one thousand nine hundred eighty two and so as a.

Ninety seven two people italy northern queensland One rome airport one second reason third one english four hundred few days ago one thousand nine hundred eigh edward de bono italian david rutledge parrots one more time englishman maltese
Best Mic Boom Arms for the Everyday Podcaster

Deadset Podcasting

01:55 min | Last month

Best Mic Boom Arms for the Everyday Podcaster

"Over did sit podcasting dot com. I came here we go. This is where stuff gets super nerdy people. Why would it matter. Uh boom stand on walks danger use. It matters and i can tell you from now running a studio where people coming here. We'd no experience on a microphone and have to within an ala. Not only presented talk when maybe they're not used to doing that and be entertaining on these shows. I'm engineering. they'll say move. Mock stands iran move marks closer and further from themselves. I'll i'll just put it this days. Bluey mock stands. I've got off to the sides p. Con say those. But i'm glad to get winning here swinging around. Yeah die Beautiful they probably the most beautiful thing in his studio in terms of how that the aesthetic design a few of the choices like the cable management. Beautiful they're not as long as my day option. Which i didn't think would bother me but it bothers me because i've got these joint chairs. That will almost single chairs. But they're almost the size of a double chair. So the has to reach out to the middle they dart hauled the white of some of these marks even with that mark an actual shock man on expecting them to without really taught everything out to the point where some people that come in he taught in the knobs to move the mock stand around if they short toll of actually going to go and basically lever it up. because i've taught him up to really really taught old. I just got this full. Dan and they're not as quiet as i should be for a mark that has apparently moving parts where it's actually cradled in the bono creeks and it shouldn't because to me it's just plastic on plastic but it does so they look beautiful people coming here and i think it's joe rogan

Bluey Mock Iran DAN Joe Rogan
Sue Thorne: The Woman Keeping David Thorne's Case for Innocence Alive

Murder In Alliance

02:03 min | 2 months ago

Sue Thorne: The Woman Keeping David Thorne's Case for Innocence Alive

"This truly could be the rest of david's life. Because as i mentioned david doesn't have a lawyer anymore and he ran out of money and all of his first appeals and he's had a difficult time finding someone pro bono to take his case and that's been a battle in itself because nobody wants to do anything without money. You know russian. That i've learned the hard way outta sight outta mind but he hasn't lost all hope and that's because he's had sue on his side. Davis dog caja. You'd be here. Sue is david longtime advocate and knows more about the case than anyone. I feel pretty confident saying that. She has sent e every document interview. Transcript audio recording. You name it that. She has available in this case including her own reports. So how is he. David's dog did he have him in prison prison. Kerr way to be part of it because these kind of lifestyle real central so he would just kind of buddy after the guys who had dodged for the dog program so that he can hang out with the dog today. Sue is more than david's advocate. She's also his wife. They got married in two thousand eight and she goes by sue glass thorn now but before she got involved in david's case she was a family friend remember. She worked at the post office and was friends with david grandparent's and she couldn't believe what had happened to david guy. I knew that came into the post office that true hanaway and granddaughter time and you just license guy ever. I thought no. This can't be in her gut. She just believed in his innocence. She didn't know his supposed accomplice. Joe wilkes the young friend who told police. David had hired him to kill yvonne for three hundred dollars so nathan. I can't understand. there's got to be more. And when she started doing her own digging she did find more.

David SUE Bono Sue Glass David Grandparent Davis Kerr David Guy Hanaway Buddy Joe Wilkes Yvonne Nathan
Where Estate Planning and Social Inequality Meet

Pod 4 Good

04:26 min | 5 months ago

Where Estate Planning and Social Inequality Meet

"I'm richie philanthropy. Jesse vice admiral flint pod. Chris miller and today our guests are laurel and riley carbone kern founders of tall grass estate. Planning their goal was to create a different kind of law firm when they're reaches out to people who are routinely overlooked traditional law firms or people who are hesitant to work with traditional law firms we talked to riley in laurel about social justice through estate planning the lord of the rings and why everyone needs estate planning even sar on the deceiver enjoy. We are very excited. Have riley and laurel kaduna kern from tall grass estate. Planning on the podcast today. Hello both of you view. Elo mainly grits. Thank you welcome. Mo- more popular of the two of us. I would say it's all the incheon. Listen we fight over the attention. That's always been our problem. And i relate to. That aren't i don't have to fight for our listeners. They're going to be asking this point why we are having an estate. Planning company on the podcast. So we'll start with the most basic question which is how is estate planning social justice issue. I recognize that estate. Planning sounds like feels like smells like the most untold listed whitebread topic. Anyone has ever thought about. We are as spicy as as yes manny's however we are grateful to be able to do a fair amount of pro bono low bono work and we see in that practice a number of things pop up like over and over and over again people who their grandparents great grandparents own a piece of property and then didn't know about estate planning and so now they're in a situation where like fifteen people own it To be able to like apply for grants for certain things they would need to track all of down or pay for a quiet title action. It should be something that is giving them wealth insecurity but instead it's costing them money to have this asset and if you know what state planning is if you're willing to hear about it and learn about it It can really enhanced generational wealth for for non. Just you know middle class. America or or upper class market but like literally everyone. And that's why it's so important to us to help. People understand estate. Planning is for every single person. The the misconception is that estate planning is about figuring out who gets your stuff when you die and there's a whole lot of people who look at their lives and think i don't have stuff so who cares That's that's a wrong understanding of what it is. It's really just about making sure that the right people are in control at the right times of the right things and what we see your your question about it. Being a social justice issue is that there are massive disparity in who plans for that kind of control and because all of us no matter. What our demographic Racial status religious status nationality cetera. All of us are subject to losing that control because of disability and death because of the disparity in who plans there's also a disparity generational wealth and the influence political influence financial prosperity. That come along with that so over generations you see the disparity linked to you know we think of as as a as a pretty clear as one example reinforcement of systemic racism. Disproportionately people who have large amounts of money are larger. Amounts of money are thinking about doing estate planning right. It has occurred to them. Hey i should probably do a power return. He get a trust in place right but the reason that they're doing that planning the things that they see may be happening down the down the line in their lives and being possible. Those things are possible for every single person regardless of how much you have but if you have a plan in place it's gonna affect your life and your loved ones a lot differently than if you don't have that planning in place

Jesse Vice Admiral Flint Pod Riley Carbone Kern Tall Grass Estate Laurel Kaduna Kern Riley Chris Miller Bono Richie Laurel Manny America
"bono" Discussed on Vulnerable, el podcast de seguridad digital

Vulnerable, el podcast de seguridad digital

05:49 min | 5 months ago

"bono" Discussed on Vulnerable, el podcast de seguridad digital

"Same broke cash. They access of those because there is an annuity with us was tunnels worst the needless And says and this. But i think of his record on housing potential non capacity was onus was emotionally a deal. Engage everything through this. You get a personality issue. They let it depends again. Let us push that imprint in this continuous internet coming out just rendering second in the program i guess but before i knew what was perceived by all inclusive lawyer but that i think again but shooting me stomach almost florida. He didn't know what what's happening. Gay so what are the lowest. He's seen he haven't they should door and tim is aimed. Point does gambling pontiac. He mean by the c stores dozen persona schema fleming tillerson listencleveland equipment in automate case allows our load a several commotion but he came up. No la vida or even token input into skopje. louisiana's report. monday maitland. For and those are some entire lamenting is is the most window. Indian e known as. Musk is the propellers. Placebos memento look but accountable community ramtane meta blessing in lincolnshire gusmao Known in there Window in the like Implementation thick klarna conceal the coalition of poisonous believers in the will stay at a use a chemical himself so religious up until april. This and those a political challenge is still complete thurston. Rocha's divorce from solano on track. The gas lucy caparros one moment over get thing was dave ramsey emphasis zhiping crusoe olympic require way premier. Wages has been suppose kick cato this good deed militias. Had run into numerous will be sold. Your kiro christina. His company roses. Deputy royal getting that's aggressive. They can also sell rebel It took us given mentioned. It can start the minimum i grandest episode movies. Celebrity is almost out of the scene scene crippled. Soberly immature cassini twilight. They or since. We're both intimate to me seem. Podcast was what you buy this. Podcast is this spokesman Per week allergy. See so important as nervous as beginning but they will stick on those glow chris. Melissa percent khushab mass can mean record. Communicate a celebrity voice Episode ill at mental health going. Then they will be known so it was sort also report custody a again a mess in a little. Escapism taddeo podcasts. Nothing gordon accident said this gordon. Police department His wound across us. Me that i can get. This was also coming soon. I assume somebody both gusts copious. He said persona chris casey. What the mean. I'm interested mr. Stay as real the thing on your list. Cooling needs us all too common titus over to rating several be show. The podcasting is to descend apple. Podcasts sporty flies side walks with one a big push being a me. That level will continue community for major frequency as you just depending on where they are always took one percent tho. Those Built ways that the mining dog always the information them said in which go the rallies. The ninty galaxy hit give parliamentary elections. That is that the information. So needless Mccain's gomez allow so given employment that other got into stands to the political. Move into this benita minister one of your other service.

april Musk one percent lincolnshire dave ramsey Rocha chris casey christina monday both benita second Melissa florida maitland Indian dozen persona ninty galaxy one olympic
"bono" Discussed on Vulnerable, el podcast de seguridad digital

Vulnerable, el podcast de seguridad digital

07:20 min | 5 months ago

"bono" Discussed on Vulnerable, el podcast de seguridad digital

"Middle sent those over his of this the heat on september. You're gonna come through on this podcast numbers around the location recipes on seem away at the on. Could give it. Then you say they'd be sold your gumby. They're gonna going me. That it means. Lissette is different hinting. Board game may have had a domestic is that they see industry just is. He just unveiled eagles. Who they just that thing so are in peru qualifies almost forget and he get thing but i get the feeling said to complete the maintain. Automobiles from the on. Bumpy thaw author cormie interruption personnel. Maybe talking about imposing those s in will be sorely unmovable the alley. He have percent infantry episode. You say this so the almost be sober. No i can see. Rick would lessen premier promotions dilip. Liberty saw the so. They've been with each metal. Get somewhere no by own noble. Who's got an open out. Detrimental there must you know commitment nor joy. This laverick sonic post casing getting from detroit. Gave him a little. What i will from on the satellite events with you saw him look. Wafiq is almost way to english bundles. Living the same. Who's your own issue day of incensio inclusive Owners into this this living in brisbane. Those cfc does sound while the police entity success. One mosad really police pussy will listen for metal casting laptops rather or the in yes possessions. Say the hope is contemplating in. But i'm not as killing it from information. Grenade limits mental simulation basis aka. No balloon the dennis be zone own. Internal internally ella Intimidated kassim yet. Jealousy but hebrew him telecinco mechanical nine months World no tina first bangala. He's on the campus. They will they. Will you see sepals. Bristol rovers who would've make the down mcdonnell knowing the computer system ninety like well no misperceived no mutational Minimum dirty bush dominated cancer. Butcher's meat paseo Pixel seattle don't own these ridden he loses particulars of these deals for masochist. Stuck in lake or something that resembles borking and central team. Be of the. The guy is responsible for the covey's like your show free eunice. Perfect in milan look Not order but both these Kilo soviet locate or ci. Will they choose thing. But he proficient in tennessee Dose it got into the see. No the He lives have cheap. Whiskey must mean poor. Tavern in secular split boardwalks today this piece in the A local brand is deal. Vehicle gentlemen proton. Don't let me know it up. They meet this. Need them koita Plus in better dealers were boost gail pocketing posted amedeo. Eat knock but the owned by so not being most geno peninsula. Put all those together. You get them to begin. Seem to be in the inner city breath in minimum for these immigrant. We didn't kill them. I almost don't come out of monday. Your on the buttocks which appropriate service persona cornet can make companionate episode Could upper from the komo get easy. Parliament can probe bit focus on your on navy dot com attack sixty torso ransomware. Since gave me narrow the keep them on made us some selling casing stella quirky people continue seattle. The lowest didn't most other young you know in the the mutcherson focus we need. Gary will put muscle on delivered advocate. It's hit a millionaire story. Sony temporarily lowest. He can get those dollars during his daughter's doll does does own of of me by that. We feel gordy seattle. Some studies one of them done since he's been gestating on the fighting. Near commodity dinu semi just continue daniel mini-me saddle liquid assets recuperate. This story was on your was given semester case. Really raptor fake wasilla. Scenario perfect tokens A ceo lane all this noise terrorists things levy home every team complete rockstar. Thieves silicon balanchine. Okay.

Sony Gary Rick september monday brisbane nine months today daniel both milan ninety one Bristol Wafiq tennessee first bangala each metal koita Plus seattle
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 5 months ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

Greg Colton Aaron Perkins Ten Percent Wilson Two Years Five Years Forty Days One Hundred Percent Fourteen Sixteen Months Simmons Five Step Five Less Than Eight Hundred Bucks TWO Today Twenty Five Years Twenty Five Will Simmons Both Seven Seven Hundred Eighty Buc VA Greg Navy Gregg Golden Simmons Law Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 5 months ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

Greg Colton Aaron Perkins Ten Percent Wilson Two Years Five Years Forty Days One Hundred Percent Fourteen Sixteen Months Simmons Five Step Five Less Than Eight Hundred Bucks TWO Today Twenty Five Years Twenty Five Will Simmons Both Seven Seven Hundred Eighty Buc VA Greg Navy Gregg Golden Simmons Law Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
Interview With Naomi Hirabayashi And Marah Lidey

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:17 min | 7 months ago

Interview With Naomi Hirabayashi And Marah Lidey

"Hey everyone it's currently. I'm really excited to introduce our guests. Today we have to bam mara lady. Anna hirabayashi are the co founders. Enco ceos of shine a digital self company. That's on a mission to make caring for mental and emotional health easier. Mara naomi actually started out as co workers at do something dot org before going out on their own shine started as their side hustle and now the platform has over four million active users. Mara naomi thank you so much for joining me. Welcome to skin from the couch. Thanks for having parlor excited to be here now. I have to say it's the first time since the pandemic that. I actually have seen two people on a couch. He can't see them as a podcast air literally sitting next to each other. And i'm like oh my gosh human contact. What does that link that. We're gonna jump in. And i'm going to ask each of you to scam your resume late. I can start. I moved to new york in two thousand six the same year that twitter came about so it was basically right when socially news coming on the map. I started at the weather channel and quickly realized that. Tv advertising was was changing in a major way and so got the opportunity to actually be this seventh employee of the first boutique. Social media marketing agency called attention. I got to be part of fast. Growing startup changed the way brands. Figure out how to adjust to this new world. Really connect with people over social and it was there that i started offering pro bono work for not for profits to use these new tools as a way to connect with people around their impacting ultimately get more donors or funding or whatever. It may be that. Let me do something. That was a client and became really passionate about what they were building and actually joined do something as director of marketing and later became the chief marketing officer there and was there for five years helping to scale the organization from zero to five million members and help young people. Gen z and millennials Find more ways to get involved in social action and it was there that i met morrisseau always been really passionate about how he used the new tools at our disposal to break the stigma build connections and raise awareness for the things that matter snap those fishing sam. I think my career started as a side hustle very similar to shine. I paid my way through college. I was the first in my family to go to college. In part of how i paid for college was so many a lot of creative side. hustles engaged. I always found a way to turn those into resume. Builders so i worked for current tv and worked with twitter early on in some of the early social networks as an intern. Part of what. I was doing was handing out swag on campus but i also turn those into internships air quotes that allowed me to get into a couple of really powerful opportunities that actually were really focused on getting more people of color to jobs in new york in in a digital internet. Mtv networks said learned a lot about digital in in a different way. What is the look like to engage people in kind of involve a platform. It started on tv and then went to a start up. Had a really really a fantastic time. One of the first employees at a fashion startup. That was a joint venture with american express. I learned a lot about what it looks like to merge kind of older brands with a new emerging brand that was very creative and oversaw their digital media from media to member experience and similar to me. i found myself just really leaning towards impacts and wanting to know how i could make a deeper impact in the world heard about do something applied online. Met naomi I'm so in and went to do something to lead their their mobile engagement. In so at the time that meant tax messaging and actually similar to naomi we partner together to show their member userbase from zero to five million users shirley using text messaging and it led us to to spend some more time together to know each other in an ultimate to start shine when a shine so shiners leading self care app. We make it easy and inclusive for you to start daily self care ritual. That's going to be relevant to your world and fun facts. Sweeper actually honored as one of the best apps of twenty twenty by apple. We'd like low key heavy award like right behind us. You know we're so pumped about it. But i think particularly this year it's mental lot because our mission has been so rooted in inclusivity representation and to see this year's intersection of the pandemic the uprising for racial justice fee. Election the us and how he's been able to directly address that head on in our content every diet Through something we call the daily shine which is really we almost a podcast meets meditation. It's recorded fresh every day. And so you're going to hear meditation. That's relevant to your world every single day and so for those reasons it's it's led to this being such a powerful year for the company. Where so many people are recognizing that they need to support often for the first time and that they need that support to see them and to be inclusive and to recognize what they're going through in this very specific time and they're very specific experiences.

Mara Naomi Mara Lady Anna Hirabayashi Morrisseau The Weather Channel Twitter New York Bono Naomi Mtv Networks American Express Apple United States
Courtney Act on How Drag Helped Her Find Her Trans Identity

Homo Sapiens

03:16 min | 7 months ago

Courtney Act on How Drag Helped Her Find Her Trans Identity

"Perhaps courtney was almost a performance thing at the beginning of your career but now it's sort of like why would it be performance because she is also you. Yeah i guess it's that thing where with lots of labels and things. These days which i personally have found very helpful in understanding who i am but i think now that i've understood. I'm not completely. But i've i've got the large chunks. That pestered me for most of my teens and twenties out of the way i just kind of feel like me and so i think that's something beyond the physical packaging and the superficial decoration of that. Which is just like the core essence of who i am and and how my sexuality and my gender and my identity overnight to that which i feel really comfortable about but i think like drag was assigned post that the fact that i was drawn to drag the fact that i did drag in a world where it certainly wasn't a normal thing Was always sort of like a signposted. Sort of the bigger question about my identity and it's always been like this flag that has drawn attention to the concepts of gender and identity and will the words the words around have become. They've always been there. They've sort of been our fingertips for the past five years in a way that they just weren't before right. Yeah it's so weird. How language can empower and labels can empower someone. Because in the beginning. I was a boy who did drag and there's is nothing funny going on. It was just a costume like a police. Van would put on a police uniform and go to work mine. Was this more. Glamorous and the only other option at that time was to be trans. And i didn't identify with that because i think it was filled like a lot of people with a lot of i had a lot of internalized transphobia. I think In my early days. Because i had received a lease negative images and messages. Just as i had internalized homophobia and themm phobia arab. You know all of these sorts of things these messages that we with And then over. The years is the language has developed as the stories have felt in pop culture with Trans people the transit civility has probably been one of the biggest things has allowed me to accept who i am although i identifies trans. It created a space where i was able to actually ask myself those questions and answer them. Honestly because i was seeing amazing transplant and transparent in pop culture like laverne cox janet mock and angelica ross and chaz bono and jenny boylan and capable in saint louis books and things i'd read and i was like oh well. Being transparent is valid in beautiful wonderful. And i was no longer scared of the idea of being a transparent and so then i was able to actually look at it. I was like oh actually i think i secretly thought that i was transfer very longtime because those only two options and i didn't feel like i was a man so therefore i must be a woman and actually as it turns out. I don't feel like that. I just feel like me.

Courtney Laverne Cox Janet Mock Angelica Ross Phobia Jenny Boylan VAN Chaz Bono Saint Louis
Steady Grind Leads to Sustainable Side Income

Side Hustle School

04:00 min | 7 months ago

Steady Grind Leads to Sustainable Side Income

"John mcadam is a self described nerd at heart. That's why he's been making websites for more than a decade initially just for fun way back. When he started he was simply curious. You wanted to develop his development skills so he began to make websites for himself his friends family members and local churches all for free at that point he says that money was not a motivating factor for him instead. Every new project helped him learn something new. And that was valuable. Sony began to expand out from just building web sites. He learned to make simple web applications. John create these products for one reason to help solve a problem. He was facing himself after he would solve the problem. He publishes work to the chrome app store. Figured if he had a problem that people might have it too and it would help them again. He was doing this for free no charge. John spent much of his free time working on these projects. Never earning a dime from them but again he was learning he identified two very important things he was learning. One was the portfolio of technical skills that still to this day. The other was the notion of what he calls. Putting in the work. Essentially john got used to grinding. He would wake up at five in the morning to work on side on days off drive a few hours to attend community development meet ups to connect with others in his field. One time even left a few hours late for a vacation to finish update after building both his skills and his mindset. John began to venture into paid work. That's right there is a satisfied connection. Every store we have here is all about paid work. John had plenty of pro bono. Work to showcase which helped him land his very first client. Someone had heard about him and told her husband who was looking to hire someone to a site for his small business. John was ecstatic for the first time. He realized that making extra money on the side is possible now while he was getting paid now he still did not value profit the most in terms of his business above all else he wanted clients to want to pay him because he was adding so much guy to their goals. So in the first year. John made a grand total of one thousand two hundred and forty dollars. He found most of his other clients just like he found the first word of mouth. He was constantly telling people in this community about his. After hours work for the next few years he slowly began to increase profits. More people found out about him which caused him to get more referrals. Also purchase google edwards and renamed his business apps by john twenty fifteen. John was making about five thousand dollars a year from his hustle. Then tekere emailed him hoping to recruit him for a project. Ironically they reached out to him because john published one of his failed projects online for all the world to see. This failed app. Used a specific kind of technology called cordova apps although it was his least successful app by continuing to publish work that he knew as imperfect he made this new connection john agreed to work with tech recruiter and successfully help the company. Deliver a mobile app for the client. The company was happy with his work and his work ethic and has kept him on as sub-contractor ever since now this was great for john in more ways than one his profits increased substantially and. Now here's about forty thousand dollars a year just from his side hustle by working with the larger team. He's been able to work with more. Prestigious clients have been able to impact more people. Not only that but working with the larger business has helped polish skills even further now. John doesn't have to find as many personal client. Projects still does every now and then when the work it is consulting contract fluctuates. He says there were many things he did right so he could be ready for this opportunity. This includes not giving up even when the hustle got tough showcasing. His failed app not being afraid to do that and having confidence in his abilities which grew over time at this point john has no idea. What's next enjoys both this side hustle. Ns fulltime job as a transportation engineer. An extra forty thousand dollars. A year on the side isn't bad either.

John John Mcadam Chrome App Store John Twenty Tekere Sony Bono Google
Buying a home when 'New to Canada'

Bo Knows Real Estate

04:13 min | 8 months ago

Buying a home when 'New to Canada'

"Know funny. Things happened mike. And i had actually planned this episode several weeks back to discuss the options for new to canada homebuyers so it was completely fortuitous that i received a voicemail from a potential future home buyer in england. This gentleman apparently wants to move to canada in about a year from now. And he's got he's got questions about options for getting mortgages and what. The costs are involved in buying a house. Here's his voice. Mail a by a heavier well. I may cost list from the uk. My life is winning. Pick and we're looking to move back to winnipeg with young kids in the year or so. My question is this aside from the usual down payment taxes. Is there anything else you think. We may need to consider when volume winnipeg when moving from abroad particularly in relation to mortgages and credit otherwise. Thanks during about costs. A nice place to stay in touch with what's happening will the best now. First of all let me say. I really love getting feedback like that. It tells me that there's actually people listening and it's making a difference that's that's really good Very simple way for you to leave me a voicemail like this by simply going to my podcast website page which is at bono's dot homes slash podcast or if you to this episode in particular bono's dot homes slash one four two everytime you go to my site. A little microphone will appear at the bottom of your screen. Just click it. Leave me voice mail. The will be required to leave an email address. And i will get back in touch with you. I will play. Or i may. I probably will play your voicemail. But i take your name out to keep it private love to hear from you but for now let's call. Mike conceal yes to say. Hey mike it's bowl kaufman. How you doing today. Hey do well how about yourself. Excellent excellent so you heard essentially that question from that gentleman in england. Who's thinking of moving to winnipeg correct and so in answered his question. The first question is how much down payment do you have. He's asking determine what type of credit information. We need for example. If you have a twenty five percent down payment and you've been in canada for three years or less it doesn't matter what your income or immigration status we can get you a mortgage at a positive rate. That kind of threw me there. It's three years or less correct. Three years left. So it's if you've been in canada for less than three years you're good to go with twenty five percent down that's correct. Yes and then you can students. You don't have to have employment. You don't even have credit. That's the requirement cool so as we go down from there so the next level down would be. Let's say a ten percent down so if you have a ten percent down payment you'll have been at your job and in canada or three months and you need to show letter your bank saying that you have a history of making pates. The next step down there will be five percent down payments if you have a five percent down payment cata typically for twelve months so for one year and have a letter from your landlord. Show you pay your rent on time. So those are the sort of the with the descending amounts of down payment. What's required to get a mortgage cara okay. What about a job at five percent down you here for a year. You still have to do a qualifying employment right correct. Yes you you still have to have a job off of probation. Most lenders have a one two three month. Probationary period's okay. So let's go back. That i one really. If you're in the country even a student a refugee anybody was in the country for less than three years can buy a house. And i understand that you just recently did a mortgage for somebody told me about that cracked and so we helped a couple where there was two brothers encounter for ten years and they just brought their parents over from asia and their parents want to buy a house will they brought over money with them so the parents did not have a job did not have any income in canada but because they just came here and they had a twenty five percent down payment they're able to buy a nice house coaster kids. Well okay that's that's awesome. That's good and the rate of those people was. They got a two point. One four percent on a five year fixed.

Winnipeg Canada Mike Conceal Mike England Kaufman UK Cata Asia
The San Francisco 49ers Should Trade Jimmy Garoppolo Now

Papa and Lund

02:30 min | 9 months ago

The San Francisco 49ers Should Trade Jimmy Garoppolo Now

"Young. Basically, just talk about what we've been talking about right? He basically said it comes down to whether Kyle can trust Jimmy completely right. That's that's what he said Well, and then Jimmy's gotta execute it. And it's just their evaluation of Ah, Jimmy Garoppolo and And I was thinking When Matt barrels was on has been covering the team a while. You know, it's just one of the worst days as far as injuries to find out, you know, Chill your offensive, Captain Zerg on your quarterback, and you're And you're arguably your best overall player. Certainly one of your team leaders who just gave Ah $75 million contract, too. And Have you had some bad days that second week of the year against the Jets when Nick Bozo went down and Solomon Thomas went down and Jimmy hurt. The ankle initially was pretty bad. So that was a bad day. And then you know, going back to Steve's career much his first game in 97. Warren Sapp knocked Concussed him and not Jerry out. Jerry. Try to come back later, and it turned out to be worse and Steve did come back. So there's been some bad days and days of Steve Young. You know, when they first got here it was before Plan B Free agency, which was the first kind of soft entree. Into free agency in the NFL. You know, you could have Joe Montana, Steve Young and Steve Bono. When that was your three and a quarter back room, just incredible. And you know, the Raiders said Ah, Lamonica, Landa and Stabler all other same team. I mean, you just don't have that luxury. So the reason we're talking about this is the finances of it. And where Jimmy is that in the contract in the way they they front loaded the contractors. They had salary cap room at the beginning, so they They can make a choice here financially. Take it out from under Jimmy Garoppolo is even talking about before the year even started. I don't think this is really anything. I knew Jimmy has no more guaranteed money in his contract after this year, and the 40 Niners would have Tio suffer a two point million dollar dead, cap it if they trade him. Or release him. So I would much rather release him are partly trade him, then release him. But also the timing of this. The new league year will start. And you don't have to make any call on Jimmy Garoppolo. D have somebody on the hooker in the building or signed to a contract to be able to do that. So if you are going to replace him, you have to have somebody to replace him with And you're not going to do that now. I mean, it's just an exercise there. We're gonna play now that they do. Look at people They do look at contracts and they do look at who's possibly available and all that's in play. Now

Jimmy Garoppolo Jimmy Captain Zerg Nick Bozo Solomon Thomas Steve Young Steve Bono Jerry Lamonica Warren Sapp Steve Kyle Joe Montana Matt Jets Landa Stabler Young Raiders
Floridians With Felony Convictions Must Pay Fines Before They Can Vote

Morning Edition

03:58 min | 10 months ago

Floridians With Felony Convictions Must Pay Fines Before They Can Vote

"Legislature appears to be succeeding in its drive to prevent people with felony convictions from voting. The people of Florida voted otherwise. Two years ago by an overwhelming margin, Floridians overturned the state's lifelong ban on voting for most people who were convicted of felonies and ER done serving time. Then Florida lawmakers stepped in. The legislators barred people with felony convictions from voting if they still owe outstanding fines. Danny Rivero of W. LRN reports on the result. The big promise when voters passed a ballot initiative in 2018 was that more than a million Floridians would get the right to vote back, but after the state connected voting with making payments Less than 10,000 ex felons are expected to vote in November, according to research from Georgetown Law Center. That's because the majority of people can't afford to pay what they owe. Even if a tiny percent of them can have paid all my thighs. I have paid my debt to society. And now maybe Sean Jones came out of Florida State prison six years ago when she was serving time for drug charges. When I met her in August, she was marching to the polls in Miami to vote in Florida's primary election. Today. Jones is a social worker now. And for the occasion, she's wearing a homemade black and pink shirt that celebrates how far she's made it. So my short says she's then reform have DC number, which is day County corrections, and I have my voter's registration number checked, so No longer a felon and my eyes. I'm not a few Florida counties have come up with programs that allow judges to modify someone sentenced to allow them to vote even if money is still open. In the program's first launched there was a lot of promise that they could help people register to vote. Democratic State Senator Jason Pizzo helped create one of these programs in Miami Dade County a year ago. He says. The biggest problem with the program is that so few people have used it less than 100. People of their cases have been modified in the largest county in Florida and the third largest, Pizzo says there's more pro bono attorneys that have offered to help with cases than people who have called for help. Is it apathy or is it beating down people and Basically digging and feel so disheartened and disenchanted with a system that I give up. You know, I just give up. I won't engage. I don't know. A fund to help would be voters was created last year and has raised million so far. But even those charitable contributions are facing pushback from the state. After billionaire Michael Bloomberg announced he would help donate nearly $20 million for the effort. Florida's attorney General Ashley Booty, asked the FBI and state police to investigate in the letter, She cited laws against election bribery. It's hard not seeing this as a bit of voter intimidation. Daniel Length, is an attorney with the campaign legal center. She represented plaintiffs in the federal court case. And she says Florida is trying to scare people away from accepting help for paying off their fines and fees. There is no criminal investigation to be had here. The law is about paying people to vote or paying people in order to induce them to vote. Instead, the generosity of fellow citizens is allowing individuals to become eligible to vote. Most of us don't have to pay to become eligible to vote. But unfortunately, these folks dio Betty Riddle was a plaintiff in the federal lawsuit, and now she's scrambling to come up with the money. She needs to be able to vote in November. It doesn't make that frustrates free meat is unbelievable What these people will go through to stop from bone. I mean, you you want we got okay, Riddle says Despite all the legal rulings, she's going to keep trying to get her voting rights back even if it takes until the next presidential election. For NPR news. I'm Danny Rivero in Miami.

Florida Senator Jason Pizzo Danny Rivero Betty Riddle Sean Jones General Ashley Booty W. Lrn Miami Miami Dade County Legislature Georgetown Law Center NPR Michael Bloomberg Attorney Daniel Length FBI Bribery
Floridians With Felony Convictions Must Pay Fines Before They Can Vote

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:54 min | 10 months ago

Floridians With Felony Convictions Must Pay Fines Before They Can Vote

"Dot com slash NPR to learn more. Florida's Republican legislature is largely succeeding in its drive to prevent people with felony convictions from voting the people of Florida voted otherwise two years ago by an overwhelming margin Floridians overturned the state's lifelong ban on voting for people convicted of crimes. Then Florida lawmakers stepped in the legislators barred people from voting if they still owe outstanding fines, which most can't afford to pay Danny Rivera of member station, wwl R. N. reports on the result. The Big promise when voters passed a ballot initiative in two thousand eighteen was that more than a million Floridians would get the right to vote back. But after the stay connected voting with making payments, less than ten thousand ex-felons are expected to vote in November according to research from Georgetown? Law. Center. That's because the majority of people can't afford to pay what they owe. Even if a tiny percent of them can have paid all my fines. I have pay my dentist society. And now, maybe Bolt Sean came out of Florida State. Prison six years ago where she was serving time for drug charges. But when I met her in August, she was marching to the polls in Miami to vote in Florida's primary election. Jones a social worker. Now for the occasion, she's wearing a homemade black and pink shirt that celebrates how far she's made it. So my shirt says she's been reform. DC number, which is day county corrections crossed out. And I have my voter registration number checked So no longer a felon and my is not a few Florida counties have come up with programs that allow judges to modify someone sentenced to allow them to vote. Even if money is still out when the programs I lost, there was a lot of promise that they could help people registered to vote. Democratic. State Senator Jason Pizzo helped create one of these programs in Miami Dade. County a year ago and he says the biggest problem with the program is that so few people have used it less than one hundred people out of their cases modified in the largest county in Florida in the third largest country pizzo says there's more pro Bono attorneys that have offered to help with cases. Then people who have called for help is it apathy or is it beating down people and basically Nagin and feel so disheartened and disenchanted with system like I give up Give up I don't WANNA gauge. I don't a fun to help would be voters was created last year and has raised million so far. But even those charitable contributions are facing pushback from the state after billionaire Michael Bloomberg announced he would help donate nearly twenty million dollars for the effort. Florida's Attorney General Ashley. Moody. Asked the FBI in State police to investigate and the letter she cited laws against election bribery. Not See this as a bit of voter intimidation. Then you link is an attorney with the campaign legal center. She represented plaintiffs in the Federal Court case, and she says, Florida's trying to scare people away from accepting help for paying off their fines and fees. Air is no criminal investigation to be had here. The law is about paying people to vote or paying people. In order to induce them to vote instead the generosity of fellow citizens is allowing individuals to become eligible to vote Most of us don't have to pay to become eligible to vote unfortunately these folks do, but he riddle was a plaintiff in the federal lawsuit, and now she's scrambling to come up with the money she needs to be able to vote in November government. Fustrates me I mean unbelievable what these people will go through to stop

Florida Senator Jason Pizzo Florida State R. N. General Ashley Danny Rivera Attorney NPR Miami Dade Michael Bloomberg Georgetown Sean FBI Jones Nagin Federal Court Miami Bribery
The Hillside Stranglers Kenneth Bianchi and Angelo Buono Jr.

Serial Killers

02:49 min | 10 months ago

The Hillside Stranglers Kenneth Bianchi and Angelo Buono Jr.

"Last time we examined Angelo and Kenny's turbulent childhoods. They're toxic attitudes toward women and their first three murders. Today will cover the series of strangulations that had Los Angeles on edge as well as the fateful falling out that brought the cousins on done. We've got all that and more coming up stay with us. More by early November, nineteen, seventy seven cousins, forty-three-year-old Angelo Bono Junior and twenty, six year old Kenny Bianchi Felton principle they'd raped and murdered three women and loved it. There I. Two victims were sex workers known to frequent the sunset strip and their most recent kill was an aspiring professional dancer and waitress but to Angelo and Kenny they were all the same. The cousins tossed the naked bodies of all three women along the. Roads and hillsides of Los Angeles noticing the similarities between the murders authorities suspected they had a serial killer on their hands and they quickly -duced that the killer wasn't working alone the lack of fingerprints, footprints and tire tracks at each dumpsite suggested that the killer had help. There was no way one person could carry and dump the bodies alone but not wanting to tip the killers off police withheld their theory from the media. then. Again, there wasn't much media attention on the murders yet and with little coverage in the press Angelo and Kenny felt free to choose their next victim on the streets of Hollywood and this time they wanted to be more discerning in who they picked. Angelo had a taste for strawberry blondes and firmly believed that younger was always better. If they were going to commit a crime, they figured the woman had to be. Worth it. She had to be beautiful enough to kill in Hollywood. It's not hard to find looks to die for and on November Ninth Nineteen, Seventy seven Angelo and Kenny noticed a striking blonde waiting at a bus stop along the sunset strip twenty-eight-year-old Jane King was a stunner who'd look years younger than her age she was perfect. Kenny approached the aspiring actress with a friendly smile and took a seat beside her on the. Ever the charmer he engaged Jane in friendly conversation for a few minutes carefully building a rapport with her as he listened to. Jane chataway Kenny. Feign surprise when Angelo pulled up beside them in the Cadillac playing the part Angelo offer them both a ride home which Kenny readily accepted Jane hesitated at first. But when Kenny flashed a badge and told her, he was in the police reserves, she happily got into the car.

Jane Chataway Kenny Angelo Bono Kenny Bianchi Felton Los Angeles Jane Jane King Hollywood
Parents Sue Los Angeles Unified Over How It’s Handling Distance Learning

All Things Considered

01:19 min | 11 months ago

Parents Sue Los Angeles Unified Over How It’s Handling Distance Learning

"Have filed a class action lawsuit against the L. A Unified school district. Lawsuit claims L. A USDA is remote learning plans fall short of providing students what they need to learn. More specifically says the district's distance learning planned violates the students right toe a basic public education under the California Constitution, and the black and Latino students, English learners and students with disabilities are disproportionately impacted. Dear Elizabeth, his lawyer at Kirkland and Ellis. That's the law agency representing the families, Pro bono. She pointed toe, low online participation rates and shorter workdays for teachers as glaring issues that have not been addressed. Even though L. A USD had 4 to 5 months to rectify the glaring deficiencies from the spring program. They failed. Several parents spoke at a press conference in downtown L a today, including cash, our Russia whose son is in the district. He fills us supporting his education. And I am afraid that my son is not prepared for the sixth grade. The work that my son is receiving is not challenging. His schedule was not consistent. And there have already been days in school that he has finished before. 10 A.m.. Allegations echo findings released by the district itself in July. The suit was filed in L. A Superior Court Today, California's community colleges are bracing for the longer

L. A Unified School District California Usda Russia Kirkland Elizabeth Ellis
Xbox Series S and X preview

The Vergecast

09:58 min | 11 months ago

Xbox Series S and X preview

"All Right Tom. You have just like dummy xbox at your house, but what is going on? You just plastic shells. He's just making videos with like should I tell you the story of week? So. They arrived on. Monday morning and like like I'm grumpy wouldn't say old berm like it and I knew phone and we get new laptop and he does know me I, know that sounds like. And and I'm like I mean a really fortunate position. But like once you've seen so much stuff once visited location. So many times he just doesn't. It's not exciting, right? So He's very me to get sight about technology but like Jane genuinely when opened up the series was like, wow, this is. Not. Excited by a brand new laptop with the latest graphics card a super fast processor and a ton of Ram Beautiful Four K. screed but you were excited by a plastic dummy box of the xbox series. And I don't know why. But it was late is is a deny it sounds really like fan boil some. It sounds like he was like Christmas I was like Oh this is so. Because I haven't seen it before. And I knew other people hadn't seen before. So is an element of that but it was also just like Michael being so small like how did how did they do this? That was my immediate thing was like how like will? It right. They haven't told me anything about it at this point. So they just sent me these damn dummy units and I was just like. BSO The dummy units arrived they respond to be I mean there was supposed to be announcing this thing next week. So there's going to be a bunch of like. Honey. Technical. In Belgrade, sessions where briefings for the press, so they give us the full information so that we'd have our goals like informative for people to read. That's great involved because like it just means that I can explain things better. readers get better pitcher and but then it leaked. So I woke up I can't even remember which day it leaked because it's just been such a week. But it leads at some point. Jews Wednesday. Up, and I was like Oh God like zoo happen, and then like that will C- kick Mike soft intellect panic mode we need to announce everything because everything's leaked. So they like just dumped the whole thing. The experts pricing everything. This is a trend because Google does this now and the thing leaks that just like Oh. Yeah. Okay. That's Just did it with the wing? Yeah. Well, I mean L. L G announces every single practice makes fifty times so. Count. But it's a pattern. We might as well, just announce it. We're done I think I think with Marxist cases that I've been. Flight. Will to years. Alongside bunch of reposes will. But like I think for them, it was like they needed to explain his fingers like the thing suspending. Well, this is the experts series S. His basically a smaller more budget friendly and and let's say less performance. Experts console than the bigger experts series X, which I'm sure most people listening to this probably familiar with Bono and it's basically designed for fourteen Philippi gaming. So like that's I, mean I'd say the vast majority of Mona's out there today that people gaming on the moment. East acton on the TV's and stuff but like this is a pretty good. Sweets book fully Philippi right now, spy from the PC side and. It's like a good talk. And they basically promising a symbol of architecture and all of the next gen premiums from the series. Excellent. CPU cloud under two hundred megahertz. The thing I care about is, does it have the the fast d at the series extras? Yeah. It does but it's five hundred, twelve storage instead of one terabyte. So there are no right. There's no Dr. Discloses all digital. Is Two hundred, ninety nine buffs, which is, which is good. I think it's like that's a pretty impressive for us but this is obviously the the the drawbacks to it. No disks will do diesel prices. If Games are typically higher yields, he can't use use games I think a lot to see Sonia my soul. In some way I'd love to just say my district sorted signing just digitize as well. I think we spoke about that on the way I look at like this series s is I think he's great life. If you kid you place fort like twenty, four, seven in bed, remove ten ADP TV because you haven't spent. Two Thousand Bucks on the Keio lead for them. Surprisingly. Like. I think I. Think it's great for that sold market like having. By that for Free Hundred Bucks and they get the new CPU the new ESA stays below times and the performance overall will be like way better than expos one. Like it just depends how it compares to the to the series x I. Think like they're doing some upscaling stuff for four K. if you really want to touch, it's a four K.. By Donna, how good that's going to be. That misses the point like. Different market. But what is the market for fourteen forty game I mean When you say monitors get it but most people with fourteen forty P monitors plugging PC's into them not consoles I is fourteen forty pm out. So I think the market is really ten API. which which is the TV's. Still turn EP like I would probably imagine the forty percent Stilton apr there at the moment. And I think that goes wildly up when you look at bedrooms and like kids rooms like where you're buying a typically smaller TV and you're not gonNA get e can't even by like a smaller lighter the twenty. Shit Four. K. TV. It's just they just don't exist. Although maybe they do but like. Just don't sell volume and I think that that's the market. That's the market ICS. Definitely. Going for like the MOMS and the POPs the shopping around at Christmas and they want to get their gear console they want to get something this noon and stuff, and these things only gonNA come down in price. So to me the market for the series S is. Why definitely have to buy a playstation because I want to get those games and if Playstation maybe I'll get the best one because I don't know what's going on the cheaper one about they're going to do there. And so if I've done that I still kind of want an xbox because I'm thinking about getting this Xbox game pass thing because he all these games on it. But I don't want to have to big ass consuls my living room saw the the cheaper xbox. I'll get the cheaper xbox to play Xbox Game Pass Games, and then I'll get the more expensive PSI to be like my main console that I get like my kick ass four K. stuff on it is. So blindingly clear which one of you has a child in which one doesn't. Just putting. Very obvious. How your perspectives shifted. Like I would say game passes Tom to your point you the game passes the thing here right? Like, yeah. If this is a Fox for your second TV or your kids TV, then what you need is a cloud gaming service. They can address all the xboxes right. And if you don't have a disk, doesn't matter because all the Games on the cloud anyway and you're just moving licenses around and maybe you're going to get to to streaming games in this thing, will be able to stream the games right like. You kinda see where they're going is these are just sort of client units for an xbox service with different GPS. Yeah. Exactly. It's different. Slight different economic you a bunch of specs and people who've been tweet me thousand times a minute this week. But you can argue a bunch of stuff to the essential differences between the two is the once targeting Larry's Lucien Melissa's and TV's and the EVA's talkative. Okay. Like that. That's that's basically the basic gist of the if you were really simplifier. And I think the cheap one is really gonNA appealed to the experts getting pulse market. Like that. Is Probably the best for you and gave me right now like I. Think it's very. Apple, arcade. Lately, just added a play or that it didn't add it to base expos game policies to the almost see have to you have to pay the all of the xbox names are bad and confusing. And then there's the P. C. There's the version that you can also play it on PC, which now costs more, right yes. Let's give me ten bucks a month by feel like that's I mean if you experts came all that covers you on anyway. So feel like you just. Denies. People go for the old anyway I think. So you've got the the series as the that will call the ten ADP model because I think it's functionally what it is even yeah basically forty nine. To Ninety nine, the series x, which is the four K. high refresh rate. Refrigerator refrigerator model. Model model is four ninety nine, which is actually still very aggressive and my mind and just based on what can do and then experts expensive. The Ninja xbox Game Pass Ultimate Yep is twenty five bucks a month in. Fifteen a month. But if you pay more and then you get a box out of it to write for twenty four months, you you you pay the subsidize. It's like a phone plan. Basically you get you pay a little bit more and then you a paying down your hardware and installments and it's basic. Tech Industry only has one business model which is. And T. in two, thousand and four. Yeah. But right. But that's a killer deal right that she ended up paying less over the twenty four months than you would. If you bought them separately right when you can get either right for the Yup can get the X. which I think is four, nine, nine a month I think. Five month or twenty five, the S. I I see that I'm like I'm just GonNa. I'm just GONNA, X.. Whatever like I am going to do the dumb starbucks, which is it's three coffees Erlich whatever. AM. And that is just a brilliant move for Microsoft, right? Yeah. Basically make an expensive thing seemed cheap even as maybe in the end, it's only slightly cheaper than buying everything out right?

Jane Belgrade Google Starbucks Microsoft Michael DR. Mike East Acton Bono Mona L. L G Keio Sonia ESA Donna ADP
Kellyanne Conway's Daughter Claudia, 15, Says She's Seeking Emancipation

The Vegas Take

04:47 min | 1 year ago

Kellyanne Conway's Daughter Claudia, 15, Says She's Seeking Emancipation

"Kellyanne Conway, his 15 year old daughter. Ah has said some very interesting statements on social media, not just in the last day, but in the last weeks months, she said. She's she was devastated. That her mother will be speaking at the RNC. Ah, in a flurry of tweets criticizing her parents. She also said she and her father agree on absolutely nothing politically before announcing she would be taking a mental health break from Social Media. Get her daughter's only 15 years old, she says. I'm officially pushing for emancipation buckle up, because this is probably going to be public one way or another. Unfortunately, welcome to my life. She's left leaning. At one point, she urged progressive representative Alexander Acosta Cortez to adopt her. I'll tell you I wish Cortez would adopt me. I'll be honest, I'm with her on that one. She says. As far as my dad goes politically, we agree on absolutely nothing. We just both happen to have common sense when it comes to our current president. Stop staining him. Claudia tweeted using a term, referring to someone who admires someone or something the point of obsession. She added that her mother was selfish for pushing her line of work. My mother's job ruined my life to begin with. She also went on to say, heartbreaking that she continues to go down the path. After years of watching your Children suffer selfish. It's all about money and fame. Ladies and gentlemen, she also continued, and she said, I'm a savage. I'm aware, but you know, just going on and on talking about how angry she is that her parents, particularly in this situation, her mother for ruining her life now she also I've got some breaking audio that she went on Tic tac, and this just broke out on TMZ. So again, this is Kellyanne Conway's daughter. 15 years old on Tic tac. Have a listen to this. I'm probably stall this earth because of all of you like and I'm really grateful for that. Um And I'm really trying to manage my sister. My situation, but I I love you guys so much. Um And I just want to say thank you for supporting me. If anybody has lawyers or anything, you can email me. Um I'm going to be a whole lot of thinking for once. Take it. What does she want? Lawyer? She wants to sue her mom trapped. Trying to understand what does she want? No, she said she wants emancipation. By the way, if Kellyanne Conway was my mother, I'd probably want to get an attorney as well. Those air alternative fax my mother is Mrs alternative facts, But I wonder why, like, what is she trying to do? I want to sue my mom because my mom is a bad parent. And she cares more about Donald Trump in her own fan. I mean, I guess you could see your mom for that. I wonder how that would work. Anyway. Go ahead, Shaun going to be, you know, taking e mails on my email at sea and Conway five at gmail dot com. That's C M. As in movie Conway, five. A. Stein, Can you please write down that email? I want to get Kelly and complex daughter on a radio show I want. I want to get around the show. I'm serious. It's worth an email. I'm sure she got probably 200 other emails. But, you know, I'm sure she'll do Vegas local radio. Why wouldn't she dotcom And if you have any information on pro bono lawyers in the New Jersey or D C areas I really, really appreciate it. Um Because this is really getting out of control tonight. I have to get out of the situation of men. Um, and it sucks that I'm kind of being used as a publicity stunt. The PR son. It actually sucks. That's like and I don't even know what to say. Right now. I'm just kind of just in shock. I'm kind of just like And I can't even cry anymore because I'm so numb like two crying like I just can't But please don't believe anything that you see, especially like my parents saying that they're doing it for the family. They're not like they're not at all. I'm literally giving you the tea. I'm giving you all the realist. They didn't say anything about this. Um they literally just tweeted about it. Um, my dad doesn't care about me and Eric. He's never cared about me. Um, he probably doesn't even know my middle name. Which is really sad, but it's true. You know, he never really cared about me my whole life he always belittle when I was younger. My dad physically abused me a lot. Um Right here in this very room and My mom is standing with my mom. You know, my mom got me arrested. You know, She's very, very physically abusive, long, very, very, very abusive. I've been belittles and badgered Mine's higher life, And I just said this to them, you know? You guys putting on this whole show? You know, they want attention. So you know, then putting it on this whole show of them Leaving? I guess isn't really Going to be effective. You know, I think they're just scared that I'm going to emancipate myself, which I am. I'm going to try.

Kellyanne Conway Alexander Acosta Cortez Eric RNC Kelly Donald Trump Mine Claudia President Trump Representative New Jersey A. Stein Shaun Vegas Attorney
"bono" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"bono" Discussed on Shedunnit

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> these more excessively <Speech_Female> complicated <Speech_Female> inheritance stories <Speech_Female> might <SpeakerChange> be twentieth <Speech_Female> century mentioned <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> but the idea of asking <Speech_Female> who benefits <Speech_Female> from a crime <Speech_Female> goes back much <Speech_Female> much. Further <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> coup <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Bono <Speech_Female> a Latin phrase <Speech_Female> meaning literally to <Speech_Female> whom is it a benefit <Speech_Female> was <Speech_Female> popularized by the <Speech_Female> Roman senator and lawyer. <Speech_Female> Marcus Tovia <Speech_Female> CICERO. <Speech_Female> He used <Speech_Female> it in a speech <Speech_Female> made in defense of a <Speech_Female> man suspected of <Silence> murdering his father <Speech_Female> and argued <Speech_Female> that just because <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the son had inherited. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> It didn't <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> prove that he'd committed <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the crime.

"bono" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"bono" Discussed on Shedunnit

"Firstly inheritance is a concept is completely relatable we might not all have Richon with complicated wills but every family of every kind has experienced some kind of transfer property when a member dies even if the asset in question was apprised but ugly jug rather than a sprawling country estate if death is a universal experience then so is the disposition of property that follows then. There's the temptation that a substantial inheritance represents other common motives like revenge. Infidelity and protection tend to require the potential Madrid to kill for the sake of a concept. Jealousy and rage are powerful forces. No doubt but it's much easier to believe that someone might commit murder for material gain than for the more nebulous satisfaction that an idea offers especially if that temptation has been designed in order to overcome them scruples. Perhaps they're rich. Relative is old or already ill or extremely unpleasant and the air urgently needs money for some very worthy reason in such a case. Cow Bad could it be to just hasten the inevitable you can see how quickly this line of reasoning entities that gray area between right and wrong where a certain kind of character had manufacturer justification that will enable them to do the unspeakable thing? Dorothy Elsa has nineteen twenty seven novel unnatural death in which an elderly woman with a terminal disease dies in suspicious circumstances and heir presumptive by Henry Wade from nineteen thirty five in which a hard up young man from a junior branch of rich entitled family. Take steps to move up the line of succession of both works where you can see. This used to great effect. And beyond just the protagonist motivation inheritance has some subsidiary aspects. That can be very useful to the novelist. The will has great narrative potential. The murder victim can deliver a sudden twist from beyond the grave in the form of a surprise bequest to someone outside the family circle or they can astound their relatives with the actual contents of their estate as a detective. Unravels the tangled web of tensions that make up a fraud inheritance scenario. They also get a crash course in the dysfunctions of that family. And so does the reader a will can help to cut across clause boundaries to if the deceased has left a major but unexpected. Bequest to seven or Secretary for instance. Dorothy I'll say like using inheritance so much in her books that she even had a recurring solicitor character in Mr Mumbles who has sleuth Lord. Peter Whimsey regularly calls upon when he needs some legal matter explaining. That's another reason. Why inheritance is so suited to the Golden Age Detective Story? It is ultimately susceptible to investigation. Wills can be extracted from their hiding places or found in caves and detectives can get statements from solicitors by what they contain in unnatural. Death say has has inspect to poker Scotland Yard. Do the tedious Legwork for finding the Bloomsbury solicitor that Williams's favourite suspect is thought to have consulted off to interviewing dozens of possible candidates. Polka does eventually find the right man and get the story from him. The legal world loves documents. So there's always a paper trail to follow if the sleuth is methodical and assistant enough. It's unlikely that the mysteries going to Peter out in an unsatisfactory way inheritance is also both extremely simple and very complicated in its most basic form. One person dies and another person receives their property as there will dictate but there are many variations and intricacies that can be added onto this transaction as the whodunit requires multiple versions of wills spiteful codicils. I'm bizarre conditions can all live in up this kind of story. The enterprising criminal can even manipulate some of them to their advantage. Such as in the unpleasantness at the Bologna Club by Sayers from Nineteen Twenty Eight. When the order in which to apparently natural deaths occurred is vital in determining who inherits a fortune or in the footsteps at the lock by Ronald Knox published in the same year? We see two cousins who hate each other going to canoeing holiday together. If the elder ones survives the next two months he'll inherit fifty thousand pounds and if he doesn't the other cousin cleans up. It's that simple. And also that complicated as you can see from the titles. I've mentioned so far inheritance. Mysteries were very popular in the Nineteen Twenties and early thirties. And indeed. As the tropes of Golden Age detective fiction became better known right to started playing with the elements of the classic inheritance plot to mislead readers and subvert expectations coleman like a missing air or an impersonation for profit begin to be used as red herrings diversions as well as central plot devices as a reader of these stories. You quickly learn to be on your guard when a particles on gambling problem tends to make amends just before his wealthy father kicks the bucket. There's a strong chance that the solution is going to be a bit less obvious than that. But right as didn't tire of these troops just because they became popular far from it one of John Dixon. 'cause best locked room novels. The crooked hinge from nineteen thirty eight includes an impersonation element as does does having taste nineteen forty-nine novel brought Farah and nine hundred sixty five's the belting inheritance by Jillian Simmons. Once you start looking for them you see the murderous as everywhere after the break. It's time to talk about teens..

murder Peter Whimsey Nineteen Twenties Richon Dorothy Elsa John Dixon Henry Wade Ronald Knox Secretary Dorothy I poker Scotland Yard Bloomsbury fraud Jillian Simmons Mr Mumbles Farah Polka Bologna Club coleman Sayers
"bono" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"bono" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"No or less it's not real all tired today well well it looks like bono would you rather forget about his speak or forget how to read I'll read yeah you can kind of lie your way through life you know just me getting that way oh my gosh I need to get new glasses can you read this for me like start making a cold and figured it out years back to me choice both no not takin he's always out speaking loves it he doesn't want to talk the happiest I ever was was the month that I had laryngitis I couldn't talk all my god it made me really I think I faked it for another month after I got my voice back you have a little dry erase board had you I just went into my mouth he said no no no shook my head no or to communicate no I forget reading yeah good bye yeah would you rather please stink and not know what we thank you.

bono
"bono" Discussed on Shelter From The Storm

Shelter From The Storm

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"bono" Discussed on Shelter From The Storm

"Started working with my uncle bill he used to do steam fixing and he got me a job at steel fixers and then sometimes be working nope eleven and twelve stories up in the air and that was fun but I I have to stir a start point is I didn't even if I had an excellent job I didn't want the standard for longer than six months I just want to keep the trying something new all the time and that was that was the idea I think it was I was getting bored easy broken up in a in a relationship with a woman and I took it very badly and was a basically didn't care whether I was alive or dead but yeah I think probably doing dangerous work was my way of testing my own mortality. There was a guy called Timmy Butler who worked for who worked on the pipe fitting yeah A men's water the main blew up in his face and he was drowned decapitated and when we heard people shouting people screaming we ran down and we just saw his body at the top of the water so I witnessed the aftermath I didn't witness the actual event itself but I don't have been talking to him by five minutes before he was feeding the lines through to me through the pipes it was it was a freaky time because he was so young he was so good at his job it it just started to introduce a lot of question marks you know was this the writing to be doing I didn't I don't think I stayed in India particular job very much long after because I was in shock I didn't I think about things or at least I didn't I'd have half a dozen pine stem neck before I'd be incapable of talking to somebody about what just happened when we were in the army one time we were firing big guns when an explosion happens and that made me think as well but I mean.

Timmy Butler India five minutes six months
"bono" Discussed on Shelter From The Storm

Shelter From The Storm

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"bono" Discussed on Shelter From The Storm

"It I stayed with a family an Irish family who had moved to London and they had two sons who were born in London the eldest the sons had just gotten married so was myself on the youngest son who were in the House and he was showing me all around London and we were one of the Times one of the first times that we went down into the center of London he was showing me down around Downing Street and screaming Lord Sutch marched down Downing Street with I think it was four sakes naked women to publicize a rock-n-roll concert that was happening in Wembley follow on Saturday and is a big to do about that naturally but it work because we went to the rock and roll concert the following Saturday aw everybody you name absolutely every single person who is still alive and who had been involved with rock and roll we saw them all I think boy was really really pivotal and really important boy it's okay for guys to say an women to say that they were bisexual he made us okay for people to dress up crazy he you know he was just so totally off the wall and while he was my hero anywhere he he certainly opened up a lot of doors for me I had only been over for three for months at that stage school had already started and the part of me was worried about I was drinking so much and I was and seven nights a week and it was just one continuous boost session we even went to we went to the public lunchtime in that's how normally was and I taught simply because everybody else was doing at at this was the normal thing to do but it's not an I knew I was gone AOL my state exams I knew I was going to fail the Inter cert and I still wanted to prove to myself that I can do it and I have to go back in Ireland that I missed her as well so they're they're the three reasons why impact but mainly to repeat digs them I also needed I needed somebody to say to me gone off the rails and my brother would never have said that to me as far as he was concerned I was just having a good time there you aren't time during the summer breaks I was doing stints in the Irish Territorial Army there was a an impression probably a false mon but a lot of Irish publicans looked at it in a way that if you come into a public in army uniform on you you were old enough to drink even if your birth said Sir said that you weren't because you could join the Torius at sixteen which could only drink eighteen but as far as they were concerned if you're in an army uniform he was serving and there were no exceptions to that and they made it easy for you and again it's the thing again about it being a small provincial town with forty something CBS in it what else is supposed to do in a place like that except maybe go to church or something I don't know it's just simply something that every single woman myself my miss did we drank didn't drink seven nights a week we could have if we had the money for we would have if we had the money for tom my parents were trying to keep control of but they knew that they had lost me as well so instead of myself and my dad constantly being more with one another we just basically avoided one another and he told me years later that it was the only way he knew deal with me I mean don't get me wrong I wasn't appearing in court every week or anything like that but I was doing stupid things robin stealing we were trying to I think what we were trying to do is basically prove how hard we were to one another which is probably a teenage thing as well but that's how mostly that's how we got when the army Walson because very very difficult to get jobs in the small town like that anyway and just waiting to finish school and while we were wetting to finish school we would drink quite a lot but by that stage we had started taking I certainly had started taken barbiturates with booze I started drinking drinking on top of Valium loggins and if you ever get into that particular cler trip that definitely is memory loss now you're talking true memory loss you know go out and Friday night and and you might not know it might not even come around mentally until Sunday evening or something and maybe not even then because we had no clue of the dosages that we were taking if somebody handed you say ten valium you just swallowed them in one up no matter what strength there were whatever and that's what we were doing we also getting you see you get you get to know all the bulls that other people don't get no like there was a particular her in the seventies there was a particular women's slim and tablet available from the chemists that you could buy across the counter think it was called Pun rex I don't know if it was available over here but we used to take about seven or eight of those on the Saturday night and drink a couple of flagons aside or will be smashed totally smashed for twenty four hours speeding around the place in the whole and that that particular pill led me onto put I used to describe as my favorite drug at one time which was uh-huh phetamine solve it the pond rex led me onto sulfate I don't know why called motor every truck because his singularly it almost killed me a couple of times anti stage I sort of felt like I was an old hand in on to me just nipping across was was literally that nipping across could be here for a week or a copy here for a year I worked with smack necklaces pipe fitting I worked on the railways with lowry's just thinking of Agai dare called Pat McGuire who we just found out just in the morning he he died he was in shouted accommodation and is linked tonight worked on the same gang as him he was a huge huge mine he was about six foot five six foot six seventeen or eighteen stone and he would move sections of railway line virtually on his own and I just I just wanted to mention in him here because I suppose very few people will even know him but apply facing the railways buildings and there was one thing I always wanted to try just to see if I could do it my boss my grandfather and my grandmother were Baker's he opened up a bakery shop in our hometown and he married my grandmother when his first wife died and she was a confectioner so I was always surrounded by idea of baking and confectionery confronting the whole lot so I always wanted to work in a bakery to see if it was in my DNA so I worked in a bakery for about six months as well just to see if I could do to the guys who are working in the place poor Baker and it's a good job to have joined the winter because at that time I was sleeping rough in in a A House that nobody had lived in Finchley central for a long time and I was just sorta sneaking into it at nighttime sleep in there breaking up in the morning at a small little arm clock at six talking I'd be up and Bekker's for seven talking to morning but I liked it liked to have continued us but that was some parts of the plan the plan was there was no plan and I was just gone to try every single thing that I could do to see if it would kill me that was the plan.

London twenty four hours eighteen stone five six foot six months six foot
"bono" Discussed on The Non-Prophets

The Non-Prophets

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"bono" Discussed on The Non-Prophets

"I totally accept your interpretation of the bible that says that people have say over their own bodies. Even if they're women woods because. Holy fuck. Just I I think the way this woman phrases some things a little weird. Yeah. That women are which woman. Are you talking about the one who did the video who's doing the? Yeah. The one I do the Malia Bono video the tight she's trying to appeal to their view and say, hey, you're gonna necessarily say this is bad. Because like she I it. It's like. Trying to talk to a Christian the ones that that. Don't go to the doctor because they too many the Christian scientists. Yes, chris. Because like you could argue me. Where you could argue them the the science that has progressed in know healthcare has progressed that part of God's plan. Therefore, you not going to the doctor is fucking crazy. I think that basically what she's trying to do. Yeah. To be clear, if if my role in life was lightly different. That's probably the argument. I would make well if you were year two ago depends on how many Christians deal with the problem of evil village. Explain oh, what we think of evil is really just God's plan for us. And so what they do is they proceed to then define evil out of existence. You made a really fuck with their mind. So it's like. You know, everything is God's plan. Jor? Do anything you want? It's God's plan because how could it be wrong? Otherwise, the devil would be more powerful than all right? And that's not fucking possible. So on is. I think I think the main problem is. To meet them way. I think that's. Them where they are. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And I applaud her for her efforts. Maybe not all of her word choice. But her efforts for sure. I'm trying to get as many young women on the path to success and not motherhood or motherhood later down the road is admirable. Yet. She so later on she says, she s kids what they think abortion is in several say, it's quote when you get rid of a baby but Bono refers to the the pregnancy which..

Malia Bono
"bono" Discussed on The Non-Prophets

The Non-Prophets

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"bono" Discussed on The Non-Prophets

"I totally accept your interpretation of the bible that says that people have say over their own bodies. Even if they're women woods because. Holy fuck. Just I I think the way this woman phrases some things a little weird. Yeah. That women are which woman. Are you talking about the one who did the video who's doing the? Yeah. The one I do the Malia Bono video the tight she's trying to appeal to their view and say, hey, you're gonna necessarily say this is bad. Because like she I it. It's like. Trying to talk to a Christian the ones that that. Don't go to the doctor because they too many the Christian scientists. Yes, chris. Because like you could argue me. Where you could argue them the the science that has progressed in know healthcare has progressed that part of God's plan. Therefore, you not going to the doctor is fucking crazy. I think that basically what she's trying to do. Yeah. To be clear, if if my role in life was lightly different. That's probably the argument. I would make well if you were year two ago depends on how many Christians deal with the problem of evil village. Explain oh, what we think of evil is really just God's plan for us. And so what they do is they proceed to then define evil out of existence. You made a really fuck with their mind. So it's like. You know, everything is God's plan. Jor? Do anything you want? It's God's plan because how could it be wrong? Otherwise, the devil would be more powerful than all right? And that's not fucking possible. So on is. I think I think the main problem is. To meet them way. I think that's. Them where they are. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And I applaud her for her efforts. Maybe not all of her word choice. But her efforts for sure. I'm trying to get as many young women on the path to success and not motherhood or motherhood later down the road is admirable. Yet. She so later on she says, she s kids what they think abortion is in several say, it's quote when you get rid of a baby but Bono refers to the the pregnancy which..

Malia Bono
"bono" Discussed on Living Legacy Leadership

Living Legacy Leadership

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"bono" Discussed on Living Legacy Leadership

"In brain research which bono was very key part in generating so we didn't have a longitudinal study for many years to to show them and so it was the business people who would say look if this stuff of these tools we can teach our people will improve the bottom line let me have some of it if it doesn't we won't hire you back and the rally was it did it did improve productivity improved profits it improved leadership ability thinking creativity in an age of accelerating change over the last couple of decades so as we're kind of winding a little bit towards the end of our session here today let me just mention another couple books one is called parallel thinking nother one is i am right you are wrong where bono talks about rock logic which is based on what he calls identity what something is where you stand your ground saying this is the way it is that's rock logic if you're in a boat going down a river and you run into a rock the rock winds your vote will get dented or shattered and you get thrown out of the boat in contrast to that is water logic and that's the name of another book and water logic is where you look at instead of what something is solid thing it's based on what does this lead to it's a flow it's where it's the water that goes around the rock that flows around the rock like the flow of your thoughts in your mind that directs your attention that can lead to mental movement in your thinking and then just to finish up with lateral thinking again their differences between when he calls lateral thinking versus vertical thinking now vertical thinking is where you try to prove that you're right versus trying to generate alternative possibilities in lateral thinking it's where you are analytical about your the issues and your focus versus being provocative.

bono
"bono" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

The Steve Deace Show

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"bono" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

"Which bottle has on many occasions and then does things that ultimately the response to which scripture lee is the lord say the so guy like bottles says i did this this and this in your name and lord says yeah and i hardly knew that's more fascinating to me and that's i think what we were trying to wrap our brains around on the show without dismissing the fact that everybody in aaron nailed it you know we don't know one i can't remember the last time i put in one of my youtube cds for back in the day if i hear them it's back on the radio more recently again it is what comes across my twitter feed oh here's what bono said here's what bono said about this just happened again that's what we do on this show in our analysis i just there were no blinders there was no i i don't know what they did at their concert a week ago perhaps but it's way more interesting these days that we have a lot of christians that are a lot like bono who they they would they call themselves that they wouldn't dare deny it overtly but in it all manner of of action they don't they don't match up is just the latest example of that and tony knows a lot of people in his own life that i'm quite certain he likes that had the same problem so i don't i don't don't go the other direction and be too legalistic bind.

bottles lord aaron bono youtube twitter tony
"bono" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"bono" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Dole quota won a token belle isle de guzman get my name in may mouth i note the bear bono you to lee once a month good deal with people would do your annual genetic postyookalaylee appeal a topic deal with the door your word too much short we will never outi guzman gammon name in may mouth i know the bear bono you two should lee once a month could deal with people would do your and you see the polish who pulled off a pill the topic deal with the door your clear word too much short we will never rhinos pavement we showing up in court cold we don't know no gaza we know dunno are again we know people social site we had our target we don't know romo wrong we don't pay shows you the barely you should wear again your halo your kobuki your area hail the area like we associate with respect you'll also get your money play rumanian will you bore for nagging michael weiss iowa hello mild reagan adult break it down baggio regular raila beta beta theta regular layup leyla of picking a bail dan majerle awhile regular leg break it down breaking begi loyalties bannam regular regular regular regular regular rail.

social site romo dan majerle Dole lee guzman gammon michael weiss iowa reagan
"bono" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"bono" Discussed on PRI's The World

"The asylum law and the united states is uh really focused on a more traditional kind of refugee coming from religious persecution or national persecution and it was very hard of four these families to make the case in immigration court without the assistance of a lawyer and lawyers have been just very hard to find for for many of these families right i mean a lot of these found with can't afford a lawyer so viggo for the pro bono ones them over the pro bono essentially changed to low bono or no bono and in the court where i was looking at this there's an additional difficulty for these families that court that i visited was in charlotte north carolina and that's a court wear two out of the three judges who have been hearing cases in that court really don't believe and as a matter of law that these families are eligible for asylum under under the classic categories of asylum law and so they've made it a very difficult for the families even with lawyers to win those cases and without a lawyer you really have a very slim chance uh if you're a central american family in the charlotte court but this has been discouraging to the immigration lawyers who do practice in the court it's a kind of an ethical dilemma for these lawyers because they met many of them can't work for free they have to charge an asylum cases a complicated case and if you know at the outset from looking at the odds that it that your client has a very small chance of winning any way.

united states religious persecution charlotte north carolina viggo pro bono charlotte
"bono" Discussed on Shelter From The Storm

Shelter From The Storm

10:39 min | 4 years ago

"bono" Discussed on Shelter From The Storm

"It. I stayed with a family an Irish family who had moved to London and they had two sons who were born in London. The eldest of the the sons had just gotten married so was myself on the youngest son who were in the House and he was showing me all around London and we were one of the Times one of the first times that we went down into the center of London he was showing me down around Downing Street and screaming. Lord sutch marched down Downing Street with I think it was four six sakes naked women to publicize a rock and roll concert that was happening in Wembley follow on Saturday and there was is a big to do about that naturally but it worked because we went to the rock and roll concert the following Saturday saw aw everybody you name absolutely every single person who is still alive and who had been involved with rock and roll. We saw them all. I think boy was really really pivotal and really important boy made. It's okay for guys to say. An women said that they were bisexual. He mid okay for people to dress up crazy crazy. He you know he was just so totally off the wall and while he was my hero anywhere he he certainly opened up a lot of doors for me. I had only been over for three or four four months at that stage school had already started and the part of me was worried about I was drinking so much and I was and seven nights a week and it was just one continuous boost session we went to we went to the public lunchtime. In that's how normal it was and I taught simply because everybody else was doing at at this was the normal thing to do but it's not an. I knew I was going to fail AOL. My state exams on you was going to fail the Inter cert and I still wanted to prove to myself that I can do. It and I'd love have to go back in Ireland that I missed her as well so they're they're the three reasons why impact but mainly to repeat ig. I also needed I needed somebody to say to me. You're gone off the rails and my brother would never have said that to me. As far as he was concerned I was just having a good time. There aunt time during the summer breaks. I was doing stints in the Irish Territorial Army. There there was a an impression probably a false mon but a lot of Irish publicans looked at it in a way that if you come into a public in an army uniform on you you were old enough to drink even if you said that you weren't because you could join the territory Torius at sixteen which could only drink eighteen but as far as they were concerned. If you're in an army uniform he was serving and there were no exceptions to that and they made it easy for you and again. It's the thing again about it being small provincial town with forty something pubs CBS in it. What else is supposed to do in a place like that except maybe go to church or something. I don't know it's just simply something that every single one of myself my miss said we drank didn't drink seven nights a week but we could have if we had the money for we would have if we had the money for at that time my parents were trying to keep control of me but they knew that I that they had lost me as well so instead of myself and my dad constantly being at more with one another we just basically avoided one another and he told me years later that it was the only way he knew how to deal deal with me. I mean don't get me wrong. I wasn't appearing in court every week or anything like that but I was doing stupid things Robin stealing we were trying to I think what we were trying to do is basically prove how hard we were to one another which is probably a teenage thing as well but that's how yeah mostly that's how we got the money when the Army Walson because very very difficult to get jobs in a small town like that anyway anyway and just waiting to finish school and while we were wetting to finish school we would drink quite a lot but by that stage we had started taking ice certainly had started taken barbiturates with with booze. I started drinking drinking on top of Valium Noggins and if you ever get into that particular cler trip that definitely is memory loss now you're talking true memory loss you know go out and Friday night and and you might not know it might not even come around mentally until Sunday evening or something and maybe not even then because because we had no clue of the dosages that we were taking if somebody handed you say ten valium you just swallow the Moon Wallop up no matter what strength there were whatever and that's what we were doing. We also getting is he. You get you get to know all the bulls that other people don't get no like there was a particular her in the seventies there was a particular women's slim and tablet available from the chemists that you could buy across the counter think it was called. Pun Rex rex. I don't know if it was available over here but we used to take about seven or eight of those on the Saturday night and drink a couple of flagons aside or will be smashed totally smashed for twenty four hours speeding around the place in the whole La and that that that particular pill led me onto put I used to describe as my favorite drug at one time which was uh-huh phetamine solve it. The pond rex led me onto sulfate. I don't know why I called it motor every truck because his singularly the one it almost killed me a couple of times anti stage. I sort of felt like I was an old hand and on to me just nipping across was was literally that nipping across could be here for a week or a copy here for a year I worked with smack nickless's doom pipe-fitting I worked on the railways with lowry's just thinking of a guy called Pat McGuire who we just found out just in the morning he he died. He was in shouted accommodation and is linked. Tonight worked on the same gang as him. He was a huge huge mine. He was about six foot five six foot six seventeen or eighteen stone and he would move sections of railway line virtually on his own and I just I just wanted to mention in him here because I suppose very few people will even know him but apply fighting the railways buildings and there was one thing I always wanted to try just to see if if I could do it my both my grandfather and my grandmother were Baker's he opened up a bakery shop in our hometown and he married my grandmother when his first wife died and she was a confectioner so I was always surrounded by this idea of baking and confectionery confronting the whole lot so I always wanted to work in a bakery to see if it was in my DNA so I worked in in a bakery for about six months as well just to see if I could do to the guys who are working in the place of Bakersfield fault. Highly Qualified Bakers both said to me that I had I gotta thumb is a bakery open east finchley called Bekker's and and it's a good job to have joined the winter because at that time I was sleeping rough in in a a house that nobody had lived in Finchley central for a long time and I was just sorta sneaking into it at nighttime sleep in their waking breaking up in the morning at a small little arm clock at six talking. I'd be up and Bekker's seven talk in the morning but I liked. It and I'd liked to have continued us but that was some parts of the plan. The plan was there was no plan. I was just going to to try every single thing that I could do to see if it would kill me that was the plan.

London Lord sutch Irish Territorial Army center of London Ireland AOL Finchley Bekker Bakersfield Torius CBS Baker Pat McGuire Robin bulls La nickless lowry