17 Burst results for "Bonnie Langford"

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:12 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Do you know, with every surgery there is risk, you know, we sign ourselves the forms to say, we accept that risk and we know what they are. Now, I fully understand this is all to do with the NHS is what their reports about. They looked at 8 studies. How can 8 studies out of hundreds and hundreds of women that have had surgeries, you know, you look at the pros and cons. The pros massively outweigh I'm now being subjected to continuous the chance that this will continue to progress in the areas that have not been treated because we don't know how long these studies are going to take. The studies where they're being done in Germany, they're still operating. Why? I made that decision. I am not, you know, we've had to fund this ourselves. What right have they got to take that away from me and stop my preventing me from having all the surgeries, which I need, because I can't continue with this journey. I can certainly hear Marie what a frustrating process it has been for you and it's clearly a condition that is impacting your life on a day to today basis. We do thank you for coming on the program and sharing your story. A nice spokesperson said, we would like to recommend treatments that are safe and effective for this condition, but we can not compromise on safety. The committee hopes that a randomized controlled trial currently taking place in Germany could provide the high quality evidence they need to revise their recommendation on this procedure once the study has reported its findings. We will review our guidance and we too here at women's hour will revisit this story when we have those findings. Our thanks also to shari fed cert, the chair of lipedema, UK, someone's got in touch with us, Val, who also has stage three Luka doma and basically says it has changed his life and due to the nice guidelines all surgeries now are being suspended..

NHS Germany Marie shari fed cert lipedema Val Luka UK
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

01:52 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Being stopped <Speech_Female> in the middle <Silence> of a journey, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> you know, to get my <Speech_Female> quality of life <Speech_Female> back and for many <Silence> others all so <Speech_Female> how <Speech_Female> can I do <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> I've <Speech_Female> looked and <Speech_Female> researched when I was diagnosed <Speech_Female> in 2019 <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> after <Speech_Female> being dismissed <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> disregarded <Speech_Female> by my <Speech_Female> GP. <Speech_Female> Who eventually kept <Speech_Female> me on my practice. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You know, <Speech_Female> I get a diagnosis that <Speech_Female> I researched and <Speech_Female> researched for the <Speech_Female> best option. I was told I'd <Speech_Female> be suitable <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Female> liposuction. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> And, <Silence> you know, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> that's what I wanted to go <Speech_Female> ahead with being faced <Speech_Female> with being told, you know, <Speech_Female> I could end up in a wheelchair <Speech_Female> in a <Speech_Female> several years time <Speech_Female> was not an option for me. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And when you say you <Speech_Female> were a suitable candidate <Speech_Female> that you were told <Speech_Female> you were a suitable <Speech_Female> candidate for liposuction, <Speech_Female> who <SpeakerChange> gave you <Speech_Female> that guidance? <Speech_Female> That was saint George's <Speech_Female> hospital. <Speech_Female> Who <Speech_Female> I've been massively <Speech_Female> supportive <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> outstanding. <Speech_Female> For me, <Speech_Female> I've had <Speech_Female> many surgeries <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> when I choose if I <Speech_Female> have to go <Speech_Female> on the NHS, which are <Speech_Female> fantastic to have <Speech_Female> surgery, <Speech_Female> I don't get to choose <Speech_Female> my surgeon. I don't <Speech_Female> know what experience they've <Silence> got or what expertise. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You know, I've <Speech_Female> chosen the decision I went <Speech_Female> with for their <Speech_Female> expertise, their <Speech_Female> knowledge, you know, <Speech_Female> the commitment <Speech_Female> to perform <Speech_Female> in these things. And <Speech_Female> my <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Female> stages have had so far. <Speech_Female> I've had three. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> The <Speech_Female> actual <Speech_Female> impact that has <Speech_Female> had on my life <Speech_Female> so far has <Speech_Female> been amazing. <Speech_Female> You know, to be able to lift up <Speech_Female> a hairdryer <Speech_Female> and actually do it <Speech_Female> myself without relying on <Speech_Female> my family to <Speech_Female> do them just <Speech_Female> the basics. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> When <Speech_Female> you hear from nice <Speech_Female> that they feel that <Speech_Female> they need to do <Speech_Female> a <Speech_Female> larger, more wider, <Speech_Female> more in depth assessment <Speech_Female> about <Speech_Female> the safety of <Speech_Female> this. Do you not <Speech_Female> welcome the extra caution <Speech_Female> if it is a matter <Speech_Female> of <SpeakerChange> your health <Speech_Female> going forward?

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:56 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"It does appear to look like obesity, but it is not obesity, it is a genetic formation of fat, which occurs usually following puberty or some hormone change in the female body. And because people, it does tend to run in families when people first consult at their GP or any other medical professional, they tend to the medical professional tends to assume they are overweight because at the moment the whole ethics and medical profession is that you become overweight through your own lack of exercise and poor food selection. But this isn't applicable to lipedema, it happens regardless of how a few calories you can see consume or how enthusiastically you exercise..

obesity
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:09 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"But the judge also agreed with you that mister wanted a sexual relationship with you. Tell us about that situation what you did, how you responded. How did you deal with that situation? It was impossible to deal with it. I mean, I've done this because I know that they're going to be many of the women in the same situation as me right now. But he was my boss. He recruited me. He set all of my targets. He practically owns, you know, who I was within that sort of organization. So having somebody like that, being persistent in his pursuit towards you without trying to offend him and to effectively to lose your job because that's what would have happened. It was impossible to manage. So effectively, what I was trying to do was decide step it, you know, I was just trying to kind of almost sort of bounce it back and sort of laugh it off and kind of move on and try not to make too much of a thing about it because I genuinely didn't know what else to do. There was no sort of particular helplines. There is no mentor group, you know, at Gartner. So there was literally nowhere for me to turn other than just sort of try and tolerate it to a degree. And it didn't, you know, clearly it didn't work. It wasn't the right thing for me to have done. But I genuinely, at the time, didn't know what else I could have done. So we've made it any better. But eventually, you took out a grievance and the judge said that when you did that, things just got worse. It did. I mean, you know, I mean, I feel a little bit upset by the fact that the media is focused just purely on the good girl comments. You know, I wouldn't have dedicated four years of my life just to fight being called or described as a good girl. You know, it was the way in which Gartner responded to the grievance that I that I raised. You know, they broke confidentiality. They treated the whole grievance proceedings terribly so that they put me at a disadvantage. I felt as though everybody was closing ranks on me. You know, I was completely singled out for speaking out about the treatment that I received from him. I hold Gartner 100% responsible for the behavior that is, you know, that is acceptable within Gartner. I wouldn't have had to have put up with the situation with mister adri with mister wood and also mister bisset, you know, if they didn't allow that sort of behavior to prevail within the organization. Well, I'm sure many of our listeners commend you for stepping up and taking that action. I should at this point bring you the statement from the company Gartner, which says we're extremely disappointed in the ruling of the UK employment tribunal. We don't believe the evidence supports the ruling and we are currently determining potential next steps, including whether we appeal this decision. At Gartner, we are committed to creating an inclusive culture where every associate feels safe, respected and empowered to do their best at work. I know that you also have a young daughter and this must have been a huge step to take considering you are raising her as a single mom..

Gartner mister adri mister wood mister bisset UK
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:11 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Him? It's gonna be all right. You can have some dark, dark times, and I mean really dark times where you can not see any way out of it. But it is gonna be all right. Ryan there, speaking to our reporter, Henrietta Harrison, and we got this message from a listener. He was also tuning in, he writes in 1991 after 15 years of marriage and four kids. My wife told me, in a dear John letter, she had never loved me, and she left me for a woman. I was devastated, and even more so when I got conned into temporarily leaving, but she filed for divorce and I lost my home and my kids 30 years later, it still hurts. Please do get in touch if you too have been affected by the issues raised in that series and that piece, which we will continue to bring you in the coming weeks here on women's hour. A woman who was continually called a good girl by her boss has won an employment tribunal. The judge in the tribunal found that Francis fricker, who was an accounts executive with a consultancy company called Gartner, had been sexually harassed at work and because she fought against the harassment by taking a grievance, she was treated even worse. As well as being called a good girl, Francis was told by her boss at which photo to put on her work profile because he thought it was the most attractive. The judge also described the culture where Francis worked as lavish and toxic and that some social media posts were nasty and sexist with Francis rickard joins me now. Thank you for coming on to the program. Tell us when the good girl comments began. They started roughly around about the February time in around about 2018. So they lasted for about three months or so. And they persisted. They did, yeah, so the ones that were actually raised in the actual the actual reading itself, any sort of pulled out specific parts, but there are quite a few that were sort of said to me vocally as well. So they kind of were, it felt like there were all the time to be honest with you. I hope that sort of three month period. It was kind of used as a kind of like a controlling behavior. And your boss Giuseppe adds, he not just, he didn't just use that language, but I understand he also picked on your appearance and your photos on social media. Yeah, he did. He'd be picked at a particular photo on my Facebook accounts where he thought I look fat. It was actually taken about three months after I had my child. So there was a certain amount of excess skin around my stomach and he was sort of commenting on the fact that he thought I looked fat. Yes, and he used that a lot as well. It is shocking just hearing that at that time, how did that make you feel? I mean, at the time, I didn't really want to make too much of a fuss. You know, being in that sort of discriminatory culture, it was very difficult to sort of try and not be offended by it. However, you know, especially when something so personal is being described as being fat as after having a child is incredibly difficult to tolerate. But I did to begin with. And eventually it just sort of warmed me down. The judge specifically made a point about the language used. He said, language evolves over time, words and phrases that might once have seemed harmless and now regarded as racial homophobic and sexist slurs..

Henrietta Harrison Francis fricker Francis rickard Francis Ryan Gartner John Giuseppe Facebook
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:10 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"She knew what I was going through. She was like, where are you? I'm in bed. Are you crying? I was like, no, I'm not crying. That's good. She said, you know, get up, have a shower, make a cup of tea and make another phone call to that landlord or whatever. On those very, very tough days. You know, she was there. Was your mom plugged in in that way or your mates? I think my mom's gone through this divorce as much as I have to be fair. And she's been solid. I mean, I remember sobbing in my mom's arms and she's only 5 foot bless her. She got me through some tough tough times. So she's had a second divorce. What we crying about that day, do you remember what a triggered it? I just think it was a situation around the kids and when I used to send them back and it still tough when I send them back now, just add them for 5 days and now they go back to mothers for 5 days so I don't get them until Monday. And I still find these 5 days tough. That seesaws really hard isn't it? It's like the intensity of having them on your own. Yeah. Then they're gone. Then they're gone. It's like nothingness. So I've not got my head around that. No, I don't think I ever will. It would be better when they're older and they have a phone. But you will get used to it, I'm told. You can do cool stuff on your own, right? Yeah, I mean a work and see my mates and whatever, but it still, it's not your kids. You moved to this village. You're out of a town to a village. So you could be a 50 50 parent. How welcome have you been by the village as a single parent? I don't know anyone when I've recently spoke to one of my daughters friends at school's mother and you know that's been good, but because also you.

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:48 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"You mentioned that your parents split. How old were you when they split? About 5, actually. Yeah. Do you think that in some ways motivated your determination to do more than what your dad did? Yeah, definitely, 'cause I used to dread gun, my dad, my dad was a good bloke, and I don't get me wrong, I'm still very close to them now, but it was like all my Friends were at home. It was like every other week and it was, you know, I couldn't wait to stop it to be fair. And I don't want that with my kids. I want them to feel like they've got two homes. They're the same and it's just normal. And we're at a stage now where that is normal. I hope it continues. Find it really interesting area because my kids, I think, very much see my place as home. And I think in some ways, I quite like it like that. I'm embarrassed to admit it. But why? We're human, aren't we? We have emotions. You're not going to say, oh, I love it that they see my exes as their home, and they don't love it. Of course, you're not going to do that. I mean, that would be dishonest, wouldn't it? You want your children to want to be with you more, don't you? It's just life. I talk to a woman we call demander in the first part of this series, and we discussed our shared personal experience that after divorce men tended to pursue other relationships and put their needs first. But Ryan's having none of that. No, I definitely not. I mean, my ex is living with someone and moved on really quickly and he was in the house within under a year. So and I haven't, you know, it's me and the kids and actually, I kinda like it like that. You know, I give them my full attention. I don't rely on anyone financially or for any help with them. It is me. So are you actively not looking for a relationship, you know? I've been seeing people. There's been no one here in the morning. No, no, no, definitely not. You wouldn't want to do that. No, why not? I like it in the morning, the kids jump in my bed. Do you know what I mean? We get up, we have our little routine. Yeah. I'm not saying it won't happen, but you know, right now it's not my priority. Kids at work. Your ex has got a new partner. Yes. I knew she was seeing someone. It felt to me fairly quick. I definitely didn't deal with it well. I think my Friends will tell you that. To a point where they sort of all had like a private WhatsApp group and they came around one night and they were like, Joe, like, 50 miles to come around there because obviously a bit worried about me and they sort of came around and they were like, look, sort yourself out..

Ryan Joe
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:24 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"That's just the norm. Ryan lives in a two bed flat above a shop in a village in the east of England. We talk in the kitchenette come sitting room while his kids are sleeping. There's a table chairs are sofa and boxes and boxes of toys. The only pictures on the wall are those drawn and painted by his kids. After his ex moved out, he stayed in the family home for three months before he moved here. That was a really lonely time that was. And actually he was better than when I moved out of the family home and moved to a new place because it was mine. It's just the memories, isn't it? You sort of rattle around a big house because you've had a family home and you do go down that sort of dark, lonely road. You've got friends and family, but at the end of the day is your battle, isn't it in your head and you do have to deal with that on your own? Just takes time. Did she take a lot of the stuff out of the house? I sort of was so not in the right frame of mind. I remember she said, and we're still amicable at the time. She said, well, my dad's going to help me move. I was at final take kids out for the day, you know, take what you want, but when I got back, the house was literally like stripped. I wasn't too impressed, but looking back on it now, am I bothered now, you know, is what it is. She was acting stressful time as well moving, et cetera, so. As a man, I definitely think you sort of give up at some point. I certainly was just like, do you know what is possessions? I'm not bothered. I had a few sentimental things and a TV and that was about it. A lot of the stuff had gone. Most of the kids stuff. And even things like little ones passports and that and birth certificates which I didn't really think about at the time, but I also need them and have a right to them and we didn't even discuss that. It was just sort of like taken. It's still that old stigma, isn't it that the mother has more rights and as a dad, you are on the back foot still. Why do you say that you're on the back foot? You just feel it. You still feel it. Absolutely. I know I didn't physically give birth to them. But I've been there from day one. I do everything for my children, so. You had to fight quite hard to get 50 50 with the kids. Not really. I think originally when we split up, we sort of had that conversation and my ex was very much. You shouldn't have them 50%, et cetera. And then all of a sudden, she sent me a parenting plan. These are your days, 55th no conversation. It was just like these are your days. It's 50%. I think it was, he's not going to be able to do that. So she had moved the children about 45 miles away, so on my days. I was getting up driving them to school. Then driving a 50 miles to work the other way, then in the evening driving 50 miles back to get them and then 50 miles again, which wasn't fair on the kids. And I'd done that for three months because I was like, I'm not giving up..

Ryan England
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:10 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And I think it was very powerful to show that actually although we're a dramatization that it's important to show how that is affecting people on a daily basis. We might not hear about it so much in news these days. But it certainly is still happening and somehow we have to find a way of stopping it. Away from acting, we know that you've been ice skating on dancing on ice. You decided to give that a go, but what's the next challenge for you? Oh, who knows? I mean, last year I was a squirrel in the market. I mean, this is what I think this is what I quite like about my job is that I actually never know what's going to come next. And as much as you might want to plan and say, oh, I'd love it if my career went in this direction, quite frankly, what real life, you know, what it actually offers you. You never know, and that ridiculous phone call that might come through. I do like different challenges, obviously. And you listen to your instinct and see if you can give it a go. I did the ice skating because I thought I was like Bambi on ice and it would be hilarious, but in fact I then I then found it so inspiring and brilliant looking at how people can ice skate. So, you know, I just don't know what's going to come next. Who knows? Hopefully it's great stuff. I've still got an appetite for it, which I'm really thrilled about. So thank you for that universe. Bonnie, thank you for joining us here on women's hour and just to say anything goes is currently on a UK tour returning to the barbican theater in London on the 25th of June. Now I have been asking you about kindness and whether you feel that you are getting kinder as you get older, that's according to some new research from California, a couple of messages to bring you here dear women's hour, I don't recognize people are kinder as they age quite the opposite. I use crutches as I have MS. I can't count the number of times I've been pushed aside by older people in the supermarket while being shown great courtesy by younger people, another one, I'm confused by the kindness project as it's presents kindness as something positive. Surely kinases are just a really basic substitute for real feeling. How would you feel if someone said I never loved you? I was just being kind. That is from Julia. And one more I want to bring you. A brilliant woman's hour going to tell you why they have a growing kinder as they've gotten older. You need to talk to people around them. Please do keep your messages coming into us. I'll try and bring you a few more towards the end of the program. In the latest in our series about life after divorce, we hear a male perspective, Ryan, not his real name, is 34 and has two young children. He met his wife in his early 20s and married in 2015, but their relationship began to deteriorate after kids came along and they began the divorce process in November 2020. His own parents divorced when he was young. More than 40% of marriages end in divorce and most of us will have been affected by one, whether it be our own, our parents or our children's..

barbican theater Bonnie London UK California Julia Ryan
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:24 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"I think you were practicing some of your moves there. That's amazing. Tell us about the musical for those who don't know about it. Well, it's words of music by Cole Porter. So the musical score is absolutely glorious. And that's about the only thing I sing in it actually, but everybody else does a lot of singing and dancing and tap dancing. There's obviously anything goes. It's the lovely, I get a kick out of you, blow Gabriel blow. I mean, the score is absolutely wonderful and timeless. And the story is a bit madcap because it's set in 1934 on a cruise liner on a ship that is sailing from New York to London and the characters that are within this short trip. There's a lot of jeopardy. They have to sort of make their lives work, but obviously fate takes its hand. It's very slapstick. It's almost, it's almost a fast. So to be honest, you come to the show to escape what's going on in the real world. It's an uplifting what I call a blue sky musical, just fun, just lighthearted, tap dancing sailors, and really quite frankly, what more can you want? Uplifting, but also physically demanding, performing every night singing, dancing, where does your stamina come from? Oh, cappuccinos really. I don't know. Nothing particularly better. I do have a joy for sort of being on stage for having that live experience. And that gives you an adrenaline that's for sure. Being in a company, I have missed that. That's one of the things about the pandemic is that, you know, we were not able to be in the room where it happens live every night with like minded people with all the skills that it takes both on stage and backstage and to be with those people again and to have that wonderful camaraderie. That's what I enjoy hearing the live music. We have 15 musicians there playing this fantastic music. And to be on stage with glorious actors with Cary Ellis, I'm with Simon callo. We will get married every night. I'm delis Lawson and a whole team of 39 in the cast. So that's where my energy comes from. That's where my enthusiasm comes from. Again, being back in that creative environment. Of course, it's not just musicals that you work in, TV has been a big part of your career, Doctor Who, and eastend as many of our listeners will know you from your role as Carmel kazemi, who was mother to two boys in the soap opera and the storyline of your young on screen son being killed in a stabbing. It was one of the most emotional storylines of the program in recent years..

Cole Porter Gabriel sailing Cary Ellis Simon callo London New York Lawson Carmel kazemi
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:34 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"I was a very, very quiet child contrary to popular belief. And so I do remember all these things vividly. I mean, I remember when I was 6, actually, I was on television for the first time. And I enjoyed that immensely being told all about the technical aspects of it and enjoying that from my own sort of perspective. But being on stage, I mean, to have started when I was 7 at the beautiful theater or jury lane. I just think it was an absolute privilege. And you know, it was never thought that I would, that was the beginning of a career. They were all wonderful experiences for me. The invaluable experiences that I may never get again. And I just feel really grateful that I am still doing it. Am I still enjoy it? I don't enjoy it all the time. There's times when, you know, like everything you think, I don't like this, or it can be a very cruel and unforgiving industry at times, but somehow the core of it is that I actually enjoy storytelling. I enjoy being, I have, it gives me confidence being somebody else and portraying their story. Your family are in show business. I know that your mom was a dance teacher. Was it therefore inevitable that you'd go into musical theater? Well, I don't think so. I mean, my mother's 91 and she's still teaching. So, you know, if nothing else, she's got determination. And my great aunt was a dancer with pavlova. So what was part of my background was training. It was learning your craft. It wasn't about being famous. It wasn't about being on television or on stage. It was experiences that led to the ability and the craft of being able to do your chosen profession. But I don't think it was inevitable that I did it because quite frankly often people who are in an industry don't necessarily encourage their children to do it because they know the reality of it and it can be quite, as I say, it can be quite harsh and unforgiving. So in some respects, I think I probably but the trend, although yes, my family, many of them. I think there's obviously a creative vein that runs through us all. I have two sisters and I elder sister on most of all her girls are actors or singers or dancers, all three. My other sister, they're all creative in the industry. Mostly behind the scenes and writers and so in the blood. It's in the blood. There is a creative gene that's for sure. That's for sure. And I have to say, I interviewed your niece. ZZ Stalin, who was playing the lead in Mary Poppins in the West End. She was utterly fantastic. And it's good to see that there's certainly that bond that connects you all. You are currently touring in the role of evangeline harcourt in the musical anything goes. Let's get a flavor of you and the rest of the cast singing. This is Bon voyage. Bonnie.

pavlova ZZ Stalin Mary Poppins evangeline harcourt Bonnie
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:35 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"The vaccine research. So there is no incentive for commercial companies to include pregnant women in research. And I don't mean, I'm not advocating researching on pregnant women without their knowledge. And when we wouldn't consider it to be completely safe. But excluding women, not offering women the option to be included in a vaccine trial means that we have no information. Because for companies that is considered to be too risky, we're actually we see what the consequences that pregnant women can then not benefit from vaccination. So we need to make sure that we've got a framework which ensures that pregnant women can benefit. Can we talk about messaging because during those first months of the vaccine rollout, only pregnant health or healthcare workers or those at risk groups were advised by the joint committee on vaccination and immunization to consider the jab due to a lack of evidence. And then in April 2021, we have that reassurance that the vaccine is safe for pregnant women. But was the damage done in your opinion in those early days that seed of doubt was planted in the minds of many pregnant women. That's exactly right. The siege of doubt was planted because we didn't have that evidence. And that unfortunately has led to long-term consequences, as you mentioned at the beginning, I know that there have been deaths of pregnant women who've not been vaccinated, who were eligible for vaccination. There have been no deaths in pregnant women who've been fully vaccinated. And that's a really important message. We have to think about the benefits of vaccination and not just any theoretical potential risks. We are at a situation where COVID regulations are being lifted. We've got fewer masks. We've got less social distancing and it almost seems like many the pandemic is a thing of the past, and it might make some including pregnant women feel that they don't need to be vaccinated now that things are better. And others still might be concerned about getting the vaccine if they are pregnant. What do you say to them? For me, it's absolutely the converse. The vaccine is now more essential than ever. Because we still got significant amount of amounts of infection, those protective measures, mask wearing, social distancing, and not being practiced as widely, which means pregnant women are more vulnerable. And we know there's really other benefits to the baby. We know that if you are vaccinated, your antibodies pass across the placenta.

joint committee on vaccination COVID
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:34 min | 8 months ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"On the program, we're going to tell you more about a condition that often goes undiagnosed. It's called lipo Dima, which impacts one in ten people mainly women, and what it is is the build up of fat cells in the bottom, legs, and sometimes the arms. And up until recently, the most common type of treatment for this was liposuction, but due to safety concerns, it's used has now been stopped in the UK until further research is carried out. So we're going to hear from someone whose treatment has been stopped midway and the chair of lipedema UK. Bonnie Langford is a familiar face to many of us on TV and in musicals with an impressive portfolio of acting, singing and dancing under her belt. Well now she is marking 50 years in showbiz and we're going to have a catch up with her a little later. In our latest in the series of life after divorce, we'll hear from a man, we are calling Ryan about his divorce journey. He's in his 30s, with two little children. More than 40% of marriages end in divorce and most of us will have been affected by one. Our series is trying to open up a Frank and honest conversation about the process. And you might remember the anatomy of kindness here on radio four and the kindness test the world's largest study of kindness. When our researchers have found on average with some exceptions, people get kinder as they get older. These study from a group of academics in California has found that this change in mood is largely thanks to rising levels of oxytocin, which is often called a feel good hormone. So by doing more good, we create what is called a positive feedback loop. We want to hear from you. Do you recognize this in yourself as you age, are you becoming a more compassionate, kind and gentle person? What about others around you? There are various ways to get in touch with us. You can text us on 8 four 8 8 8, email us via our website or catch us over on social media at BBC women's hour. A leading scientist who investigates every maternal death in the UK says pregnant women have been an afterthought during the coronavirus pandemic, and that some of their deaths were preventable. Doctor Marion knight, who is Professor of maternal and child population health at the national perinatal epidemiology unit, says the latest data shows that there have been at least 40 maternal deaths from COVID in the UK, almost all were unvaccinated and more than half happened after pregnant women were advised to take up the vaccine. Professor knight joins me on the line now. Good morning. Thank you for joining us here on the program. Good morning..

Bonnie Langford UK Ryan Frank Marion knight national perinatal epidemiolog California BBC COVID Professor knight joins
"bonnie langford" Discussed on So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on So it's a show?: keeping up with the Gilmore Girls

"Came out in nineteen seventy six. It was a movie directed by alan parker in stars. Jodie foster scott baeau who We have also briefly even happy days. Florence garland john cassisi. Bonnie langford dexter fletcher among others. It was nominated for one oscar for best music original song score and its adaptation or best adaptation score which like great is such a long term. I don't actually know what it means. And they don't call it that anymore. So had something to do with music and box office receipts. Were not really track. Like they are today in nineteen seventy six but we do know it was not much of a hit in the united states however in my research i've seen it was a huge hit in the united kingdom. I saw one article mentioned that children in ethiopia have grown up with this movie. I've also seen. It was a hit in japan so apparently this is a movie that was well loved just not in the united states. I mean the plot was all. Us his history. I mean loose. Us and it was a little bit back in the day and seems like perfect american musical. I know and if you are not familiar with this period in american history and honestly. I don't know why you would be united states like yeah. It's kind of a. It's wildly doing yeah. It was forty years in the past from the time. The movie came out and it was targeted at children. Who absolutely did not live at that time. I don't know yeah so this movie. Think basically what you need to know as before we go any further is that this is a musical spoof on gangster films and all of the rules don't roles but they're played by children. Yes a hundred percent of the cast is children. There are no adults average. Age was twelve so like actual children in ice on. No one was older than sixteen. I saw than seventeen so maybe a birthday foul in the middle. Maybe either way. None of them were legal. Voting age won't at the time they filmed. Yeah which they had to have like teachers onset and they couldn't shoot at night and so lots of restrictions on that but this was the vision that the director had because the son gave the idea which is funny. I mean it sounds like something. A kid would just say about any movie but he happened to say it to his director. Father about this movie sure. Yeah i read an interview with the director in. He said i had four young children in. We used to go up to cottage on the weekends. In on the long boring car journey up there i started telling the story of a gangster called bugsy malone and they'd ask questions i'd makeup answers based on my memories of watching old movie reruns as a kid and it. Yeah like you said it was. His idea has sunset can the heroes kids in the ids. Say can as well as the villains and everybody else. Yup must be box right. No you're not no but that's the best punch. I've saw even coached door taking it up. Nope why not. You could be a champion. There had the chance. I could help you. You know cagey joe. No you must know sluggish as much through you know what's your name anyway Smith leroy smith bugsy malone put it there leeway. You've got yourself a manager in the thirties. Around prohibition and there were two dueling mobs or gangs gangs and loosely based off of like al capone and Another gangster call eggs marine. Yeah it was like it's close. The best part. I think is that because you know you're like oh a mobster. Movie gangster. Movie played by kids of that seems a little grotesque No because the guns shot whip cream and they like literally also took pies and through pies at each other amazing Yes i love it. I love that all of the children when they are getting pied were shot. I guess they're splurged with the whipped game to like no no. What did i do to deserve this out. Like the die when this happens but at the same time like they are very upset and do not want this to happen and you don't see them again so yeah Apparently they did not actually shoot the whipped cream on saturday. Tried doing it with wax balls filled with cream but it actually hurts people to shoot them with it did on adults so instead they shot pingpong balls and then they used editing to make it look like they were getting lurched yeah that must've been so like what a fun movie to be on as a kid who's gonna throw of cream at each other. I feel like as an adult. It would be a blast so yes as a kid. That would be amazing. I'd be more conscious about my hair washing schedule. And.

scott baeau Florence garland john cassisi Bonnie langford dexter fletche united states alan parker Jodie foster oscar ethiopia united kingdom Smith leroy smith bugsy malone bugsy malone japan al capone joe
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Something Who

Something Who

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Something Who

"To something who episode forty three. I'm talking again with chris. Chapman a man of many talents but among them is putting together. These fantastic documentaries for the doctor blu-ray collections. The last time we talked chris it was it was pretty much the start of the pandemic some sometime in in march last year. And i i mean. I guess at that point that the impact was being felt in the uk. So i suppose a some degree of mouthy starts to resume have you fair to him. Has it been for you. And it's been busy which it is it's i. I think we'll certainly personally been quite lucky. I've seen a lot of people in my industry have have a difficult time and and i hope that changes is certainly starting to change very quickly. But i've personally had a very busy lockdown kind of went from cancelling doctor who shoots that was very to shoot to being employed in country file for year doing doctor. Who in the background running out to all born when i heard grabbing frank skinner when i could and going and filming restaurant in december about the only week possibly get silvester mccoy to sit at a table with bonnie langford and several. So it's been kind of nonstop in quite a pleasing way. And i kind of i wouldn't have liked to have seen what my lockdown would have been like without. I think if i'd been unable to work would have probably been adopt time as i'm sure it has been lots people. So now it's been it's being okay. And where gradually shifting back to normal in terms of filming. I think it's just made us all very conscious particularly on the who've range of of how precious the people we phone with our. Nobody wants to be the person that goes in and kills. Frazer hines wipes out as mccoy or something like that so it makes us very. We'll always trying to avoid that. Even in peacetime it's made us acutely aware of how fragile and precious the people that we were without definitely. Yeah now i. I definitely got the impression that you were busy from from twitter feet and a similar story for me really in that very different line of work now at a broadcast transmission company And sort of light. It really but nonetheless very very busy but yeah it. It seems to be like that. I mean people seem to have either been flat out or had nothing to do and i think it's been a very unequal experience as a result. But yeah i'm glad glad glad to hear that might have to keep going and of course now award winning you may otherwise but the doctor who cooked revisited winning the award last summer i think yeah. Thank you now. That was a delicious surprise. Me because i vented doctor who talks low television society awards before when i lived up in the northeast and and we never go anywhere with really because i think ultimately the joy these things is that made for such a niche audience. We can of evelyn that but you show that to a not we and the of care. What is this what is this. Why haven't you write this for a general audience and answer normally. We got nowhere..

bonnie langford chris march last year Frazer december frank skinner twitter last summer Chapman uk evelyn people episode forty three
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"That was actually temperature and so we had planned. We hear at ohio. Laugh at that by the way yes And we're we'd planned to. Have everyone work from home starting on monday. But we had not counted on the rolling blackouts of the because there are three power grids in the us. There's the east there's a west and there's texas because texas wants to be independent and jari of our power comes from oil and gas and coal so this was not a failure of wind or any green technology. This was just pure They did done zayn. Our factories to be You know they're built to handle the hundred degree heat during the summer but they aren't billed to help that so A lot of my time was spent trying to work with agents to get them someplace warm and safe. So that's why restopped to charles and i said. Hey you know. On tuesday at six thirty. And i'm still working. You know where we totally a. Yeah and you're like absolutely we rachel. I had that it's no problem. It's no big deal so everyone's fine. No one no one in our immediate vicinity of friends family were hurt. Spent like four days with us because he had no power in his apartment. So everything's back normal and now then You know and we get to mock ted cruz because you know. He flew to cancun because when the towing gets tough. Your senator goes to cancun now that he's complaining. I can't handle these conditions. Let me cross the border. Let's be fair. There's always time to muck ted cruz. Alvin he's complaining that The people who leaked the tweets from his wife saying. Hey everyone we're going out of town. Yeah the neighbors that ride it on him. Yeah yes i wish. She tweeted a little bit of boasting like. We're all going to cancun if any would like to come with us. You're more than welcome. That kind of thing so i felt swishes and i appreciate it. I'm blind well. Obviously we had a lot of our listeners. Very concerned about you just like phantom zone. So we're glad you're ok and we're glad you're back to talk the final part of the trial the time lord. So here's episode. Two hundred twenty. We're gonna be discussing the ultimate foe dot dot done aka parts thirteen and fourteen of the trial of a time lord written by robert holmes least part. Thirteen was and pippa. Jane baker who part fourteen directed by chris clough. Interestingly you know of ca. Jane baker also wrote tear voice and chris clo- also directed terror void. So they're back for this one. Of course robert homes were the opener. The mysterious planet his last complete story. This was the four serial doctor who season twenty three and nineteen eighty six starring of course in his final onscreen appearance at least as far as the colin baker air is concerned colin baker as the sixth doctor and bonnie langford has melanie mel bush and Before we get started. I did to have a little bit of news on my own. So just nothing as big as your you guys because you guys at great stories but But i want to give a special thanks to stop everywhere zone. Christine paryski who this past week sent me a little care package after listening to last week's episode so i got the package today and open it up. And it's a packet of jamie dodgers. You guy i just finished my senate caca jay so i wanna thank christine for being kind of now. She did say she She asked me to go..

bonnie langford Christine paryski christine robert holmes chris clough Alvin cancun monday today last week colin baker melanie mel bush four days chris clo Jane baker sixth doctor charles tuesday at six thirty four serial doctor robert
"bonnie langford" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"bonnie langford" Discussed on Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

"What's what's interesting is if you look at the credits for this particular series. There is no script editor credit. Because at this point say we're did resigned. And actually john nathan turner worked as script editor. But they they did not give him credit for it. I don't think they. I don't think they could because if i remember the studio that they one of the reasons that They have the show runner wasn't allowed to be. Also the script editor recall correctly. Make sense officially anyway. Yeah as long as in his head. He knew he did it. I guess because if i recall correctly there was a big deal during the jon. Pertwee era that berry leads. The show runner at the time couldn't be listed on one of the scripts that they had to come up with. This guy leopold sudan. Because that's how crazy it was back then at the esi. Yeah now days is like you obviously have show runners who are also you know writers for the series. Yeah you'll expect it over here in the states anyway. Yeah yeah now nowadays. We watch doctor. Who it's like you know written by chris tribunal and we don't think anything of it no not at all but then like i said that's how it was back in the weird Old days bbc all right anything else. You wanna share or get a dive in then. We'll dive into our topics. We have four of them this time although the fourth one should be pretty quick vitamin abc. Andy you exactly. I like what you did there. As yes. They the nice british pronunciation of vitamin vitamin pill. Yes yep so one. Carrots use code baker bodes in this episode not the carriage catches that comes later. Entered the first time carrot on his lapel right. He's not wearing said vegetable predecessor. Kill decorative vegetables are cool. So this does. We'll talk about obviously the sixth doctor. Let's also talk about mel. Who like i said doesn't get a traditional companion introduction. We kind of because the doctors presenting evidence from his future. It just happens to be the future where mail is already traveling with him. so it just kind of like pick up Like like if you're like the doctor pulled out is a dvd set and kind of skipped ahead a few episodes to To this part in this time line so So what did you think of colin in this this particular story in his interaction with bonnie langford for it being the first time. We're meeting mel right. I think they did a really good job of just kind of jumping into it. Feels like they've been hanging out and traveling together for a while at this point contentious. Yeah which i think really really helps and i kinda understand why they did. Not make this introduction episode. Because that just would've. I would've ruined the flow of everything to have to introduce a character. Who is she where is she from. You know what did she do before she met the doctor. You know you have a job or perry yourself is usually the formula right that we get we get a little bit of background of the you know companion to be and see what there is and to right before they get brought into the doctor's insanity of his whole tiny widely spacey way seats kinda thing. Yeah so this we can just jump right into it this thing. Yeah that's cool. I mean i get it. I think steven moffat would have really appreciated this..

bonnie langford john nathan turner Andy colin sixth doctor steven moffat one chris tribunal first time mel fourth one four one of scripts Pertwee sudan